Crown-Indigenous Relations and Northern Affairs: 2018-19 Departmental Plan

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Table of contents

Minister’s message

In August 2017, the Prime Minister announced the dissolution of Indigenous and Northern Affairs Canada and the establishment of two new departments to better meet the needs and aspirations of First Nations, Inuit and Métis. At that time, he named two Ministers to lead these new departments: a Minister of Crown-Indigenous Relations and Northern Affairs and a Minister of Indigenous Services.

This change offers an historic opportunity to make lasting and profound changes to move forward, more effectively, towards reconciliation with Indigenous peoples.

As the first ever Minister of Crown-Indigenous Relations and Northern Affairs, I am pleased to present my Department's Plan for 2018–2019. During the coming year, my department will focus on working in full partnership with First Nations, Inuit and Métis to transform our relationship and accelerate self-determination.

On February 14, 2018, the Prime Minister also announced the launch of a national engagement process that I will lead in full partnership with First Nations, Inuit and Métis. From this engagement, we will develop a Recognition and Implementation of Indigenous Rights Framework – one that is fully consistent with the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous peoples.

This Framework will include legislation and policy that ensures the recognition and implementation of constitutionally protected Aboriginal and Treaty rights are the basis for all relations between Indigenous peoples and the federal government going forward. The engagement will also inform legislation on the final form that the Departments of Crown-Indigenous Relations and Northern Affairs and Indigenous Services Canada will take.

Budget 2018 outlines new steps our Department will take to increase the number of modern treaties and self-determination agreements that reflect a recognition of rights approach.

As part of this approach, starting this year, we will fund Indigenous participation in modern treaty negotiations through non-repayable contributions as well as $51.4 million over two years to continue to support federal and Indigenous participation in the recognition of rights and self-determination discussions.

Budget 2018 is also investing to support the capacity building efforts of Indigenous groups that are seeking to re-build their nations in a manner that responds to the unique needs and priorities of their communities. This includes $74.9 million over five years to provide funding to support the Permanent Bilateral Mechanisms with First Nations, Inuit and the Métis Nation.

We are also investing to build capacity in First Nations communities, support strong Indigenous institutions, and support continued and broadened work with First Nations to establish a new fiscal relationship.

With respect to the North, a key priority for 2018–2019 will be to co-develop the Arctic Policy Framework to inform future policies and investments that will meet the unique needs of all communities and peoples living in the North. These actions will benefit Canada and build stronger relationships with Indigenous communities and Northerners.

These are many other important undertakings moving forward. I encourage you to read the "Plans at a glance" section as well as the "Planned results" section for more details on specific projects.

I believe we are at a turning point in our history. Together we are working towards a future in which healthy, prosperous, self-determining Indigenous Nations are driving a better future for Canada and all Canadians.

 

The Honourable Carolyn Bennett, M.D., P.C., M.P.
Minister of Crown-Indigenous Relations and Northern Affairs

Plans at a glance

A Bentwood Box, carved by Coast Salish artist Luke Marston, a tribute to all Indian Residential School survivors

In August 2017, the Prime Minister announced the dissolution of Indigenous and Northern Affairs Canada, and the creation of two new departments designed to better meet the needs of the people they serve, to accelerate self-determination and the closing of socio-economic gaps and to advance reconciliation.

The work that Crown-Indigenous Relations and Northern Affairs is doing is transforming how we relate to, and work in partnership with, Indigenous peoples, to accelerate the renewal of our relationship with First Nations, Inuit and Métis, on a distinction-basis, to support Indigenous visions of self-determination. The other new department, Indigenous Services Canada, was created to: improve access to high-quality services for First Nations, Inuit and Métis; support and empower Indigenous peoples to control the delivery of those services; and improve the socio-economic conditions and quality of life in their communities.

While the final forms of both new Departments are still being shaped through engagement, Crown-Indigenous Relations and Northern Affairs is entrusted to accelerate progress towards self-determination, with an emphasis on reconstituting nations, and developing a Recognition and Implementation of Indigenous Rights Framework. These new organizations and their mandates reflect a new era of cooperation with Indigenous peoples based upon respect and the recognition and implementation of rights. They represent an historic opportunity to make lasting, profound, transformative change, and move away from colonial and paternalistic approaches.

Crown-Indigenous Relations and Northern Affairs – A new Department to:

  • Accelerate the renewal of the relationship
  • Modernize institutional structures and governance to support self-determination
  • Advance work in the North

Exploring shared priorities with our Indigenous partners presents an opportunity for gender-based interests and approaches to be incorporated into new legislative and policy reform activities. Minister Bennett's national engagement will specifically include women, elders and youth.

In 2018–2019, Crown-Indigenous Relations and Northern Affairs will continue the work already underway to advance nation-to-nation, Inuit-Crown, government-to-government relationships; support Indigenous peoples' vision of self-determination; and lead the Government of Canada's work in the North. This first Departmental Plan focuses on three priority areas: accelerating the renewal of the relationship with Indigenous peoples; supporting Indigenous visions of self-determination by modernizing institutional structures and governance; and unlocking potential in the North.

Accelerating the Renewal of the Relationship with Indigenous peoples

Relationships built on colonial structures have contributed to the unacceptable socio-economic gap between Indigenous and non-Indigenous peoples in Canada. While day-to-day realities in Indigenous communities must continue to be addressed directly, there must also be a path to systematic change. The creation of two new departments, in cooperation with Indigenous peoples, is intended to guide the Government's forward-looking and transformative work to create a new relationship with Indigenous peoples. This work is part of the unfinished business of Confederation and is critical to the success of Canada as a whole.

To renew the relationship, past injustices must be recognized and resolved. In the year ahead, the Department of Crown-Indigenous Relations and Northern Affairs will:

  • Develop a Recognition and Implementation of Indigenous Rights Framework in full partnership with First Nations, Inuit and Métis. The contents of the Framework will be determined through distinctions-based national engagement activities that are focused on the legislative and policy changes needed to make the recognition and implementation of rights the basis for all relations between Indigenous people and the federal government. The Prime Minister has stated his intention to have the Framework introduced in 2018 and implemented before October 2019.
  • Accelerate the implementation of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission's Calls to Action that relate to federal roles, and continue to fulfill the Indian Residential Schools Settlement Agreement. We will also continue to work with provinces, territories and civil society to advance the Calls to Action. The Truth and Reconciliation Commission identified 94 Calls to Action, 76 of which fall under federal or shared responsibility with other partners, implicating 25 federal entities. As of January 2018, three Calls to Action are in the final stages of delivery and three have been concluded, 19 are fully underway and 51 are in earlier stages of planning and implementation.
  • Work to resolve disputes with Indigenous peoples, including those involving Childhood Claims, outside of the courts, in a fair, compassionate, and respectful manner that promotes reconciliation and healing. This commitment will continue to be demonstrated through:
    • Completing healing and commemoration activities as part of the Newfoundland and Labrador Residential Schools settlement;
    • Approving the Sixties Scoop settlement agreement, as the first step in resolving litigation. The Government of Canada will also work with plaintiffs, their counsel, provinces, territories and Métis and Non-Status leadership to work towards resolving the remaining Sixties Scoop litigation; and
    • Creating a Foundation, under the Sixties Scoop settlement, to support healing, wellness, language, culture, education, and commemoration.
  • Accelerate progress at the Recognition of Indigenous Rights and Self-Determination discussion tables to explore new ways of working with Indigenous communities at approximately 60 discussion tables across Canada, including with a number of Métis governing bodies and organizations. These discussions involve exploring shared priorities and co-developing mandates to advance interests, fostering self-determination and working towards closing socio-economic gaps.
  • Advance reconciliation between the Crown and Indigenous peoples, unlock economic development opportunities, and close socio-economic gaps between Indigenous and non-Indigenous communities through the conclusion of treaties, agreements and other constructive arrangements.
  • Continue to work with First Nations and First Nation organizations – with meaningful involvement of First Nations women, Elders and youth – to co-develop policy and process options that promote a collaborative, respectful, fair and timely approach to the resolution of specific claims.

Modernizing Institutional Structures and Governance to Support Self-determination

"The Prime Minister tasked me with modernization of institutional structures and governance models so that First Nations, Inuit, and Métis Nations can build capacity to implement their vision of self-determination." Minister Bennett, Twitter, Dec 15, 2017

First Nations, Inuit and Métis want to determine their political, economic, social and cultural development. Achieving self-determination requires support for Indigenous governance systems to advance the transition from colonial systems to reassuming control and jurisdiction within their communities.

A new relationship with First Nations, Inuit and Métis requires new structures. The dissolution of Indigenous and Northern Affairs Canada is intended to create two new ministries to improve services to Indigenous peoples while accelerating a move to self-determination and self-government for Indigenous peoples.

