2017–2020 Departmental Sustainable Development Strategy

Section 1: Context for the Departmental Sustainable Development Strategy

The 2016–19 Federal Sustainable Development Strategy (FSDS) presents the Government of Canada’s sustainable development goals and targets, as required by the Federal Sustainable Development Act. In keeping with the objectives of the Act to integrate environmental, social and economic considerations into decision-making, and make such decisions more transparent and accountable to Parliament, Indigenous and Northern Affairs Canada supports reaching goals laid out in the FSDS through the activities described in this Departmental Sustainable Development StrategyFootnote 1 (DSDS).

The Policy on Green Procurement supports the Government of Canada’s effort to promote environmental stewardship. In keeping with the objectives of the policy, Indigenous and Northern Affairs Canada supports sustainable development by integrating environmental performance considerations into the procurement decision making process through the activities in this DSDS.

Section 2: Sustainable Development in Indigenous and Northern Affairs Canada

INAC's vision is a future in which First Nations, Inuit, Métis and northern communities are healthy, safe, self-sufficient and prosperous — a Canada where people make their own decisions, manage their own affairs and make strong contributions to the country as a whole. The Department has identified key performance indicators that either contribute to a goal or target identified in the 2016–19 FSDS or are specific program activities that support wide-ranging sustainability outcomes. INAC’s DSDS aligns with seven of the thirteen long-term goals identified in the FSDS including:

FSDS Goal: Clean drinking water — INAC has developed an action plan aimed at eliminating all long-term drinking water advisories affecting on-reserve public First Nation drinking water systems financially supported by INAC by March 31, 2021. As long-term drinking water advisories are lifted, First Nations will have improved access to safe and sustainable drinking water. Capital investments will result in a newer and upgraded stock of water assets on-reserve that can be more easily operated and maintained and contribute to meeting the priority of improving essential physical infrastructure for Indigenous communities. Through investments in facility operation and maintenance, and operator training, First Nations will be able to manage water and wastewater assets and ensure ongoing drinking water safety for community members.

FSDS Goal: Low Carbon Government – INAC is the custodian of buildings, leases space in facilities across the country, manages a fleet of vehicles, and procures goods and services in order to serve Canadians. The commitments under the low-carbon government goal outline the areas INAC plans to focus on to continue to reduce the environmental effects associated with the Department’s physical operations and procurement decisions. Specifically, INAC will take steps to 'green’ its buildings, support the reduction of energy use in the Department’s fleet, and better integrate environmental performance considerations into all aspects of the departmental procurement process.

FSDS Goal: Effective action on climate change – Climate change is a critical global problem that could affect future generations’ ability to meet their basic needs. INAC’s suite of climate change programs support effective action on climate change through both mitigation and adaptation. INAC’s Northern REACHE (Responsible Energy Approach for Community Heating and Electricity) program provides funding for planning and implementing of renewable energy and energy efficiency projects, and related capacity building and planning in the Yukon, Northwest Territories, Nunavut, Nunavik, and Nunatsiavut regions. Increasing energy efficiency and the use of renewable energy sources will result in environmental, social, and economic benefits to support developing healthier, more sustainable Northern communities. Adaptation, a key factor in addressing climate change, is about making smart, informed, forward-looking decisions. INAC’s First Nation Adapt, Climate Change Preparedness in the North and new Indigenous Climate Community-Based Monitoring programs focus on developing information and tools to support Indigenous and Northern communities to identify climate change impacts and adaptation measures. The long-term outcome of these programs is to increase resilience to climate change impacts by implementing adaptation measures.

FSDS Goal: Modern and Resilient Infrastructure – Green infrastructure protects the natural environment, supports healthy and resilient communities, drives economic growth, and improves our quality of life. INAC investments in waste management infrastructure and programming on-reserve seek to work with First Nations to develop solid waste management approaches that meet individual community needs with solutions tailored to the needs of the community comparable to off-reserve communities. The commitments INAC plans to focus on include: diverting waste from reserve whenever possible; supporting recycling, composting, and hazardous waste diversion programming; increasing community awareness; and constructing landfills when appropriate.

