Details of transfer payment programs of $5 million or more

Transfer Payments for Governance and Institutions of Government

Start date/End date: Ongoing

Type of transfer payments: Grants and contributions

Type of appropriations: Transfer payments are voted unless otherwise denoted with an (S) in below Planning Information table.

Strategic Outcome: Support good governance, rights and interests of Indigenous peoples

Description: This Program provides support to First Nation governments, as well as Indigenous governance institutions and organizations. The intent of this support is to facilitate capacity development in the Indigenous public service, the elected leadership, and entities that administer aggregate services on behalf of or to First Nation governments and their communities. Transparent and accountable First Nation governments attract investment, create opportunities, and effectively support their citizens. Transparent and accountable institutions and organizations strengthen the fabric of Indigenous governments across Canada, assist Indigenous communities and their governments in attracting investment, and support Indigenous participation in the Canadian economy. Ultimately, good governance practices are essential for active Indigenous participation in Canadian society and the economy.

Repayable contributions: It is possible to have recoveries under the contribution program.

Results achieved: Please refer to the Results: what we achieved section in the 2016–17 Departmental Results Report.

Audits completed or planned: No audit work was completed or planned in this program area in 2016–2017.

Evaluations completed or planned: An evaluation of Governance and Institutions of Government began in 2015–2016 and was completed in March 2017. An evaluation of Matrimonial Real Property, a component of the Governance and Institutions of Government program, began in 2016–2017 and is expected to be completed in August 2017.

Engagement of applicants and recipients: In July 2016, the Minister of INAC and the National Chief of the Assembly of First Nation signed a memorandum of understanding to establish a new fiscal relationship on a nation-to-nation level with Indigenous peoples, based on the recognition of rights, respect, co-operation and partnership.

The program regularly consults and engages with First Nations Fiscal Management Act institutions (i.e. the First Nations Tax Commission, the First Nations Financial Management Board, and the First Nations Finance Authority) on funding, program implementation and policy issues (e.g., annual corporate plans, budgets and reports, program terms and conditions, legislative and regulatory proposals).

Performance information (dollars)
Type of transfer payment 2014–2015 Actual spending 2015–2016 Actual spending 2016–2017 Planned spending 2016–2017 Total authorities available for use 2016–2017 Actual spending (authorities used) Variance (2016–2017 Actual minus 2016–2017 Planned)
Grants
Grant for Band Support Funding 154,748,327 157,748,998 229,300,671 160,929,272 160,929,272 (68,371,399)
Grant to the Miawpukek Indian Band to support designated programs 10,424,808 10,633,304 10,845,970 10,845,970 10,845,970 0
Grant to the First Nations Finance Authority pursuant to the First Nations Fiscal and Statistical Management Act 500,000 500,000 500,000 500,000 500,000 0
Grants to British Columbia Indian bands in lieu of a per capita annuity 300,000 300,000 300,000 300,000 300,000 0
(S) Indian Annuities Treaty payments 950 0 0 0 0 0
Total grants 165,974,085 169,182,302 240,946,641 172,575,242 172,575,242 (68,371,399)
Contributions
Contributions to supply public services in Indian Government Support and to build strong governance, administrative and accountability systems 210,356,547 212,473,026 115,893,360 234,789,856 234,789,856 118,896,496
Contributions for the purpose of consultation and policy development 1,432,940 474,770 0 1,441,277 1,441,277 1,441,277
Contributions to promote social and political development in the North and for NorthernersFootnote 1 638,415 638,415 0 638,415 638,415 638,415
Total contributions 212,427,902 213,586,211 115,893,360 236,869,548 236,869,548 120,976,188
Total other types of transfer payments 0 0 0 0 0 0
Total transfer payments 378,401,987 382,768,513 356,840,001 409,444,790 409,444,790 52,604,789
Due to rounding, figures may not add to totals shown.

Comments on variances: The difference between 2016–2017 planned spending and actual spending primarily reflects additional resources reallocated during the year for Indian Government Support activities to meet demand for Indigenous Governance Institutions and Organizations services (including an internal transfer of about $68 million from grants to contributions), as well as incremental funding provided through Supplementary Estimates to support First Nations' access to capital markets (Budget 2016).

Transfer payments for Rights and Interests of Indigenous PeoplesFootnote 2

Start date/End date: Ongoing

Type of transfer payments: Grants and contributions

Type of appropriations: Transfer payments are voted unless otherwise denoted with an (S) in below Planning Information table.

Strategic Outcome: Support good governance, rights and interests of Indigenous peoples

Description: This Program seeks to strengthen collaboration between governments and Indigenous groups through mutual respect, trust, understanding, shared responsibilities, accountability, dialogue and negotiation concerning the rights and interests of Indigenous peoples. Partnerships will be established to contribute to the strengthening of the social, economic and cultural well-being of Indigenous communities to support conditions for more active participation in Canadian society. The Program also addresses reconciliation objectives, constitutional and historic obligations and public policy by: negotiating agreements that achieve clarity with respect to law-making authority and the ownership, use and control of lands and resources; addressing specific claims; dealing with special claims; developing multi-partner processes in areas identified by Indigenous groups and the federal government; and supporting effective and meaningful consultation and accommodation with Indigenous groups and their representation in federal policy and program development.

Repayable contributions: None

Results achieved: Please refer to the Results: what we achieved section in the 2016–17 Departmental Results Report.

Audits completed or planned: No audit work was completed or planned in this program area in 2016–2017.

Evaluations completed or planned: An evaluation of Métis Relations and Rights Management and Non-Status Indian Relations, which was planned for 2016–2017, has been deferred to 2018–2019. An evaluation of Specific Claims, a component of Rights and Interests of Indigenous Peoples, is planned for 2017–2018.

Engagement of applicants and recipients: Recipients were involved in recognition of rights and self-determination discussions, the negotiation and implementation processes, the development of joint work plans, the review and approval of funding proposals, and ongoing discussions to promote effective and meaningful consultation in federal policy and program development. Indigenous groups under self-government negotiations were consulted and kept informed on the status of the new self-government fiscal policy being collaboratively developed with current Indigenous Governments.

Performance information (dollars)
Type of transfer payment 2014–2015 Actual spending 2015–2016 Actual spending 2016–2017 Planned spending 2016–2017 Total authorities available for use 2016–2017 Actual spending (authorities used) Variance (2016–2017 Actual minus 2016–2017 Planned)
Grants
Grants to First Nations to settle specific and special claims negotiated by Canada and/or awarded by the Specific Claims Tribunal 35,972,153 28,996,054 372,608,693 576,287,804 383,092,933 10,484,240
Total grants 35,972,153 28,996,054 372,608,693 576,287,804 383,092,933 10,484,240
Contributions
Contributions to support the negotiation and implementation of Treaties, Claims and self-government agreements or initiatives 45,029,223 46,891,597 20,878,679 56,118,323 56,118,323 35,239,644
Contributions to support the basic organizational capacity of representative Aboriginal organizations 21,108,800 21,172,161 10,940,796 26,446,839 26,446,839 15,506,043
Federal Interlocutor's Contribution Program 7,441,474 14,901,192 14,943,588 21,614,187 21,614,187 6,670,599
Contributions to supply public services in Indian Government Support and to build strong governance, administrative and accountability systems 8,829,189 10,130,054 9,734,799 11,430,226 11,430,226 1,695,427
Contributions for the purpose of consultation and policy development 9,574,621 9,763,249 23,744,071 22,967,974 21,467,974 (2,276,097)
Contributions to promote social and political development in the North and for NorthernersFootnote 1 0 0 1,050,000 0 0 (1,050,000)
Contributions for promoting the safe use, development, conservation and protection of the North's natural resources, and promoting scientific development 0 0 72,083 0 0 (72,083)
Total contributions 91,983,306 102,858,253 81,364,016 138,577,549 137,077,549 55,713,533
Total other types of transfer payments 0 0 0 0 0 0
Total transfer payments 127,955,459 131,854,307 453,972,709 714,865,353 520,170,482 66,197,773
Due to rounding, figures may not add to totals shown.

Comments on variances: The difference between planned spending and actual spending primarily reflects incremental funding provided through Supplementary Estimates for: the settlement of special claims; the negotiation and settlement of specific claims program; the negotiation of comprehensive land claims and incremental treaty and non-treaty agreements across Canada; and Indigenous Representative Organizations (Budget 2016). This increase is partially offset by re-profiles of funds that are not required in the current fiscal year, such as the specific claims settlement, and funding reallocated to other programs. Specific claims settlement funding cannot be used for any other purpose than for settling specific claims, but can be re-profiled to future years to be available for the intended purpose.

