Lower-level Programs

Table of contents

Sub-Program 1.1.1: First Nation Governments

Description

This sub-program supports the core operations and capacity development of First Nations governments, including the professional development of their personnel. Support for community development and capacity building is through collaborative, coordinated and targeted community-driven investments, leveraging partnership wherever possible. Funding is provided to support the costs of core government functions such as the holding of elections, law-making and enforcement, financial management, general administration, and executive leadership. In addition, the sub-program provides advice and support to First Nations on governance matters, and develops and implements legislation and policies that support the modernization of governance frameworks and transparent and accountable governance, while simultaneously overseeing the discharge of the Department's statutory and regulatory obligations in respect of governance processes under the Indian Act. Activities include — but are not limited to — assistance in establishing governance and associated capacities, processes and mechanisms, such as the development and implementation of community election systems, adoption of open and transparent governance practices, law-making and development of enforcement authorities.

Results achieved
Expected results Performance indicators Targets Actual results
Enhanced governance capacity of First Nation Governments Percentage of First Nations who have submitted a plan and have received funding for the development or implementation of a Governance Capacity Plan 80% by March 31, 2017 2016–2017: 71%
2015–2016: 82%
2014–2015: 80%
Percentage of First Nations scoring low risk on the Governance section of the General Assessment 70% by March 31, 2017 2016–2017: 70%
2015–2016: 76%
2014–2015: 77%
Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2016–2017 Planned spending 2016–2017 Actual spending
(authorities used)
2016–2017 Difference
(actual minus planned)
379,957,788 385,234,529 5,276,741
Human resources (full-time equivalents)
2016–2017 Planned 2016–2017 Actual 2016–2017 Difference
(actual minus planned)
415 391 (24)

Sub-Program 1.1.2: Indigenous Governance Institutions and Organizations

Description

This sub-program provides funding and supports aggregate program delivery and capacity through Indigenous governance institutions and organizations at the local, regional and national levels, including tribal councils and AFOA Canada (formerly Aboriginal Financial Officers Association of Canada). To provide support to First Nation governments wishing to develop capacity and systems in the areas of taxation and financial management, the First Nations Fiscal Management Act institutions receive administrative, policy and financial support to deliver on their legislative mandates under the Act. Funding, as well as tools, training and advice, are also provided to organizations and institutions to support First Nation government efforts to implement the Family Homes on Reserves and Matrimonial Interests or Rights Act.

Results achieved
Expected results Performance indicators Targets Actual results
Governance institutions and organizations have the capacity to support First Nations Percentage of tribal councils scoring low risk on the General Assessmenta 90% by March 31, 2017 2016–2017: 88%
2015–2016: not applicableb
2014–2015: not applicableb
Percentage of First Nations Fiscal Management Act institutions scoring low risk on the General Assessment 100% by March 31, 2017 2016–2017: 100%
2015–2016: not applicableb
2014–2015: not applicableb
a The General Assessment is a tool used by the Department to measure funding agreement management risks. The assessment is completed by INAC staff, and then shared and discussed with recipients.
b INAC did not include the same or a comparable performance indicator in the Performance Measurement Framework in this fiscal year.
Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2016–2017 Planned spending 2016–2017 Actual spending
(authorities used)
2016–2017 Difference
(actual minus planned)
17,213,104 62,889,451 45,676,347
The difference between planned spending and actual spending primarily reflects the reallocation of resources to meet demand for Indigenous Governance Institutions and Organizations services. It also reflects incremental funding provided through Supplementary Estimates to support First Nations' access to capital markets (Budget 2016).
Human resources (full-time equivalents)
2016–2017 Planned 2016–2017 Actual 2016–2017 Difference
(actual minus planned)
4 8 4
The difference between planned and actual full-time equivalents is attributed to program restructuring.

Sub-Program 1.2.1: Negotiations of Claims and Self-Government Agreements

Description

This sub-program supports Canada's commitment to the negotiation of claims and self-government agreements as the best means for reconciling Aboriginal rights, as recognized and affirmed under section 35 of the Constitution Act, 1982, with the sovereignty of the Crown. It also supports Canada's commitment to negotiating self-government agreements to address aspirations for greater Indigenous autonomy and self-reliance and to promote good governance. With the participation of provincial and territorial governments, Canada negotiates claims and self-government agreements that provide Indigenous groups with a solid foundation for self-reliance and for the improvement of social, cultural and economic conditions within their communities.

Results achieved
Expected results Performance indicators Targets Actual results
Certainty and clarity with respect to law-making authority and the ownership, use and control of land and resources Percentage of objectives reached as identified in the negotiations action plans 80% by March 31, 2017 2016–2017: 85.5%
2015–2016: 91%
2014–2015: 88%
Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2016–2017 Planned spending 2016–2017 Actual spending
(authorities used)
2016–2017 Difference
(actual minus planned)
40,768,972 83,704,964 42,935,992
The difference between planned spending and actual spending primarily reflects incremental funding provided through Supplementary Estimates for the negotiation of comprehensive land claims and of incremental treaty and non-treaty agreements across Canada.
Human resources (full-time equivalents)
2016–2017 Planned 2016–2017 Actual 2016–2017 Difference
(actual minus planned)
140 238 98
The difference between planned and actual full-time equivalents primarily reflects incremental funding provided through Supplementary Estimates (as noted above).

Sub-Program 1.2.2: Specific Claims

Description

This sub-program provides support to address specific claims made by a First Nation against the federal government that relate to the administration of land and other First Nation assets, and to the fulfillment of Indian treaties. The Specific Claims sub-program is an alternative dispute resolution option in which First Nations may participate on a voluntary basis. Key activities include the assessment of the historical and legal facts of the claim; the negotiation of a settlement agreement if it has been determined that there is an outstanding lawful obligation; payment of monetary compensation to First Nations, pursuant to the terms of a settlement agreement or award of the Specific Claims Tribunal; and participation in proceedings before the Specific Claims Tribunal. The Government of Canada made the resolution of specific claims a priority when it announced the Specific Claims Action Plan in 2007, and reiterated its commitment to resolve claims in the 2010 Speech from the Throne. Following that, in the Federal Budget of 2013, funds were identified to continue to ensure that specific claims are addressed fairly and promptly. Resolving specific claims fairly and expeditiously addresses the legal rights of, and provides justice to First Nation claimants, discharges outstanding legal obligations of the Crown, and provides certainty for all Canadians.