In 2018–2019, Crown-Indigenous Relations and Northern Affairs will continue the co-development of a principled approach to fiscal relations with Indigenous Governments that is consistent with self-government agreements and treaties, and, ultimately, supports the elimination of socio-economic gaps.

The Department will also:

  • Develop a Recognition and Implementation of Rights Framework, to be introduced in 2018, informed by a distinctions-based national engagement. The Framework will include new legislation and policies that will entrench the recognition and implementation of rights, the basis for all relations between Indigenous peoples and the federal government. This includes a new distinctions-based policy to replace the Comprehensive Land Claims and the Inherent Right policies.
  • Introduce legislation in 2018, to establish the Department of Crown-Indigenous Relations and Northern Affairs and the Department of Indigenous Services with mandates to better serve the distinct needs of First Nations, Inuit and Métis.
  • Work with representatives of First Nations, Inuit and the Métis Nation to: identify joint priorities for the second year of the Permanent Bilateral Mechanism processes; continue to advance work in the co-development of policies; and monitor ongoing progress. These processes will continue to be responsive and adapt to changing priorities and interests.
  • Accelerate progress of approximately 60 Recognition of Indigenous Rights and Self-Determination tables and increase the number of both comprehensive modern treaties and new self-government agreements. Indigenous partners are advancing the conversation around the recognition and implementation of Indigenous rights. What is discussed with Indigenous partners is informing the development of the Recognition and Implementation of Indigenous Rights Framework.
National Aboriginal Day, Vincent Massey Park, Ottawa, ON
Inukshuk
Métis performers, Gatineau, QC

Advancing Work in the North

Student taking water sample, Cambridge Bay, Victoria Island, NU

Strong Arctic communities, the environment, and sustainable development of the North are important to Northerners and Canada as a whole. The Department's role is to support the aspirations of Northerners, including: political evolution, healthy people and communities, sustainable economies, environmental protection, and increased capacity to reduce, respond and adapt to climate change. In 2018–2019, the Department will continue to:

  • Work with key partners to develop a new Arctic Policy Framework for Canada – a whole-of-government long-term plan for the Arctic from now to 2030. The policy is being co-developed and is based on the Shared Arctic Leadership Model with Indigenous organizations, other federal departments, provinces and territories.
  • Advance the devolution process of transferring administrative powers for lands and resources by completing phase 2, an Agreement-in-Principle, with the Government of Nunavut and Nunavut Tunngavik Inc.
  • Update and expand the Nutrition North program, in consultation with northern communities.
  • Work in partnership with territorial governments, Indigenous groups and Northerners to advance opportunities for sustainable economic development and science-based decision-making in resource sectors such as offshore oil and gas.
  • Support community-led initiatives to address and mitigate the effects of climate change in the North.
  • Advance work on the assessment, care and maintenance, remediation/risk management and monitoring activities on contaminated sites in the territories to reduce risk to human and environmental health, while promoting socio-economic benefits to Northerners, particularly Indigenous peoples.

For more information on Crown-Indigenous Relations and Northern Affairs' plans, priorities and the planned results, see the "Planned results" section of this report.

Construction of the Canadian High Arctic Research Station, Cambridge Bay, NU

Planned results: what we want to achieve this year and beyond

Rights and Self-Determination

Description

Support Indigenous and Northern organizations, individuals, communities and governments in controlling and managing their own affairs and interests based on the recognition and honouring of rights, respect, collaboration and partnerships. Activities include: governance capacity and community planning, negotiating and implementing treaties, self-government agreements and specific claims; addressing historic grievances; consulting and engaging on issues of importance to First Nations, Inuit, Métis and Northerners as well as registration, estates, trust moneys administration and implementation of the Indian Residential Schools Settlement Agreement.

Planning highlights

The renewal of a nation-to-nation, Inuit-Crown, and government-to-government distinctions-based relationship with Indigenous peoples is critical to moving forward with the unfinished business of Confederation. The renewed relationship, based on the recognition of rights, respect, cooperation, and partnership, while integrating distinctions-based approaches wherever possible and appropriate, forms the foundation of the Department's approach to the self-determination of Indigenous peoples. The Department is pursuing this path because it is the right thing to do, and it will lead to better results for all Canadians.

To achieve progress in this area, the Department will focus on the following three Departmental Results.

1. Indigenous peoples and Northerners determine their political, economic, social and cultural development

Recognition and Implementation of Rights Framework:

  • To support the rebuilding of Indigenous nations and governments, and advance Indigenous self-determination and the inherent right of self-government.

The Government of Canada recognizes that all relations with Indigenous peoples need to be based on the recognition and implementation of their right to self-determination, including the inherent right of self-government.

In 2018–2019, the Department will:

  • Develop a Recognition and Implementation of Rights Framework to be introduced in 2018, informed by distinctions-based national engagement. The Framework will include new legislation and policies that will entrench the recognition and implementation of rights as the basis for all relations between Indigenous peoples and the federal government.
  • Introduce legislation in 2018, to establish the Department of Crown-Indigenous Relations and Northern Affairs and the Department of Indigenous Services with mandates to better serve the distinct needs of First Nations, Inuit and Métis.
  • Continue to work with the Assembly of First Nations, the Inuit Tapiriit Kanatami and the four Inuit Nunangat Regions, and the Métis National Council and its governing members, and Modern Treaty and Self-Governing First Nations – on the implementation of shared priorities identified via the Permanent Bilateral Mechanisms, and the identification of potential new priorities.
  • Accelerate progress at approximately 60 Recognition of Indigenous Rights and Self-Determination tables and increase the number of modern treaties and self-government agreements. These Discussion tables represent more than 320 Indigenous communities with a total population of more than 700,000 people.
  • Continue to work in partnership with historic treaty groups through the treaty commissions in Saskatchewan and Manitoba and the Recognition of Indigenous Rights and Self-Determination tables. Priorities in 2018–2019 include: advancing public education to improve understanding and awareness of the historic treaties, supporting partnerships between Treaty First Nations and private industry to create economic opportunities; advancing reconciliation activities that support the Truth and Reconciliation Commission's Calls to Action; supporting commemoration initiatives; and, engaging with Treaty First Nations on treaty-related issues and interests.
  • Hold consultations in partnership with First Nations and other Indigenous groups on issues relating to Indian registration, band membership and First Nation citizenship. These consultations are legally required by An Act to amend the Indian Act in response to the Superior Court of Quebec decision in Descheneaux c. Canada (Procureur général) (Bill S-3), which came into force on December 22, 2017.
  • Work in partnership with First Nations to address issues with crossing the Canada-United States border, informed by a report on the topic by the Minister's Special Representative in 2017.
  • Continue to co-develop a new self-government fiscal policy with self-governing Indigenous governments based upon the framework developed in 2017–2018. Funding approaches that are sufficient, predictable, and sustained will be developed with self-governing Indigenous governments, with a focus on developing a new approach to governance funding this year.
  • Continue to co-develop a new Arctic Policy Framework, with Indigenous organizations, other federal departments, provinces and territories, and Northerners.
2. Indigenous peoples and Northerners advance their governance institutions

Renewal of the nation-to-nation, government-to-government, and Inuit-Crown relationships, including treaty relationships, includes putting in place effective mechanisms to support the transition away from colonial systems of administration and governance through support to Indigenous peoples and Northerners to advance their governance institutions. In 2018–2019, the Department will:

  • Continue to provide First Nations with the capacity and means to assert jurisdiction over the enactment of matrimonial real property rules and laws, the generation of local revenues and property taxation, and the management of their land, environment, natural resources, oil and gas, finances, and moneys, through the following:
    • Enhancements to the First Nations Fiscal Management Act, will be considered in 2018–2019, to clarify provisions, and address gaps in the Act. This will improve its administration and ensure the three First Nation-led institutions (First Nations Financial Management Board; First Nations Tax Commission; First Nations Finance Authority) under the Actcan meet current and growing demand for their financial capacity and legislative services. The Government of Canada is co-developing the proposed amendments under the Act with these three First Nation-led institutions;
      • The Department will also continue to collaborate with these three institutions on innovative First Nation-led initiatives, such as piloting alternative financing mechanisms, supporting new approaches to building sustainable capacity of First Nations currently under default, and on providing First Nations with access to 10-year grants as part of the New Fiscal Relationship;
      • The Department and the First Nations Tax Commission will explore the potential of a national First Nations Infrastructure Institution that could find innovative ways to address the current infrastructure deficit on reserve, while building First Nations capacity for infrastructure financing, planning, development and maintenance;
    • Under the First Nations Land Management Act, the Department will work with 36 First Nations who entered the regime in the past two years. This is part of an effort to have 92 First Nations with operational land codes and law-making authority, allowing them to opt out of 33 sections of the Indian Act by 2019. The goal is to increase to 115 First Nations by 2021; and
    • Under the Family Homes on Reserves and Matrimonial Interests or Rights Act, the Department will identify options for program improvement and renewal based on recent engagement with First Nations and the recommendations from a 2017–2018 program evaluation. To this day, First Nation women continue to experience ongoing impacts of past discriminatory provisions from the Indian Act. While the Act is gender-neutral and provides various rights and protections that were previously non-existent for men, women, children and families, women are more likely to benefit from its provisions.
  • Continue to support Northerners on their path to self-determination and to advance their governance institutions. The Governments of Canada, Nunavut, and Nunavut Tunngavik Incorporated are working to advance devolution in Nunavut, and in particular towards the conclusion of the Nunavut Lands and Resources Devolution Agreement-in-Principle. Tripartite main Table meetings are scheduled to take place on a monthly basis throughout the fiscal year 2018–2019.
  • Advance the implementation of constitutionally protected agreements and treaties. A Deputy Minister's Oversight Committee supports the Government of Canada in meeting its legal obligations. Indigenous partners are invited to participate in this committee to share their experiences of modern treaty implementation. Five meetings are planned for 2018–2019.
    • In cooperation with Treaty partners, the Department will continue to provide modern treaty implementation obligation training to federal officials. In 2018–2019, at least five training sessions are planned to be offered. The key result is to increase awareness and understanding among public servants of modern treaties and implementation obligations.
  • Continue to support a whole-of-government approach to consultation and accommodation that ensures the Crown meets its constitutional obligations and cooperates in good faith with the aim of securing free, prior and informed consent of Indigenous peoples.
3. Past injustices are recognized and resolved

National Council for Reconciliation:

  • The Truth and Reconciliation Commission’s Calls to Action #53 and # 54 call for establishing a National Council of Reconciliation.
  • In December 2017, an Interim Board of Directors was appointed to advance Canada’s commitment to implementing these Calls.
  • The Board will engage with various stakeholders to establish the National Council for Reconciliation, and the endowment of a National Reconciliation Trust to advance the cause of reconciliation.

Assimilationist policies and practices have led to the denial of Indigenous rights. Reconciliation is an ongoing process which requires recognition of rights, acknowledgement of past wrongs, including the disenfranchisement of women under the Indian Act, knowing the colonial history of Canada and working together to co-develop solutions with Indigenous peoples. In 2018–2019, the Department will:

  • Continue to support and advance the implementation of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission's 94 Calls to Action, building on the progress to implement and complete the 76 Calls to Action within federal or shared purview. As of January 2018, three Calls to Action are in the final stages of delivery and three have been concluded, 19 are fully underway and 51 are in the early stages of planning and implementation.
  • Continue work with Indigenous partners to implement the 2016 Policy on Additions to Reserve/Reserve Creation, including training First Nation land managers, and addressing obstacles to Additions to Reserve implementation through the newly created national Additions to Reserve Advisory Committee. This will result in a more efficient, and transparent process; improve community access to land and resources; and increase community and economic opportunities for First Nations. Five percent of outstanding additions to reserve related to legal obligations will be addressed in 2018–2019.
  • Work with the Department of Justice to promote cooperation over adversarial processes, and move towards reconciliation and a recognition of rights approach. The Department will draw from lessons learned in the Anderson class action settlement, and applied to the proposed settlement of the Sixties Scoop litigation, to work with plaintiffs, their counsel, Métis and Non-Status leadership in order to resolve Childhood Claims outside of the courts. Additionally, the Department is currently engaging plaintiffs in the Gottfriedson class action in exploring the potential for a resolution; instead of advancing this matter in court (a Minister's Special Representative is leading these discussions). While still subject to negotiation, it is intended that these types of settlements, while likely to include individual compensation, could also include funding for healing, wellness, commemoration, language and culture, to support the survivors' ongoing and future needs.
  • Continue to implement and to fulfill the terms of the Indian Residential Schools Settlement Agreement.
Planned Results
Departmental Results Departmental Result Indicators Target Date to achieve target 2014–2015 Actual results 2015–2016 Actual results 2016–2017 Actual results
Indigenous peoples and Northerners determine their political, economic, social and cultural development Percentage of First Nations adopting alternatives to the Indian Act 49%

2017
Baseline:43%
March 31, 2019    New indicator for 2018–2019
Number of communities where Indigenous Rights and Self-Determination processes are underway 502

2017
Baseline: 472
March 31, 2019    New indicator for 2018–2019
Number of communities where Indigenous Rights and Self-Determination agreements have been concluded 54

2017
Baseline: 31
March 31, 2019    New indicator for 2018–2019
Percentage of First Nations that exercise options to collect, manage and/or access revenues held in trust To be determined

2017–2018
Baseline: to be set after first year of data collection in 2017–2018
To be determined    New indicator for 2018–2019
Percentage of Arctic Council initiatives that correlate to or advance Canadian Indigenous Permanent Participants' priorities 100%

2015–2017
Baseline: 70%
March 31, 2019    New indicator for 2018–2019
Indigenous peoples and Northerners advance their governance institutions Percentage of First Nation communities with Financial Management System Certification through the First Nations Financial Management Board 1.6%

2017
Baseline:1%
March 31, 2019    New indicator for 2018–2019
Percentage of First Nation communities with land governance regimes established 24%

2017
Baseline: 16%
March 31, 2019    New indicator for 2018–2019
Percentage of First Nation communities with real property taxation regimes supported through the First Nations Tax Commission 20%

2017
Baseline: 18%
March 31, 2019    New indicator for 2018–2019
Completion of devolution phases in Nunavut Full completion

2014
Baseline: beginning of negotiations
March 2023    New indicator for 2018–2019
Past injustices are recognized and resolved The annual percentage of specific claims accepted for negotiation that are resolved by means of a negotiated settlement agreementa 50%a

2017
Baseline:77%
March 31, 2019    New indicator for 2018–2019
Hectares of land added to the reserve land base to fulfill legal obligations 37,474

2017
Baseline: 26,626
March 31, 2019    New indicator for 2018–2019
Percentage of Indian Residential Schools Settlement Agreement claims completed through the Independent Assessment Processb 100%

2017
Baseline: 96%b
March 31, 2020    New indicator for 2018–2019
Number of litigation claims concludedc Not availablec

Baseline: Not availablec
     New indicator for 2018–2019
Note: The Planned Results and indicators in the above table are transitional as the structure of Department is clarified and as results and performance indicators are defined in partnership with Indigenous peoples.
aThe conclusion of negotiated settlement agreements is not entirely within the control of the federal government. In order to achieve a settlement agreement, consensus must be reached with First Nations and, in some cases, other levels of government. Given the complexity of claims, the rate at which settlement agreements are concluded changes from year to year. The 2018–2019 target of 50 percent is an annual notional target that will be exceeded in some years.
bAlthough the indicator has not been reported through past Reports to Parliament, historical data indicate that 83 percent and 91 percent of claims were completed at end of fiscal years 2014–2015 and 2015–2016 respectively.
cThis indicator addresses resolution of litigation and/or out-of-court settlements as they occur. As the Department has no control on the amount or the timing of resolved claims, the target and baseline cannot be established.
 
Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2018–2019
Main Estimates
2018–2019
Planned spending
2019–2020
Planned spending
2020–2021
Planned spending
2,232,915,663 2,232,915,663 1,351,665,931 1,319,439,475
The decrease of $881.2 million in 2019–2020 mainly reflects the following changes:
  • sunset (in 2018–2019) of the specific claims settlements provided under Justice at Last (-$658.0 million); and
  • reduced requirements for the continued implementation of the Indian Residential Schools Settlement Agreement (-$109.6 million).
 
Human resources (full-time equivalents)
2018–2019
Planned full-time equivalents
2019–2020
Planned full-time equivalents
2020–2021
Planned full-time equivalents
1,021 923 919

Financial, human resources and performance information for the Crown-Indigenous Relations and Northern Affairs' Program Inventory is available in the GC InfoBase.

Community and Regional Development

Description

Support the efforts of Indigenous and northern communities in sustainable economic development, sustainable food, natural resources and environmental management. This includes: investment in Indigenous and Northern entrepreneurs and businesses; land management and resource development; clean energy development and climate change adaptation; remediation of contaminated sites; and protection of the Arctic ecosystems and advancement of northern (Arctic) science and technology.

Planning highlights

Community and regional development is critical to the well-being of Indigenous peoples and Northerners, and underpins their full participation in Canada's social and economic development.

In close cooperation with the Department of Indigenous Services Canada, the Department supports the efforts of Indigenous peoples and Northerners to live in strong and healthy communities with thriving cultures that are self-determining, self-governing, and increasingly self-sufficient, and no longer marginalized.

To achieve progress in this area, the Department will focus on the following three results.