Transfer payments for Management and Implementation of Agreements and Treaties

Start date/End date: Ongoing

Type of transfer payments: Grants and contributions

Type of appropriations: Transfer payments are voted unless otherwise denoted with an (S) in below Planning Information table.

Strategic Outcome: Support good governance, rights and interests of Indigenous peoples

Description: This Program aims to create and maintain ongoing partnerships to support fulfilment of Canada's legal obligations pursuant to both pre and post-1975 treaties, while considering ongoing rights and interests of Indigenous peoples. This Program supports Indigenous communities in articulating their interests, participating in economic activities, and managing and developing land and resources, where applicable. It also helps to demonstrate the importance of treaties and related partnerships between the Crown and Indigenous peoples. This is achieved by honouring Canada's obligations as set out in final settlement agreements and treaties, and by improving collaboration between Canada and Indigenous peoples, and between Canada and pre and post-1975 Treaty groups. Creating and maintaining relationships and partnerships that honour pre and post-1975 treaties contributes to strengthened, healthy, self-reliant and sustainable Indigenous communities while promoting delivery of programs and services vital to the health and advancement of Indigenous peoples.

Repayable contributions: None

Results achieved: Please refer to the Results: what we achieved section in the 2016–17 Departmental Results Report.

Audits completed or planned: An audit of the Implementation of Modern Treaty Obligations, planned for 2016–2017, has been postponed to 2019–2020.

Evaluations completed or planned: An evaluation of Pre-1975 Treaties is planned for 2018–2019.

Engagement of applicants and recipients: In December 2016, Indigenous governments, under self-government agreements, discussed the co-development of a fiscal approach to self-government agreements and the importance of the fiscal relationship in supporting reconciliation, with Deputy Ministers from INAC and other federal departments and agencies. In 2016–2017, INAC engaged Nunavut, Quebec and Atlantic Land Claims Agreements treaty partners on the issue of transfer payments to government institutions by asking them to submit budgets, work plans and budget reviews and meet all requirements within Department time frames. INAC also discussed ongoing treaty implementation issues with these partners at tri-annual or quarterly implementation panel/committee meetings. The Department continues to engage Yukon's 11 Self-Governing First Nations and the Government of Yukon through the Implementation Working Group to ensure all parties meet and advance obligations and make progress on mutual goals.

Under the James Bay and Northern Quebec Agreement, negotiations with Makivik Corporation led to the signing of the 2016–2017 Nunavik Housing Agreement and the renewal of a five-year Nunavik Housing Agreement. Productive discussions were also held on the review and renewal of a 10-year implementation plan for the Nunavik Inuit Land Claims Agreement, which will expire on March 31, 2018.

For the Nunavut region, the Department worked closely with Nunavut Tunngavik Incorporated on key issues affecting Inuit public service employment, federal contracting in the Nunavut Settlement Area, and economic development and resource management throughout the territory. The Department administered 36 grants, 21 contribution agreements and 54 funding amendments for the implementation of modern treaties and self-government agreements. Regular engagement with treaty partners in British Columbia, Yukon, Northwest Territories and the Prairies also helped streamline the transfer of funds and resolve problems or issues.

Special efforts were made to engage with Northwest Territories treaty boards on the issue of core funding renewal, including face-to-face meetings with board executive directors.

Various treaty partners, especially in Yukon and British Columbia, took part in the one-year extension process for their current transfer agreements. Recognition of Indigenous Rights and Self-Determination discussions began in Yukon, Northwest Territories and British Columbia on longer-term agreements and future funding renewals. Recipients also helped review and approve supplementary funding proposals.

Performance information (dollars)
Type of transfer payment 2014–2015 Actual spending 2015–2016 Actual spending 2016–2017 Planned spending 2016–2017 Total authorities available for use 2016–2017 Actual spending (authorities used) Variance (2016–2017 Actual minus 2016–2017 Planned)
Grants
Grants to implement comprehensive land claims and self-government agreements 415,905,951 436,540,831 470,925,141 477,415,037 477,415,037 6,489,896
(S) Grants to Aboriginal organizations designated to receive claim settlement payments pursuant to Comprehensive Land Claim Settlement Acts 69,051,514 57,412,370 66,317,287 69,236,768 69,236,768 2,919,481
Grants to First Nations to settle specific and special claims negotiated by Canada and/or awarded by the Specific Claims Tribunal 0 0 0 10,000,000 10,000,000 10,000,000
(S) Indian Annuities Treaty payments 2,117,170 1,839,924 1,400,000 2,237,965 2,237,965 837,965
Grants to Participating First Nations and the First Nations Education Authority Pursuant to the First Nations Jurisdiction over Education in British Columbia Act 0 0 600,000 0 0 (600,000)
(S) Grant to the Nunatsiavut Government for the implementation of the Labrador Inuit Land Claims Agreement pursuant to the Labrador Inuit Land Claims Agreement Act 18,357,713 0 0 0 0 0
Total grants 505,432,348 495,793,125 539,242,428 558,889,770 558,889,770 19,647,342
Contributions
Contributions to support the negotiation and implementation of Treaties, Claims and self-government agreements or initiatives 231,228,722 291,835,034 241,845,478 281,016,206 281,016,206 39,170,728
Contributions for the purpose of consultation and policy development 3,539,780 0 3,517,929 0 0 (3,517,929)
Contributions to support First Nations Elementary and Secondary Educational Advancement 0 0 319,000 0 0 (319,000)
Total contributions 234,768,502 291,835,034 245,682,407 281,016,206 281,016,206 35,333,799
Total other types of transfer payments 0 0 0 0 0 0
Total transfer payments 740,200,849 787,628,159 784,924,835 839,905,976 839,905,976 54,981,141
Due to rounding, figures may not add to totals shown.

Comments on variances: The difference between 2016–2017 planned spending and actual spending primarily reflects incremental funding provided through Supplementary Estimates for Inuit housing (Budget 2016) and for the settlement of special claims. This difference also reflects additional funding reallocated internally for education under the James Bay and Northern Quebec Agreement and for the implementation of comprehensive claims.

Transfer payments for Education

Start date/End date: Ongoing

Type of transfer payments: Grants and contributions

Type of appropriations: Transfer payments are voted unless otherwise denoted with an (S) in below Planning Information table.

Strategic Outcome: Individual, family and community well-being for First Nations and Inuit

Description: This Program's overarching goal is to work in partnership with First Nations, provincial and territorial governments and other education stakeholders, to provide eligible First Nation and Inuit students with support in order to achieve educational outcomes that are comparable to those of other Canadians. The Education Program provides funding for culturally-appropriate elementary and secondary education for eligible First Nation students ordinarily resident on-reserve, and financially supports post-secondary education for eligible First Nation and Inuit students.

Repayable contributions: None

Results achieved: Please refer to the Results: what we achieved section in the 2016–17 Departmental Results Report.

Audits completed or planned: No audit work was completed or planned in this program area in 2016–2017.

Evaluations completed or planned: A review of the Implementation of the Tripartite Education Framework Agreement was completed in June 2016 and the report will be closed as an internal document.

Engagement of applicants and recipients: In 2016–2017, the Department engaged recipients through ongoing funding activities including delivering more than $245 million in additional Budget 2016 funds for, among other things, discussions on the cost pressures faced by First Nations (e.g., effects of population growth on educational services, etc.). INAC also engaged recipients through National Selection Committee discussions on the New Paths for Education, First Nation Student Success, Education Partnerships, and Post-Secondary Partnerships programs, which offered detailed and current information on areas where recipients hope to deliver these services.

On December 16, 2016, an agreement with the Manitoba First Nations Education Resource Centre established the Manitoba First Nations School System, with operations beginning as of July 1, 2017.

The Department also signed two new tripartite education agreements — one with the Province of Ontario and Association of Iroquois and Allied Indians, and another with the Province of Quebec and Institut Tshakapesh, which represents seven Innu communities in Quebec. These agreements commit the parties to work together to promote the success of First Nation students.

In 2016–2017, the Department began engaging with First Nations to build a new fiscal relationship to provide sufficient, predictable and sustained funding for on-reserve education. This has involved setting up five technical task teams to address important issues affecting education outcomes for First Nation students.