Results achieved
Expected results Performance indicators Targets Actual results
Canada discharges outstanding legal obligations to First Nations fairly and promptly through negotiated settlement agreements or awards of the Specific Claims Tribunal Percentage of claims assessed within the legislated three-year time frame 100% of claims filed with the Minister are assessed within the legislated three-year time frame by March 31, 2017 2016–2017: 82%a
2015–2016: 100%
2014–2015: not applicableb
Number of negotiated settlement agreements concluded 10 settlement agreements concluded by March 31, 2017 2016–2017: 19
2015–2016: not applicableb
2014–2015: not applicableb
Percentage of awards of the Specific Claims Tribunal paid within 45 days of the award being made 100% of all awards of the Specific Claims Tribunal, unless otherwise agreed by the parties or directed by the Specific Claims Tribunal, are paid in full within 45 days of the award being made by March 31, 2017 2016–2017: 100%
2015–2016: not applicableb
2014–2015: not applicableb
a INAC did not meet the target as a result of the application of a risk management approach designed to improve the quality of assessments.
b INAC did not include the same or a comparable performance indicator in the Performance Measurement Framework in this fiscal year.
Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2016–2017 Planned spending 2016–2017 Actual spending
(authorities used)
2016–2017 Difference
(actual minus planned)
383,180,319 403,871,161 20,690,842
The difference between planned spending and actual spending primarily reflects incremental funding provided through Supplementary Estimates for the settlement of special claims, and for the renewal of the Specific Claims program. This increase is partially offset by re-profiling of the specific claims settlement funds that were not required in 2016-2017; these monies will be re-profiled to future years, when they will be available for the intended purpose. The funding was established to ensure a readily accessible source of funding to settle specific claims in a timely manner. The value and number of negotiated specific claim settlements and Tribunal awards is difficult to project, given the many factors outside of the Department's control.
Human resources (full-time equivalents)
2016–2017 Planned 2016–2017 Actual 2016–2017 Difference
(actual minus planned)
46 92 46
The difference between planned and actual full-time equivalents primarily reflects incremental funding provided through Supplementary Estimates (as noted above).

Sub-Program 1.2.3: Consultation and Accommodation

Description

This sub-program provides support to internal and external stakeholders to maintain collaboration with Indigenous groups and their representatives. It includes contributions to a representative organization for engagement on developing policy and programs, and advice on how to engage community members on the development of a community plan. In the context of the duty to consult, this support takes several forms, including: assistance to federal departments/agencies in fulfilling the Crown's duty to consult; engagement with Indigenous groups and representatives, provinces and territories, and industry with regard to that duty; and the negotiation and implementation of consultation protocols/agreements and related contributions (transfer payments).

Results achieved
Expected results Performance indicators Targets Actual results
Assistance provided in fulfilling the Crown's legal duty to consult and, where appropriate, to accommodate when Crown conduct may adversely affect rights of Indigenous peoples Number of instances where support is provided to assist in fulfilling the Crown's duty to consult 15,000 instances where support was provided by March 31, 2017 2016–2017: 14,800
2015–2016: not availablea
2014–2015: 15,504
a Specific data for this indicator were not included in the 2015-2016 Departmental Performance Report.
Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2016–2017 Planned spending 2016–2017 Actual spending
(authorities used)
2016–2017 Difference
(actual minus planned)
43,520,569 55,995,107 12,474,538
The difference between planned spending and actual spending primarily reflects incremental funding provided through Supplementary Estimates for Indigenous Representative Organizations (Budget 2016).
Human resources (full-time equivalents)
2016–2017 Planned 2016–2017 Actual 2016–2017 Difference
(actual minus planned)
42 39 (3)

Sub-Program 1.2.4: Métis Relations and Rights Management, and Non-Status Indian Relations

Description

This sub-program aims to enhance the representativeness of Métis and Non-Status Indian organizations and their ability to build partnerships with federal and provincial governments and with the private sector. It also proactively supports the reconciliation of Métis rights.

Results achieved
Expected results Performance indicators Targets Actual results
Enhanced capacity of Métis and Non-Status Indian Aboriginal Representative Organizations to effectively represent their members Percentage of Métis and Non-Status Indian Aboriginal Representative Organizations scoring low risk on the Governance, Planning and Financial Management sections of the General Assessment 75% by March 31, 2017 2016–2017: 87.5%
2015–2016: not applicablea
2014–2015: not applicablea
Assertions of Métis rights effectively managed Percent of self-identified Métis in five western-most provinces (according to National Household Survey) that are in Métis registries 29%b by March 31, 2017 2016–2017: not availablec
2015–2016: not applicablea
2014–2015: not applicablea
a INAC did not include the same or a comparable performance indicator in the Performance Measurement Framework in this fiscal year.
b This target reflects the expected decrease in overall rate of growth and potential increase in Métis Nation-Saskatchewan registrations.
c Due to data collection timelines for external partners, results are not currently available.
Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2016–2017 Planned spending 2016–2017 Actual spending
(authorities used)
2016–2017 Difference
(actual minus planned)
19,977,380 22,945,966 2,968,586
The difference between planned spending and actual spending primarily reflects incremental funding provided through Supplementary Estimates for Indigenous Representative Organizations (Budget 2016).
Human resources (full-time equivalents)
2016–2017 Planned 2016–2017 Actual 2016–2017 Difference
(actual minus planned)
6 7 1

Sub-Program 2.1.1: Elementary and Secondary Education

Description

This sub-program supports First Nation decision making by providing funding to eligible on-reserve students with elementary and secondary education services that are comparable to those required in provincial schools. The sub-program provides funding to First Nations, or organizations designated by First Nations, to pay salaries for on-reserve school teachers and other instructional services, reimburse tuition for on-reserve students who attend provincial schools, provide student support services (e.g. transportation), and enhance education services (e.g. curriculum and language development, teacher recruitment and retention, community and parent engagement in education, and Information Communication Technology capacity). Funding also targets a series of specific initiatives that: support students with identified, high-cost special education needs; improve student achievement levels in reading, writing and mathematics; develop school success plans; implement school performance measurement systems to assess, report on, and accelerate student progress; and encourage students to remain in school and graduate. Additionally, this sub-program invests in tripartite partnerships — amongst First Nations, provincial governments and the Government of Canada — to help First Nation students who move between on-reserve and provincial schools to succeed. This sub-program also includes a number of initiatives that support culturally appropriate education activities, including cultural education centres. It also provides support to First Nation and Inuit youth in their efforts to transition from secondary school to either post-secondary education or the labour market.