1. Indigenous communities advance their business development and economic growth

The Department supports Indigenous and northern communities in advancing their economic development by investing in community readiness, entrepreneurs and businesses, land management, and strategic partnerships. In 2018–2019, the Department will:

  • Leverage greater access up to an additional $50 million in capital.
    • Integrate and align departmental programs, such as the Canada Small Business Financing program and the Indigenous Skills and Employment Training strategy, to better support the Aboriginal Financial Institutions network and Indigenous entrepreneurs. By March 2019, the Department plans to support at least three Aboriginal financial institutions in applying to participate in the Canada Small Business Financing program.
  • Support the National Indigenous Economic Development Board in advancing its innovative policy agenda by: launching its economic benchmarking report on closing the socio-economic gap between Indigenous and non-Indigenous peoples, providing advice on sustainable food systems in the North, championing Indigenous women's economic empowerment and entrepreneurship and convening a forum on reconciliation and inclusive economic growth for the Inuit. The Department will also lead a collaborative project with the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development and other government departments on linkages between Indigenous communities and regional economic development folks.
  • Contribute to the Government of Canada's procurement modernization agenda by continuing to improve procurement with Indigenous providers.
  • Continue to support national, regional and international economic development strategies with key stakeholders, such as the Indigenous Tourism Association of Canada, the Canadian Council for Aboriginal Business, the Native Women's Association of Canada, and Indigenous Works.
  • Continue to support large-scale commercial and industrial projects by First Nations through the First Nations Commercial and Industrial Development Act.
  • Continue to modernize the regulatory regime to support oil and gas development on reserve lands, including work with First Nation partners in exploring options to exercise greater First Nation jurisdiction.
  • The Department will continue its review and analysis of First Nation community ratification processes currently required to evidence informed consent under several policy and statutory frameworks. Together with First Nations partners, the Department will co-design and co-implement a consultation process that will identify potential to reform ratification processes and practices to better recognize and respect the right to self-determination, including the inherent right of self-government.
  • Support the development of strategic joint economic development plans between municipalities and neighboring First Nation communities through the second phase of the successful Community Economic Development Initiative with the Federation of Canadian Municipalities and the Council for the Advancement of Native Development Officers. Between now and 2021, as many as 30 new communities will create joint economic development and land management partnerships based on their shared desire for a better future.
  • Continue to implement the Métis Economic Development Strategy announced in Budget 2016, including the monitoring of recapitalization with the five Métis Capital Corporations.
  • Continue to work with Matawa Tribal Council, Aroland, Constance Lake, Eebametoong First Nation, Ginoogaming First Nation, Long Lake No. 58 First Nation, Marten Falls, Neskantaga First Nation, Nibinamik First Nation, Webequie and the Province of Ontario to support the Ring of Fire Community Well-being pilot project in the James Bay Lowlands of northern Ontario. Since 2011, the Department has provided up to $18 million in funding to improve mining and employment readiness which will enable the communities to improve socio-economic conditions. The Ring of Fire is estimated to have a potential economic yield of $60 billion in mineral deposits.
2. Indigenous and Northern communities strengthen their capacity to adapt to changing environments

Indigenous and Northern communities face many challenges that demand the capacity to adapt to changing environments. These include: managing the impacts of a changing climate, addressing the high and often fluctuating costs of food, and promoting sustainable development that balances environmental, social, and economic well-being. Other important factors include: remoteness and inaccessibility, cold climate, aging and inefficient infrastructure, flooding, and reliance on diesel for electricity generation, and space heating. In 2018–2019, to strengthen community capacity to adapt to these changing conditions, the Department will:

  • Invest $27.6 million to support climate change adaptation and increase the resilience of Indigenous peoples and Northerners. The implementation of the
    Pan-Canadian Framework on Clean Growth and Climate Change will provide support to:
    • Facilitate community-level climate change data collection and its integration with Indigenous knowledge;
    • Support territorial governments and northern Indigenous communities to conduct risk assessments, and to identify, plan, and implement adaptation measures; and
    • Support First Nations to assess climate change impacts through risk and adaptation assessment projects and flood plain mapping.
  • Work to update and expand the Nutrition North program, based on leveraging what was heard in the year-long engagement process with communities, and advancing initiatives that ensure the program is more responsive to the needs of Northerners, while remaining sustainable. The Department will continue to work with the Nutrition North Canada Indigenous Working Group, launched in May 2017, co-design policy options and support program reform.
  • Support the active involvement of Indigenous organizations and northern communities to address concerns about contaminants in country foods in the North. Indigenous organizations and Northern community organizations will participate in the governance and decision-making structures of the Northern Contaminants Program, including at least two meetings of each of the five regional contaminants committees and the program's national management committee.
3. Land and resources in Indigenous communities and the North are sustainably managed

Many remote Indigenous and northern communities are not connected to power grids, and rely on high-cost diesel-powered electrical generation. Investment in alternative energy sources, where possible, can provide reliable, clean energy at a lower cost to Indigenous and Northern communities. The North also has a number of contaminated sites, abandoned by previous occupants that include legacy contamination, primarily from private sector mining, and oil and gas activities as well as military activities by the Government. Land use planning, capacity building and training, enable First Nation communities to effectively manage lands, natural resources and solid waste and environmental activities that will leverage community and economic development opportunities. In 2018–2019, the Department will:

  • Support Northern communities to reduce their reliance on diesel and support the implementation of the Pan-Canadian Framework on Clean Growth and Climate Change. This includes:
    • Working with other departments, territorial, provincial, and regional governments, Indigenous organizations and Northern communities to create regional plans and inform a national view; and
    • Provide support to Northern communities, governments, and organizations to develop clean energy projects and capacity building initiatives. Projects in the three territories and Inuit regions of Nunavik (Northern Quebec) and Nunatsiavut (Northern Labrador) are expected to reduce diesel use by 400,000 litres of greenhouse gas emissions by March 31, 2019.
  • Lead the government's work in the North and support Northern programming, governing institutions, and scientific initiatives.
  • Continue to support and pursue regulatory frameworks in the North, including environmental assessment legislation that yields sound resource management decision-making. This includes:
    • Working with territorial and Indigenous governments and other partners to make changes to the Mackenzie Valley Resource Management Act that will resolve litigation and implement additional improvements; and
    • Continuing to address the implementation issues with the Nunavut Planning and Project Assessment Act, which came into force in 2015.
  • Co-develop options with Indigenous organizations and First Nations, based on previous engagement with First Nation communities, to improve the Reserve Land and Environment Management Program, which currently has 111 certified land managers in First Nation communities. The Department will improve the program and expand it to the 375 First Nation communities currently unable to take on the responsibility of managing their reserve lands and environment under the Indian Act.
  • Work in partnership with First Nations to propose modernizing regulations for the sustainable management of oil and gas resources on reserve lands. These regulations will be released for public consultation by Summer 2018.
  • Continue to support First Nation communities to develop land use plans and complete land surveys through the Land Use Planning Initiative. The Department is planning to invest $7.5 million annually starting in 2018–2019 to allow a minimum of 60 communities to complete and implement their land use plans by March 31, 2021. The initiative aligns land use planning with other department-funded planning processes, such as comprehensive community and infrastructure planning, to promote integrated community planning as a best practice for sustainable community development. The Department will also continue working with Indigenous partner organizations to offer training and capacity enhancing opportunities in land use planning and surveys.
  • Continue to actively manage high-priority Northern contaminated sites in order to protect the health and safety of Indigenous peoples and Northerners, as well as restore the integrity of the environment. Active site management, including planning, remediation or long-term monitoring activities, contributes to sustainable land management and economic benefits for Indigenous and Northern communities through increased access to training, employment and business opportunities. The Department is also advancing opportunities for the re-commercialization of abandoned mine sites through leveraging private sector interest in remaining mineral resources at these sites. By March 31, 2019, the Department is planning the following investments:
    • $187.5 million in the active management of its high-priority Northern contaminated sites; and
    • $50 million in the clean-up or containment of 35 percent of contaminated sites on reserve that pose imminent danger to public health and safety where clean-up or containment is occurring.
  • Continue to support First Nation communities in improving solid-waste management. The Department is planning to invest $97 million in 2018–2019, to increase access to modern and environmentally sustainable solid waste management systems comparable to those available off reserve; to reduce environmental, human health and safety risk; and to enable sustainable economic development.
  • Continue working with territorial governments, Northerners, Indigenous groups and institutes of public governance to ensure a robust regulatory regime that supports sustainable development in the resource sector.
Résultats prévus
Departmental Results Departmental Result Indicators Target Date to achieve target 2014–2015 Actual results 2015–2016 Actual results 2016–2017 Actual results
Indigenous communities advance their business development and economic growth Percentage of First Nation communities where non-government revenues represent 25% or more of total revenues To be determined

