Looking to the Future - 2018-2019 Calendar by the Committee for the Advancement of Native Employment and the Pacific Aboriginal Network

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© Her Majesty the Queen in Right of Canada, 2017

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Table of contents

Message from from the Executives of BC Committee for the Advancement of Native Employment and Pacific Aboriginal Network

The Executives of BC Region's Committee for the Advancement of Native Employment (CANE) and the Pacific Aboriginal Network (PAN) are pleased to present the eighth edition of the CANE calendar. We are especially proud to collaborate on this calendar and promote this year's theme: "Looking to the Future". Under this banner, we are continuing to support the recruitment, retention and advancement of Indigenous students and employees in the federal public service, and to raise awareness of the history and culture of Aboriginal peoples in Canada.

Both of our networks continue to play an active role in supporting efforts to improve the workplace for Indigenous employees in federal government offices in BC. Both groups meet regularly with their collective membership to discuss opportunities for meaningful change in our workplaces; to share best practices and to identify areas of common interest where we can work together and move forward. We organize and participate in several cultural and employment related activities within federal departments and we invite you to read more about them in the pages of this calendar.

We would like to express our sincere thanks to the many people involved in the production of the calendar, and to all those who supported and assisted BC CANE and PAN initiatives to meet our goals and objectives.

BC CANE and PAN Executives

Top (left to right): Marion McLarty (PAN Executive), Leanne Newman (CANE Executive), Ruby Langan (CANE Executive)
Bottom (left to right): Quentin Laporte (CANE Executive), Tanya Duncan (CANE Executive), Tracey Brussard (CANE Executive)

Bill Guerin

Bill Guerin (CANE Champion)

Terry Geddes

Terry Geddes (CANE Executive)

Tim Low

Tim Low (PAN Executive)

Committee for the Advancement of Native Employment (CANE)

The purpose of CANE is to examine, explore and recommend ways to increase the number of Aboriginal persons employed within the Department, seek ways to retain these employees and improve the quality of their employment. To this end, CANE works co-operatively with senior management to recommend and facilitate change to Aboriginal employment policies and programs within the Department, and to address concerns raised by Aboriginal employees. CANE also plays an important role in raising awareness about Aboriginal peoples through workshops, cultural activities, guest speakers, and other means. CANE's work to raise awareness supports the Department's efforts to increase the understanding and respect for the culture and history of Aboriginal peoples in Canada.

Pacific Aboriginal Network (PAN)

PAN was established as an interdepartmental resource for Aboriginal employees in BC Region in 2006. It now has a membership of 165 employees representing over 19 departments and agencies.

PAN aims to provide an inclusive environment where Aboriginal employees are valued, respected and supported through the sharing of resources, ideas, information and guidance. The committee also seeks to connect and work with departmental committees such as CANE in an effort to strengthen and collaborate on common issues and initiatives.

PAN is a Standing Committee of the BC Federal Council (BCFC) and works collaboratively with the BCFC on initiatives that support Aboriginal federal public servants in BC, as well as line departments in their efforts to recruit and retain Aboriginal employees.

Indigenous and Northern Affairs Canada — a Department in Transformation

As Prime Minister, I have made it very clear that there is no relationship more important to me and to Canada than the one with Indigenous peoples. We seek a renewed, nation-to-nation relationship, based on recognition of rights, respect, co-operation and partnership.

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau

On August 28, 2017, the Prime Minister announced in a Cabinet shuffle his intention to create two new departments:

  • Crown-Indigenous Relations and Northern Affairs, which will advance reconciliation objectives and will lead on northern programming and Arctic policy; and
  • Indigenous Services, which will improve delivery of programs and services, lead policy reform of those services and contribute to closing socio-economic gaps.
Minister Bennett and Minister Philpott

Institutional transformation of this magnitude takes time and marks a significant step toward renewing the relationship with Indigenous peoples. The transformation of Indigenous and Northern Affairs Canada (INAC) will take place in stages and include legislative amendments.

On December 4, 2017, the Government of Canada marked a milestone in the transformation of the way services are delivered to Indigenous peoples by announcing the creation of the Department of Indigenous Services Canada (DISC). At the same time, the Minister of Crown-Indigenous Relations and Northern Affairs (CIRNA) is continuing the work of engaging on the final form that the Department of Crown-Indigenous Relations and Northern Affairs and the Department of Indigenous Services Canada will take.

It's an exciting time to be working on reconciliation, as the Government of Canada continues the path towards a reconciled Canada.

History of the Calendar

Past calendars

CANE issued its first calendar in 2006. The calendar offered CANE an opportunity to advance its mandate to increase the number of Indigenous persons employed at the Department, to retain those employees, and to improve the quality of their employment.

This 2018-19 calendar is the eighth edition of the publication. Over the years, the calendars have featured the stories, aspirations and advice of more than 90 Indigenous employees. The calendars have also included messages from Indigenous leaders, cultural awareness information, and a list of key historical events. The calendars have been distributed to libraries and educational institutions, and at cultural events such as National Indigenous Day and the 2010 Winter and Paralympic Games in Vancouver.

This year, CANE has continued its collaboration with PAN to redesign the calendar for use as a recruitment tool. The partnership has provided the opportunity to feature the stories of Indigenous students from several departments with the aim of inspiring others to see a future for themselves in the public service.

Message from the Deputy Ministers

We would like to offer our congratulations to the Committee for the Advancement of Native Employment (CANE) in BC Region on the publication of their eighth calendar. Also, a big thanks to the students featured in these pages who agreed to share their experiences in the public service.

The theme of this year's calendar, "Looking to the Future", and its focus on students, echoes an important initiative that we are proud to support. The Deputy Minister's Aboriginal Workforce Initiative (DMAWI) targets the recruitment, retention, development, and advancement of Indigenous employees. The DMAWI is co-chaired by CANE and management, and is working towards the vision that the federal government will become an employer of choice for Indigenous peoples.

We know that students strengthen our organization with their energy and enthusiasm. Their vision and dedication are advancing our work towards reconciliation and helping build a strong, vibrant and diverse workforce. We are sure the students' stories will motivate those of us already working for the Government of Canada. We also hope that these stories inspire and encourage prospective employees to consider a future in the public service.

Hélène Laurendeau

Hélène Laurendeau,
Deputy Minister, Crown-Indigenous Relations and Northern Affairs

Diane Lafleur

Diane Lafleur,
Associate Deputy Minister, Crown-Indigenous Relations and Northern Affairs

Jean-François Tremblay

Jean-François Tremblay,
Deputy Minister, Indigenous Services

Sony Perron

Sony Perron,
Associate Deputy Minister, Indigenous Services

Message from the BC Regional Director General

Many public servants started their careers as students, or shortly after graduation, so it is a time-honoured tradition to look to students to build the future of the public service. With that in mind, I am so pleased that CANE has chosen to highlight the fresh perspectives and insights of students working for the federal government for the eighth edition of their calendar. I found the students' accounts of their experiences in the public service a cause for both reflection and celebration.