Performance information (dollars)
Type of transfer payment 2014–2015 Actual spending 2015–2016 Actual spending 2016–2017 Planned spending 2016–2017 Total authorities available for use 2016–2017 Actual spending (authorities used) Variance (2016–2017 Actual minus 2016–2017 Planned)
Grants
Grants to support First Nations and Inuit Post-Secondary Educational Advancement 1,047,102 994,120 1,500,000 1,092,714 1,092,714 (407,286)
Grants to increase First Nations and Inuit Youth Participation in Education and Labour Market Opportunities 35,000 45,000 45,000 45,000 45,000 0
Grants to support First Nations Elementary and Secondary Educational Advancement 8,007 9,258 150,000 6,594 6,594 (143,406)
Total grants 1,090,109 1,048,378 1,695,000 1,144,308 1,144,308 (550,692)
Contributions
Contributions to support First Nations Elementary and Secondary Educational Advancement 1,370,659,613 1,399,815,020 1,435,425,670 1,680,325,427 1,680,325,427 244,899,757
Contributions to support First Nations and Inuit Post-Secondary Educational Advancement 331,538,650 335,101,393 349,306,107 350,217,704 350,217,704 911,597
Contributions to increase First Nations and Inuit Youth Participation in Education and Labour Market Opportunities 49,660,015 36,390,789 41,376,000 76,217,997 76,217,997 34,841,997
Total contributions 1,751,858,279 1,771,307,202 1,826,107,777 2,106,761,128 2,106,761,128 280,653,351
Total other types of transfer payments 0 0 0 0 0 0
Total transfer payments 1,752,948,388 1,772,355,580 1,827,802,777 2,107,905,436 2,107,905,436 280,102,659
Due to rounding, figures may not add to totals shown.

Comments on variances: The difference between 2016–2017 planned spending and actual spending primarily reflects incremental funding provided through Supplementary Estimates the First Nations elementary and secondary education (Budget 2016), and the First Nation and Inuit Youth Employment Strategy — Skills Link Program (Budget 2016). The difference also reflects additional funding reallocated internally from other programs.

Transfer payments for Social Development

Start date/End date: Ongoing

Type of transfer payments: Grants and contributions

Type of appropriations: Transfer payments are voted unless otherwise denoted with an (S) in below Planning Information table.

Strategic Outcome: Individual, family and community well-being for First Nations and Inuit

Description: This Program provides funding to four social sub-programs: Income Assistance, Assisted Living, First Nations Child and Family Services, and Family Violence Prevention. Together, these sub-programs assist First Nation individuals and communities in becoming more self-sufficient, protect individuals and families at risk of violence, provide prevention supports that allow individuals and families to better care for their children, and support greater participation in the labour market. The Program assists First Nation men, women and children to achieve greater independence and self-sufficiency in First Nation communities across Canada by providing funding for First Nations, First Nation organizations, provinces and others that provide individual and family services to on-reserve residents (and Yukon First Nation residents). These services help First Nation communities meet basic and special needs, support employability and participation in the workforce, and support the safety of individuals and families. Through these five social sub-programs, First Nations are better able to advance their own development, leverage opportunities and actively contribute to the broader Canadian economy and society.

Repayable contributions: None

Results achieved: Please refer to the Results: what we achieved section in the 2016–17 Departmental Results Report.

Audits completed or planned: An audit of the First Nations Child and Family Services Program was completed in March 2017.

Evaluations completed or planned: An evaluation of Family Violence Prevention was completed in May 2017. Three evaluations are planned for completion in 2017-2018 for this program area: the Public Safety Canada-led horizontal evaluation of the National Action Plan to Combat Human Trafficking (September 2017); the evaluation of Income Assistance (November 2017); and the evaluation of Assisted Living (March 2018).

Engagement of applicants and recipients: In 2016–2017, INAC issued calls for proposals for pre-employment supports, including case management, through the Income Assistance Reform initiative. Together with Employment and Social Development Canada, the Department helped ensure more First Nation communities across Canada took part in the initiative. The initiative has had good outcomes, with more than 10,400 on-reserve young adults receiving case management support and, as of March 31, 2017, approximately 7,300 leaving the income assistance program to pursue education or employment. A range of mechanisms were used to track funding recipients, including on-site visits, desk reviews, and ongoing communication.

INAC has formed working groups in all three Maritime provinces (consisting of First Nations, provincial governments, and subject matter experts) and supported First Nations-led research on income assistance. The Department has also continued to ensure the Income Assistance program is soundly managed via support, monitoring and compliance measures.

INAC continued to implement Canadian Human Rights Tribunal rulings and work with First Nations and other partners to reform the First Nations Child and Family Services program. To this end, it worked with the Assembly of First Nations and the First Nations Child and Family Caring Society of Canada to re-create the National Advisory Committee on Program Reform, attended regional tripartite tables, supported activities in Quebec and Manitoba by regional indigenous organizations, worked with the Nishnawbe Aski Nation on the needs of remote communities, collaborated with the Federal/Provincial/Territorial Indigenous Children and Youth Committee, signed a memorandum of understanding with the First Nations Health Council, and hosted an online survey.

The Minister also appointed a special representative, Dr. Cynthia Wesley-Esquimaux, who met with partners in each region to hear about wise practices and short- and long-term program reform solutions. Collaborations such as these demonstrate the Department's commitment to engage and work with partners and stakeholders to reform the First Nations Child and Family Services program.

Engagement with shelters funded by the Family Violence Prevention Program, and with the National Aboriginal Circle Against Family Violence (including discussions on recipient reporting), is integral to the work of the Family Violence Prevention Program. For example, in 2016–2017, INAC regional staff conducted a range of training and capacity-building initiatives. In the same year, the Family Violence Prevention Program launched an annual call for proposals for off-reserve prevention projects.

Performance information (dollars)
Type of transfer payment 2014–2015 Actual spending 2015–2016 Actual spending 2016–2017 Planned spending 2016–2017 Total authorities available for use 2016–2017 Actual spending (authorities used) Variance (2016–2017 Actual minus 2016–2017 Planned)
Grants
Grants to provide income support to on-reserve residentsFootnote 3 9,394,115 7,323,654 10,000,000 8,407,419 8,407,419 (1,592,581)
Total grants 9,394,115 7,323,654 10,000,000 8,407,419 8,407,419 (1,592,581)
Contributions
Contributions to provide income support to on-reserve residentsFootnote 4 991,939,516 1,032,502,927 1,034,663,082 1,055,905,261 1,055,905,261 21,242,179
Contributions to provide women, children and families with Protection and Prevention ServicesFootnote 5 678,553,838 708,789,784 704,594,372 799,489,207 799,489,207 94,894,835
Contributions for the purpose of consultation and policy development 0 1,317,932 250,000 0 0 (250,000)
Contributions to provide programming for low income reserve residents with children under the National Child Benefit Reinvestment InitiativeFootnote 6 37,357,835 Not applicable Not applicable Not applicable Not applicable Not applicable
Total contributions 1,707,851,189 1,742,610,643 1,739,507,454 1,855,394,468 1,855,394,468 115,887,014
Total other types of transfer payments 0 0 0 0 0 0
Total transfer payments 1,717,245,305 1,749,934,297 1,749,507,454 1,863,801,887 1,863,801,887 114,294,433
Due to rounding, figures may not add to totals shown.

Comments on variances: The difference between 2016–2017 planned spending and actual spending primarily reflects incremental funding provided through Supplementary Estimates to support investments in the First Nations Child and Family Services Program (Budget 2016) and the Family Violence Prevention Program (Budget 2016). The increase also reflects the reallocations of resources to meet increased demand for social development programs and services.

Transfer payments for First Nations Individual Affairs

Start date/End date: Ongoing

Type of transfer payments: Grants and contributions

Type of appropriations: Transfer payments are voted unless otherwise denoted with an (S) in below Planning Information table.

Strategic Outcome: Individual, family and community well-being for First Nations and Inuit

Description: This Program contributes to ensuring federal stewardship of the legislative and administrative responsibilities of the federal government pertaining to registration, membership, status cards and estates. Results are achieved through direct client services and partnerships with First Nations to determine eligibility for registration under the Indian Act, issuing proof of registration documents such as the Secure Certificate of Indian Status, and administering estates under the Indian Act. Through client-centric service delivery, the sound administration of Individual Affairs contributes to the well-being of First Nation individuals, families and communities.

Repayable contributions: None

Results achieved: Please refer to the Results: what we achieved section in the 2016–17 Departmental Results Report.

Audits completed or planned: The System Under Development Audit of the Secure Integrated Registration and Certification Unit was completed in January 2017.