FSDS Goal: Clean Energy – INAC seeks to ensure that all Canadians have access to affordable, reliable and sustainable energy by working with territorial governments, Indigenous organizations and communities, and other federal departments to develop a plan and timeline for deploying innovative renewable energy and efficiency alternatives to diesel. The plan also includes working with other governments and the private sector to improve the development of clean and renewable energy sources, including through the Northern REACHE (Responsible Energy Approach for Community Heating and Electricity) program.

FSDS Goal: Sustainable Food – INAC contributes to creating a world-leading agricultural sector and food economy for the benefit of all Canadians through its Nutrition North Canada Program. INAC provides a retail-based subsidy on nutritious, perishable food that must be transported by air to northern communities without year-round surface access to ensure these foods are more accessible and affordable for residents of isolated northern communities in Canada.

FSDS Goal: Safe and Healthy Communities – INAC seeks to ensure all Canadians live in clean, sustainable communities that contribute to their health and well-being by managing contaminated sites to reduce risk to human and environmental health and safety. INAC implements the Federal Contaminated Sites Action Plan and completes remediation and risk management activities at known high priority federal contaminated sites. In addition, the data generated by the Northern Contaminants Program is used to assess ecosystem and human health, and the findings of these assessments inform policy, resulting in action to eliminate contaminants from long-range sources.

Section 3: Commitments for Indigenous and Northern Affairs Canada

1. Clean Drinking Water: All Canadians have access to safe drinking water and, in particular, the significant challenges Indigenous communities face are addressed

Responsible Minister: Minister of Indigenous and Northern Affairs

FSDS targets: By March 31, 2019, 60% and by March 31, 2021 100% of the long-term drinking water advisories affecting First Nation drinking water systems financially supported by Indigenous and Northern Affairs Canada are to be resolved.Footnote 2 Footnote 3

FSDS Contributing Actions: Provide support for water and wastewater services

Corresponding departmental actions

  • Provide funding and advice to First Nation communities on the planning, procurement, design, construction, commissioning, operation and maintenance of water and wastewater systems.
  • Assists First Nations in identifying infrastructure needs and submitting capital projects proposals.

Contribution by each departmental action to the FSDS goal and target

  • Funding and technical support will enable delivery of drinking water and wastewater services in First Nations communities to ensure that First Nations public drinking water and wastewater systems financially supported by the Department meet established standards.
  • Provide funding and support to First Nations communities for the delivery of infrastructure capital projects in the area of public water and wastewater systems.
  • Ensure that First Nations public drinking water and wastewater systems financially supported by the Indigenous and Northern Affairs meet established standards.
  • Provide funding and support to ensure that First Nation communities’ with drinking water and wastewater systems that are financially supported by Indigenous and Northern Affairs have the capacity for operating and maintaining their water system.
Starting points where available and performance indicators for departmental actions
  Starting point Performance indicator Program in which the departmental actions will occur
Drinking water system 2011 baseline: 27% of on-reserve public drinking water systems financially supported by INAC have low risk ratings By March 31, 2021, 65% of on-reserve public drinking water systems financially supported by INAC will have low risk ratings. 3.4.1 Water and Wastewater
Wastewater systems 2011 baseline: 35% of on-reserve public wastewater systems financially supported by INAC have low-risk ratings. By March 31, 2019, 65% of on-reserve public wastewater systems financially supported by INAC have low risk ratings.
Long-term drinking water advisories 2015 baseline: 77 of long-term drinking water advisories affecting on-reserve public water systems financially supported by INAC. End long-term drinking water advisories affecting on-reserve public water systems financially supported by INAC by March 2021
Infrastructure projects   Number of Budget 2016 drinking water and wastewater infrastructure projects completed and in use in First Nation communities.
140 Budget 2016 drinking water and wastewater infrastructure projects completed and in use in First Nation communities per year until March 31, 2021.
Water and Wastewater System Operators 2011 Baselines:
51% of on-reserve public systems financially supported by INAC that have primary operators certified to the level of the drinking water systems.
By March 31, 2021 70% of on-reserve public systems financially supported by INAC that have primary operators certified to the level of the drinking water systems.
2011 Baselines:
42% of on-reserve public systems financially supported by INAC that have primary operators certified to the level of the wastewater system.
By March 31, 2021, 60% of on-reserve public systems financially supported by INAC that have primary operators certified to the level of the wastewater systems.