Results achieved
Expected results Performance indicators Targets Actual results
First Nation students progress in their elementary and secondary education The percentage of tested students on reserve who meet or exceed standard assessmenta for literacy and numeracy in the province of reference (at the testing interval adopted by that provinceb, referenced by gender and province) Incremental increase year after year
(Reporting against 2013–2014 baseline beginning in 2015–2016)
See table below
a Standardized assessment attainment and increases in attainment rates over time are proxy indicators for likelihood of overall progression in studies.
b Given data availability, results are reported by INAC region rather than by province. Due to collection timelines, actual results for the 2016–2017 year will not be available until 2018.
Actual resultsa
Province Gender Literacy Numeracy
2015–2016 2014–2015 Baseline
(2013–2014)
2015–2016 2014–2015 Baseline
(2013–2014)
Atlanticb Male 51% 67% 65% 52% 16% 16%
Female 57% 70% 70% 50% 54% 54%
Quebec Male 41% 38% 38% 37% 40% 33%
Female 44% 45% 45% 43% 38% 36%
Ontarioc Male 46% 47% 21% 34% 30% 18%
Female 49% 53% 32% 36% 20% 20%
Manitobad Male 20% 53% 53% 33% 59% 59%
Female 31% 65% 65% 29% 50% 50%
Saskatchewane Male Not available Not available Not available Not available Not available Not available
Female Not available Not available Not available Not available Not available Not available
Albertaf Male 25% 14% 28% 30% 21% 21%
Female 33% 26% 36% 31% 22% 19%
British Columbiag Male Not available 50% 45% Not available 50% 50%
Female Not available 50% 45% Not available 50% 50%
a Reporting on data for this indicator is only required for First Nation Student Success Program recipients. Actual results are for First Nation students on reserve who participated in standardized testing in 2015–2016; standardized testing results for 2016–2017 are expected in 2018. Data are not available for Saskatchewan, as standardised tests are no longer used in the province.
b Many funding recipients in the Atlantic shifted their assessment approach by testing different grades and therefore using different tests. This makes it difficult to compare 2014–2015 to 2015–2016.
c Five funding recipients included in the 2014–2015 calculations for Ontario did not have data available for 2015–2016 at the time of the preparation of the report; four additional funding recipients were included for 2015–2016.
d There was a marked decrease in the participation rates in Manitoba — 949 students were tested in 2015–2016 (501 females and 448 males) compared to 6,336 students in 2014–2015 (3,739 females and 2,597 males). As the data are aggregated, no analysis can be made as to whether the absence of specific student groups has caused a decrease in actual results.
e Testing of this nature is no longer performed in Saskatchewan.
f Some funding recipients in Alberta no longer test grade three students and others have added grade nine to 12 students. There is one extra recipient included in 2014–2015 calculations in comparison to 2015–2016.
g Published data are not available for British Columbia for 2015–2016. For 2014–2015, literacy and numeracy results for all genders were merged. For 2013–2014, results were not broken down by gender, and literacy results were reported by reading and writing.
Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2016–2017 Planned spending 2016–2017 Actual spending
(authorities used)
2016–2017 Difference
(actual minus planned)
1,497,154,017 1,787,403,845 290,249,828
The difference between planned spending and actual spending primarily reflects incremental funding provided through Supplementary Estimates for the First Nations elementary and secondary education program (Budget 2016), and the First Nation and Inuit Youth Employment Strategy – Skills Link Program (Budget 2016).
Human resources (full-time equivalents)
2016–2017 Planned 2016–2017 Actual 2016–2017 Difference
(actual minus planned)
262 272 10

Sub-Program 2.1.2: Post-Secondary Education

Description

This sub-program helps eligible First Nation and Inuit students access and succeed in post-secondary education. The sub-program provides funding to First Nations, tribal councils or regional First Nation and Inuit organizations to assist eligible students to pay for tuition fees, books, travel, and living expenses (when applicable). Financial support also targets a series of specific initiatives to: enable eligible First Nation and Inuit students to attain the academic level required for entrance to degree and diploma credit programs through entrance preparation programs offered by Canadian post-secondary institutions; and assist post-secondary education institutions to design and deliver university- and college-level courses that are tailored to the needs of First Nation and Inuit students. This sub-program also provides funding to Indspire — a national, registered non-profit organization — to provide post-secondary scholarships, including matching funds raised by Indspire from non-federal sources, and to deliver programs, such as career conferences, for secondary students in order to help First Nation and Inuit students pursue academic or career opportunities.

Results achieved
Expected results Performance indicators Targets Actual results
First Nation and Inuit post-secondary students who receive funding through the Post-Secondary Student Support Program (PSSSP) progress in their program of study. Percentage of PSSSP funded students who completed their academic year and were funded the next academic yeara Incremental increase year after year
(Reporting against 2012–2013 baseline data beginning in 2015–2016)
Overall retention
2016–2017: not availableb
2015–2016: not availableb
2014–2015: 46.7%
(2012–2013 Baseline: 42.8%)

Returned to same institution, program and level of study
2016–2017: not availableb
2015–2016: not availableb
2014–2015: 38.7%
(2012–2013 Baseline: 17%)

Returned to a different institution, program or level of study within the same region
2016–2017: not availableb
2015–2016: not availableb
2014–2015: 8%
(2012–2013 Baseline: 25.8%)
Percentage of First Nation and Inuit students, funded through PSSSP, who continue in the program beyond the first year of their program of studyc Overall retention for year one students
2016–2017: not availableb
2015–2016: not availableb
2014–2015: 30.6%
(2012–2013 Baseline: 25.5%)

Second year at same institution, program and level of study
2016–2017: not availableb
2015–2016: not availableb
2014–2015: 26.7%
(2012–2013 Baseline: 10.4%)

Second year at a different institution, program and level of study, within the same region
2016–2017: not availableb
2015–2016: not availableb
2014–2015: 3.9%
(2012–2013 Baseline: 15.1%)
a This indicator represents movement of all funded students from any academic year to the next.
b Due to data collection timelines, this information is expected to be available in 2018.
c This indicator represents movement of funded students from the first to second years of study only, and is also a proxy indicator for retention of students at a critical point of their education.
Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2016–2017 Planned spending 2016–2017 Actual spending
(authorities used)
2016–2017 Difference
(actual minus planned)
358,318,901 359,108,967 790,066
Human resources (full-time equivalents)
2016–2017 Planned 2016–2017 Actual 2016–2017 Difference
(actual minus planned)
17 20 3

Sub-Program 2.2.1: Income Assistance

Description

This sub-program provides funding to First Nations, First Nation organizations and the province of Ontario (under the 1965 agreement) to assist eligible individuals and families living on reserve who are in financial need, through the provision of basic and special needs that are in alignment with the rates and eligibility criteria of reference for provinces or territories. The sub-program also provides funding for service delivery and pre-employment services designed to help clients transition to, and remain in, the workforce. INAC also contributes to the funding of day care services for First Nation families in Ontario and Alberta.

Results achieved
Expected results Performance indicators Targets Actual results
Eligible men and women in need use income assistance supports and services to help them meet their basic needsa and transition to the workforce Percentage of Income Assistance clients and dependents, aged 16–64, who exit to employment or education Increasing year over year by March 31, 2017 2016–2017: not availableb
2015–2016: 20%c
2014–2015: 11%
Percentage of Income Assistance clients and dependents, aged 16–64, who participate in Active Measuresd Increasing year over year by March 31, 2017 2016–2017: not availableb
2015–2016: 7%
2014–2015: 8%
Income Assistance Dependency Rate Aligned to off-reserve dependency rate by March 31, 2017 2016–2017: not availableb
2015–2016: 29.8%
2014–2015: 31%
a Supports are provided to eligible clients and dependents in order to meet their basic needs in the following general categories: food; clothing; shelter costs including, rent, fuel/utilities, and other shelter-related costs; and other related costs.
b This information will be available in September 2017.
c Active measures is an approach to the delivery of social assistance. It is opposed to "passive measures", which is limited to the provision of a benefit. The "active measures" approach relies on two key components: 1) Active case management, which is a collaborative, client-driven process for the provision of support services through the effective and efficient use of resources. Case management supports the client's achievement of safe, realistic and reasonable goals within a complex health, social, and fiscal environment; 2) Client's access to services and programs aimed at reducing obstacles to employment and increasing employability through basic skills training, formal education, skills training, and career counseling.
d For this indicator, the 2015–2016 results are not comparable with previous years due to a change in data collection. As of 2015–2016, all exits of clients are counted, including dependents under the age of 16; prior to this, only exits of clients and dependents aged 16 or over were counted.
Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2016–2017 Planned spending 2016–2017 Actual spending
(authorities used)
2016–2017 Difference
(actual minus planned)
912,105,316 923,967,237 11,861,921
Human resources (full-time equivalents)
2016–2017 Planned 2016–2017 Actual 2016–2017 Difference
(actual minus planned)
73 73 0

Sub-Program 2.2.2: National Child Benefit

Description

This sub-program is a joint federal/provincial/territorial child poverty reduction initiative led by Employment and Social Development Canada. The sub-program has two components: a financial benefits component (the federal Canada Child Tax Benefit and National Child Benefit Supplement, and provincial/territorial integrated child benefits) and a reinvestment component (the National Child Benefit Reinvestment). Under the financial benefits component, the Department provides funding to the Yukon Territorial Government for the cost of the Yukon Child Benefit paid to First Nation families. Under the reinvestment component, INAC provides funding for community-based supports and services for children in low-income families for child care, child nutrition, support for parents, home-to-work transition and cultural enrichment.