Baseline: To be determined in 2018–2019
To be determined     New indicator for 2018–2019
Number of Indigenous businesses created and/or expanded To be determineda

2017
Baseline: 1,235
To be determined 1,207 1,290 1,235
Percentage growth of federal procurement contracts set aside for Indigenous businesses 5% increase

2010–2014
Baseline: $112.7 million
March 31, 2019 $93.5 million Not availableb Not availableb
Indigenous and Northern communities strengthen their capacity to adapt to changing environments c Percentage of Climate Change Impact Assessments that identify adaptation measures 50%d

2017–2018
Baseline: to be determined
March 31, 2019     New indicator for 2018–2019
The annual growth rate of food prices in isolated Northern communities compared to the national growth rate At or below 2%

2016
Baseline: 2%
March 31, 2019     New indicator for 2018–2019
Land and resources in Indigenous communities and the North are sustainably managed c Percentage of contaminated sites on reserve that pose imminent danger to public health and safety where clean-up or containment is occurring to reduce risk 35%e

2012–2016
Baseline: 29%
March 31, 2019 32% 46% 57%
Percentage of contaminated sites in the North that pose imminent danger to public health and safety and the environment that are being actively managed 81-85%f

2017
Baseline: 86%
March 31, 2019     New indicator for 2018–2019
Percentage of First Nations with land use plans 27%

2017
Baseline: 16%
March 31, 2021     New indicator for 2018–2019
Percentage of First Nation communities with certified land managers At least 25% of First Nation communities

2017
Baseline: 23.6%
March 31, 2019     New indicator for 2018–2019
Percentage of First Nation, Inuit and Northern Communities that are dependent on dieselg To be determinedh

2017–2018
Baseline: 73% (Inuit and Northern Communities)
To be determined     New indicator for 2018–2019
Percentage of First Nation, Inuit and Northern Communities that are implementing projects that reduce dependency/reliance on dieselg 20%i of Inuit and Northern Communitiesh

2017–2018
Baseline: to be determined
March 31, 2019     New indicator for 2018–2019
Percentage of First Nation communities with adequate solid waste management systems To be determined

Baseline: To be determined
To be determined     New indicator for 2018–2019
Note: The Planned Results and indicators in the above table are transitional as the structure of Department is clarified and as results and performance indicators are defined in partnership with Indigenous peoples.
aA target cannot be established as the number of applications received yearly by Aboriginal Financial Institutions vary significantly from year to year.
bThe data are collected by Public Services and Procurement Canada on an annual (calendar year) basis, with a two-year lag in publication – for example, results for 2016–2017 will be available in 2019.
cThis result is transitional and reflects a shared responsibility with Indigenous Service Canada, and is subject to change as the new departmental structures are clarified.
dThe indicator reflects a new program as of 2016–2017. Therefore, the baseline will be established at the conclusion of 2017–2018, and a notional target of 50 percent has been established based on project proposals.
eThe target is lower than the results achieved over the past two fiscal years, reflecting stimulus funding provided through Budget 2016 for two years to enhance activity.
fThe 81–85 percent target represents 55–58 out of 68 high-priority sites. The number of high-priority sites varies annually as site activities are completed, responsibility for active management is transferred to third parties, and the Department becomes responsible for new sites. The number of actively managed sites will also vary annually as site activities are completed or as sites move into active management.
gThis is an interim indicator reflecting a shared responsibility with Indigenous Services Canada. Indigenous Services Canada reports results on First Nations on reserve south of 60° and Crown Indigenous Relations and Northern Affairs reports on Inuit and Northern Communities.
hThe indicators and targets are considered interim for 2018–2019 and will be reviewed for 2019–2020 in consultation with partners.
iA notional target of 20 percent has been established based on project proposals.
 
Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2018–2019
Main Estimates
2018–2019
Planned spending
2019–2020
Planned spending
2020–2021
Planned spending
646,610,036 646,610,036 613,112,173 436,174,341
The year-over-year differences primarily reflect:
  • changes in approved funding for the assessment, management and remediation of federal contaminated sites (-$32.0 million in 2019–2020 and -$177.7 million in 2020–2021).
Human resources (full-time equivalents)
2018–2019
Planned full-time equivalents
2019–2020
Planned full-time equivalents
2020–2021
Planned full-time equivalents
856 847 723

Financial, human resources and performance information for the Crown-Indigenous Relations and Northern Affairs' Program Inventory is available in the GC InfoBase.

Internal Services

Description

Internal Services are those groups of related activities and resources that the federal government considers to be services in support of programs and/or required to meet corporate obligations of an organization. Internal Services refers to the activities and resources of the 10 distinct service categories that support Program delivery in the organization, regardless of the Internal Services delivery model in a department. The 10 service categories are: Management and Oversight Services; Communications Services; Legal Services; Human Resources Management Services; Financial Management Services; Information Management Services; Information Technology Services; Real Property Services; Materiel Services; and Acquisition Services.

Planning highlights

Since the Department of Indigenous Services Canada was created on November 30, 2017 without any dedicated internal services function or structure, interim sharing and transfer management arrangements were put into effect for the continuity and provision of internal corporate services from Crown-Indigenous Relations and Northern Affairs' resources. A Memorandum of Understanding was put in place, which identifies governance whereby the quality, continuity, sharing and/or transfer of service resources can be accomplished in an efficient and effective manner. Senior level decisions regarding the degree of integration or separation of these departments' internal service functions in early 2018–2019 will inform this work in the coming years.

In 2018–2019, the Department will:

  • Define and establish the interim and planned longer-term resource transfer and shared service platform approach for the delivery of internal corporate services to Indigenous Services Canada and Crown-Indigenous Relations and Northern Affairs;
  • Once established in its long-term form, the Department will maintain an ongoing review of its internal service delivery approach to ensure high quality and sustainable services; and
  • Throughout all changes in the service delivery platform in the coming years, ensure the continuity of corporate services to avoid any disruption or impact to services provided to Indigenous peoples.
1. Management and Oversight Services

The Department will work to promote greater accountability, transparency and oversight in its operations by conducting audits, evaluations, management practice reviews or audits as well as risk assessments. Through this work, the Department will ensure the appropriate use of human and financial resources and that programs and services delivered by Crown-Indigenous Relations and Northern Affairs are relevant, efficient, and effective. Special attention will be given to identifying, assessing and responding to the risks that may exist with the formation of Crown-Indigenous Relations and Northern Affairs as a new department.

In the context of the establishment of the new Department, a priority in 2018–2019 will be to develop and implement a new Departmental Results Framework, reflecting engagement with First Nations, Inuit and Métis, with the goal to provide simpler, clearer and more meaningful reports to Parliament and Canadians as set out in the Treasury Board's Policy on Results. Similarly, the Department will, in partnership with Indigenous peoples, advance its work to better support decision making, program reforms and the measurement and reporting on closing socio-economic gaps and improving well-being of all Indigenous peoples based on outcomes and measures that are important to their communities. The Department will continue working with key partners such as the First Nations Information Governance Centre and Statistics Canada to continue implementation of the Regional Health Survey and the Aboriginal Peoples Survey program as well as help advance Indigenous data governance capacities and research innovation.

2. Communications Services

The Communications Branch is leading on Transformation communication issues and regularly assessing the impact on departmental staff, nurturing positive outcomes. The Branch will continue to provide strategic advice and communication products allowing for clear communication of the Transformation process and mandate letter priorities both externally and internally.

The Branch is updating the Indigenous and Northern Affairs Canada Departmental website and content in compliance with Canada.ca specifications and institutional profiles of the Department. Further, using the web and social media platforms such as Facebook, Twitter and Instagram, the Branch will support Government of Canada efforts to engage Indigenous peoples and all Canadians in the "project of reconciliation" with a special focus on youth and supporting the first National Indigenous Peoples Day in 2018 and beyond.

3. Human Resources Management Services

Human Resources and Workplace Services Branch will continue to support the development and implementation of a Workplace Well-being & Mental Health Strategy by:

  • Building on the Strategy and the departmental activities that were already taking place to reduce the stigma related to mental health prior to the dissolution of Indigenous and Northern Affairs Canada (i.e. in-house survey in 2016 and subsequent focus groups), a Strategy unique to the requirements of Crown-Indigenous Relations and Northern Affairs will be developed.
  • Combining and integrating the views and results of Crown-Indigenous Relations and Northern Affairs and the Department of Indigenous Services Canada from the Public Service Employee Survey 2017 (conducted prior to the dissolution of Indigenous and Northern Affairs Canada), will provide information on the strengths and the areas for improvements in improving workplace well-being.