Evaluations completed or planned: An evaluation of Registration and Membership is planned for 2017–2018.

Engagement of applicants and recipients: In 2016–2017, INAC Regional Offices launched a call for proposals to give First Nation communities and recipients access to contribution funding under the Estates Management Program. The Program supports First Nations individuals, communities and organizations in conducting estate-related initiatives such as: estate planning and will-writing workshops; information sessions on estate awareness and planning for illness, accidents, or other disabilities that can leave people unable to manage their finances; and the development of educational tools for members. The Estate Management Program encourages First Nation members to plan and administer estates to ensure peace of mind for themselves and their families. Recipients submitted project proposals outlining their goals, activities, budget and deliverables. Department officials then rated the proposals based on program objectives, expenditures, and eligibility criteria.

Performance information (dollars)
Type of transfer payment 2014–2015 Actual spending 2015–2016 Actual spending 2016–2017 Planned spending 2016–2017 Total authorities available for use 2016–2017 Actual spending (authorities used) Variance (2016–2017 Actual minus 2016–2017 Planned)
Grants
(S) Indian Annuities Treaty payments 5,893 8,482 0 4,682 4,682 4,682
Total grants 5,893 8,482 0 4,682 4,682 4,682
Contributions
Contributions to Indian bands for registration administration 4,341,747 4,522,379 8,066,674 4,994,071 4,994,071 (3,072,603)
Contributions to support Land Management and Economic Development 2,385,238 2,348,840 0 2,450,802 2,450,802 2,450,802
Contributions to supply public services in Indian Government Support and to build strong governance, administrative and accountability systems 511,721 322,881 209,039 1,191,971 1,191,971 982,932
Total contributions 7,238,706 7,194,100 8,275,713 8,636,844 8,636,844 361,131
Total other types of transfer payments 0 0 0 0 0 0
Total transfer payments 7,244,599 7,202,582 8,275,713 8,641,526 8,641,526 365,813
Due to rounding, figures may not add to totals shown.

Comments on variances: Variance is not material.

Transfer payments for Residential Schools Resolution

Start date/End date: Ongoing

Type of transfer payments: Contributions

Type of appropriations: Transfer payments are voted unless otherwise denoted with an (S) in below Planning Information table.

Strategic Outcome: Individual, family and community well-being for First Nations and Inuit

Description: This Program supports a fair and lasting resolution to the legacy of Indian Residential Schools and promotes reconciliation with former students, their families and communities, and other Canadians. INAC and the Indian Residential Schools Adjudication Secretariat (IRSAS), an independent, arm's-length body receiving administrative support from INAC, implement the Indian Residential Schools Settlement Agreement (IRSSA) — a multi-party negotiated settlement monitored by the courts — by resolving claims of abuse under the Independent Assessment Process and meeting the Government of Canada's obligations vis-à-vis the Truth and Reconciliation Commission. In addition to fulfilling legal obligations under IRSSA, INAC and IRSAS promote reconciliation between the Government of Canada and Indigenous peoples, as well as between Indigenous and non-Indigenous peoples, through specific reconciliation initiatives. A fair resolution of the legacy of Indian Residential Schools contributes to improved relationships between Indigenous peoples and other Canadians, and strengthens Indigenous communities.

Repayable contributions: None

Results achieved: Please refer to the Results: what we achieved section in the 2016–17 Departmental Results Report.

Audits completed or planned: No audit work was completed or planned in this program area in 2016–2017.

Evaluations completed or planned: An evaluation of Lessons Learned - Personal Credits was completed in September 2016.

Engagement of applicants and recipients: An annual call for proposals process is held to fund healing and reconciliation activities for groups of Independent Assessment Process claimants.

In 2016–2017, 11 groups ranging from three to 62 members received funding through eight contribution agreements totalling $775,842. The groups were from four provinces (Nova Scotia, Manitoba, Saskatchewan and Alberta) and one territory (Northwest Territories). Program activities include both traditional and contemporary healing and reconciliation activities, such as pow-wows, healing circles and healing journeys, other ceremonies, and similar.

Indian Residential Schools Adjudication Secretariat staff regularly engage with stakeholders to raise awareness of the availability of the Group Independent Assessment Process and encourage applications, particularly in communities with historically lower levels of participation. In 2016–2017, in addition to publishing information on the Independent Assessment Process website and on social media, the Indian Residential Schools Adjudication Secretariat met with federal stakeholders (INAC and Health Canada), survivor's groups, friendship centres, healing centres and other community organizations across the country to provide information sessions and encourage participation.

The 2017–2018 call for proposals for Group Independent Assessment Process projects began in September 2016 and ended December 1, 2016, during which time the Indian Residential Schools Adjudication Secretariat received 27 proposals. Of these, 20 groups representing 285 claimants were selected for funding in 2017–2018.

Performance information (dollars)
Type of transfer payment 2014–2015 Actual spending 2015–2016 Actual spending 2016–2017 Planned spending 2016–2017 Total authorities available for use 2016–2017 Actual spending (authorities used) Variance (2016–2017 Actual minus 2016–2017 Planned)
Grants
Total grants 0 0 0 0 0 0
Contributions
Contributions for Groups of Indian Residential School survivors who wish to resolve their claim as a group under the Independent Assessment Process 646,426 654,500 0 775,842 775,842 775,842
Contributions for the purpose of consultation and policy development 0 3,618,800 0 0 0 0
Total contributions 646,426 4,273,300 0 775,842 775,842 775,842
Total other types of transfer payments 0 0 0 0 0 0
Total transfer payments 646,426 4,273,300 0 775,842 775,842 775,842
Due to rounding, figures may not add to totals shown.

Comments on variances: The difference between 2016–2017 planned spending and actual spending primarily reflects incremental funding provided through Supplementary Estimates to continue Canada's legal obligations under the Indian Residential Schools Settlement Agreement.

Transfer payments for Indigenous EntrepreneurshipFootnote 7

Start date/End date: Ongoing

Type of transfer payments: Contributions

Type of appropriations: Transfer payments are voted unless otherwise denoted with an (S) in below Planning Information table.

Strategic Outcome: Full participation of First Nations, Métis, Non-Status Indians and Inuit individuals and communities in the economy

Description: This Program supports and strengthens the long-term viability of Indigenous entrepreneurial business, greater participation in the economy, and improved economic prosperity for Indigenous peoples. This Program — guided by the Federal Framework for Aboriginal Economic Development — helps create and grow viable Indigenous businesses through increasing access to capital, capacity, networks, business development services and business opportunities.

Repayable contributions: Contributions under this program may be conditionally or unconditionally repayable, as well as non-repayable. For more information, see the Terms and Conditions for Contributions to Support Land Management and Economic Development.

Results achieved: Please refer to the Results: what we achieved section in the 2016–17 Departmental Results Report.

Audits completed or planned: An audit of Economic Development Programs, planned for 2016–2017, has been postponed to 2017–2018.

Evaluations completed or planned: An evaluation of Lands and Economic Development Services is currently planned for 2020–2021.

Engagement of applicants and recipients: In 2016–2017, INAC promoted the meaningful economic participation of Indigenous businesses, organizations and entrepreneurs by funding projects to support collaborative approaches, frameworks and partnerships and foster opportunities for First Nations people and businesses in and outside the federal government. This included, among others, the National First Nations Sustainable Economic Development and Fiscal Relations Strategy developed by both the Canadian Council for Aboriginal Business and the British Columbia Assembly of First Nations.

INAC conducted outreach activities to inform current and potential recipients of opportunities, program support, partnerships, etc. and worked with federal departments and agencies in priority areas like women entrepreneurship (e.g., Native Women's Association of Canada) and tourism (e.g., Aboriginal Tourism Association of Canada) to leverage funds, strengthen partnerships, develop strategies and conduct government-wide strategic planning and policy initiatives.

To track compliance with program terms and conditions, in 2016–2017 the Department used a range of means to maintain dialogue with recipients (e.g., attendance at events, phone calls, emails, report reviews, meetings at headquarters if the recipient was in Ottawa, etc.). In 2016–2017, the Indigenous Entrepreneurship Program gave $33,927,000 in funding to the National Aboriginal Capital Corporations Association to advance Indigenous business and financial institutions, develop the Indigenous economy, and create jobs throughout Canada.