Additional departmental sustainable development activities and initiatives

In spring 2017, Regional Operations Sector created the Strategic Water Management Team to oversee the Department’s commitment to end long-term drinking water advisories on public systems financially supported by INAC by 2021. The team coordinates departmental efforts in addressing this commitment and liaises between governmental and non-governmental stakeholders on issues pertaining to drinking water advisories.

2. Low-Carbon Government: The Government of Canada leads by example by making its operations low-carbon

Responsible Minister: All ministers

FSDS targets: Reduce GHG emissions from federal government buildings and fleets by 40% below 2005 levels by 2030, with an aspiration to achieve this reduction by 2025Footnote 4

FSDS Contributing Actions: Improve the energy efficiency of our buildings/operations

Corresponding departmental actions

  • Develop a baseline of INAC facility GHG emissions.
  • Implement the updated INAC Real Property Sustainability Framework.
  • Assess and optimize the environmental performance of INAC real property projects and assets.

Contribution by each departmental action to the FSDS goal and target

Actions that reduce the demand for energy or switch to cleaner sources of energy will lead to reductions in GHGs.

Starting points where available and performance indicators for departmental actions
Starting point Performance indicator Program in which the departmental actions will occur
INAC has not reported on facility GHG emissions to date.

INAC is currently updating its departmental Real Property Sustainability Framework and environmental performance standards for real property. INAC’s environmental performance indicators for real property will be included in the next update to this strategy.
INAC will develop a baseline for facility GHG emissions by fiscal year 2018–19.

INAC will update its real property environmental performance standards by fiscal year 2018–19.

  • GHG emissions from facilities in fiscal year 2005–06 (base year) = Not available
  • GHG emissions from facilities in fiscal year 2016–17 = Not available
  • Percentage (%) change in GHG emissions from facilities from fiscal year 2005–06 to fiscal year 2016–17 = Not available
Internal Services

FSDS Contributing Actions: Modernize our fleet

Corresponding departmental actions

  • Reduce carbon intensity through vehicle purchase and replacement (deploying hybrid, electric, and fuel-efficient vehicles where feasible).
  • Promote behaviour change (e.g. anti-idling campaigns, driver training, car-pooling initiatives).

Contribution by each departmental action to the FSDS goal and target

Actions that reduce the amount of fuel consumed for fleet operation or switch to less GHG intensive sources of fuels will contribute to GHG reductions.

Starting points where available and performance indicators for departmental actions
Starting point Performance indicator Program in which the departmental actions will occur
INAC updated its departmental Fleet GHG Emissions Reduction Strategy in 2016.

INAC exceeded the 2013–2016 FSDS fleet GHG emissions reduction target of "17% by 2020–21" in 2012. INAC plans to meet the new federal fleet GHG emissions reduction target of 40% by 2020.

INAC’s fleet GHG emissions increased between 2013–14 and 2016–17, however further reductions are expected through advances in vehicle technologies and anticipated reductions in program activities over the next several years.
INAC expects to reduce GHG emissions from its fleets by 40% by 2020 relative to fiscal year 2005-06.

  • GHG emissions from fleet in fiscal year 2005–06 (base year): = 0.534 ktCO2e
  • GHG emissions from fleet in fiscal year 2016–17 = 0.404 ktCO2e
  • Percentage (%) change in GHG emissions from fleet from fiscal year 2005–06 to fiscal year 2016–17 = 24.3% decrease
  • Overall fuel consumption (Gasoline Litres Equivalent) in fiscal year 2016–17: 180,003 litres
Internal Services

FSDS Contributing Actions: Support the transition to a low-carbon economy through green procurement

Corresponding departmental actions

  • Establish updated departmental targets to reduce the environmental impact of specific goods or services.
  • Integrate environmental considerations into procurement management processes and controls.
  • Incorporate environmental considerations into the development of any common-use procurement instruments.
  • Ensure decision-makers have the necessary training and awareness to support green procurement.
  • Ensure key officials include contribution to and support for the Government of Canada Policy on Green Procurement objectives in their performance evaluations.

Contribution by each departmental action to the FSDS goal and target

Green procurement incorporates environmental considerations into purchasing decisions and is expected to motivate suppliers to green their goods, services and supply chain. GHG reductions are one area of consideration in green procurement.