This edition's theme "Looking to the Future" has special meaning to the Department as we collectively take on the work of advancing reconciliation and building a renewed nation-to-nation relationship with Indigenous peoples. For real change, we need to harness the imagination and dreams of Indigenous youth and inspire them to consider public service as a career.

After 26 years of working for the federal government, I can tell you that this career is a calling. To be a public servant means upholding Canada's values and ethics, and being accountable to all Canadians. Certainly, as with any job, there are challenging times, but the reward is a shared sense of purpose and being part of building a better future for all Canadians. It is also about having fun and forming meaningful relationships, as you will read here.

My congratulations to all the students involved, and to CANE and PAN for a calendar that is useful, beautiful, informative, and truly inspiring.

Catherine Lappe

Catherine Lappe,
Regional Director General, Indigenous Services, BC Region

Making Life Better for Future Generations — Advice from sʔəyəɬəq Larry Grant, Musqueam Elder and UBC Adjunct Professor

Zoe Craig Sparrow and Elder Larry Grant

Both at home in Musqueam: student Zoe Craig Sparrow speaks with Elder Larry Grant

Musqueam Elder Larry Grant is a teacher of language and culture, not just in his home community, but also as the Resident Elder at the University of British Columbia (UBC) First Nations House of Learning and an Adjunct Professor in the First Nations Endangered Languages program. Larry has been teaching at UBC for over 18 years, and attributes his love for teaching to the students.

"When you're teaching a language, you get to see the lights go on in students: [it's] the understanding of the language happening. You also get to impart a lot of history that the younger generation has no experience with. I help students move forward, and also share how to carry with them all the genealogical and political history of their heritage," he said.

And that history is something that Larry never wants students to forget. As an Elder and a teacher, he has a unique perspective on guiding youth down the right path and the role of the past in improving the future. He says progression as a people also means progression as a society. And the change begins with Indigenous youth.

"It's not just that little microcosm of [your reserve]," he explained. "If we don't go out there, we are going to confine ourselves to a lifestyle contained within those boundaries. And our great-grandparents didn't want us to do that, they wanted us to be in a whole territory and always being involved. When you look at the history of our older people from the time of Confederation, we have been struggling and for us not to expand our horizons means that we will not be able to continue past that struggle. And if we can't convey that understanding to the youth, then we will confine ourselves to being stuck in that reserve mind-set. We must not forget who we are, what we come from, who we come from, and who we belong to. It's to work between the societal differences that exist today."

It can be difficult to navigate how to make meaningful change while staying true to your culture, or even exploring more of your culture — but he thinks the public service is a great place to start.

"We need [Indigenous] students in the public service. You cannot change things from the outside — once you're inside, you can get the knowledge of how to manoeuvre within the system to be able to bring about Indigenous self-worth to the country of Canada. Always think about making life better for future generations. How to make it better and be a good person yourself; and, to never forget who and what you come from."

Employment Opportunities in the Government of Canada

Programs for Students

The Government of Canada offers programs specifically for students. This includes high school and post-secondary students who want to work for the federal public service while they are still in school or during their summer break.

The Federal Student Work Experience Program (FSWEP) gives students the chance to work in an environment that encourages you to explore your interests as well as develop new skills. Jobs can be offered on a full-time or part-time basis, and there is no previous work experience required!

The Co-op/Internship Program is another way for students to get hands-on work experience with federal government organizations in their fields of study. Start by registering in a Co-op/Internship Program with your academic institution and keep an eye on the job notice boards at your campus career placement center or the Co-op/Internship placement office.

The Research Affiliate Program (RAP) is for post-secondary students interested in obtaining experience in research. Students in this program are normally placed with ongoing research operations in federal government facilities. Research projects in the program are structured to help students develop specific knowledge and research skills in their field of study.

For more information on the above programs, please visit canada.ca/en/public-service-commission/jobs/services/recruitment/students.html

Programs for Graduates

The Post-Secondary Recruitment (PSR) program is a virtual gateway for job‐seeking college or university graduates. Whether you are a new or recent graduate or already have work experience, you can advance your career through the PSR program.

The Recruitment of Policy Leaders (RPL) initiative focuses on recruiting exceptional candidates with diverse achievements and experience into mid and senior-level policy positions in the federal public service. It is designed to attract professionals and graduates who have the drive and potential to shape the future of Canada's public policy landscape.

More information on PSR and RPL can be found at canada.ca/en/public-service-commission/jobs/services/recruitment/graduates.html

More Employment Opportunities

Many federal government departments and agencies offer Specialized Recruitment programs for both students and graduates. Learn about these programs at canada.ca/en/public-service-commission/jobs/services/recruitment/specialized-recruitment-programs.html

GC Jobs (canada.ca/en/public-service-commission/jobs/services/gc-jobs.html) lists federal government jobs open to the public, students, graduates and professionals. Your job search can be refined in a number of ways, including preferred work locations, salary, and types of job postings.

Top 10 Reasons to Join Canada's Public Service

1. A career to match your passion

Social justice issues? International development? Healthy living? Marine science? Whatever your passion or interest, the public service may have what you're looking for. Visit jobs.gc.ca.

2. Make a difference

Working in the public service has real meaning and impact on the lives of Canadians. What we do matters, whether it's pushing the boundaries of science to save lives or contributing to global security. Visit canada.ca/serving-canadians for more information.

3. People and diversity matter

Our strength is the diversity of our people and the ideas they generate. Our core values include treating all people with respect, dignity and fairness; with engagement and inclusion being the building blocks of a healthy workplace.

4. Your ideas are needed

The public service is undergoing major change to build a culture that encourages more innovation, new ideas and approaches, better collaboration and engagement. Be part of shaping this modern public service.

5. Location, location, location

Public service jobs are not just located in Ottawa. In fact, the majority are outside the National Capital Region. There are jobs in every province and territory, and even around the world. You can work on land, at sea, or in the air.

6. Advance your career

You have the opportunity to build a career in the public service by tapping into networks, on-the-job training, mentoring programs, job mobility, and other career development tools. We support life-long learning — we even have our own Canada School of Public Service to help you develop throughout your career.

7. Good salaries and benefits

We offer competitive salaries and benefits, such as supplemental health insurance, dental care, and generous vacation allowances.

8. Work/life balance

The public service offers flexible work arrangements, volunteer days, family-related leave, and options such as leave with income averaging and self-funded leave.

9. Be part of a world-class institution

Canada's professional, non-partisan public service is among the best in the world. To maintain this reputation, we need new people who are talented, skilled and passionate about their work.

10. You can try it out

There are a number of ways to discover whether the public service is right for you. We are the country's largest employer, and last year we hired over 11,000 students. Build your resumé through programs such as the Federal Student Work Experience Program or the Co-op or Internship placement programs. Build your career by applying to our Post-Secondary Recruitment campaign or other recruitment programs.