INAC has worked with Aboriginal financial institutions, the National Aboriginal Capital Corporations Association, and other key stakeholders to find ways to support and fund Indigenous entrepreneurs, expand the scope of services and programs in the Aboriginal financial institutions network, and increase access to capital for Aboriginal financial institutions. It has also developed and applied collaborative approaches, partnerships and frameworks for business and economic initiatives to ensure greater Indigenous participation in and outside the federal procurement system. Such initiatives have included national shipbuilding and defense procurement committees.

Performance information (dollars)
Type of transfer payment 2014–2015 Actual spending 2015–2016 Actual spending 2016–2017 Planned spending 2016–2017 Total authorities available for use 2016–2017 Actual spending (authorities used) Variance (2016–2017 Actual minus 2016–2017 Planned)
Grants
Total grants 0 0 0 0 0 0
Contributions
Contributions to support Land Management and Economic Development 37,282,246 35,474,312 36,450,000 43,657,735 43,657,735 7,207,735
Total contributions 37,282,246 35,474,312 36,450,000 43,657,735 43,657,735 7,207,735
Total other types of transfer payments 0 0 0 0 0 0
Total transfer payments 37,282,246 35,474,312 36,450,000 43,657,735 43,657,735 7,207,735
Due to rounding, figures may not add to totals shown.

Comments on variances: The difference between 2016–2017 planned spending and actual spending primarily reflects incremental funding provided through Supplementary Estimates to support economic development for the Métis Nation (Budget 2016).

Transfer payments for Community Economic Development

Start date/End date: Ongoing

Type of transfer payments: Grants and contributions

Type of appropriations: Transfer payments are voted unless otherwise denoted with an (S) in below Planning Information table.

Strategic Outcome: Full participation of First Nations, Métis, Non-Status Indians and Inuit individuals and communities in the economy

Description: This Program promotes conditions that will help improve community economic development and prosperity for Indigenous peoples. Guided by the Federal Framework for Aboriginal Economic Development — and its vision of "Enhancing the Value of Indigenous Assets" — this Program promotes greater self-reliance and participation in the mainstream economy and community well-being. This is achieved through supports to institutions and First Nations for land and environmental management and economic development.

Repayable contributions: Contributions under this program may be conditionally repayable. For more information, see the Terms and Conditions for Contributions to Support Land Management and Economic Development.

Results achieved: Please refer to the Results: what we achieved section in the 2016–17 Departmental Results Report.

Audits completed or planned: An audit of Economic Development Programs, planned for 2016–2017, has been postponed to 2017–2018.

Evaluations completed or planned: An evaluation of the Contaminated Sites On-Reserve (South of the 60th Parallel) Program was completed in June 2016. An evaluation for the Investment in Economic Opportunities component of Community Economic Development is planned for 2019–2020.

Engagement of applicants and recipients: Throughout 2016–2017, the Department used various means to maintain dialogue with recipients and monitor compliance with program terms and conditions (e.g., attendance at events, phone calls, emails, report reviews, and meetings at headquarters or recipient locations where feasible). In fall/winter 2016–2017, a series of pre-engagement discussions were held with regional land associations to guide and inform future engagement in the Reserve Land and Environment Management Program.

INAC has worked with key stakeholders like the Lands Advisory Board and the Lands Advisory Board Resource Centre to support First Nations at development and operational stages of the First Nations Land Management Regime. It has also worked with the National Aboriginal Lands Managers Association to help First Nations manage and administer their land, environment and natural resources under the Indian Act by building capacity and supporting land use planning and survey initiatives.

For the Contaminated Sites (On-Reserve) Program, INAC helped First Nation communities carry out environmental assessments at 100 sites and remediation activities at 175 priority sites.

Lastly, INAC provided funding to help the National Aboriginal Lands Managers Association inform First Nations about commercial leasing policy and the Additions to Reserve Toolkit. It also helped the Assembly of First Nations finalize the Additions to Reserve/New Reserve policy directive.

INAC has encouraged the Council of Native Development Officers and the Federation of Canadian Municipalities to support joint strategic economic development planning between First Nation communities and neighbouring municipalities across Canada.

Through calls for proposals, INAC has continued to help First Nation and Inuit communities across Canada prepare for and benefit from major economic opportunities in cases where communities cannot do so on their own.

Performance information (dollars)
Type of transfer payment 2014–2015 Actual spending 2015–2016 Actual spending 2016–2017 Planned spending 2016–2017 Total authorities available for use 2016–2017 Actual spending (authorities used) Variance (2016–2017 Actual minus 2016–2017 Planned)
Grants
Grants to First Nations to settle specific and special claims negotiated by Canada and/or awarded by the Specific Claims Tribunal 487,201 217,145 5,000,000 3,602,214 602,214 (4,397,786)
Total grants 487,201 217,145 5,000,000 3,602,214 602,214 (4,397,786)
Contributions
Contributions to support Land Management and Economic Development 137,696,466 143,112,089 142,483,159 168,961,489 168,961,489 26,478,330
Contributions to First Nations for the management of contaminated sites 29,434,295 22,882,344 3,287,071 50,234,091 50,234,091 46,947,020
Contributions for the purpose of consultation and policy development 920,906 900,000 1,283,000 1,120,000 1,120,000 (163,000)
Contributions to support the negotiation and implementation of Treaties, Claims and self-government agreements or initiatives 41,117 0 0 0 0 0
Total contributions 168,092,784 166,894,433 147,053,230 220,315,580 220,315,580 73,262,350
Total other types of transfer payments 0 0 0 0 0 0
Total transfer payments 168,579,985 167,111,578 152,053,230 223,917,794 220,917,794 68,864,564
Due to rounding, figures may not add to totals shown.

Comments on variances: The difference between planned spending and actual spending primarily reflects incremental funding provided through Supplementary Estimates for the First Nations Land Management Regime, and the assessment, management and remediation of federal contaminated sites (Federal Contaminated Sites Action Plan: Phase III and Budget 2016), as well as funding provided through internal reallocations for the Community Opportunity Readiness Program. This increase is offset by the deferral of activities associated with the implementation of treaty land entitlement in Saskatchewan. Specifically, a portion of the funding provided for payments to the Saskatchewan Association of Rural Municipalities and to the Province of Saskatchewan for compensation for the loss of their tax base as a result of the settlement of treaty land was not required in 2016–2017 due to delays in the transfer of lands to reserve status; this deferred funding has been re-profiled to 2017–2018, where it will be available for the intended purpose.

Transfer payments for Strategic Partnerships

Start date/End date: Ongoing

Type of transfer payments: Contributions

Type of appropriations: Transfer payments are voted unless otherwise denoted with an (S) in below Planning Information table.

Strategic Outcome: Full participation of First Nations, Métis, Non-Status Indians and Inuit individuals and communities in the economy

Description: This Program supports Indigenous community preparedness activities to engage with partners in economic opportunities, including the Strategic Partnerships Initiative (SPI) — an innovative, horizontal program intended to align federal efforts to support Indigenous participation in complex economic opportunities, particularly large regional opportunities and major resource developments. The Strategic Partnership Initiative provides a mechanism for federal partners to collectively identify emerging opportunities, target investment decisions and streamline program application and approval processes to support Indigenous communities at the early stages of large and complex economic opportunities. In doing so, closer partnerships with non-federal partners, including provincial and territorial governments, the private sector and Indigenous communities can be built. By addressing gaps in programming, this ensures that Indigenous peoples can participate in and benefit from priority regional opportunities and major resource developments.

Repayable contributions: Repayable contributions exist for this program. For more information, see the Terms and Conditions for Contributions to Support the Aboriginal Economic Development Strategic Partnerships Initiative.

Results achieved: Please refer to the Results: what we achieved section in the 2016–17 Departmental Results Report.

Audits completed or planned: No audit work was completed or planned in this program area in 2016–2017.

Evaluations completed or planned: An evaluation of the Strategic Partnership Initiative — West Coast Energy Initiative is planned for 2017–2018.

Engagement of applicants and recipients: The Strategic Partnerships Initiative continues to support economic readiness activities that let Indigenous communities take part in major economic development opportunities. In 2016–2017, its $14.4 million budget funded 19 initiatives across Canada in a range of areas such as clean energy, mining, forestry, fisheries, environmental assessment and monitoring, and tourism. The program also leveraged more than $38 million in extra funding.

Of the 19 initiatives, 13 were delivered by INAC regional offices (in conjunction with provincial ministries and federal departments) and six were delivered by other federal partners. In response to recommendations in this regard, the Initiative also supported greater Indigenous participation in West Coast Energy infrastructure projects. Working through Natural Resources Canada's Major Projects Managements Office — West along with Western Economic Diversification, Environment and Climate Change Canada, the Department of Fisheries and Oceans, and Transport Canada, the program invested $15.1 million in projects to support engagement and awareness, environmental protection, jobs and growth, and fish habitat restoration.