Results achieved
Expected results Performance indicators Targets Actual results
In eligible regions, children in low income families have access to National Child Benefit/National Child Benefit Reinvestment benefits and supports Percentage of communities in which National Child Benefit Reinvestment projects are provided 100% by March 31, 2017 As announced in Budget 2016, the National Child Benefit has been replaced with the new Canada Child Benefit. The Department of Finance is reporting on results of the program.
2015–2016: not applicablea
2014–2015: not applicablea
a INAC did not include the same or a comparable performance indicator in the Performance Measurement Framework in this fiscal year.
Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2016–2017 Planned spending 2016–2017 Actual spending
(authorities used)
2016–2017 Difference
(actual minus planned)
53,091,312 38,734,108 (14,357,204)
The difference between planned spending and actual spending primarily reflects funding that has been reallocated to Income Assistance and Assisted Living sub-programs.
Human resources (full-time equivalents)
2016–2017 Planned 2016–2017 Actual 2016–2017 Difference
(actual minus planned)
6 5 (1)

Sub-Program 2.2.3: Assisted Living

Description

This sub-program provides funding for non-medical, social support services so that seniors, adults with chronic illness, and children and adults with disabilities (both mental and physical) can maintain functional independence. There are three major components to the sub-program: in-home care; adult foster care; and institutional care (institutional care is provided for eligible individuals in need of personal, non-medical care on a 24-hour basis). These services are available to individuals living on reserve or ordinarily resident on reserve who have been formally assessed by a health care professional (in a manner consistent with provincial or territorial legislation and standards), and identified as requiring services but without the means to obtain such services themselves.

Results achieved
Expected results Performance indicators Targets Actual results
In-home, group-home and institutional care supports are accessible to low-income individuals in need Percentage of clients whose assessed social support needs are met 100% by March 31, 2017 2016–2017: 98%
2015–2016: 99.7%
2014–2015: not applicablea
a INAC did not include the same or a comparable performance indicator in the Performance Measurement Framework in this fiscal year.
Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2016–2017 Planned spending 2016–2017 Actual spending
(authorities used)
2016–2017 Difference
(actual minus planned)
86,901,771 111,795,523 24,893,752
The difference between planned spending and actual spending primarily reflects the internal reallocation of resources to meet increased demand for Assisted Living, which was primarily due to an overall population increase on-reserve, combined with an increased number of persons requiring in-home social supports or institutional care, as well as rate increases.
Human resources (full-time equivalents)
2016–2017 Planned 2016–2017 Actual 2016–2017 Difference
(actual minus planned)
16 19 3

Sub-Program 2.2.4: First Nations Child and Family Services

Description

This sub-program provides funding for child and family services supporting the safety and well-being of First Nation children and families who are ordinarily resident on reserve. Culturally appropriate prevention and protection services are delivered by service providers in accordance with provincial or territorial legislation and standards. This sub-program supports: developmental funding for new organizations; maintenance funding for costs associated with maintaining a child in care; operations funding for staffing and administrative costs of an agency; and prevention funding. In 2007, following provincial lead, the First Nations Child and Family Services sub-program started introducing changes focussing on prevention. The goal of the prevention approach is to improve services, family cohesion and life outcomes for First Nation children and families on reserve.

Results achieved
Expected results Performance indicators Targets Actual results
First Nation children in need or at risk have access to and use protection and prevention supports and services Percentage of children not re-entering the child welfare system following a prior placement within the fiscal year (recurrence)a Increasing year over year by March 31, 2017 2016–2017: not availableb
2015–2016: not availablec
2014–2015: not applicabled
Percentage of children in care who are placed with a family member (kinship care)e Increasing year over year by March 31, 2017 2016–2017: not availableb
2015–2016: 15.95%
2014–2015: 16.12%
a Information regarding a child's admission into care, including the child's admission start date or the child's discharge date, is not captured in the information management system for this sub-program. Two regions (Ontario and British Columbia) receive and track child admission data, and a count based on the child maintenance data for both of these regions has been used to determine the percentage of children not re-entering the child welfare system following a prior placement within the fiscal year. There may be situations where a child does not have any reported placement expenses for a period of time, but is still in care for the fiscal year.
b Due to the reporting timelines for external partners, this information will be available in March 2018.
c This information will be available in September 2017.
d INAC did not include the same or a comparable performance indicator in the Performance Measurement Framework in this fiscal year. However, results were 30.54% for 2015–2016, and 31.14% for 2014–2015.
e Expense-based child maintenance data are received from recipients throughout the fiscal year. The percentage is based on eligible placement expenses based on the last day of the fiscal year. The fiscal years 2013–2014 to 2015–2016 represented a transition period in the Quebec region, as the unionization of foster families led to changes in how child maintenance data were reported. As a result, there was no clear distinction between a child serviced by foster care and a child serviced by kinship care. Therefore, numbers of kinship placements artificially appeared to go down. These data will be reported accurately for the 2016–2017 fiscal year.
Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2016–2017 Planned spending 2016–2017 Actual spending
(authorities used)
2016–2017 Difference
(actual minus planned)
679,011,897 768,037,213 89,025,316
The difference between planned spending and actual spending primarily reflects incremental funding provided through Supplementary Estimates to support urgent investments in the First Nations Child and Family Services program (Budget 2016) and for Jordan's Principle, as well as the reallocation of resources to meet increased volume for First Nations Child and Family Services and increases in provincial rates to maintain a child in care.
Human resources (full-time equivalents)
2016–2017 Planned 2016–2017 Actual 2016–2017 Difference
(actual minus planned)
40 39 (1)

Sub-Program 2.2.5: Family Violence Prevention

Description

This sub-program provides funding for family violence protection and prevention services that are responsive to community needs for which there are two components. The first component supports women, children and families living on reserve with family violence shelter services by providing funding to core shelter operations. The second component is to support family violence prevention activities by providing funding to Indigenous communities and organizations. The Family Violence Prevention sub-program also works to address issues related to Indigenous women and girls.

