Gordon Lake Group Remediation Project

Overview

A dilapidated wooden headframe stands above an open shaft surrounded by trees.

Gordon Lake is located 85 km northwest of Yellowknife. The Gordon Lake Group Remediation Project involves cleaning up the following nine sites:

The mining activity in this area began in the 1940s and continued into the 1990s. These sites were included in a single remedial action plan because of their close proximity to each other.

What work has been done?

2017-2019
  • Remediation began in Summer 2017 and was completed in 2018. Equipment will be demobilized site in early 2019 through a winter road. The project will then move into its monitoring phase to ensure the site no longer poses a threat to the environment.
2016
  • The remediation contract was awarded in 2016 to a joint venture between Delta Engineering Ltd. and Nahanni Construction Ltd.
  • The Land Use Permit and Water Licence for the remediation work were awarded by the Mackenzie Valley Land and Water Board.
  • The Remedial Action Plan for this group of nine sites was developed based on discussions with First Nations and stakeholders.
2013-2015
  • Supplemental assessment activities in support of a risk assessment were conducted at the sites to help define risks to human health and the environment.
2012
  • Work on the sites was completed to determine and/or confirm the presence and volume of contaminants, to provide remedial options and estimated clean-up costs.
  • Phase III Environmental Site Assessments at Camlaren Mine, Burnt Island, West Bay-Blackridge Mine, Goodrock Mine, Kidney Pond and Treacy Mine completed.
  • Phase I/IIs Environmental Site Assessments at Try Me and Murray Lake completed.
2009
  • Phase II Environmental Site Assessments at Camlaren, Burnt Island, Kidney Pond, West Bay-Blackridge, Storm, Goodrock and Treacy Mine completed.

More information

Although industry cleaned up some of sites in the late 1980s, concerns remained. As well, prospector's cabins and exploration camps were  added to the assessment of the nine sites. The historical significance to mining heritage has been discussed with the Yellowknife Historical Society (formerly the NWT Mining Heritage Society) and the Prince of Wales Northern Heritage Centre. Archeological and traditional knowledge studies that included documenting items and areas of cultural or heritage significance were conducted in the area, in consultation with the these same groups and the Yellowknives Dene First Nation.

The full scope of the work required is outlined in the Remedial Action Plan, which is available on the Mackenzie Valley Land and Water Board's Public Registry as well as on buyandsell.gc.ca.

CIRNAC is committed to engaging with local communities to provide information about remediation processes. Find out more by reading the Community Engagement Plan for the Gordon Lake Group Remediation Project.

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