50 Per Cent Aboriginal Hiring Strategy

The 50 Per Cent Aboriginal Hiring Strategy is the result of a Letter of Understanding between the Department — legally known as the Department of Indian Affairs and Northern Development — and the Assembly of Manitoba Chiefs in 1996. The Letter of Understanding sets out the commitment to achieve a majority Aboriginal representation, equitably distributed throughout all groups and levels, including Executive level in the Department. The strategy was addressed as follows:

In view of its unique mandate and its special relationship with First Nations, the Department of Indian Affairs and Northern Development (DIAND) has a long-term objective of having a majority of DIAND employees with Aboriginal ancestry. The Department will make every reasonable effort to reach an objective of a 50 per cent hiring share for Aboriginal peoples until the Department meets its objective. The Department undertakes to make every effort to ensure that Aboriginals are equitably represented across all occupational groups and levels in the Department, including management positions.

In December 2016, INAC adopted a new Indigenous Recruitment and Retention Framework that focusses on three major themes: measures to promote Indigenous hiring, increasing outreach activities and measures to retain Indigenous employees. This framework supports departmental commitments to establish a workforce that is culturally sensitive and is representative of Indigenous communities.

Regional Recruitment Initiatives

The Government of Canada is "looking to the future" when it comes to Indigenous recruitment initiatives. The British Columbia Federal Council (BCFC) has partnered with the BC Human Resources Council to create a regional recruitment and retention strategy with a focus on Indigenous candidates.

In collaboration with the Public Service Commission (PSC), the BCFC established a public service-wide pool of Indigenous candidates, and implemented a recruitment action plan to reach Indigenous communities.

The PSC has also created an Indigenous position in BC to complement its national Aboriginal Centre of Expertise and raise awareness about the diverse career opportunities available to Indigenous employees within the public service.

Showcase: Aboriginal Employees in the Government of Canada

Federal public servants who self-identify as Aboriginal come from all regions of Canada. Nearly 12,000 Aboriginal peoples of diverse backgrounds are employed throughout the federal public service.

Brandon Bob

Brandon Bob started working with the Canada Border Services Agency in 2005 through the Federal Student Work Experience Program. He chose to work for the Government of Canada because he saw a lot of programs and initiatives that were Aboriginal-focused. This led to more opportunities and growth for him. In 2010, he moved to Citizenship and Immigration Canada and in 2016, Brandon moved to INAC, where he is now a Policy and Program Officer. "I think as an Aboriginal person, for me, working in the public service, I see [it] as part of the reconciliation process. It benefits both the Indigenous community and the Government of Canada."

Coldwater – Interior Salish • Housing Policy and Program Officer

Isabel Jackson

Isabel Jackson has worked at the Department of Justice since 2001. She also teaches the Aboriginal history section during Aboriginal Awareness sessions for public servants. She says Aboriginal Awareness is something the Government of Canada needs to integrate on a daily basis, not just on National Indigenous Peoples Day. "There continues to be a large gap in the knowledge and understanding around the history and culture of Aboriginal peoples. I appreciate that people sympathize with what happened through colonization, but it's not sympathy that Aboriginal peoples want or need; it is respect." She hopes more Indigenous youth choosing careers in the public service will help address that gap.

Gitxsan • Counsel, Aboriginal Law Section at Department of Justice

Rod Cunningham

Rod Cunningham has been working in the federal government for 25 years. "I enjoy sharing my knowledge and experience with staff and managers who may not be as familiar with the important cultural differences and nuances that are essential to building effective relationships with the communities we serve." Rod is especially supportive of the recruitment of Indigenous youth into the federal public service. He says Indigenous team members directly contribute to improved overall Aboriginal awareness in the workplace, while gaining the opportunity for continuous, life-long learning. "We all play vital roles in addressing pressing issues ranging from training and employment, to health issues, homelessness, environmental concerns, and economic development."

Woodland Cree • Senior Development Officer at Service Canada

Hilary Lawson

Hilary Lawson has worked at Transport Canada for 25 years. She says it has been a rewarding career with good benefits that have helped her with her kids, and a pension that is supporting her plans for retirement. She says her co-workers are people who honestly care and share from their hearts. For all its attractions, Hilary says public service was not something she considered before getting hired. "It was a fluke. I was actually looking for some information on EI [employment insurance] and was sent to a job interview for which I qualified and have never left the department!"

Heiltsuk/Nisga'a • Boating Safety Officer, Marine Safety at Transport Canada

Sherry Wright

Sherry Wright joined the Government of Canada 30 years ago and sees a lot of value in working in the public service. "Integrity, trust and professionalism are values of what I expect in the government, and have defined my career." Outside of work, Sherry's family is what is most important to her. Recently, she has been teaching Aboriginal Awareness workshops that include information about the Indigenous worldview. She is passionate about sharing this knowledge. Sherry is with the Frog Clan and her hereditary name is Woks Je Jan in the house of Nisto'o from Gitsegukla, BC.

Gitxsan • Special Projects at Public Services and Procurement Canada

As a collaborative working group, the Department of National Defence Aboriginal Advisory Group (DAAG) engages in a variety of traditional customs and advises senior leadership on Indigenous issues in the workplace. The group helps support employment equity and a positive approach to issues that benefit the entire workforce. Based in Esquimalt and Comox, DAAG members come from different territories within Canada including: Anishinaabe, Wet'suwet'en, Cree, Métis, and Nuu-chah-nulth. DAAG aims to connect Indigenous employees with each other and their cultures. These connections and management support for these communities, makes working for a federal department a good place for Indigenous peoples.

Department of National Defence Aboriginal Advisory Group (DAAG)

In picture, from left to right:

  • Canadian Forces Base Comox
    • Tania Woodbeck - Cree, Ochapowace Band
    • Jeff Foss
    • Sheila Thompson - Chawathil First Nations
    • Corporal JB Swartz
    • Lynne McDonnell - Métis
    • Master Warrant Officer JSS Harvey
    • Josh Bowles
    • Sergeant Nina Usherwood
    • Jasmine Hart - Cree
  • Canadian Forces Base Esquimalt
    • Master Corporal Nikki Ducharme - Métis
    • Elijah Buffalo - Samson Cree Nation
    • Lisa deWit - Wet'suwet'en First Nation
    • Kim Cameron - Anishinaabe / Long Plain First Nation
    • Bill Stewart - Ahousaht

Contributing to a Positive and Respectful Relationship

Although Aboriginal peoples are forming a growing segment of the Canadian population, and are playing an increasingly important role in Canada's social and economic development, many Canadians are not very familiar with Aboriginal issues.

CANE and PAN play an important role in helping raise awareness about Aboriginal issues, culture and history in the public service.