Starting points where available and performance indicators for departmental actions
Starting point Performance indicator Program in which the departmental actions will occur
INAC has developed an Implementation Strategy for Green Procurement to structure necessary work on internal procedures. INAC is currently developing a departmental Green Procurement Policy and updating its departmental green procurement targets.

INAC’s latest departmental green procurement targets included two that ended on March 31, 2017, and one related to air travel which is now addressed through the FSDS actions to promote sustainable travel. INAC’s new departmental green procurement targets will be reflected in the next update to this strategy.
By December 31, 2017, INAC will establish new departmental green procurement targets.

By March 31, 2018, 90% completion of the INAC Implementation Strategy for Green Procurement.

  • Percentage of common-use procurement instruments developed that incorporate environmental considerations (Starting point in 2016–17: Not available)
  • Percentage of specialists in procurement and materiel management who have completed training on green procurement (Starting point in 2016–17: 21 of 22 positions (95%).
  • Number and percentage of managers and functional heads of procurement and materiel whose performance evaluation includes support and contribution towards green procurement in the current fiscal year (Starting point in 2016–17: 3 positions (100%).
  • Percentage of purchases that include criteria or clauses which reduce the environmental impact of the product or service being purchased.
(Starting point in 2016–17: Not available. All INAC purchases through National Master Standing Offers managed by Public Services and Procurement Canada and Shared Services Canada include such criteria).
Internal Services

FSDS Contributing Actions: Promote sustainable travel practices

Corresponding departmental actions

  • Monitor annual GHG emissions from business-related air travel.
  • Promote the use of teleconferences and videoconferences to minimize travel requirements for meetings.
  • Promote awareness of environmental impacts due to employee travel.
  • Purchase GHG emission offsets for travel where feasible and in accordance with federal direction.

Contribution by each departmental action to the FSDS goal and target

Actions taken to reduce the amount of business travel or switch to less GHG intensive modes of transportation will reduce GHG emissions.

Starting points where available and performance indicators for departmental actions
Starting point Performance indicator Program in which the departmental actions will occur
INAC has been reporting on greenhouse gas emissions from business-related air travel since 2011–12.

By March 31, 2021, INAC will reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from business-related air travel 25% relative to 2008–09 levels.

INAC will update its departmental air travel GHG emissions reduction target by fiscal year 2018–19 to promote continued improvement.
  • GHG emissions from business-related air travel in 2008–09 (base year) = 8876 tonnes.
  • GHG emissions from business-related air travel in 2016–17 = 4555 tonnes.
  • Percentage (%) change in GHG emissions from business-related air travel from fiscal year 2008–09 to fiscal year 2016–17 = 48% decrease.
  • Departmental air travel GHG emissions reduction target is updated by fiscal year 2018–19.
Internal Services
INAC promotes awareness of environmental impacts due to employee travel through regular annual events such as Canadian Environment Week and the Commuter Challenge. INAC is developing an Employee Engagement Strategy in collaboration with the INAC Greening Government Working group by the end of fiscal year 2017–18.
  • Development of INAC Greening Operations Employee Engagement Strategy by March 31, 2018.
  • Development of guidance to employees and managers on purchasing offsets for travel by March 31, 2019.
INAC has not purchased GHG emission offset credits for business-related travel or large events to date.
  • Volume (kt CO2e) and cost of GHG emission offset credits purchased by the department in the given fiscal year.

3. Effective Action on Climate Change: A low-carbon economy contributes to limiting global average temperature rise to well below two degrees Celsius and supports efforts to limit the increase to 1.5 degrees Celsius

Responsible Minister: Minister of Environment and Climate Change; supported by a whole-of-government approach to implementation

FSDS targets: By 2030, reduce Canada’s total GHG emissions by 30%, relative to 2005 emission levels

FSDS Contributing Actions: Work with partners on climate change

Corresponding departmental actions

  • Work with territorial governments, Indigenous organizations and communities, and other federal departments — through the Climate Change Preparedness in the North Program — to identify northern adaptation priorities by developing a Northern Adaptation Strategy.

Contribution by each departmental action to the FSDS goal and target

The development of a Northern Adaptation Strategy requires INAC to work with key partners on Climate Change Preparedness.