Efforts will be strengthened in Indigenous recruitment, leadership development, and retention. Crown-Indigenous Relations and Northern Affairs and the Department of Indigenous Services Canada will both take part in the efforts to hire Indigenous peoples, help them develop their careers, and retain them in the Federal Government in line with the Indigenous Recruitment and Retention Framework. In 2018–2019, the Department will continue to support the following:

  • Deputy Minister's Aboriginal Workforce Initiative II;
  • Aboriginal Leadership Development Initiative; and
  • Aspiring Indigenous Managers Development Initiative.

These initiatives are expected to lead to increased Indigenous recruitment, leadership development and retention in both Crown-Indigenous Relations and Northern Affairs and the Department of Indigenous Services Canada.

Prior to its dissolution, Indigenous and Northern Affairs Canada developed expertise in dealing with the difficult issues affecting pay following the implementation of the new Phoenix Pay System. Also, Indigenous and Northern Affairs Canada transitioned early from its previous departmental Human Resources application to My Government of Canada Human Resources (My GCHR), the new Government of Canada standard.

The Human Resources and Workplace Services Branch, including the Phoenix Response Team, will continue to provide services to Crown-Indigenous Relations and Northern Affairs on the transformation of the Department to ensure the integrity of the data and alignment of its workforce resulting from organizational changes. It will also provide the Department of Indigenous Services Canada with its knowledge and expertise for their gradual transfer to into My Government of Canada Human Resources. This will result in better data integrity for both departments in 2018–2019 and beyond.

4. Financial Management Services

The focus for financial resource management during the transition will be on ensuring appropriate controls are in place ‎to manage budgets, given that separate financial systems will only be in place by April 2019. Another priority is to ensure sound resourcing strategies to support emerging priorities associated with the transition requirements such as staffing key positions and adapting business and financial information and technology systems.

For 2018–2019, Corporate Accounting and Reporting will implement the required business and reporting processes to ensure timely and accurate financial reporting and processing of transactions using the shared financial systems in place. Financial Systems and Training will work with Health Canada to implement dedicated financial and management systems for April 2019.

5. Information Management and Information Technology Services

The Information Management and Information Technology services will support Crown-Indigenous Relations and Northern Affairs Sectors in their planning, designing and implementation of Information Management /Information Technology solutions required to deliver on mandate letter commitments; maintaining existing Information Management and Information Technology services and solutions in support of both Departments responsibilities and commitments and Implementing Government of Canada Information Management and Information Technology projects, standards, direction and strategies.

6. Real Property; Materiel; and Acquisition Services

The Corporate Accounting and Materiel Management Branch will continue to lead the Department's real property management action plan in order to mitigate health and safety risks and enhance sound stewardship of Crown assets, while ensuring compliance with the Government's real property policies and guidelines. In the context of the Department's Transformation agenda, the Branch will initiate the transfer of properties that are required to support both new Departments' mandates and meet the program requirements. The Branch will also focus on planning the acquisition services strategically in order to improve service levels to departmental clients.

 
Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2018–2019
Main Estimates
2018–2019
Planned spending
2019–2020
Planned spending
2020–2021
Planned spending
204,678,749 204,678,749 196,037,768 195,685,070
*The decrease in 2019–2020 mainly reflects the sunset (in 2018–2019) of: funding to conduct research for the development and implementation of the overall strategy for Childhood Claims (-$4.1 million) and funding for advancing reconciliation in Canada (-$3.6 million).
** Most of internal support services funding for the Department of Indigenous Services Canada is in Crown-Indigenous Relations and Northern Affairs’ reference levels, pending future transfers once the structure and funding levels are finalized for the Department of Indigenous Services Canada.
Human resources (full-time equivalents)
2018–2019
Planned full-time equivalents
2019–2020
Planned full-time equivalents
2020–2021
Planned full-time equivalents
1,231 1,206 1,205
Crown-Indigenous Relations and Northern Affairs will be providing internal support services to the Department of Indigenous Services Canada.

Financial, human resources and performance information for the Crown-Indigenous Relations and Northern Affairs' Program Inventory is available in the GC InfoBase.

Spending and human resources

Planned spending

Departmental spending trend graph

* Effective November 30, 2017, pursuant to Order in Council P.C. 2017-1465, the Education and Social Development Programs and Partnerships and Regional Operations Sectors were transferred to the Department of Indigenous Services Canada. Therefore, the forecast spending for these programs (for the period of November 30, 2017 to March 31, 2018) are not included in the above numbers.

 
Budgetary planning summary for Core Responsibilities and Internal Services (dollars)
Core Responsibilities and Internal Services 2015–2016 Expenditures 2016–2017
Expenditures
2017–2018
Forecast spending
2018–2019
Main Estimates
2018–2019
Planned spending
2019–2020
Planned spending
2020–2021
Planned spending
Rights and Self-Determination* 1,697,772,183 1,807,260,470 3,224,325,327 2,232,915,663 2,232,915,663 1,351,665,931 1,319,439,475
Community and Regional Development* 672,190,446 673,420,254 888,294,159 646,610,036 646,610,036 613,112,173 436,174,341
Amount not allocated to core responsibilities above** 5,316,677,144 6,365,446,681 3,956,605,248 N/A N/A N/A N/A
Subtotal 7,686,639,773 8,846,127,405 8,069,224,734 2,879,525,699 2,879,525,699 1,964,778,104 1,755,613,816
Internal Services 268,654,893 286,377,646 297,646,228 204,678,749 204,678,749 196,037,768 195,685,070
Total 7,955,294,666 9,132,505,051 8,366,870,962 3,084,204,448 3,084,204,448 2,160,815,872 1,951,298,886
*2015–2016 and 2016–2017 Expenditures as well as 2017–2018 Forecast spending have been restated from the Program Alignment Architecture to reflect the Departmental Results Framework.
**Effective November 30, 2017, pursuant to Order in Council P.C. 2017–1465, the Education and Social Development Programs and Partnerships and Regional Operations sectors were transferred to the Department of Indigenous Services Canada. Therefore, the actual expenditures and forecast spending for these programs are not included in the Departmental Results Framework for the Crown-Indigenous Relations and Northern Affairs.

For the period 2015–2016 to 2018–2019, spending is expected to decrease from $8.0 billion in 2015–2016 to $3.1 billion in 2018–2019. The decrease of $4.9 billion primarily reflects the net effect of the transfer of the Education and Social Development Programs and Partnerships and Regional Operations sectors to Department of Indigenous Services Canada effective on November 30, 2017 (-$5.3 billion), offset by an increase in spending for the specific and special claim settlements (-$0.8 billion).

For the period 2018–2019 to 2020–2021, spending is expected to decrease from $3.1 billion in 2018–2019 to $2.0 billion in 2020–2021. This decrease of $1.1 billion is in large part due to:

  • The sunset of funding for specific and special claims settlements
    (-$0.8 billion);
  • The sunset of funding related to the assessment, management and remediation of federal contaminated sites (-$0.2 billion); and
  • Decrease in spending related to the implementation of the Indian Residential Schools Settlement Agreement as the program approaches completion
    (-$0.1 billion).

Renewal of the sunset initiatives will be sought in the near future and reflected in future estimates.

 
2018–2019 Budgetary planned gross spending summary (dollars)
Core Responsibilities and Internal Services 2018–2019
Planned gross spending
2018–2019
Planned gross spending in specified purpose accounts
2018–2019
Planned revenues netted against expenditures
2018–2019
Planned net spending
Rights and Self-Determination 2,232,915,663 0 0 2,232,915,663
Community and Regional Development 646,610,036 0 0 646,610,036
Subtotal 2,879,525,699 0 0 2,879,525,699
Internal Services 206,678,749 0 (2,000,000) 204,678,749
Total 3,086,204,448 0 (2,000,000) 3,084,204,448

Planned human resources

Human resources planning summary for Core Responsibilities and Internal Services (FTEs)
Core Responsibilities and Internal Services 2015–2016
Actual
2016–2017
Actual
2017–2018
Forecast
2018–2019 Planned 2019–2020 Planned 2020–2021 Planned
Rights and Self-Determination* 1,251 1,181 1,170 1,021 923 919
Community and Regional Development* 801 822 875 856 847 723
Amount not allocated to core responsibilities above** 1,041 1,164 852 N/A N/A N/A
Subtotal 3,093 3,167 2,897 1,877 1,770 1,642
Internal Services 1,431 1,476 1,466 1,231 1,206 1,205
Total 4,524 4,643 4,363 3,108 2,976 2,847
*2015–2016 and 2016–2017 Actual Full Time Estimates as well as 2017–2018 Forecast have been restated from the Program Alignment Architecture to reflect the Departmental Results Framework.
**Effective November 30, 2017, pursuant to Order in Council P.C. 2017-1465, the Education and Social Development Programs and Partnerships and Regional Operations sectors were transferred to the Department of Indigenous Services Canada. Therefore, the actual Full Time Estimates and forecast Full Time Estimates for these programs are not included in the Departmental Results Framework for the Crown-Indigenous Relations and Northern Affairs.