In particular, many CANE and PAN members facilitate Aboriginal Awareness 101 workshops for their colleagues. The workshop facilitators encourage participants to engage in continuous learning about Aboriginal peoples in Canada by sharing their knowledge of the history, values, customs, aspirations, beliefs and diversity of the First Nations in BC, as well as the issues facing them today. Resources are provided to public servants to help them communicate and work effectively with Aboriginal communities, and to increase the respect for, and understanding of, Aboriginal cultures and values.

Since its inception in 2005, the workshop has been delivered to employees at many federal government departments, students and educators at post-secondary institutions and non-profit agencies.

The following pages show examples of the information we share with our colleagues.

Etiquette and Protocol Tips

  • Acknowledge the people and if needed their territory at the start of a new relationship and on an ongoing basis as required.
  • Observe Aboriginal peoples at the start of a new relationship and you will notice a very common question, "Where are you from?" When the question is asked it does not mean where you are living now. It means what is your kinship connection. You may want to include something about who you are and where you come from.
  • Individuals can be uncomfortable if asked to make decisions for the group. Some communities operate under collective decision making or with permission.
  • In traditional Aboriginal cultures, being patient and avoiding criticism and direct confrontation are highly valued to preserve personal and group honour and dignity.
  • Be prepared to work in and experience highly emotional environments when working with Aboriginal peoples. Meetings can sometimes be very emotional due to ongoing historical grievances. It is important to not brush it off, but to instead listen to understand what they are saying.
  • What should I call you? Indian? First Nation? Aboriginal? Indigenous? Status? Treaty Indian? In most cases it all depends on the person, and is an individual preference.
  • Regalia? Can I touch it? Each Aboriginal culture will have different traditions regarding their regalia. These items (which may be garments, masks or other items) are not costumes; they carry cultural value and meaning. Some cultures may have rules that only certain people can touch (or even see) objects that are considered sacred. The best practice is to ask respectfully if you may touch the regalia.
  • Ask permission before taking a photograph.
  • Let people finish what they are saying. Don't feel that you have to respond to every point as it arises. Note, there can be some really long pauses.

Quick Facts

According to the 2016 Census:

  • 270,585 individuals in BC indicated Aboriginal identity
  • 5.9% of BC population identifies as Aboriginal
  • 2.8% of BC population is Status Indian
  • 40.1% of Status Indians in BC live on reserve

Glossary

Aboriginal Peoples (Native)
The descendants of the original inhabitants of North America. The 1982 Canadian Constitution recognizes three groups of Aboriginal peoples: Indians, Inuit, and Métis. These separate groups have unique heritages, languages, cultural practices, and spiritual beliefs. "Native" is another general term used to describe people of Aboriginal ancestry.
Aboriginal Rights
The rights that Aboriginal peoples in Canada hold are as a result of their ancestors' long-standing use and occupancy of the land. The rights of certain Aboriginal peoples to hunt, trap and fish on ancestral lands are examples of Aboriginal rights accorded either through treaties or formal agreements. Aboriginal rights vary from group to group depending on the customs, practices, and traditions that form part of the group's distinctive culture.
Band
A group of First Nations people for whom lands have been set apart and money is held by the Crown. Each band has its own governing band council, usually consisting of one or more Chiefs and several councillors. Community members choose the Chief and councillors either by election, or through traditional custom. The members of a band generally share common values, traditions and practices rooted in their language and ancestral heritage. Today, many bands prefer to be known as First Nations.
Elder
A man or a woman whose wisdom about spirituality, culture and life is recognized. Not all elders are "old." The Aboriginal community and individuals will, normally, seek the advice and assistance of Elders regarding traditional, as well as contemporary issues.
First Nation
The term First Nation came into usage in the 1970s to replace the word "Indian," which some may find offensive. Although the term "First Nation" is widely used no legal definition exists. The term "First Nation" has also been adopted to replace the word "band" in the name of communities.
Indian
The term Indian describes Aboriginal peoples in Canada who are not Inuit or Métis. The term was first used by Christopher Columbus in 1492, believing that he had reached India.
Indigenous
While an official definition of "indigenous" has not been adopted by any UN-system body, the modern understanding of this term is based on the following:
  • Those who self-identify as indigenous peoples and are accepted by the community as their member; have historical continuity with pre-colonial and/or pre-settler societies; have a strong link to territories and surrounding natural resources; have a distinct social, economic or political systems; have a distinct language, culture and beliefs; form non-dominant groups of society; and, resolve to maintain and reproduce their ancestral environments and systems as distinctive peoples and communities.
Inuit
Until recently Inuit were formerly known as "Eskimos". This term was later replaced with "Inuit", an Inuit word describing themselves as the People. Inuit in Canada are located from the Labrador coast to the Western Arctic in the Northwest Territories. Inuit are in four circumpolar countries, living in Canada, United States (Alaska), Greenland and Northern Russia (Chukotka). There are approximately 150,000 Inuit in the world today.
Métis
People of mixed First Nation and European ancestry who identify themselves as Métis, as distinct from First Nations people, Inuit or non-Aboriginal people. The Métis have a unique culture that draws on their diverse ancestral origins, such as Scottish, French, Ojibway and Cree.
Reserve
Land set aside by the federal government through the Indian Act or through treaties for the use of a specific band or First Nation. The band council has "exclusive user rights" to the land, but the land is "owned" by the Crown. The Indian Act states that this land can't be owned by individual band members.
Status Indians
People who are entitled to have their names included on the Indian Register, an official list maintained by the federal government. Certain criteria determine who can be registered as a Status Indian. Only Status Indians are recognized as Indians under the Indian Act, which defines an Indian as "a person who, pursuant to this Act, is registered as an Indian or is entitled to be registered as an Indian." Status Indians are entitled to certain rights and benefits under the law.
Non-Status Indians
People who consider themselves Indians or members of a First Nation but whom the Government of Canada does not recognize as Indians under the Indian Act, either because they are unable to prove their status or have lost their status rights. Many Indian people in Canada, especially women, lost their Indian status through discriminatory practices in the past. Non-Status Indians are not entitled to the same rights and benefits available to Status Indians.
Treaty Indian
A Status Indian who belongs to a First Nation that signed a treaty with the Crown.
Tribal Council
A grouping of First Nations with common interests who have voluntarily joined together to provide services to member First Nations.

Selection of Key Historical Events

1492

October 11: The Aboriginal peoples of North America met Christopher Columbus on their shores.

1763

October 7: Royal Proclamation on Indian Rights; sometimes called the Indian Magna Carta. This was the first time a government recognized that Aboriginals had certain rights to the land because they were the first ones to live on it.

1844

October 21: Louis Riel, future Métis leader, was born.

1850

April 29: Douglas Treaty No. 1 was signed with the Teechamitsa (Songhees).

April 30: Douglas Treaties No. 2-6 were signed with the Kosampson (Esquimalt), Swengwhung (Songhees), Chilcowitch (Songhees), Whyomilth (Songhees) and Chekonein (Songhees).

May 1: Douglas Treaties No. 7-9 were signed with the Soke (Sooke), Kakyaakan (Beecher Bay) and Chewhaytsum (Beecher Bay).