Starting points where available and performance indicators for departmental actions
Starting point Performance indicator Program in which the departmental actions will occur
New program – does not have existing data. By March 31, 2018, a Northern Adaptation Strategy, identifying northern priorities is developed. 4.1.3 Climate Change Adaptation and Clean Energy

FSDS Contributing Actions: Provide in-kind support and funding for climate resilience

Corresponding departmental actions

  • Provide direct funding support to northern Indigenous communities, all three territorial governments, and the two regional Indigenous governments in Nunavik and Nunatsiavut — through the Climate Change Preparedness in the North Program — to assess the risks of climate change on infrastructure, traditional livelihoods, and local economies; and identify adaptation measures.
  • Direct funding — through the First Nation Adapt program — will provide support to First Nation communities, band councils, tribal councils and Indigenous organizations to assess and develop plans for First Nation communities on-reserve to respond to the potential climate change impacts on community infrastructure and emergency management.
  • Provide direct funding — through the Indigenous Community-Based Climate Monitoring Program — to support Indigenous communities to collect climate data at the community level and facilitate the integration of the information into regional and national monitoring initiatives.

Contribution by each departmental action to the FSDS goal and target

INAC provides funding to Indigenous and Northern communities to develop information and tools to support to the identification of climate change impacts and adaptation measures. The long-term outcome of these programs is to increase resilience to climate change impacts by implementing adaptation measures.

Starting points where available and performance indicators for departmental actions
Starting point Performance indicator Program in which the departmental actions will occur
These are new programs and do not have existing data. By March 31, 2019, 50% of completed risk assessments and adaptation plans identify adaptation measures.

By March 31, 2021, 40% of completed territorial government and northern community risk assessments and adaptation plans contain adaptation measures that have been implemented.

By March 31, 2021, 30% of completed First Nation community risk and adaptation assessments contain adaptation measures that have been implemented.

Beginning 2018-19, 15-20 community-based climate monitoring projects funded per year.
4.1.3 Climate Change Adaptation and Clean Energy

3.4.5 Climate Resilience

FSDS Contributing Actions: Provide in-kind support and funding for climate resilience

Corresponding departmental actions

  • Make funding available to First Nations communities through Indigenous and Northern Affairs Canada’s enhanced Emergency Management Assistance Program to support emergency preparedness activities, including: the development of risk assessments, the FireSmart program on-reserve, flood protection studies, and developing, updating, and exercising emergency management plans.

Contribution by each departmental action to the FSDS goal and target

INAC’s Emergency Management Assistance Program provides First Nations with support through the four pillars of emergency management — preparedness, non-structural mitigation, response, and recovery — as well as forest fire suppression activities. This approach to emergency events, many of which are exacerbated or caused by climate change, enables INAC to better support First Nation communities in strengthening their capacity and resilience to the mounting threats associated with climate change. The funding made available through the Emergency Management Assistance Program facilitates disaster readiness, threat and capability awareness, and also supports individual and community recovery efforts following a disaster event.

Starting points where available and performance indicators for departmental actions
Starting point Performance indicator Program in which the departmental actions will occur
In the 2016–17 fiscal year, the Emergency Management Assistance Program (EMAP) funded 100% of the $19.11M allocated towards the non-structural mitigation and preparedness funding stream. Of the $19.11M, 80% was allocated towards non-structural mitigation and preparedness activities. The remaining 20% ($3.7M) was internally reallocated, when Emergency Management Service Agreements with provincial stakeholders were not finalized, to support priority housing projects in Ontario and fire hall projects in Quebec, both of which contributed to building community resilience. 100% of non-structural mitigation (i.e. flood mapping and risk assessment) and preparedness funding allocated towards on-reserve emergency resiliency and capacity building by March 31, 2018. The First Nations Adapt Program

3.4.6 Emergency Management Assistance
Historically, the EMAP has funded 100% of all identified and eligible response and recovery costs to support community recovery and disaster resilience. When the Program’s A-Based funding has been depleted, the EMAP has consistently secured additional funds through submitting requests to Treasury Board. 100% transfer of funds equivalent to eligible costs identified (eligible costs include but are not limited to the evacuation of on-reserve First Nation communities, direct emergency response activities, and other cleaning and rebuilding expenses) by March 31, 2018.