Results achieved
Expected results Performance indicators Targets Actual results
Men, women or children in need or at risk have access to and use prevention and protection services Number of women and children accessing INAC-funded shelters Not applicablea 2016–2017: not availableb
2015–2016: 3,365 women, 1,720 childrenc
2014–2015: 2,887 women, 2,828 children
Percentage of projects directed to community priorities/needs 95% by March 31, 2017 2016–2017: not availableb
2015–2016: not applicabled
2014–2015: not applicabled
a Please note that setting targets for this indicator is not appropriate as it represents the ability to meet the needs of First Nation women and children for access to shelters.
b Due to data collection timelines for external partners, results are anticipated to be available in Fall 2017.
c These figures are based on the 38 out of 41 (93%) recipient reports.
d INAC did not include the same or a comparable performance indicator in the Performance Measurement Framework in this fiscal year.
Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2016–2017 Planned spending 2016–2017 Actual spending
(authorities used)
2016–2017 Difference
(actual minus planned)
33,250,502 38,102,037 4,851,535
The difference between planned spending and actual spending primarily reflects incremental funding provided through Supplementary Estimates for the Family Violence Prevention Program (Budget 2016).
Human resources (full-time equivalents)
2016–2017 Planned 2016–2017 Actual 2016–2017 Difference
(actual minus planned)
12 14 2

Sub-Program 2.3.1: Registration and Membership

Description

This sub-program supports INAC, under the Indian Act, to maintain the Indian Register, determine entitlement to Indian registration, maintain departmentally controlled Band lists and provide advice on matters such as Band divisions and amalgamations. Through client services and partnerships with First Nations, the sub-program seeks to register eligible applicants pursuant to sections 5 to 7 of the Indian Act, and also issue proof of registration documents, such as the Secure Certificate of Indian Status, which identify those eligible to receive programs and services available to registered Indians. A current and accurate Indian Register and issuance of the Secure Certificate of Indian Status are fundamental to the effective and accountable delivery of federal programs and services for eligible users.

Results achieved
Expected results Performance indicators Targets Actual results
Applicants receive a decision on entitlement under the Indian Act within established service standards Percentage of registration applications for which a decision is rendered within service standards. (Current service standards being reviewed in 2015–2016) 80% by March 31, 2017 2016–2017: 84%
2015–2016: 84%
2014–2015: 96%
Eligible applicants receive Secure Certificate of Indian Status within service standards Percentage of eligible applicants issued a Secure Certificate of Indian Status within service standard. Current standard: 16 weeks from date that a completed application is received by the Department 90% by March 31, 2017 2016–2017: 78%
2015–2016: 94%
2014–2015: 94%
Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2016–2017 Planned spending 2016–2017 Actual spending
(authorities used)
2016–2017 Difference
(actual minus planned)
24,878,196 27,452,376 2,574,180
The difference between planned spending and actual spending primarily reflects additional resources reallocated internally for registration and membership activities.
Human resources (full-time equivalents)
2016–2017 Planned 2016–2017 Actual 2016–2017 Difference
(actual minus planned)
214 212 (2)

Sub-Program 2.3.2: Estates

Description

This sub-program ensures that the federal government's responsibilities (pursuant to sections 42 to 52 of the Indian Act) are met by developing policies and procedures, and providing guidance, information and support for the management and administration of Indian estates. The Indian Act provides the Minister of Indigenous and Northern Affairs Canada with exclusive jurisdiction over the administration of estates for First Nations individuals who were ordinarily resident on reserve at the time of their death (decedent estates), or for those declared by the appropriate provincial/territorial authority to be incapable of managing their financial affairs (living estates of dependent adults). The Indian Act also provides the Minister with discretionary jurisdiction to appoint guardians to administer the property of minors. INAC's role includes approving a will or declaring a will to be void in whole or in part and providing for the administration of both decedent and living estates through the appointment of executors, administrators or guardians. INAC may also act as the administrator or guardian of an estate when there is no one else eligible or willing to do so.

Results achieved
Expected results Performance indicators Targets Actual results
Canada fulfills its Indian Act obligations, in section 43 (a), to appoint executors and administrators of wills and estates within established service standards Percentage of estate files opened for which executors and administrators are appointed within 120 calendar days 90% by March 31, 2017 2016–2017: 94%
2015–2016: not applicablea
2014–2015: not applicablea
a INAC did not include the same or a comparable performance indicator in the Performance Measurement Framework in this fiscal year.
Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2016–2017 Planned spending 2016–2017 Actual spending
(authorities used)
2016–2017 Difference
(actual minus planned)
4,033,424 5,481,172 1,447,748
The difference between planned spending and actual spending primarily reflects additional resources reallocated internally for estate management activities, such as First Nation community estates planning workshops and/or training to First Nation communities on estates management.
Human resources (full-time equivalents)
2016–2017 Planned 2016–2017 Actual 2016–2017 Difference
(actual minus planned)
40 46 6
The difference between planned and actual full-time equivalents primarily reflects additional resources reallocated internally.

Sub-Program 2.4.1: Independent Assessment Process

Description

This sub-program supports one of the compensation elements established under the Indian Residential Schools Settlement Agreement — the Independent Assessment Process (IAP) — which is a non-adversarial, out-of-court process for claims of sexual abuse, serious physical abuse, and other wrongful acts causing serious psychological consequences to the claimant. The IAP aims to bring a fair and lasting resolution to harm caused by residential schools through a claimant-centered and neutral process. Updates on the IAP are posted quarterly on the Department's website.

Results achieved
Expected results Performance indicators Targets Actual results
Canada's obligations for the Independent Assessment Process, as per the terms of the Settlement Agreement, are fulfilled Percentage of payments processed within service standards (20 calendar days after appeal period, 85% of the time) 85% by March 31, 2017 2016–2017: 89%a
2015–2016: 91%
2014–2015: 74%
a This statistic was calculated based on 976 of 1,092 payments being processed within 20 calendar days.
Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2016–2017 Planned spending 2016–2017 Actual spending
(authorities used)
2016–2017 Difference
(actual minus planned)
165,991,965 168,219,547 2,227,582
The difference between planned spending and actual spending primarily reflects incremental funding provided through Supplementary Estimates for the continued implementation of the Indian Residential Schools Settlement Agreement, offset by the deferral of Independent Assessment Process settlement payments and delivery funding for continued implementation of the Indian Residential Schools Settlement Agreement.
Human resources (full-time equivalents)
2016–2017 Planned 2016–2017 Actual 2016–2017 Difference
(actual minus planned)
40 333 293
The difference between planned and actual full-time equivalents primarily reflects incremental funding provided through Supplementary Estimates for the continued implementation of the Indian Residential Schools Settlement Agreement. The completion timeline of the Independent Assessment Process was previously extended in response to both the influx of thousands of unanticipated applications received in the months prior to the application deadline and unforeseeable claim complexities. As a result, salary dollars were re-profiled to unfunded future fiscal years. The difference between planned and actual full-time equivalents reflects both the increased workload and extended timelines required to process and resolve these claims. Actual full-time equivalents have decreased from 449 in 2015–2016 as the overall volume of claims has decreased year-over-year. The 2016–2017 actuals represents 186 full-time equivalents for the Indian Residential Schools Adjudication Secretariat and 147.5 for the Settlement Agreement Branch.

Sub-Program 2.4.2: Reconciliation

Description

This sub-program provides ongoing support for the implementation of the Indian Residential Schools Settlement Agreement (IRSSA) and promotes reconciliation between Canada and former Indian Residential School students, their families and communities, as well as between Indigenous peoples and other Canadians. Reconciliation supports the implementation of IRSSA by working with the churches that ran the schools to ensure they fulfill their obligations under IRSSA, and by working with Health Canada as it provides health supports under IRSSA. The sub-program promotes reconciliation with an emphasis on leading the implementation of a departmental reconciliation framework and the analysis of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission's final report.