1851

February 8: Douglas Treaties No. 10-11 were signed with the Queachkar (Kwakiutl) and Quakeolth (Kwakiutl).

1852

February 7: Douglas Treaty No. 12 was signed with the South Saanich (Malahat).

February 11: Douglas Treaty No. 13 was signed with the North Saanich (Tsawout, Pauquachin, Tseycum, Tsartlip).

1854

December 23: Douglas Treaty No. 14 was signed with the Saalequun (Nanaimo, Nanoose).

1867

July 1: Canada became a nation.

1876

April 11: Indian Act was passed to regulate Indians and their lands.

1885

January 1: Potlatch Law declared anyone engaging or assisting in a potlatch ceremony guilty of a misdemeanour.

November 16: Louis Riel was hanged in Regina for treason. He was later exonerated of this charge and officially recognized as a founder of the province of Manitoba. November 16 is widely regarded as Louis Riel Day in the Métis Nation.

1888

November 26: Fisheries Act was passed – Indian commercial fishing was outlawed.

1899

June 21: The original Treaty No. 8 was signed at Lesser Slave Lake with the Cree.

1949

March 24: Indians were granted the right to vote in provincial elections.

June 15: Nisga'a Chief Frank Calder was elected to the BC legislature.

1951

June 20: The Indian Act was amended for the first time to allow First Nations to organize for a land claim and be admitted to University without being enfranchised (losing status rights).

1958

January 31: James Gladstone, a member of the Blood Tribe in Alberta, was appointed to the Canadian Senate. He is Canada's first Aboriginal Senator.

1960

March 31: Indians were granted the right to vote in federal elections.

1966

June 16: Department of Indian Affairs was formed by Act of Parliament.

1971

October 19: A Federal court decided that Status Indian women who married non-Status Indians would no longer lose their status and rights as Indians.

1973

February 22: The Calder Decision: the Supreme Court of Canada ruled that the Nisga'a held Aboriginal title before settlers came but the judges were split evenly on land title.

1974

September 28: Canadian-born North American Indians were granted the right to pass freely over the United States - Canada border.

1977

April 10: Willie Adams of Rankin Inlet was appointed Senator for the Northwest Territories and was the first Inuit to sit in the Senate.

1981

April 26: The World Council of Indigenous People declared the International Covenant on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples.

1985

June 28: Parliament passed Bill C-31 – it removed sections of the Indian Act that treated First Nations women unfairly; change allowed thousands of First Nations people to regain their Indian status.

1989

September 12: Nisga'a Framework Agreement was signed with the federal government.

1990

May 31: Sparrow Case affirmed Aboriginal fishing rights.

October 3: Province of British Columbia entered tripartite negotiations with the Nisga'a and the Government of Canada.

1992

September 21: Agreement establishing the BC Treaty Commission was signed by the Right Honourable Brian Mulroney, and Honourable Mike Harcourt, and First Nations Summit representatives.

1995

December 6: The late Elijah Harper, a Cree Member of Canada's Parliament from Manitoba, organized the first Sacred Assembly. This was a gathering for Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal spiritual leaders in Canada.

1996

June 13: The Governor General of Canada proclaimed June 21st to be National Aboriginal Day: a time for all Canadians to recognize the diverse cultures and outstanding contributions of First Nations, Inuit and Métis peoples.

November 21: The final Report of the Royal Commission on Aboriginal Peoples was released. Its 440 recommendations called for sweeping changes to the relationship between Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal people and governments in Canada.

1997

December 11: Delgamuuxw Supreme Court decision.

1999

April 1: Canada formally created the territory Nunavut.

2000

April 13: Nisga'a treaty was officially ratified.

2007

September 19: The Indian Residential Schools Settlement Agreement, which included the Independent Assessment Process (IAP), was implemented. The IAP is a claimant-centred, non-adversarial, out-of-court process for the resolution of claims of sexual abuse, serious physical abuse, and other wrongful acts suffered at Indian Residential Schools.

2008

June 11: The Government of Canada made a statement of apology to the former students of the Indian Residential Schools system.

2009

April 3: Tsawwassen First Nation treaty took effect as the first modern treaty negotiated under the British Columbia Treaty Commission process.

2010

June 16, 2010 to March 30, 2014:
The Truth and Reconciliation Commission held seven national events across the country. These events educated and engaged the Canadian public in dialogue on the history of the Indian Residential Schools system, the experiences of former students and their families, and the ongoing legacy of the institutions within communities.

2011

April 1: Maa-nulth First Nations treaty took effect as the second modern treaty negotiated under the BC Treaty Commission process.

2013

June 20: The City of Vancouver in British Columbia was the first Canadian municipality to proclaim June 21, 2013 to June 20, 2014 as the Year of Reconciliation.

September 16 to 22: Reconciliation Week took place in British Columbia. Organised by Reconciliation Canada, the week of activities bookended the Truth and Reconciliation Commission's BC National Event. With events such as the All Nations Canoe Gathering and the Walk for Reconciliation, event organizers aimed to unite all cultures in BC in discussions about reconciliation.

October 1: The British Columbia First Nations Health Authority (FNHA), the first of its kind in Canada, assumed control of the programs, services, and responsibilities previously handled by Health Canada's First Nations Inuit Health (FNIH) Branch – Pacific Region.

2014

June 25: The Supreme Court of Canada granted declaration of Aboriginal title to more than 1,700 square kilometres of land in British Columbia to the Tsilhqot'in First Nation.

October 24: BC Premier Christy Clark apologized for the wrongful hanging of six Tsilhqot'in Chiefs in 1864-1865 and confirmed that the Chiefs were fully exonerated for any crime or wrongdoing.

2015

June 2: The Truth and Reconciliation released its report, titled "Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada: Calls to Action", containing 94 recommendations for redressing the legacy of residential schools and advancing the process of Canadian reconciliation.

November 4: Jody Wilson-Raybould sworn in as the Minister of Justice and Attorney General of Canada and became the first Indigenous person to hold that position.

2016

April 5: Tla'amin treaty took effect.

May 10: Canada becomes a full supporter, without qualification, of the United Nations Declaration on Rights of Indigenous Peoples.

2017

July 14: The Government of Canada released a set of Principles Respecting the Government of Canada's Relationship with Indigenous Peoples that will guide the review of laws, policies and operational practices and form a foundation for transforming how the federal government partners with and supports Indigenous peoples and governments.

August 28: The Government of Canada announced plans to dissolve INAC and replace it with two new departments as part of its commitment to a renewed, nation-to-nation relationship with Indigenous peoples.

December 4: The Government of Canada announced the creation of the Department of Indigenous Services Canada.

Disclaimer: This list does not present a comprehensive list of BC Aboriginal historical events, but rather an eclectic collection of dates and events contributed by departmental employees.