4. Modern and Resilient Infrastructure: Modern, sustainable, and resilient infrastructure supports clean economic growth and social inclusion

Responsible Minister: Minister of Infrastructure and Communities

FSDS targets: By the end of 2025–2026, invest $20 billion in funding for green infrastructure initiatives that reduce GHG emissions and improve climate resilience and environmental quality

FSDS Contributing Actions: Work with partners on green infrastructure

Corresponding departmental actions

  • Invest in waste management infrastructure and programming on-reserve.
  • Work with First Nations to develop solid waste management approaches that meet individual community needs. Activities will include:
    • diverting waste from reserve whenever possible;
    • supporting recycling, composting, and hazardous waste diversion programming;
    • increasing community awareness; and
    • constructing landfills when appropriate.

Contribution by each departmental action to the FSDS goal and target

Key departmental actions will support First Nations with waste management solutions that are tailored to the needs of the community, comparable to off-reserve communities and provide employment opportunities to Indigenous people.

Starting points where available and performance indicators for departmental actions
Starting point Performance indicator Program in which the departmental actions will occur
TBD By March 31, 2018, 42 First Nation communities will improve their infrastructure and 64 First Nation communities will improve waste programming. 3.2.4 Contaminated Sites (on-reserve)

5. Clean Energy: All Canadians have access to affordable, reliable and sustainable energy

Responsible Minister: Minister of Natural Resources

FSDS targets: By 2030, 90% and in the long term, 100% of Canada’s electricity is generated from renewable and non-emitting sources

By 2025, contribute to the North American goal of 50% clean power generation

By 2019, there is a favourable five-year trend in renewable electricity capacity compared to overall electricity sources, from a 2014 level of 64.4%

FSDS Contributing Actions: Promote collaboration and work with partners on clean energy

Corresponding departmental actions

  • Work with territorial governments, Indigenous organizations and communities, and other federal departments to develop a plan and timeline for deploying innovative renewable energy and efficiency alternatives to diesel.
  • Provide direct funding support to Northern communities, governments, and organizations — The Northern REACHE (Responsible Energy Approach for Community Heating and Electricity) program — to plan and construct renewable energy and energy efficiency projects that reduce diesel use for electricity and heating.

Contribution by each departmental action to the FSDS goal and target

Key departmental actions will support First Nations with waste management solutions that are tailored to the needs of the community, comparable to off-reserve communities and provide employment opportunities to Indigenous people.

Starting points where available and performance indicators for departmental actions
Starting point Performance indicator Program in which the departmental actions will occur
Northern REACHE (Responsible Energy Approach for Community Heating and Electricity) program was launched in 2016–17.

For 2016-17: Planning stage — 62% (15 projects); Construction stage — 38% (9 projects)
By March 31, 2018, percentage of projects funded that are at each stage (i.e. planning (30%), construction (40%), operation (30%))

By March 31, 2023 50% of renewable energy projects funded between year 1 and year 4 are operational.

By March 31, 2023, 70% of energy efficiency projects funded between year 1 and year 4 are completed.
4.1.3 Climate Change Adaptation and Clean Energy

6. Sustainable Food: Innovation and ingenuity contribute to a world-leading agricultural sector and food economy for the benefit of all Canadians

Responsible Minister: Minister of Agriculture and Agri-Food; Minister of Health; Minister of Fisheries, Oceans and the Canadian Coast Guard

FSDS targets: Ensure safe and accessible food supply by mitigating risks to animal and plant resources from pests, diseases and other health hazards and prevent risks to health of Canadians.

FSDS Contributing Actions: Provide a food subsidy

Corresponding departmental actions

  • Provide a retail based subsidy on nutritious, perishable food that must be transported by air to northern communities without year-round surface access.

Contribution by each departmental action to the FSDS goal and target

Nutritious, perishable foods are more accessible and affordable for residents of isolated northern communities in Canada

Starting points where available and performance indicators for departmental actions
Starting point Performance indicator Program in which the departmental actions will occur
2010–2011 price for a food basket

(As per 2016 TBS-approved PM Strategy, the baseline is $438, which was the cost of the basket in isolated northern communities in 2010–2011, before the launch of the Nutrition North Canada Program. Comparisons to the baseline are adjusted for inflation).
The annual growth rate of food prices in isolated communities, compared to the national growth rate. 4.1.2 Nutrition North

7. Safe and Healthy Communities: All Canadians live in clean, sustainable communities that contribute to their health and well-being

Responsible Minister: Minister of Environment and Climate Change; Minister of Health

FSDS targets: By 2020, address the 4,300 substances identified as priorities for action under the Chemicals Management Plan

FSDS Contributing Actions: Demonstrate leadership on assessing and remediating contaminated sites

Corresponding departmental actions

  • Implement the Federal Contaminated Sites Action Plan and complete remediation and risk management activities at known high priority federal contaminated sites.