Estimates by vote

For information on the Crown-Indigenous Relations and Northern Affairs organizational appropriations, consult the 2018–2019 Main Estimates.

Future-Oriented Condensed Statement of Operations

The Future-Oriented Condensed Statement of Operations provides a general overview of Crown-Indigenous Relations and Northern Affairs Canada's operations. The forecast of financial information on expenses and revenues is prepared on an accrual accounting basis to strengthen and improve accountability, transparency and financial management.

Because the Future-Oriented Condensed Statement of Operations is prepared on an accrual accounting basis, and the forecast and planned spending amounts presented in other sections of the Departmental Plan are prepared on an expenditure basis, amounts may differ.

A more detailed Future-Oriented Statement of Operations and associated notes, including a reconciliation of the net cost of operations to the requested authorities, are available on the Crown-Indigenous Relations and Northern Affairs' website.

Future-Oriented Condensed Statement of Operations for the year ended March 31, 2019 (dollars)
Financial information 2017–2018
Forecast results
2018–2019
Planned results
Difference
(2018–2019 Planned results minus 2017–2018 Forecast results)
Total expenses 11,652,431,760 4,691,084,592 (6,961,347,168)
Total revenues 3,480,415 3,643,381 162,966
Net cost of operations before government funding and transfers 11,648,951,345 4,687,441,211 (6,961,510,134)

Expenses

Total expenses for 2018–2019 are planned at $4,691 million, representing a $6,961 million decrease from the previous year's forecasted total expenses of $11,652 million. Expenses by Core Responsibility are as follows:

  • Rights and Self-Determination $4,036 million (86.0%); and
  • Community and Regional Development $438 million (9.4%).

The remainder of the total expenses include Internal Services in the amount of $221 million (4.7%) and expenses incurred on behalf of the Government of Canada in the amount of -$4 million (-0.1%).

Revenues

Total revenues for 2018–2019 are planned at $3.6 million, representing a $0.2 million increase over the previous year's total revenues of $3.4 million. Respendable revenues from the provision of financial and administrative services represent $2.5 million (66.7%) of total revenues. Respendable revenues from the disposal of tangible capital assets, presented as miscellaneous revenue in the statement of operations, accounts for the remaining $1.2 million (33.3%).

Significant variances

Variances between the planned results for 2018–2019 and the 2017–2018 forecast results are largely attributable to the transfer of the Education and Social Development Programs and Partnerships and Regional Operations sectors to Department of Indigenous Services Canada effective on November 30, 2017. As a result, approximately $6.2 billion of planned results are reported in the 2018-2019 planned results of the Department of Indigenous Services.

Additional variance results from the timing of key elements in the federal government's fiscal cycle. Planned results for 2018–2019 are based on the Main Estimates. Significant additional funding and initiatives not approved in time for Main Estimates have not been included in the 2018–2019 planned results. This funding will be accessed through Supplementary Estimates. Over the past five years, significant additional funding has been accessed through the Supplementary Estimates process.

Supplementary information

Corporate information

Organizational profile:

Appropriate minister[s]: The Honourable Carolyn Bennett
Ministerial portfolio: Department of Indian Affairs and Northern Development
Enabling instrument[s]: Department of Indian Affairs and Northern Development Act, R.S.C.1985, c.I-6
Year of incorporation: 1880
Other:
Special operating agency: Indian Oil and Gas Canada

Administrative tribunals and agencies:

  • Indian Residential Schools Truth and Reconciliation Commission
  • Polar Knowledge Canada

Adjudicative and advisory bodies:

  • Specific Claims Tribunal Canada
  • National Indigenous Economic Development Board

Raison d’être, mandate and role
"Raison d'être, mandate and role: who we are and what we do" is available on the
Crown-Indigenous Relations and Northern Affairs' website

Operating context and key risks
Information on operating context and key risks is available on the Crown-Indigenous Relations and Northern Affairs' website.

Reporting framework

The Crown-Indigenous Relations and Northern Affairs Departmental Results Framework and Program Inventory of record for 2018–2019 are shown below:

Rights and Self-Determination
Support Indigenous and Northern organizations, individuals, communities and governments in controlling and managing their own affairs and interests based on the recognition and honouring of rights, respect, collaboration and partnerships. Activities include: governance capacity and community planning, negotiating and implementing treaties, self-government agreements and specific claims; addressing historic grievances; consulting and engaging on issues of importance to Indigenous people and Northerners as well as registration, estates, trust moneys administration and implementation of the Indian Residential Schools Settlement Agreement.
Indigenous peoples and Northerners determine their political, economic, social and cultural development Indigenous peoples and Northerners advance their governance institutions Past injustices are recognized and resolved
Percentage of First Nations adopting alternatives to the Indian Act

Number of communities where  Indigenous rights and self-determination processes are underway

Number of communities where Indigenous rights and self-determination agreements have been concluded

Percentage of First Nations that exercise options to collect, manage and/or access revenues held in trust

Percentage of Arctic Council initiatives that correlate to or advance Canadian Indigenous Permanent Participants' priorities
Percentage of First Nation communities with Financial Management System Certification through the First Nations Financial Management Board

Percentage of First Nation communities with land governance regimes established

Percentage of First Nation communities with real property taxation regimes supported through the First Nations Tax Commission

Completion of devolution phases in Nunavut
The annual percentage of specific claims accepted for negotiation that are resolved by means of a negotiated settlement agreement
Hectares of land added to the reserve land base to fulfill legal obligations

Percentage of Indian Residential Schools Settlement Agreement claims completed through the Independent Assessment Process

Number of litigation claims concluded
 
Community and Regional Development
Support the efforts of Indigenous and Northern communities in sustainable economic development, sustainable food, natural resources and environmental management. This includes: investment in Indigenous and Northern entrepreneurs and businesses; land management and resource development; clean energy development and climate change adaptation; remediation of contaminated sites; and protection of the Arctic ecosystems and advancement of northern (Arctic) science and technology.
Indigenous communities advance their business development and economic growth Indigenous and Northern communities strengthen their capacity to adapt to changing environments Land and resources in Indigenous communities and the North are sustainably managed
Percentage of First Nation communities where non-government revenues represent 25% or more of total revenues

Number of Indigenous businesses created and/or expanded

Percentage growth of federal procurement contracts set aside for Indigenous businesses
Percentage of Climate Change Impact Assessments that identify adaptation measures

The annual growth rate of food prices in isolated Northern communities compared to the national growth rate
Percentage of contaminated sites on reserve that pose imminent danger to public health and safety where clean-up or containment is occurring to reduce risk

Percentage of contaminated sites in the North that pose imminent danger to public health and safety and the environment that are being actively managed

Percentage of First Nations with land use plans

Percentage of First Nation communities with certified land managers

Percentage of First Nations, Inuit and Northern Communities that are dependent on diesel

Percentage of First Nations, Inuit and Northern Communities that are implementing projects that reduce dependency/reliance on diesel

Percentage of First Nation communities with adequate solid waste management systems
 

Concordance between the Departmental Results Framework and the Program Inventory, 2018–2019, and the Program Alignment Architecture, 2017–2018

2018–2019 Core Responsibilities and Program Inventory: 2017–2018 Lowest-level program of the Program Alignment Architecture Percentage* of lowest-level Program Alignment Architecture program (dollars) corresponding to the program in the Program Inventory
Rights and Self-Determination:
Statutory, Legislative and Policy Support to First Nations Governance 1.1.1 First Nation Governments 1%
Negotiations of Claims and Self-Government Agreements 1.2.1 Negotiations of Claims and Self-Government Agreements 100%
Specific Claims 1.2.2 Specific Claims 100%
Management and Implementation of Agreements and Treaties 1.3 Management and Implementation of Agreements and Treaties 100%
Consultation and Accommodation 1.2.3 Consultation and Accommodation 14%
Consultation and Policy Development 1.2.3 Consultation and Accommodation 44%
Federal Interlocutor's Contribution Program 1.2.4 Métis Relations and Rights Management and Non-Status Indian Relations 100%
Basic Organizational Capacity 1.2.3 Consultation and Accommodation 42%
Other Claims 1.4 Other Claims 100%
First Nation Jurisdiction over Land and Economic Development 1.1.2 Indigenous Governance Institutions and Organizations 47%
3.2.1 Lands and Economic Development Services 29%
Northern and Arctic Governance and Partnerships 4.1.1 Political Development, Intergovernmental and Inuit Relations 100%
Individual Affairs 2.3.1 Registration and Membership 100%
2.3.2 Estates 100%
Residential Schools Resolution 2.4 Residential Schools Resolution 100%
*Percentages are estimates based on 2017–2018 planned spending.
 