Gregory Miller – Tsimshian Nation

Engagement Officer • Bachelor of Arts (First Nations Studies Major), Simon Fraser University

Gregory Miller

Tsimshian Bentwood Boxes, c. 19th Century

For Gregory Miller, working on Indigenous issues fits his educational background perfectly. "I chose INAC because it's related more to my studies. I had written so many papers on INAC, on the history of the relationship between the Crown and Indigenous peoples and thought it would be good to have some exposure to that side of the lens," Gregory explained.

At his work, Gregory has discovered an active and compassionate group of people. "I am working in the Engagement Unit, and it is really powerful work. We are helping to set up dialogue between senior First Nations leadership and federal representatives while just being a fly on the wall, which is pretty cool." He says it's great to be part of the next chapter of the relationship, where reconciliation has people wanting to know more.

Indigenous people are not just in the past, history books, or in museums. They are still here and continue to share their culture and history with Canadians.

With a long-term goal of obtaining a law degree, Gregory hopes his experience and knowledge of the public service will help him progress a nation-to-nation relationship.

January 2018
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New Year's Day

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February 2018
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Groundhog Day

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Family Day (BC)

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Valentine's Day

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Family Day (AB, ON, SK)

Louis Riel Day (MB)

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Pink Shirt Day

Samantha Martin-Ferris – Gitksan Nation

Strategic Recruitment Assistant • Bachelor of Arts (First Nations and Indigenous Studies Major), University of British Columbia

Samantha Martin-Ferris

Susan Point (Musqueam): House Post, 1997

Samantha Martin-Ferris is currently with Canada Revenue Agency as a Federal Student Work Experience Program student. Samantha says the public service is a place where you can explore who you want to be and where you have lots of opportunity to grow. She has some friendly advice for other students.

Don't be scared of your managers. They are people too. They want to hear from you.

Samantha is from Gitksan and has a family that is supportive of everything she does. She has a lot of experience working with Indigenous communities and always knew she wanted to work with them. She is majoring in First Nations and Indigenous Studies at the University of British Columbia after transferring from Langara College.

Samantha is really excited about the way the Government is focused on bringing in Aboriginal students. "The fact that they are willing to take on student opinions and that we are willing to cooperate and work towards that – I think that is really looking towards the future."

She says work in the public service can also help give Aboriginal communities a meaningful connection with the Government. "When it comes to cultural diversity, having those voices at the table means so much because it allows us to better represent Canada."

March 2018
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8

International Women's Day

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Daylight Saving Time Begins

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St. Patrick's Day

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Spring Equinox

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Good Friday

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National Aboriginal Languages Day

April 2018
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Easter Sunday

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Easter Monday

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World Health Day

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Earth Day

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Rodman Joseph – Gwawaenuk Tribe

Junior Communications Officer • Bachelor of Arts (Communications Major), Simon Fraser University

Rodman Joseph

Kwakwaka'wakw Speaker's Post, c. 1860

Communications student Rodman Joseph said "working for Indigenous and Northern Affairs Canada was not my first choice for a co-op placement." In fact, it was not even in his top three. While he had originally wanted to do something more flashy like working in Border Security or Public Safety, or more law-related government departments, he was happy to accept the opportunity. On the day he started working, he knew he got lucky.

I just think it's a really great place to work. Compared to working other part-time jobs, and helping out at other places, it's definitely way nicer. It's also nowhere near as boring as the stereotype of a government job might lead you to think!

His favourite experience so far has been supporting the Honourable Minister Bennett during an announcement in a First Nations community. "It is something you would see on the news more than something you would see in school."

Looking to the future, Rodman hopes to return to the public service after he graduates and will take courses to help support that vision. "Nobody can see the future but we can do our best to direct it into a way we would like to see it go."

May 2018
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Emergency Preparedness Week (6-12)

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Mother's Day

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Victoria Day

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Aboriginal Awareness Week (22-26)

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June 2018
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National Aboriginal History Month (1-30)

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National Public Service Week (10-16)

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Father's Day

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National Indigenous Peoples Day

Summer Solstice

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United Nations Public Service Day

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St. Jean Baptiste Day (Quebec)

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Canadian Multi-culturalism Day

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Zoe Craig Sparrow – Musqueam Indian Band

Client Services Liaison Officer • Bachelor of Arts (Political Science Major), University of British Columbia

Zoe Craig Sparrow

Tsimalano House Board from Musqueam, c. 1890

For her calendar photo at the Museum of Anthropology, Zoe Craig Sparrow found an exhibit that reflects her heritage and sense of self. "To be able to find a Musqueam house post that connects to me, and who I feel I am as an individual was pretty special," she said.

Zoe is following a family tradition of working at the Department. "Both my parents worked here, both my stepparents still work here, my grandma worked here, so everyone in my family has worked at INAC."

Zoe wants to pursue a career in Indigenous law, and appreciates the experience and perspective she's gained with the Department through the Federal Student Work Experience Program.

The biggest thing I think I've learned while working here is that we are all just individuals helping individuals. There is no big man that is 'the Government'; there are a lot of little people working really hard to make a positive difference.

For Zoe, it is the opportunity to work with people whom she can relate to culturally that has made her experience so memorable. "They are doing their best to improve the lives of so many Indigenous people, families, and communities. It's really cool to see, and to be one of those people!"

July 2018
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Canada Day

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August 2018
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BC Day

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International Day of the World's Indigenous Peoples

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International Youth Day

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Leyenda Pettit – Stó:lō

Human Resources Assistant • Bachelor of Arts (Humanities and Psychology Double Major), Simon Fraser University

Leyenda Pettit

Bill Reid (Haida) & Doug Cranmer ('Namgis): House Frontal Totem Pole, 1959

Leyenda Pettit has transitioned from being a Federal Student Work Experience Program participant to a full-time employee at Fisheries and Oceans Canada. She believes the job reflects her desire for personal growth, as well as her values.

It is important to remember where you come from; it preserves your humility and strength, which comes into play at work. I respect what I do on a daily basis, and, I respect other people's individual journeys, regardless of where they are currently.

For Leyenda, building a relationship with her co-workers has created a work environment she enjoys and excels in. "When I started they showed me around the office and introduced me to everyone. Now, I love working with my team and wouldn't be happy there otherwise."

Leyenda also believes that strength comes from diversity, and that recognizing the talents and skills of Indigenous students is important because it allows for change and is a step towards reconciliation. "What you say and what you do is what creates the ripple of change. So, just bring your unique self to the team, and don't let self-doubt get in the way of your goals."

September 2018
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3

Labour Day

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10

World Suicide Prevention Day

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Fall Equinox

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Orange Shirt Day

October 2018
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7

Fire Prevention Week (7-13)

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Thanksgiving Day

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World Mental Health Day

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Halloween

Neil Mannix – Snuneymuxw First Nation

Integrated Environmental Management System Officer • Doctor of Pharmacy, University of British Columbia

Neil Mannix

Susan Point (Musqueam): People Amongst the People, 2008

While most of his classmates chose to work in a pharmacy, Neil Mannix chose a co-op placement in the federal government. "I am studying pharmacy. That's strange for where I'm at right now." This isn't a problem for Neil, since he is working towards a position at the First Nations Health Authority. "It would be more related to my studies and would give me some understanding on how the government works, how they support First Nations," he said.