Results achieveda
Expected results Performance indicators Targets Actual results
Not applicable Not applicable Not applicable Not applicable
a In light of the conclusion of the mandate of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission in 2015–2016, and the conclusion of commemoration activities under the Indian Residential Schools Settlement Agreement, there were no planned activities for this sub-program. However, reconciliation and renewing the relationship between Canada and Indigenous peoples remains a key cross-cutting priority for the Department and the Government, and information on related activities and results are reported under other sub-programs.
Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2016–2017 Planned spending 2016–2017 Actual spending
(authorities used)
2016–2017 Difference
(actual minus planned)
0 48,938 48,938
The difference between planned spending and actual spending primarily reflects salary costs that were recorded under this sub-program due to a system coding error.
Human resources (full-time equivalents)
2016–2017 Planned 2016–2017 Actual 2016–2017 Difference
(actual minus planned)
0 0 0

Sub-Program 3.1.1: Business Capital and Support Services

Description

This sub-program provides funding and support to a national network of Aboriginal Financial Institutions (AFI), Indigenous organizations and non-Indigenous organizations to enhance access to capital for Indigenous entrepreneurs. This sub-program also supports ongoing capacity to create and maintain a sustainable network of AFI to deliver business development services and provide non-repayable and repayable financing to Indigenous entrepreneurs and communities.

Results achieved
Expected results Performance indicators Targets Actual results
The network of Aboriginal Financial Institutions is sustained Percentage increase in the value of the Aboriginal Financial Institutions network's gross loan portfolio 1% increase from 2015–2016 by March 31, 2017 2016–2017: not availablea
2015–2016: not availableb
2014–2015: 2.5%c
Percentage of Aboriginal Financial Institution-supported Indigenous businesses actively repaying developmental loans 80% by March 31, 2017 2016–2017: 94.7%
2015–2016: not applicabled
2014–2015: not applicabled
a The gross loan portfolio is based on data received from Aboriginal Financial Institutions and reported in the fall of the following fiscal year. As a result, there is a one-year lag on reporting results.
b This information will be available in Fall 2017, upon publication of the National Aboriginal Capital Corporations Association's 2016 Annual Report.
c The gross loan portfolio for 2014–2015 was $318,633,390. The gross loan portfolio for 2013–2014 was $310,849,445.
d INAC did not include the same or a comparable performance indicator in the Performance Measurement Framework in this fiscal year.
Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2016–2017 Planned spending 2016–2017 Actual spending
(authorities used)
2016–2017 Difference
(actual minus planned)
39,371,145 40,718,867 1,347,722
The difference between planned spending and actual spending primarily reflects incremental funding provided through Supplementary Estimates to support economic development for the Métis Nation (Budget 2016), offset by reallocations of funding to the Business Opportunities sub-program.
Human resources (full-time equivalents)
2016–2017 Planned 2016–2017 Actual 2016–2017 Difference
(actual minus planned)
18 14 (4)

Sub-Program 3.1.2: Business Opportunities

Description

This sub-program facilitates access by Indigenous businesses to public- and private-sector business opportunities, including federal procurement contracts, using instruments like the Procurement Strategy for Aboriginal Businesses, various partnership and participation approaches; capacity and network building; and assistance in establishing business strategies.

Results achieved
Expected results Performance indicators Targets Actual results
Indigenous businesses win procurement contracts Percentage increase of federal procurement contracts value set aside for Indigenous businesses 5% increase from 2012 result of $108 million, by March 31, 2017 2017: not availablea
2016: not availablea
2015: not availablea
2014: 110% increaseb
a The data are collected by Public Services and Procurement Canada on an annual (calendar year) basis, with a two-year lag in publication – for example, results for 2017 will be available in 2019. Data for 2015 will be available by March 2018.
b This result is calculated based on an increase from $108 million in 2012 to $227 million in 2014.
Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2016–2017 Planned spending 2016–2017 Actual spending
(authorities used)
2016–2017 Difference
(actual minus planned)
3,264,925 6,453,571 3,188,646
The difference between planned spending and actual spending reflects internal reallocations of funding from the Business Capital and Support Services sub-program as well as reallocations from other departmental priorities.
Human resources (full-time equivalents)
2016–2017 Planned 2016–2017 Actual 2016–2017 Difference
(actual minus planned)
17 15 (2)

Sub-Program 3.2.1: Lands and Economic Development Services

Description

This sub-program supports communities to effectively build and manage a land base for economic development. Incentive-based funding encourages and supports First Nations seeking to take on additional land-management responsibilities under the Indian Act. It also supports an effective transition toward greater autonomy through modern land-management tools such as the First Nation Land Management Act (FNLMA) and the First Nations Oil and Gas and Moneys Management Act (FNOGMMA). Targeted funding is available to support training, capacity development, planning, and land and environmental management.

Results achieved
Expected results Performance indicators Targets Actual results
First Nation and Inuit communities have capacity to manage land and environment and to pursue economic development Percentage of First Nations managing and administering their land transactionsa 35% of 637 First Nations by March 31, 2017b 2016–2017: 36%c
2015–2016: not applicabled
2014–2015: 30%
Percentage of First Nation and Inuit communities providing economic development public services to their members 70% of communities by March 31, 2017 2016–2017: 77%e
2015–2016: ≈90%e
2014–2015: not applicabled
a Land transactions include permits, leases, and other transactions under First Nations responsibilities.
b The baseline year of 2014–2015 had 30% of 637 First Nations managing and administering their land transactions.
c This includes 131 First Nations under the Reserve Land and Environment Management Program, and 100 First Nations operating under the First Nation Land Management Regime.
d INAC did not include the same or a comparable performance indicator in the Performance Measurement Framework in this fiscal year.
e These data include services provided through tribal councils.
Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2016–2017 Planned spending 2016–2017 Actual spending
(authorities used)
2016–2017 Difference
(actual minus planned)
138,344,764 139,173,835 829,071
Human resources (full-time equivalents)
2016–2017 Planned 2016–2017 Actual 2016–2017 Difference
(actual minus planned)
276 238 (38)
The difference between planned human resources and actual resources mainly reflects an internal reallocation of Human Resources from sub-program 3.2.1 to other sub-program areas under program 3.2.

Sub-Program 3.2.2: Investment in Economic Opportunities

Description

This sub-program supports First Nations and Inuit communities seeking greater participation in large and complex economic opportunities. Targeted investments provide funding for First Nation and Inuit communities to better pursue economic opportunities. This sub-program also includes adoption of regulations for complex commercial and industrial development projects through the First Nation Commercial and Industrial Development Act which helps to establish increased certainty needed by investors. These activities are critical to successfully partner with the private and public sectors to effectively participate in — and benefit from — key economic opportunities.

Results achieved
Expected results Performance indicators Targets Actual results
First Nation and Inuit communities leverage investments from private sector and other sources Investments leveraged from sources outside of the Department for First Nation and Inuit communities 1:3 (for every dollar invested by INAC, three dollars will be leveraged from sources outside the Department) by March 31, 2017 2016–2017: 1:3.7
2015–2016: 2:4
2014–2015: 1:10
Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2016–2017 Planned spending 2016–2017 Actual spending
(authorities used)
2016–2017 Difference
(actual minus planned)
34,158,368 52,659,308 18,500,940
The difference between planned spending and actual spending primarily reflects internal reallocations of funding for the Community Opportunity Readiness Program.
Human resources (full-time equivalents)
2016–2017 Planned 2016–2017 Actual 2016–2017 Difference
(actual minus planned)
15 20 5
The difference between planned human resources and actual resources mainly reflects an internal reallocation of human resources for the Community Opportunity Readiness Program from Sub-Program 3.2.1.