2018–2019 Core Responsibilities and Program Inventory: 2017–2018 Lowest-level program of the Program Alignment Architecture Percentage* of lowest-level Program Alignment Architecture program (dollars) corresponding to the program in the Program Inventory
Community and Regional Development:
Indigenous Entrepreneurship and Business Development 3.1.1 Business Capital and Support Services 100%
3.1.2 Business Opportunities 100%
Economic Development Capacity and Readiness 3.2.1 Lands and Economic Development Services 5%
3.2.2 Investment in Economic Opportunities 100%
3.3 Strategic Partnerships 99%
Land, Natural Resources and Environmental Management 3.2.1 Lands and economic Development Services 66%
3.2.3 Administration of Reserve Land 100%
3.2.4 Contaminated Sites (On Reserve) 100%
3.3 Strategic Partnerships 1%
Climate Change Adaptation and Clean Energy 4.1.3 Climate Change Adaptation and Clean Energy 100%
3.4.5 Climate Resilience 100%
Northern Strategic and Science Policy 4.2.2 Science Initiatives (policy component only) 2%
Northern Regulatory and Legislative Frameworks 4.3.1 Petroleum and Minerals minus regional environmental partnerships, etc. 52%
4.3.3 Land and Water Management – minus environmental assessment, Land use planning, conservation, monitoring 77%
Northern and Arctic Environmental Sustainability 4.2.1 Northern Contaminants 100%
4.3.1 Petroleum and Minerals (Regional Environment Studies, partnerships component only) 48%
4.3.3 Environmental assessment, Land use planning, conservation and monitoring component only 23%
Northern Contaminated Sites 4.3.2 Contaminated Sites 100%
Canadian High Arctic Research Station 4.2.2 Science Initiatives (CHARS construction component only) 98%
Nutrition North 4.1.2 Nutrition North 100%
*Percentages are estimates based on 2017–2018 planned spending.

Supporting information on the Program Inventory

  • Supporting information on planned expenditures, human resources, and results related to the Crown-Indigenous Relations and Northern Affairs' Program Inventory is available in the GC InfoBase.

Supplementary information tables

The following supplementary information tables are available on the Crown-Indigenous Relations and Northern Affairs' website:

Federal tax expenditures

The tax system can be used to achieve public policy objectives through the application of special measures such as low tax rates, exemptions, deductions, deferrals and credits. The Department of Finance Canada publishes cost estimates and projections for these measures each year in the Report on Federal Tax Expenditures.This report also provides detailed background information on tax expenditures, including descriptions, objectives, historical information and references to related federal spending programs. The tax measures presented in this report are the responsibility of the Minister of Finance.

Organizational contact information

Les Terrasses de la Chaudière
10 Wellington Street, North Tower
Gatineau, Quebec
Internet: https://www.canada.ca/en/indigenous-northern-affairs.html
Email: aadnc.webmestre-webmaster.aandc@canada.ca

Public enquiries
Telephone (toll-free): 1-800-567-9604
Fax: 1-866-817-3977
TTY (toll-free): 1-866-553-0554
Email: aadnc.infopubs.aandc@canada.ca
Service hours: Monday to Friday from 8:30 am to 4:30 pm (Eastern Time)

Departmental Library
Telephone: 819-997-0811
Email: aadnc.reference.aandc@canada.ca
Service hours: Monday to Friday from 8:30 am to 4:30 pm (Eastern Time)

Media enquiries
Telephone: 819-953-1160
Email: aadnc.publicaffairsteam.aandc@canada.ca

Appendix A: definitions

appropriation (crédit)
Any authority of Parliament to pay money out of the Consolidated Revenue Fund.

budgetary expenditures (dépenses budgétaires)
Operating and capital expenditures; transfer payments to other levels of government, organizations or individuals; and payments to Crown corporations.

Core Responsibility (responsabilité essentielle)
An enduring function or role performed by a department. The intentions of the department with respect to a Core Responsibility are reflected in one or more related Departmental Results that the department seeks to contribute to or influence.

Departmental Plan (plan ministériel)
A report on the plans and expected performance of appropriated departments over a three-year period. Departmental Plans are tabled in Parliament each spring.

Departmental Result (résultat ministériel)
Any change or changes that the department seeks to influence. A Departmental Result is often outside departments' immediate control, but it should be influenced by Program-level outcomes.

Departmental Result Indicator (indicateur de résultat ministériel)
A factor or variable that provides a valid and reliable means to measure or describe progress on a Departmental Result.

Departmental Results Framework (cadre ministériel des résultats)
The department's Core Responsibilities, Departmental Results and Departmental Result Indicators.

Departmental Results Report (rapport sur les résultats ministériels)
A report on the actual accomplishments against the plans, priorities and expected results set out in the corresponding Departmental Plan.

experimentation (expérimentation)
Activities that seek to explore, test and compare the effects and impacts of policies, interventions and approaches, to inform evidence-based decision-making, by learning what works and what does not.

full-time equivalent (équivalent temps plein)
A measure of the extent to which an employee represents a full person-year charge against a departmental budget. Full-time equivalents are calculated as a ratio of assigned hours of work to scheduled hours of work. Scheduled hours of work are set out in collective agreements.

Gender-based analysis plus (GBA+) [analyse comparative entre les sexes plus (ACS+)]
An analytical process used to help identify the potential impacts of policies, programs and services on diverse groups of women, men and gender-diverse people. The "plus" acknowledges that GBA goes beyond sex and gender differences to consider multiple identity factors that intersect to make people who they are (such as race, ethnicity, religion, age, and mental or physical disability).

government-wide priorities (priorités pangouvernementales)
For the purpose of the 2018–19 Departmental Plan, government-wide priorities refers to those high-level themes outlining the government's agenda in the 2015 Speech from the Throne, namely: Growth for the Middle Class; Open and Transparent Government; A Clean Environment and a Strong Economy; Diversity is Canada's Strength; and Security and Opportunity.

horizontal initiative (initiative horizontale)
An initiative in which two or more federal organizations, through an approved funding agreement, work toward achieving clearly defined shared outcomes, and which has been designated (by Cabinet, a central agency, etc.) as a horizontal initiative for managing and reporting purposes.

non-budgetary expenditures (dépenses non budgétaires)
Net outlays and receipts related to loans, investments and advances, which change the composition of the financial assets of the Government of Canada.

performance (rendement)
What an organization did with its resources to achieve its results, how well those results compare to what the organization intended to achieve, and how well lessons learned have been identified.

performance indicator (indicateur de rendement)
A qualitative or quantitative means of measuring an output or outcome, with the intention of gauging the performance of an organization, program, policy or initiative respecting expected results.

performance reporting (production de rapports sur le rendement)
The process of communicating evidence-based performance information. Performance reporting supports decision making, accountability and transparency.

planned spending (dépenses prévues)
For Departmental Plans and Departmental Results Reports, planned spending refers to those amounts presented in the Main Estimates.
A department is expected to be aware of the authorities that it has sought and received. The determination of planned spending is a departmental responsibility, and departments must be able to defend the expenditure and accrual numbers presented in their Departmental Plans and Departmental Results Reports.

plan (plan)
The articulation of strategic choices, which provides information on how an organization intends to achieve its priorities and associated results. Generally a plan will explain the logic behind the strategies chosen and tend to focus on actions that lead up to the expected result.

priority (priorité)
A plan or project that an organization has chosen to focus and report on during the planning period. Priorities represent the things that are most important or what must be done first to support the achievement of the desired Departmental Results.

program (programme)
A group of related resource inputs and activities that are managed to meet specific needs and to achieve intended results and that are treated as a budgetary unit.

Program Alignment Architecture (architecture d'alignement des programmes)Footnote 1
A structured inventory of an organization's programs depicting the hierarchical relationship between programs and the Strategic Outcome(s) to which they contribute.

results (résultat)
An external consequence attributed, in part, to an organization, policy, program or initiative. Results are not within the control of a single organization, policy, program or initiative; instead they are within the area of the organization's influence.

statutory expenditures (dépenses législatives)
Expenditures that Parliament has approved through legislation other than appropriation acts. The legislation sets out the purpose of the expenditures and the terms and conditions under which they may be made.

Strategic Outcome (résultat stratégique)
A long-term and enduring benefit to Canadians that is linked to the organization's mandate, vision and core functions.

sunset program (programme temporisé)
A time-limited program that does not have an ongoing funding and policy authority. When the program is set to expire, a decision must be made whether to continue the program. In the case of a renewal, the decision specifies the scope, funding level and duration.

target (cible)
A measurable performance or success level that an organization, program or initiative plans to achieve within a specified time period. Targets can be either quantitative or qualitative.

voted expenditures (dépenses votées)
Expenditures that Parliament approves annually through an Appropriation Act. The Vote wording becomes the governing conditions under which these expenditures may be made.

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