The thing I like about INAC and one of the reasons I started working here was to branch out and learn how the government operates.

Neil has always embraced his cultural heritage and hopes to continue to support his community. "My dad was a canoe paddler for over 20 years. So we mostly did canoe journeys that he was involved in. We would cheer in the crowd, and follow his tour around the island." His father is not Neil's only source of traditional knowledge. "My grandmother is a healer, so she did a lot more than we did. When we could, we would be involved."

Neil is happy with his choice of co-op placement, and would encourage other students to consider public service. "It is a very accommodating place to work. I don't feel any pressure; so build a relationship with your co-workers and learn about the resources you can use."

November 2018
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Daylight Saving Time Ends

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Remembrance Day

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World Diabetes Day

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National Child Day

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International Day for the Elimination of Violence Against Women

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December 2018
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National Day of Remembrance and Action on Violence Against Women

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Winter Solstice

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Christmas Eve

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Christmas Day

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Boxing Day

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New Year's Eve

Bobbi Brewer – Okanagan Indian Band

CANE Assistant • Bachelor of Arts (First Nations Studies Major), Simon Fraser University

Bobbi Brewer

Lyle Wilson (Haisla): Tsimshian Cosmos, 1996

For Bobbi Brewer, sharing knowledge is an important part of her culture. "At INAC, I have the rare perspective of being a student working to make the Department more accessible to other Indigenous students," said Bobbi.

For the past year, Bobbi has been applying her knowledge and experiences to a review of hiring assessment materials to make them less systemic and more inclusive. "We're trying to fix it so we're not excluding any great candidates," she said.

Students are the future because we're the learners and we're taking all these different studies in different fields.

Another part of her work includes community outreach. While working at an information booth at the Gathering Our Voices conference in Kelowna, which attracted more than 1000 Indigenous high school and post-secondary students, she was amazed by how much interest there was in joining the public service.

"They want to see a difference with government [and] they believe it starts with them," she said.

As a student, Bobbi finds the Department to be a flexible, supportive work environment and she is happy to recommend it to others. "It's really great to get that experience and expand on that, and get a better idea of where you are and what your role is in the community and society."

January 2019
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New Year's Day

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February 2019
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2

Groundhog Day

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11

Family Day (BC)

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14

Valentine's Day

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18

Family Day (AB, ON, SK)

Louis Riel Day (MB)

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Pink Shirt Day

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Richard Barry – Thessalon First Nation

Financial Services Assistant • Accounting, Douglas College

Richard Barry

Bill Reid (Haida): Haida Bear, 1963

Richard Barry has more life experience than most students. When asked about his reason for working at the Department, Richard replied "it's about passion and desire for the betterment of First Nations people and communities."

Richard currently works full-time while also attending school part-time. His goal is to receive an Accounting Credential from Douglas College so he can grow and take advantage of future opportunities. "I am extremely happy with what I am doing now, but I'm very motivated to finish the accounting program, potentially move up to a Project Manager position to get more directly involved with First Nation communities."

I feel very fortunate to be doing what I'm doing. I've had the most amazing supervisors and colleagues around me during my 10 years with INAC and six years with Wuikinuxv Nation on the Central Coast. They've all contributed to where I am at today and I'll always be extremely grateful for the knowledge they've given me.

Richard has some advice to students entering the public service. "Learn everything you can about the position you're in and remember to maintain that drive and motivation each and everyday. Learning is a never-ending process."

March 2019
1  
2  
3  
4  
5  
6  
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8

International Women's Day

9  
10

Daylight Saving Time Begins

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17

St. Patrick's Day

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20

Spring Equinox

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31

National Aboriginal Languages Day

April 2019
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World Health Day

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Good Friday

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Easter Sunday

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Easter Monday

Earth Day

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Jared Dunlop – Fisher River Cree Nation

Accounting and Finance Clerk • Bachelor of Commerce (Finance Major), University of Victoria

Jared Dunlop

Jim Hart (Haida): Respect to Bill Reid Pole, 2000

Jared Dunlop has big goals for the future. "I want to have my own business, something to do with wellness and helping others. I have a really big passion for psychology and meditation," he said. Currently studying business, Jared says his education, work experience, and interests are all converging to help prepare him for the future.

I've always been spiritual and felt really connected to nature and even though I didn't know too much about my Aboriginal culture – I felt like it was a part of me. And now that I'm at INAC, I like the holistic approach that they are engraining in employees, and I think it's a good representation of how I'm trying to live my life.

That holistic approach includes team-building and wellness activities that have given Jared a chance to get to know his colleagues and connect outside of work. He enjoys attending weekly workplace meditation classes and even competed in a friendly, office-wide 'Just Dance' competition!

Jared feels he has benefitted from the broader perspective he has gained through his experiences as an Indigenous co-op student at the Department. He believes the cultural insight that he, and future Indigenous students, can bring to the public service will play an important role in achieving mutual understanding.

May 2019
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5

Emergency Preparedness Week (5-11)

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Mother's Day

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Victoria Day

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Aboriginal Awareness Week (21-25)

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June 2019
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National Aboriginal History Month (1-30)

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National Public Service Week (9-15)

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Father's Day

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National Indigenous Peoples Day

Summer Solstice

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United Nations Public Service Day

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St. Jean Baptiste Day (Quebec)

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Canadian Multi-culturalism Day

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Folisha Stevens – Nisga'a Nations

Financial Services Assistant • Bachelor of Arts (Criminology Major), Simon Fraser University

Folisha Stevens

Oyee (Nisga'a): Eagle-Halibut Pole of Laay', c. 1870

Folisha Stevens has accomplished a lot in the past 10 years. She works full time at the Department; she is pursuing her Bachelor of Arts in Criminology; and, she is a mother to three children. In her free time, she performs traditional dance! She says her culture shapes her approach to it all, including her relationship with co-workers.

I've had great First Nations managers, which has been really inspiring. There are a lot of nice, genuine, beautiful people here at INAC, and seeing firsthand how many people are involved with helping all of these Nations in BC — it's amazing.

Folisha is passionate about working to repair the colonial damage that exists. She is also clear about the role of the Government of Canada in this healing. "The Government should set a good example, and I think people will follow suit once they see us [First Nations] being treated equally and respectfully."

Folisha plans to work in youth probation in the future. In the meantime, she is determined to keep up her balancing act. "At times it's difficult, it's time consuming, but it's doable. I definitely like that my kids see me working hard every day; they see me at work, trying to finish school, as a mom, and I'm setting their example."