Sub-Program 3.2.3: Administration of Reserve Land

Description

This sub-program: creates, monitors and registers the rights and interests in reserve lands (including the Federal Management of Oil and Gas Interests in the Reserve Land Program, which manages and regulates oil and gas development on First Nation reserve lands through Indian Oil and Gas Canada); defines reserve boundaries; and administers land management policies and processes, including additions to reserve. This sub-program further administers band moneys (capital and revenue moneys) — pursuant to sections 61 to 69 of the Indian Act — held within the Consolidated Revenue Fund for the use and benefit of bands and their members.

Results achieved
Expected results Performance indicators Targets Actual results
First Nations benefit from the administration of reserve land. (Benefits include use of land for economic and community purposes) Percentage of active additions to reserve approveda 2.5% (approximately 35 additions to reserve per year) by March 31, 2017 2016–2017: ≈5% (70 additions)b
2015–2016: 32
2014–2015: 35
Value of money collected by Indian Oil and Gas Canada on behalf of First Nations $45 million to $70 million by March 31, 2017c 2016–2017: $59.6 million
2015–2016: $63 million
2014–2015: $163.15 million
a An addition to reserve involves adding land to an existing reserve or creating a new reserve for legal obligation and community expansion purposes for the socio-economic and cultural benefit of First Nations.
b These additions to reserve for 70 First Nations represented approximately 65,784 acres of land.
c Target is based on the current projected market demand and price. The money is collected on behalf of First Nations and is subsequently transferred to their capital and revenue accounts.
Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2016–2017 Planned spending 2016–2017 Actual spending
(authorities used)
2016–2017 Difference
(actual minus planned)
33,078,386 36,280,272 3,201,886
The difference between planned spending and actual spending primarily reflects increased expenditures related to court awards, partially offset by the deferral of activities associated with the implementation of treaty land entitlement in Saskatchewan. Specifically, a portion of the funding provided for payments to the Saskatchewan Association of Rural Municipalities and to the Province of Saskatchewan for compensation for the loss of their tax base as a result of the settlement of treaty land is not required in 2016–2017 due to delays in the transfer of lands to reserve status; this deferred funding that was not required in 2016–2017 has been re-profiled to 2017–2018, when it will be available for the intended purpose.
Human resources (full-time equivalents)
2016–2017 Planned 2016–2017 Actual 2016–2017 Difference
(actual minus planned)
143 163 20
The difference between planned human resources and actual resources mainly reflects an internal reallocation of human resources from Sub-Program 3.2.1.

Sub-Program 3.2.4: Contaminated Sites (On-Reserve)

Description

This sub-program supports the assessment and remediation of contaminated sites on reserve lands and on other lands under the Department's custodial responsibility.

Results achieved
Expected results Performance indicators Targets Actual results
The risk to public health and safety related to contaminated sites is decreased Number of Class 1 sites (sites with imminent concerns for public health and safety) where remediation activities are occurring to reduce risk 80 by March 31, 2017 2016–2017: 80
2015–2016: 69
2014–2015: 79
First Nation land is available for development Number of contaminated sites completely remediated 5 by March 31, 2017 2016–2017: 27a
2015–2016: 2
2014–2015: 26
Federal liabilities related to the existence of contaminated sites are reduced Dollar reduction in total of known federal financial liabilities in confirmed contaminated sites at the beginning of the fiscal year $8 million by March 31, 2017 2016–2017: $34.8 million
2015–2016: $16.5 million
2014–2015: $18.4 million
a The remediated sites are located as follows: two in Saskatchewan; six in Ontario; five in Alberta; three in Manitoba; one in Quebec; and ten in British Columbia.
Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2016–2017 Planned spending 2016–2017 Actual spending
(authorities used)
2016–2017 Difference
(actual minus planned)
3,992,793 52,678,859 48,686,066
The difference between planned spending and actual spending primarily reflects incremental funding provided through Supplementary Estimates for the assessment, management and remediation of federal contaminated sites (Federal Contaminated Sites Action Plan: Phase III and Budget 2016).
Human resources (full-time equivalents)
2016–2017 Planned 2016–2017 Actual 2016–2017 Difference
(actual minus planned)
5 17 12
The difference between planned human resources and actual human resources mainly reflects an increase in human resources for the management and remediation of federal contaminated sites based on incremental funding provided through Supplementary Estimates (Federal Contaminated Sites Action Plan: Phase III and Budget 2016).

Sub-Program 3.4.1: Water and Wastewater

Description

This sub-program provides funding to plan, design, construct, acquire, operate and maintain water and wastewater systems, including water supply, treatment and distribution, and wastewater collection, treatment and disposal. It also provides funding to: coordinate training and capacity building for activities related to water and wastewater facilities; identify on-reserve water and wastewater infrastructure needs; develop water and wastewater infrastructure capital plans; and design and implement management practices for water and wastewater facilities maintenance. The goal is to support First Nations in meeting health and safety standards and provide on-reserve residents with service levels comparable to those off reserve. First Nations identify priorities and needs and present project proposals to the Department. Funding is provided for projects based on a priority assessment.

Results achieved
Expected results Performance indicators Targets Actual results
First Nations drinking water and wastewater systems meet established standards Percentage of on-reserve INAC-funded First Nation drinking water systems that have low risk ratings 54% by March 31, 2019 (2011 baseline: 27%) 2016–2017: 56%
2015–2016: 56%
2014–2015: 57%
Percentage of on-reserve INAC-funded First Nation wastewater systems that have low risk ratings 65% by March 31, 2019 (2011 baseline: 35%) 2016–2017: 43%
2015–2016: 45%
2014–2015: 48%
Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2016–2017 Planned spending 2016–2017 Actual spending
(authorities used)
2016–2017 Difference
(actual minus planned)
202,965,486 462,278,082 259,312,596
The difference between planned spending and actual spending primarily reflects additional funding provided through Supplementary Estimates to support the delivery of water and wastewater servicing on First Nation reserves (Budget 2016).
Human resources (full-time equivalents)
2016–2017 Planned 2016–2017 Actual 2016–2017 Difference
(actual minus planned)
22 87 65
The difference between planned and actual full-time equivalents primarily reflects incremental funding provided through Supplementary Estimates for First Nations infrastructure in Budget 2016.

Sub-Program 3.4.2: Education Facilities

Description

This sub-program provides funding to: plan, design, construct/acquire, renovate, repair, replace, and operate and maintain band-operated elementary and secondary education facilities (including school buildings, teacherages and student residences) and any related facility services. Provincial school boards are also eligible for funding to plan, design, construct/acquire elementary and secondary education facilities for First Nation students. This sub-program also provides funding to: acquire, replace, and repair furniture, equipment and furnishing for schools, teacherages and student residences; identify education facility needs, and develop education facility plans; and design and implement maintenance management practices.