INAC engages partners and recipients through local governance structures that support Strategic Partnership Initiative projects (e.g., Labrador Trough, Ring of Fire, Voisey's Bay, Aboriginal Aquaculture in Canada Initiative, National Aboriginal Tourism Strategy, etc.), and continues to work with government departments and Indigenous organizations to assess needs and opportunities for new and existing major economic development initiatives. In 2016–2017, more than 40 partnerships were created or maintained while more than 213 communities played a direct or indirect part in SPI projects.

Performance information (dollars)
Type of transfer payment 2014–2015 Actual spending 2015–2016 Actual spending 2016–2017 Planned spending 2016–2017 Total authorities available for use 2016–2017 Actual spending (authorities used) Variance (2016–2017 Actual minus 2016–2017 Planned)
Grants
Total grants 0 0 0 0 0 0
Contributions
Contributions to support the Aboriginal Economic Development Strategic Partnerships Initiative 24,183,110 30,652,147 31,700,000 42,164,171 39,864,171 8,164,171
Total contributions 24,183,110 30,652,147 31,700,000 42,164,171 39,864,171 8,164,171
Total other types of transfer payments 0 0 0 0 0 0
Total transfer payments 24,183,110 30,652,147 31,700,000 42,164,171 39,864,171 8,164,171
Due to rounding, figures may not add to totals shown.

Comments on variances: The difference between 2016–2017 planned spending and actual spending primarily reflects additional resources reallocated during the year to support this program.

Transfer payments for Infrastructure and Capacity

Start date/End date: Ongoing

Type of transfer payments: Contributions

Type of appropriations: Transfer payments are voted unless otherwise denoted with an (S) in below Planning Information table.

Strategic Outcome: Full participation of First Nations, Métis, Non-Status Indians and Inuit individuals and communities in the economy

Description: This Program provides funding and advisory assistance to First Nation communities for the construction, acquisition, operation and maintenance of community infrastructure assets on reserves. These assets include drinking water systems, wastewater systems and community buildings. The Program also includes support for emergency management assistance, climate change adaptation projects and funding and advisory support for water and wastewater systems, education facilities, housing and other community infrastructure such as roads and bridges, electrification, and community buildings (these four sub-programs are collectively known as the Capital Facilities and Maintenance Program). Ultimately, this Program enables First Nations to participate more fully in the Canadian economy by establishing infrastructure that meets established standards, and the needs of First Nation communities.

Repayable contributions: Repayable contributions exist for the Capital Facilities Maintenance Program, the principal program through which the Government of Canada funds on-reserve community infrastructure. See the Terms and Conditions for Contributions to Support the Construction and Maintenance of Community Infrastructure.

Results achieved: Please refer to the Results: what we achieved section in the 2016–17 Departmental Results Report.

Audits completed or planned: Three audits were completed in 2016–2017 for this program area: the Follow-up Audit of Infrastructure On-Reserve (March 2017); the Audit of On-Reserve Housing (June 2016); and the Audit of the Emergency Management Assistance Program (January 2017).

Evaluations completed or planned: Two evaluations were completed in 2016–2017 for this program area: the Evaluation of Housing On-Reserve (January 2017) and the Evaluation of Emergency Management Assistance (March 2017).

Engagement of applicants and recipients:

Emergency Management Assistance Program
In 2016–2017, the Emergency Management Assistance Program continued to broker Emergency Management Service Agreements with provincial and territorial governments and First Nation representative organizations through joint negotiating sessions. These involved First Nation representatives from British Columbia, Saskatchewan, Ontario, New Brunswick, and Nova Scotia. INAC has worked with government partners (Public Safety Canada, Government Operations Centre, Health Canada — First Nations Inuit Health Branch, senior officials responsible for emergency management) and non-government partners (Canadian Red Cross, Assembly of First Nations, Indigenous Technical Organizations) to assess and improve core business and program performance, and continued to play an active part in bodies like the Indigenous Resilience Working Group.

On-Reserve Housing and Infrastructure
Between May 2016 and March 2017, the Government of Canada facilitated 19 sessions and one conference call with Assembly of First Nations chiefs, First Nations, the Public Policy Forum, academics, and industry experts to develop an effective long-term approach for on-reserve housing. This exercise was part of a broader National Housing Strategy and a dialogue on long-term on-reserve infrastructure investment and program reform. Eight of these sessions took place in Ottawa, while three were regional roundtables (Atlantic, Saskatchewan and Alberta, Ontario and Quebec). One session took place in Nova Scotia, three were in Ontario, two were in Manitoba, one was in Alberta, and two were in British Columbia. INAC also attended the Northern Housing Conference with 80 Ontario First Nations and took part in the Nishnawbe Aski Nation infrastructure summit on March 7 and 8, 2017.

In 2016–2017, First Nation communities worked with INAC regional offices to develop community level First Nations Infrastructure Investment Plans. The offices used these to develop their regional plans, which were then compiled into the National First Nations Infrastructure Investment Plan.

Climate Resilience
In 2016–2017, the First Nation Adapt program held five regional workshops to engage First Nation communities and organizations and begin a dialogue on climate change priorities and adaptation challenges. It also worked directly with communities and organizations to develop vulnerability assessments and adaptation planning projects.

Performance information (dollars)
Type of transfer payment 2014–2015 Actual spending 2015–2016 Actual spending 2016–2017 Planned spending 2016–2017 Total authorities available for use 2016–2017 Actual spending (authorities used) Variance (2016–2017 Actual minus 2016–2017 Planned)
Grants
Total grants 0 0 0 0 0 0
Contributions
Contributions to support the construction and maintenance of community infrastructure 1,102,280,976 1,123,125,932 1,091,038,543 1,701,902,169 1,701,902,169 610,863,626
Contributions for emergency management assistance for activities on reserves 105,299,211 111,982,318 64,977,822 117,918,260 115,686,700 50,708,878
(S) Contributions in connection with First Nations infrastructure 26,502,251 26,730,568 28,067,096 28,067,096 28,067,096 0
Contributions to support Land Management and Economic Development 0 0 0 4,645,227 4,645,227 4,645,227
Contributions to First Nations for the management of contaminated sites 0 0 0 270,564 270,564 270,564
Contributions for promoting the safe use, development, conservation and protection of the North's natural resources, and promoting scientific development 922,174 1,370,847 0 199,567 199,567 199,567
Total contributions 1,235,004,611 1,263,209,665 1,184,083,461 1,853,002,883 1,850,771,323 666,687,862
Total other types of transfer payments 0 0 0 0 0 0
Total transfer payments 1,235,004,611 1,263,209,665 1,184,083,461 1,853,002,883 1,850,771,323 666,687,862
Due to rounding, figures may not add to totals shown.

Comments on variances: The difference between 2016–2017 planned spending and actual spending primarily reflects incremental funding provided through Supplementary Estimates: for First Nations infrastructure (Budget 2016) including water and wastewater, education infrastructure, on-reserve housing, community infrastructure, cultural and recreational facilities, and waste management infrastructure; to reimburse First Nations and emergency management service providers for on-reserve response and recovery activities; for Operation Return Home: Manitoba Interlake Flood Remediation and Settlement; and for the First Nation Adapt program (Budget 2016). This increase was offset by funding reallocations to other departmental priorities.

Transfer payments for Urban Indigenous ParticipationFootnote 8

Start date/End date: The Urban Aboriginal Strategy ended on March 31, 2017. It will be replaced by the new Urban Programming for Indigenous Peoples, which will be implemented in 2017–2018.

Type of transfer payments: Contributions

Type of appropriations: Transfer payments are voted unless otherwise denoted with an (S) in below Planning Information table.

Strategic Outcome: Full participation of First Nations, Métis, Non-Status Indians and Inuit individuals and communities in the economy

Description: This Program supports participation of urban Indigenous individuals and communities in the economy. It is comprised of two streams: Community Capacity Support and Urban Partnerships. The Community Capacity Support stream provides funding to urban Indigenous community organizations to deliver programs and services that are designed to remove barriers and encourage innovative partnerships. The Urban Partnerships stream is comprised of a planning component and an implementation component. The planning component supports communities with multi-stakeholder engagement (private sector, municipalities, Indigenous groups) in the design and development of regional strategic plans and the identification of community priorities. These plans are then shared with the National Association of Friendship Centres which, in turn, implements the priorities through community projects.