Contribution by each departmental action to the FSDS goal and target

Contaminated sites are managed to reduce risk to human and environmental health and safety.

Starting points where available and performance indicators for departmental actions
Starting point Performance indicator Program in which the departmental actions will occur
The percentage of high priority Northern Contaminated Sites that have advanced to Step 8 (implementation) through Step 10 (monitoring) of the Approach to Federal Contaminated Sites' 10-step process is tracked annually. The greater the percentage, the greater the proportion of high priority Northern contaminated sites where remediation, risk management and monitoring activities are occurring to reduce risk to human and environmental health and safety. By March 31, 2018, 45% of high priority sites [defined as sites classified as Class 1 sites as per the National Classification System for Contaminated Sites] in Step 8 (implementation) through Step 10 (monitoring) of the Approach to Federal Contaminated Sites.

By March 31, 2018, 80 Number of Class 1 sites (sites with imminent concerns for public health and safety) where remediation activities are occurring to reduce risk.

By March 31, 2018, 5 contaminated sites completely remediated

By March 31, 2018, 8 million dollar reduction in total of known federal financial liabilities in confirmed contaminated sites at the beginning of the fiscal year

The Contaminated Sites (On-Reserve) Program will undertake remediation activities (Steps 8 through 10) on 35% high priority sites, yearly.
4.2.1 Northern Contaminants

4.3.2 Contaminated Sites
The Contaminated Sites (On-Reserve) Program will undertake remediation activities (Steps 8 through 10) on 35% high priority sites, yearly. 3.2.4 Contaminated Sites (On-Reserve)

FSDS Contributing Actions: Better understand air pollutants and harmful substances

Corresponding departmental actions

  • Continue research and monitoring related to contaminant levels and their effects in wildlife and people in the Canadian North as part of the Northern Contaminants Program efforts to reduce and, wherever possible, eliminate contaminants in traditionally harvested foods, while providing information that assists individuals and communities make informed decisions about their food use.

Contribution by each departmental action to the FSDS goal and target

The data generated by the Northern Contaminants Program is used to assess ecosystem and human health, and the findings of these assessments inform policy, resulting in action to eliminate contaminants from long-range sources. Many contaminants identified as priorities under the Northern Contaminants Program are priority chemicals under the Chemicals Management Plan, and therefore the programs are complementary.

Starting points where available and performance indicators for departmental actions
Starting point Performance indicator Program in which the departmental actions will occur
Context/background:
To measure environmental and health risks from harmful substances, the Northern Contaminants Program tracks levels of key substances in the environment, in wildlife, and in people who are most at risk of exposure to environmental contaminants through a diet that is high in certain country foods.
By March 31, 2018, 100% of current Northern Contaminants Program research, results and information accessible nationally and internationally. 4.2.1 Northern Contaminants

FSDS Contributing Actions: Provide information to inform action and decision making

Corresponding departmental actions

  • Continue research and monitoring related to contaminant levels and their effects in wildlife and people in the Canadian North as part of the Northern Contaminants Program efforts to reduce and, wherever possible, eliminate contaminants in traditionally harvested foods, while providing information that assists individuals and communities make informed decisions about their food use.

Contribution by each departmental action to the FSDS goal and target

The data generated by the Northern Contaminants Program is used to assess ecosystem and human health, and the findings of these assessments inform policy, resulting in action to eliminate contaminants from long-range sources. Many contaminants identified as priorities under the Northern Contaminants Program are priority chemicals under the Chemicals Management Plan, and therefore the programs are complementary.

Starting points where available and performance indicators for departmental actions
Starting point Performance indicator Program in which the departmental actions will occur
Statistical analysis is conducted to determine the change in contaminant concentrations compared to 1990 levels for persistent organic pollutants (POPs) and compared to 2013 levels for mercury (the greater the % decrease, the greater the reduction in concentration of these contaminants in human and wildlife populations).