July 2019
1

Canada Day

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August 2019
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BC Day

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International Day of the World's Indigenous Peoples

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International Youth Day

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Trevor Casey – Skidegate First Nation

Accounting and Finance Clerk • Bachelor of Commerce (Commercial Real Estate Major), University of British Columbia

Trevor Casey

Mungo Martin (Kwakwaka'wakw): Totem Pole, 1951

This is Trevor Casey's second summer working as a student at the Department. One of his most rewarding experiences has been seeing the effects of the work he did in his first year. "Last summer we planned engagement activities around BC, and this year I hear people talking about how they attended them. It's cool to have planned it and to be here still to see the impact," he said.

My favorite part of working at INAC is the people that I've connected with. We're all at such different places and I've liked hearing everyone's stories. It's a very diverse workplace and everyone is at different stages in their lives; not just in terms of their age but also their careers.

Trevor says his Aboriginal heritage gives him a unique perspective on the Department's role and the issues it is dealing with.

He recommends students looking to work in the public service keep an open mind. "At first I looped all federal sectors into the same category, but quickly learned that there are so many government offices, and they are all so very different, there's a spot for everyone."

Trevor hopes his future includes opportunities to learn more about his Skidegate culture and a chance to visit Haida Gwaii to experience its nature and community.

September 2019
1  
2

Labour Day

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World Suicide Prevention Day

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Fall Equinox

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Orange Shirt Day

October 2019
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Fire Prevention Week (6-12)

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World Mental Health Day

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Thanksgiving Day

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Halloween

Courtney Brown – Métis

Technical Advisor • Legal Studies Diploma, Douglas College

Courtney Brown

Bill Reid (Haida): Canoe, 1984

Courtney Brown believes in the importance of helping others, which is reflected in her choice of studies and career as a public servant. She recently secured a permanent position with Canada Revenue Agency after being with the agency for four years. The job gives her a chance to help people navigate often complicated and stressful situations. "Me being able to help people understand and to get them through hard times is important," she said.

Courtney graduated from Douglas College with a Legal Studies Diploma. She feels fortunate to have found rewarding work that recognizes the importance of law and comes with great colleagues.

I probably haven't laughed as hard as I have with my co-workers and that's something that is really cool.

For Courtney, the flexibility of government employment and the work-life balance she has been able to achieve, has made for an overall great experience. She encourages other Indigenous students to consider public service as a way to make a difference. "There are a lot of people who want to help others and their communities, and to do that you need to have education and know the game and the rules of the game."

November 2019
1  
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3

Daylight Saving Time Ends

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11

Remembrance Day

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14

World Diabetes Day

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20

National Child Day

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International Day for the Elimination of Violence Against Women

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December 2019
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National Day of Remembrance and Action on Violence Against Women

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Winter Solstice

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Christmas Eve

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Christmas Day

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Boxing Day

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New Year's Eve

Special Thanks

Bobbi Brewer, Rodman Joseph, Zoe Craig

Quatsino Hansen (Kwakwaka 'wakw): Interior House Post Frame, c. 1906

On behalf of the CANE Calendar Production Team, we would like to begin by acknowledging that the land on which we gathered to create this calendar is the ancestral, traditional, and unceded territory of the Musqueam, Squamish and Tsleil-Waututh peoples.

We would like to express our sincere thanks to the students who shared their stories, experiences and advice with us. Your motivations and unique perspectives as Indigenous students have lent so much meaning and passion to the calendar, especially to this year's theme of "Looking to the Future."

The calendar would not have been possible without the generosity of the BC Federal Council, the Pacific Aboriginal Network and the Public Service Commission. We would also like to thank our senior management and others across the public service, especially the Department of Fisheries and Oceans and the Canadian Revenue Agency, for their support of this initiative. Given the importance of students to the future, we are so honored and would like to raise our hands up to Elder Larry Grant, who was kind enough to share his wise words of guidance with us.

We are very grateful to Tanya Duncan and the CANE Executive for the opportunity to work on this project and for their continued trust and support. Thanks also to BC Region Communications for their vision and collaboration on this project. Working on this calendar together taught us so much about ourselves, our fellow students and our role in the future. We hope that this calendar helps encourage more youth to apply to work for the Government of Canada and to experience the benefits firsthand.

Sincerely,
Bobbi, Rodman and Zoe

Museum of Anthropology (MOA) at the University of British Columbia

The Museum of Anthropology (MOA) at the University of British Columbia is world-renowned for its collections, research, teaching, public programs, and community connections. It is also acclaimed for its spectacular architecture and unique setting on the cliffs of Point Grey.

MOA houses one of the world's finest collections of Northwest Coast First People's art in an award-winning building designed by Canadian architect Arthur Erickson. Opened in 1976, the concrete and glass structure is based on the post-and-beam structures of northern Northwest Coast First Nations. MOA's Great Hall displays huge totem poles, feast dishes, and canoes from the Kwakwaka'wakw, Nisga'a, Gitxsan, Haida, and Coast Salish peoples, while smaller pieces in gold, silver, argillite, wood, and other materials are exhibited elsewhere in the galleries. The Museum grounds feature indigenous plants and grasses and spectacular views of mountains and sea. The outdoor sculpture complex includes two Haida Houses and several totem poles by some of the finest contemporary First Nations artists of the Northwest Coast. MOA also has the world's largest collection of works by Haida artist Bill Reid.

The CANE Calendar Production Team would like to extend our sincerest thanks to MOA for opening their doors and allowing us to showcase selected artwork in this calendar.

Members of the Committee for the Advancement of Native Employment

Members of CANE

Thank You (English)
Merci (French)
Woliwon (Maliseet)
Kuk'chem (Shuswap)
Medu (Tahltan)
Kuks-chum (Nlaka'pamux)
Hay ch q'a' (Hul'q'umi'num')
T'oyaxsut 'nüün (Tsimshian)
Giaxsixa (Heiltsuk)
'Toyaxsii'niisim! (Gitxsan)
Quyanamiik (Inuktitut)
Kleco (Nuu-chah-nulth)
Giyanaca'ci (Wuikinuxv)
Ona (Mohawk)
Hay chxw q'u (Salish)
Marsee (Michif)
Mussi (Carrier)
Gilakas'la (Kwakwala)
How'aa (Haida)
Hi Hi (Cree)
Emote (Sliammon)
Meegwech (Ojibwe)
Tabi Mussi (Athapascan)

The Raven

This BC Northwest Coast representation of the raven is the symbol of the BC Committee for the Advancement of Native Employment (CANE). Raven is one of the most important beings in northwest coast mythology. The original trickster, transformer, teacher, catalyst and chief spirit, Raven has the power to transform both himself and other beings.

Raven

The Salmon

This West Coast Native design of salmon by artist, Richard Shorty, is the symbol of the Pacific Aboriginal Network (PAN). The Life Source, the Salmon is the provider of food for all animals and humans and represents abundance, fertility, prosperity and renewal. Salmon are often depicted in circular pairs, symbolizing the cycle of life.

Salmon
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