Repayable contributions: None

Results achieved: Please refer to the Results: what we achieved section in the 2016–17 Departmental Results Report.

Audits completed or planned: An audit of the Urban Aboriginal Strategy Program was completed in June 2016.

Evaluations completed or planned: An evaluation of the Urban Aboriginal Strategy was completed in January 2017.

Engagement of applicants and recipients: In 2016–2017, INAC continued to help the National Association of Friendship Centres administer the Urban Partnerships and Community Capacity Support programs. Across Canada, the Association funded 129 urban indigenous organizations under the Community Capacity Support program and 192 initiatives under the Urban Partnerships program. The Department also funded 45 regional planning, partnership development and research initiatives through the Urban Partnerships program.

Budget 2016 committed the Department to engage with First Nations, Inuit and Métis to review the Urban Aboriginal Strategy and ensure it met the needs of urban Indigenous peoples. This comprehensive engagement process included: 21 Canada-wide roundtables attended by 362 urban indigenous people, including key stakeholders and partners; 1,299 online survey responses; 30 submissions; and two town hall meetings. Policy options to revise the strategy were based on feedback and analysis from the 2016 national engagement process, the 2016 audit, the 2017 evaluation, and other considerations.

Performance information (dollars)
Type of transfer payment 2014–2015 Actual spending 2015–2016 Actual spending 2016–2017 Planned spending 2016–2017 Total authorities available for use 2016–2017 Actual spending (authorities used) Variance (2016–2017 Actual minus 2016–2017 Planned)
Grants
Total grants 0 0 0 0 0 0
Contributions
Contributions to support the Urban Aboriginal Strategy 47,494,745 48,999,433 27,313,051 47,798,334 47,798,334 20,485,283
Total contributions 47,494,745 48,999,433 27,313,051 47,798,334 47,798,334 20,485,283
Total other types of transfer payments 0 0 0 0 0 0
Total transfer payments 47,494,745 48,999,433 27,313,051 47,798,334 47,798,334 20,485,283
Due to rounding, figures may not add to totals shown.

Comments on variances: The difference between 2016–2017 planned spending and actual spending primarily reflects incremental funding provided through Supplementary Estimates to renew the Urban Aboriginal Strategy (Budget 2016).

Transfer payments for Northern Governance and People

Start date/End date: Ongoing

Type of transfer payments: Grants and contributions

Type of appropriations: Transfer payments are voted unless otherwise denoted with an (S) in below Planning Information table.

Strategic Outcome: Self-reliance, prosperity and well-being for the people and communities of the North

Description: This Program strengthens the North's communities and people by: devolving responsibilities for lands and natural resources to territorial governments; fostering effective intergovernmental relations with territorial and Inuit governments; collaborating with Inuit organizations and providing support to Territorial Commissioners; subsidizing the costs of nutritious perishable foods and other essential items in isolated northern communities; providing grants for hospital and physician services in Nunavut and the Northwest Territories; working with northern communities, governments, and organizations to address the risks and challenges posed by climate change and reduce reliance on diesel; and advancing Canadian and northern interests through circumpolar forums such as the international Arctic Council. Canadians and Northerners will benefit from territorial governments ultimately having more control over their own affairs.

Repayable contributions: None

Results achieved: Please refer to the Results: what we achieved section in the 2016–17 Departmental Results Report.

Audits completed or planned: No audit work was completed or planned in this program area in 2016–2017.

Evaluations completed or planned: Two evaluations were completed in this program area in 2016–2017: an evaluation of the Grants to the Government of Northwest Territories and the Government of Nunavut for Health Care of Indians and Inuit (Evaluation of Northern Hospital and Physician Services, March 2017), and the Evaluation of Northern Governance — Support for Territorial and Northern Organizations (September 2016). The evaluation of Nutrition North is expected to be completed in 2017–2018.

Engagement of applicants and recipients:

Nutrition North Canada Contribution
The Department undertook a public engagement process between May and December 2016 to ask Northerners, Indigenous organizations, and other partners how to improve the program to meet the needs of Northerners while remaining sustainable. The process included community visits, stakeholder interviews, a survey, and written feedback. Key findings were compiled in the What We Heard Report and posted on the program website.

Climate Change Adaptation and Clean Energy
Throughout the five Northern regions from September 2016 to March 2017, INAC hosted, co-hosted and supported workshops and events to explore clean energy opportunities and challenges, and hosted teleconferences to share information and track progress. A multi-stakeholder working group will be formed to compile meaningful and relevant content for stakeholders. In 2016–2017, INAC engaged directly with stakeholders to select projects for funding that were recognized by territorial governments for their work with communities, utilities and organizations (in Nunavik and Nunatsiavut, the program works through Inuit organizations and regional governments). Community projects entering the next planning or construction stages have helped support and sustain former programs or projects where communities submitted letters of interest. In keeping with the Climate Change Preparedness in the North program and a commitment to the Pan-Canadian Framework on Clean Energy and Climate Change, INAC is responsible for developing a Northern Adaptation Strategy. From October 2016 to March 2017, INAC co-hosted or supported regional engagement sessions in the three territories, Nunavik and Nunatsiavut to help develop this strategy and design the program. During these sessions, the Department asked Northern communities and organizations about their climate change adjustment priorities and ways to improve coordination between Northern stakeholders. INAC also hosted discussions with organizations in each Northern region to improve local capacity and create a governance structure will identify regional priorities, develop proposals and implement projects.

Northwest Territories Devolution Grant
During the 2016–2017 fiscal year INAC continued its regularized ongoing engagement with the Government of the Northwest Territories and Indigenous Parties to the final Northwest Territories Land and Resources Devolution Agreement. INAC met its obligation to provide ongoing funding to Indigenous parties under the final Northwest Territories Lands and Resources Devolution Agreement. Funding agreements were finalized in summer 2016. This funding helps Indigenous parties play a role in managing post-devolution land and resources with the Government of the Northwest Territories, throughout the entire fiscal year Finance Canada has managed ongoing funding to the Government of the Northwest Territories through Territorial Formula Financing.

Hospital and Physician Services Grant
During the entire fiscal year INAC continued its regular ongoing engagement with the Government of Nunavut and Government of the Northwest Territories. In spring 2016, INAC signed annual grant agreements with the governments of Nunavut and the Northwest Territories that reimburse each territorial government a portion of costs incurred to provide hospital and physician services to Indigenous and Inuit residents during the entire fiscal year.

Nunavut Negotiation Grant
During the 2016–2017 fiscal year INAC resumed engagement with the Government of Nunavut and Nunavut Tunngavik Incorporated towards negotiating an Agreement-in-Principle for the devolution of lands and resources responsibilities. In February 2017, INAC signed an agreement with Nunavut Tunngavik Incorporated that funds half the costs of taking part in Nunavut Lands and Resources Devolution Agreement-In-Principle negotiations that took place during the 2016–2017 fiscal year.

Nunavut Capacity-Building Contribution
During the entire 2016–2017 fiscal year, INAC continued its ongoing normalized engagement with the Government of Nunavut regarding that government's financial management systems. In summer 2016, INAC entered another funding agreement with the Government of Nunavut to help the territory undertake certain activities during the entire fiscal year necessary to improve its financial management capacity.

Nunavut Act Amendments
In February and March 2017, INAC began consulting 12 stakeholders (Indigenous groups and the territorial government) on possible Nunavut Act amendments for Indigenous subsistence hunting. Funding was neither requested nor transferred for these consultations.

Along with the national Inuit organization (Inuit Tapiriit Kanatami), the Government of Nunavut, and other federal departments, INAC has continued to lead the way on Inuit land claims and Nanilavut's multi-stakeholder working group on lost loved ones from the tuberculosis era. This work has included outreach, policy development, the determining of research priorities, etc.

Along with Makivik Corporation, the Government of Quebec, and the Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation, INAC also leads a working group on Nunavik housing issues.

In a gesture of reconciliation, INAC was instrumental in transferring the Igloo Tag trademark to the Inuit Art Foundation.

INAC has a funding agreement with Inuit Tapiriit Kanatami and developed an Inuit-specific general assessment tool that takes Inuit governance realities into account. It also meets regularly with Inuit partners to review proposals that concern key policies, budgets and reporting cycles.

The Yukon Intergovernmental Forum was held on March 16, 2017.