Context/background:
To measure environmental and health risks from harmful substances, the Northern Contaminants Program tracks levels of key substances in the environment, in wildlife, and in people who are most at risk of exposure to environmental contaminants through a diet that is high in certain country foods.
Percentage decrease in concentrations of previously identified contaminants in human and wildlife populations in the North:
  • By 2020, 5 to 10% decrease in three indicator persistent organic pollutants concentrations over 1990 levels;
  • By March 31, 2020, 1 to 3% decrease in mercury concentrations over 2013 levels.
4.2.1 Northern Contaminants

FSDS Contributing Actions: Provide information to inform action and decision making

Corresponding departmental actions

  • Continue, through the Northern Contaminants Program, to contribute data, information, leadership and expertise in support of international initiatives under the Arctic Council (e.g. the Arctic Monitoring and Assessment Program), international agreements and their effectiveness evaluation (e.g. the Stockholm Convention on Persistent Organic Pollutants, the Minamata Convention on Mercury), and other initiatives aimed at efforts to reduce and, wherever possible, eliminate transboundary contaminants that make their way into northern food chains that include traditionally harvested foods.

Contribution by each departmental action to the FSDS goal and target

The Northern Contaminants Program (NCP) contributes scientific data to contaminants-related international agreements and assessments, helping to position Canada as an international leader in Arctic science. The NCP plays a very important role in generating scientific information on contaminants in the Arctic. NCP research results help in the development of associated long-term global monitoring and research programs. The NCP and its researchers work in an interdisciplinary approach and include natural and social sciences as well as community-based monitoring and traditional knowledge. NCP has been cultivating links with other Canadian Arctic science programs such as ArcticNet and Polar Knowledge Canada to promote coordination and cooperation. The NCP works with the northern regions through five Regional Contaminants Committees (RCCs), and four Inuit Research Advisors (IRAs) to lead and participate in NCP-funded research and communications initiatives.

Starting points where available and performance indicators for departmental actions
Starting point Performance indicator Program in which the departmental actions will occur
  By March 31, 2018, 100% of current Northern Contaminants Program research, results and information accessible nationally and internationally.

80% of Northern Contaminants Program datasets will be used in regional, national and international policy-relevant assessments and obligations under international conventions (ongoing).
4.2.1 Northern Contaminants

Section 4. Integrating sustainable development

Sustainable Development is an integral part of the Department's mandate and INAC takes sustainable development and environmental risks into consideration in the development of policies, programs, plans and reports. The commitments made in this strategy were aligned with the Department's Program Alignment Architecture (PAA) and the Performance Measurement Framework (PMF) and will be aligned to the upcoming Departmental Results Framework and Program Inventory Profiles.

INAC will continue to ensure that its decision-making process includes consideration of FSDS goals and targets through the Strategic Environmental Assessment (SEA) process. A SEA for policy, plan or program proposals includes an analysis of the impacts of the given proposal on the environment, including on FSDS goals and targets.

INAC provides guidance to proposal leads about the application of the SEA process and requirements of the Cabinet Directive on the Environmental Assessment of Policy, Plan and Program Proposals. INAC defines a proposal as a memorandum to Cabinet, a Treasury Board Submission, a regulatory proposal, memoranda to the Minister that are seeking concurrence and any other strategic document seeking Ministerial or Cabinet approval.

INAC applies a three-level process for conducting SEAs. The first level is to complete an initial checklist to determine if further analysis is required. The second level, the preliminary scan, considers the proposal's contribution to FSDS goals and targets and identifies potential environmental impacts, either positive or negative. A detailed assessment is completed when important environmental impacts are identified during the third level preliminary scan.

Public statements on the results of INAC’s assessments will be made public when an initiative is announced. The purpose of the public statement is to demonstrate that the environmental effects, including the impacts on achieving the FSDS goals and targets, of the approved policy, plan or program have been considered during proposal development and decision making.

Public statements on the results of INAC’s assessments are made public when an initiative that has undergone a detailed SEA is announced. The purpose of the public statement is to demonstrate that the environmental effects, including the impacts on achieving the FSDS goals and targets, of the approved policy, plan or program have been considered during proposal development and decision making.

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