Performance information (dollars)
Type of transfer payment 2014–2015 Actual spending 2015–2016 Actual spending 2016–2017 Planned spending 2016–2017 Total authorities available for use 2016–2017 Actual spending (authorities used) Variance (2016–2017 Actual minus 2016–2017 Planned)
Grants
Grants to the Government of the Northwest Territories and the Government of Nunavut for health care of Indians and Inuit 52,256,000 53,301,000 54,367,000 54,367,000 54,367,000 0
Grants for the Political Evolution of the Territories, particularly as it pertains to Devolution 8,632,697 7,356,558 8,250,036 7,691,938 7,691,938 (558,098)
(S) Indian Annuities Treaty payments 0 5,000 0 0 0 0
Total grants 60,888,697 60,662,558 62,617,036 62,058,938 62,058,938 (558,098)
Contributions
Contributions to support access to healthy foods in isolated northern communities 65,499,766 68,498,325 53,930,000 72,981,181 71,871,143 17,941,143
Contributions for promoting the safe use, development, conservation and protection of the North's natural resources, and promoting scientific development 2,189,362 2,559,000 1,143,246 5,593,403 5,593,403 4,450,157
Contributions to promote social and political development in the North and for NorthernersFootnote 1 3,250,431 2,838,850 857,111 3,919,441 3,919,441 3,062,330
Contributions to support the construction and maintenance of community infrastructure 1,560,638 1,385,225 0 0 0 0
Total contributions 72,500,197 75,281,400 55,930,357 82,494,025 81,383,987 25,453,630
Total other types of transfer payments 0 0 0 0 0 0
Total transfer payments 133,388,894 135,943,958 118,547,393 144,552,963 143,442,925 24,895,532
Due to rounding, figures may not add to totals shown.

Comments on variances: The difference between 2016–2017 planned spending and actual spending primarily reflects incremental funding provided through Supplementary Estimates to expand: the Nutrition North Canada Program to support all northern isolated communities (Budget 2014 and Budget 2016); the Northern Responsible Energy Approach for Community Heat and Electricity program (Budget 2016); and for the Climate Change Preparedness in the North program and First Nation Adapt program (Budget 2016). These increases were offset by funding reallocations to other departmental priorities.

Transfer payments for Northern Science and Technology

Start date/End date: Ongoing

Type of transfer payments: Contributions

Type of appropriations: Transfer payments are voted unless otherwise denoted with an (S) in below Planning Information table.

Strategic Outcome: Self-reliance, prosperity and well-being for the people and communities of the North

Description: This Program supports scientific research and technology in the North through programs and infrastructure to ensure domestic and international policy on key northern issues is better informed by a scientific knowledge base. The focus of this Program is to: research and monitor contaminants and their impacts on the ecosystem and human health through the Northern Contaminants Program; assess, manage and communicate scientific data and results, and contribute expertise to help inform public policy making and international controls on certain contaminants; and support the construction of the Canadian High Arctic Research Station. Northerners and all Canadians will benefit from a knowledge base that supports health and sustainable development and the positioning of Canada as an international leader in Arctic science and technology.

Repayable contributions: None

Results achieved: Please refer to the Results: what we achieved section in the 2016–17 Departmental Results Report.

Audits completed or planned: No audit work was completed or planned in this program area in 2016–2017.

Evaluations completed or planned: No evaluation work was completed in this program area in 2016–2017. An evaluation of the Northern Science and Technology Program is planned for 2019–2020.

Engagement of applicants and recipients: In 2016–2017, the Northern Contaminants Program engaged potential recipients through an annual call for proposals that reflected its strategic goals. To track progress and compliance with funding conditions, the Program reviewed recipients' mid-year and final project reports and included their final results in its annual research synopsis report.

Performance information (dollars)
Type of transfer payment 2014–2015 Actual spending 2015–2016 Actual spending 2016–2017 Planned spending 2016–2017 Total authorities available for use 2016–2017 Actual spending (authorities used) Variance (2016–2017 Actual minus 2016–2017 Planned)
Grants
Total grants 0 0 0 0 0 0
Contributions
Contributions for promoting the safe use, development, conservation and protection of the North's natural resources, and promoting scientific development 3,140,760 3,145,365 3,800,945 3,286,864 3,286,864 (514,081)
Contributions to support the construction and maintenance of community infrastructure 0 0 0 520,520 520,520 520,520
Contributions to promote social and political development in the North and for NorthernersFootnote 1 Not applicable Not applicable 0 180,000 180,000 180,000
Contribution for Inuit counselling in the SouthFootnote 9 187,000 452,000 72,083 Not applicable Not applicable (72,083)
Contributions to support the Advancement of Northern Science and Technology 2,396,736 2,414,758 0 0 0 0
Total contributions 5,724,496 6,012,123 3,873,028 3,987,384 3,987,384 114,356
Total other types of transfer payments 0 0 0 0 0 0
Total transfer payments 5,724,496 6,012,123 3,873,028 3,987,384 3,987,384 114,356
Due to rounding, figures may not add to totals shown.

Comments on variances: Variance is not material.

Transfer payments for Northern Land, Resources and Environmental Management

Start date/End date: Ongoing

Type of transfer payments: Contributions

Type of appropriations: Transfer payments are voted unless otherwise denoted with an (S) in below Planning Information table.

Strategic Outcome: Self-reliance, prosperity and well-being for the people and communities of the North

Description: This Program focuses on the management, sustainable development and regulatory oversight of the land, water, natural resources, and environment of the North, delivering on the Department's role as the Government of Canada's natural resource manager in Nunavut and the northern offshore and its post-devolution responsibilities in the Northwest Territories and Yukon. This Program involves: managing oil and gas resources development; supporting the sustainable management of active mineral exploration and development; supporting the sound management of contaminated sites and the few remaining INAC-managed land and water areas in the North; and ensuring the completion of territorial land-use planning including zones for conservation, development and other uses. Northerners and Canadians will benefit from economic opportunities and sustainable development.

Repayable contributions: None

Results achieved: Please refer to the Results: what we achieved section in the 2016–17 Departmental Results Report.

Audits completed or planned: No audit work was completed or planned in this program area in 2016–2017.

Evaluations completed or planned: An evaluation of Northern Land, Resources and Environmental Management was completed in May 2017. An evaluation of the Contaminated Sites Program is planned for 2019–2020.

Engagement of applicants and recipients: The Northern Contaminated Sites Program actively engaged with Indigenous and Northern communities to factor community concerns into the planning and remediation of contaminated sites in the three territories. It also provided funding to help the Government of Yukon safeguard human health and safety at abandoned mine sites like Faro, Clinton Creek, Mount Nansen, Venus Tailings, and Arctic Gold and Silver.

Performance information (dollars)
Type of transfer payment 2014–2015 Actual spending 2015–2016 Actual spending 2016–2017 Planned spending 2016–2017 Total authorities available for use 2016–2017 Actual spending (authorities used) Variance (2016–2017 Actual minus 2016–2017 Planned)
Grants
Grants for the Political Evolution of the Territories, particularly as it pertains to Devolution 0 0 0 466,750 466,750 466,750
Total grants 0 0 0 466,750 466,750 466,750
Contributions
Transfer Payments to the Government of Yukon for the care and maintenance, remediation and management of the closure of contaminated sites in Yukon 51,251,987 42,852,121 0 43,631,877 32,131,877 32,131,877
Contributions for promoting the safe use, development, conservation and protection of the North's natural resources, and promoting scientific development 8,390,728 4,302,973 11,226,729 9,320,473 9,320,473 (1,906,256)
Transfer Payments to the Government of Yukon for the remediation of the Marwell Tar Pit Site to support the Contaminated Sites Program 90,600 1,717,900 1,979,970 1,980,100 1,980,100 130
Total contributions 59,733,315 48,872,994 13,206,699 54,932,450 43,432,450 30,225,751
Total other types of transfer payments 0 0 0 0 0 0
Total transfer payments 59,733,315 48,872,994 13,206,699 55,399,200 43,899,200 30,692,501
Due to rounding, figures may not add to totals shown.

Comments on variances: The difference between 2016–2017 planned spending and actual spending primarily reflects incremental funding provided through Supplementary Estimates for the Federal Contaminated Sites Action Plan: Phase III and for the Arctic Regional Environmental Studies (Budget 2016). This increase is partially offset by the deferral of activities associated with the Federal Contaminated Sites Action Plan. The associated funding has been re-profiled to future years when it will be available for the intended purpose. The difference also reflects the reallocation of funding to other departmental priorities.

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