Results achieved
Expected results Performance indicators Targets Actual results
First Nation education facilities meet established standards Percentage of First Nation schools with a greater than "fair" condition rating 70% by March 31, 2019 (2011 baseline: 70%) 2016–2017: 62%
2015–2016: 63%
2014–2015: 63%
Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2016–2017 Planned spending 2016–2017 Actual spending
(authorities used)
2016–2017 Difference
(actual minus planned)
306,428,973 285,673,504 (20,755,469)
The difference between planned spending and actual spending primarily reflects additional funding provided through Supplementary Estimates to support the Enhanced First Nations Education Infrastructure Fund (Budget 2016), offset by funding reallocations to other infrastructure asset classes.
Human resources (full-time equivalents)
2016–2017 Planned 2016–2017 Actual 2016–2017 Difference
(actual minus planned)
18 38 20
The difference between Planned and Actual full-time equivalents primarily reflects incremental funding provided through Supplementary Estimates for First Nations infrastructure in Budget 2016.

Sub-Program 3.4.3: Housing

Description

This sub-program provides funding for First Nations to: plan and manage housing needs; design, construct and acquire new housing units; as well as renovate existing housing units. Working with First Nations, this sub-program seeks to increase the supply of safe and affordable housing to achieve better housing outcomes for on-reserve residents.

Results achieved
Expected results Performance indicators Targets Actual results
First Nations housing infrastructure needsa are supported Percentage of First Nation housing that is adequateb as assessed and reported annually by First Nations 75% by March 31, 2019 (2011 baseline: 72%) 2016–2017: 73%
2015–2016: 74.2%
2014–2015: 76%
a Housing infrastructure needs are identified by First Nation communities.
b Adequate is defined in the INAC Reporting Guide for the Housing Data Collection Instrument as dwellings that do not require major renovations and possess basic plumbing facilities, hot and cold running water, inside toilets, and installed baths or showers.
Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2016–2017 Planned spending 2016–2017 Actual spending
(authorities used)
2016–2017 Difference
(actual minus planned)
161,532,424 409,933,257 248,400,833
The difference between planned spending and actual spending primarily reflects additional funding provided through Supplementary Estimates to support the delivery of housing on-reserve (Budget 2016), as well as funding reallocations from other infrastructure asset classes.
Human resources (full-time equivalents)
2016–2017 Planned 2016–2017 Actual 2016–2017 Difference
(actual minus planned)
20 62 42
The difference between planned and actual full-time equivalents primarily reflects incremental funding provided through Supplementary Estimates for First Nations infrastructure in Budget 2016.

Sub-Program 3.4.4: Other Community Infrastructure and Activities

Description

This sub-program provides funding to plan, design, construct, acquire, operate and maintain community infrastructure assets and facilities, as well as coordinate training and undertake capacity-building activities in this area. The goal is to support First Nations in better meeting health and safety standards and provide on-reserve residents with similar levels of service to those off reserve. First Nations identify priorities and needs in their First Nation Infrastructure Investment Plans. Funding is provided for projects based on a priority assessment.

Results achieved
Expected results Performance indicators Targets Actual results
First Nations othera infrastructure meet established standards Percentage of bridges with greater than "fair" condition rating 60% by March 31, 2019 (2012 baseline: 54%) 2016–2017: 54%
2015–2016: 54%
2014–2015: 51%
Percentage of roads with greater than "fair" condition rating 47% by March 31, 2019 (2011 baseline: 45%) 2016–2017: 44%
2015–2016: 45%
2014–2015: 42%
a Other community infrastructure includes all community assets not represented in previous sub-program activities. This includes, but is not limited to, band offices, community centres, fire protection assets and structural mitigation assets.
Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2016–2017 Planned spending 2016–2017 Actual spending
(authorities used)
2016–2017 Difference
(actual minus planned)
474,606,604 614,900,936 140,294,332
The difference between planned spending and actual spending primarily reflects additional funding provided through Supplementary Estimates for the construction of public infrastructure on reserve through the First Nations Infrastructure Fund (Budget 2016), for the construction of cultural and recreational facilities on reserve (Budget 2016), for Operation Return Home: Manitoba Interlake Flood Remediation and Settlement, and for the on-reserve waste management infrastructure (Budget 2016). This increase is offset by funding reallocations to other departmental priorities.
Human resources (full-time equivalents)
2016–2017 Planned 2016–2017 Actual 2016–2017 Difference
(actual minus planned)
108 146 38
The difference between planned and actual full-time equivalents primarily reflects incremental funding provided through Supplementary Estimates for First Nations infrastructure in Budget 2016.

Sub-Program 3.4.5: Climate Resilience

Description

Through the First Nation Adapt program, this sub-program provides funding support to First Nation communities on-reserve to assess and respond to climate change impacts on community infrastructure and emergency management. The program focuses on addressing repetitive and severe climate impacts related to flooding, forest fires and winter road failure.

Results achieved
Expected results Performance indicators Targets Actual results
First Nation communities have access to information, expertise and tools to support adaptation action Number of risk and adaptation assessments completed each year in First Nation communities 6–8 by March 31, 2017 2016–2017: 6a
2015–2016: not applicableb
2014–2015: not applicable
First Nation communities identify adaptation measures to address risks and opportunities arising from climate change Percentage of completed risk and adaptation assessments that identify adaptation measures 50% by March 31, 2019 2016–2017: not reported; first year of the program
2015–2016: not applicableb
2014–2015: not applicableb
a These six assessment were completed in 17 communities. Some assessments covered multiple communities which is why the number of assessments is fewer than the number of communities.
b INAC did not include the same or a comparable performance indicator in the Performance Measurement Framework in this fiscal year.
Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2016–2017 Planned spending 2016–2017 Actual spending
(authorities used)
2016–2017 Difference
(actual minus planned)
0 2,569,390 2,569,390
This sub-program was created in 2016–2017. The difference between planned spending and actual spending primarily reflects funding provided through Supplementary Estimates for the Climate Change Preparedness in the North program and First Nation Adapt program (Budget 2016).
Human resources (full-time equivalents)
2016–2017 Planned 2016–2017 Actual 2016–2017 Difference
(actual minus planned)
0 6 6
This sub-program was created in 2016–2017. The difference between planned and actual full-time equivalents primarily reflects funding provided through Supplementary Estimates (as noted above).

Sub-Program 3.4.6: Emergency Management Assistance

Description

This sub-program provides funding to protect the health and safety of on-reserve First Nations residents as well as their lands and critical infrastructure. The sub-program promotes the four pillars of emergency management — mitigation, preparedness, response, and recovery — by providing funding and overseeing the reimbursement of eligible emergency management costs; providing timely and efficient situational awareness; and developing policy to support emergency management. It further promotes efficiency by accessing existing resources and services of provincial/territorial and First Nation emergency management partners to address on-reserve emergencies as required (with the mandate to reimburse partners for eligible expenses).

Results achieved
Expected results Performance indicators Targets Actual results
First Nations are supported in their efforts to mitigate and prepare for emergencies Percentage of non-structural mitigation (i.e., flood mapping and risk assessment) and preparedness funding allocated towards on-reserve emergency resiliency and capacity building 100% of the $19.1 million allocated towards on-reserve emergency resiliency and capacity building by March 31, 2017 2016–2017: over 80%a
2015–2016: not applicableb
2014–2015: not applicableb
First Nations are supported in their response to and recovery from emergencies Transfer of funds equivalent to eligible costs identified (eligible costs can include but not limited to the evacuation of on-reserve First Nation communities, direct emergency response activities, and other cleaning and rebuilding expenses) 100% by March 31, 2017 2016–2017: 100%
2015–2016: 100%
2014–2015: 100%
a Of the $19.1 million, $15.4 million was spent on emergency resilience and capacity building activities. The remaining $3.7 million was reallocated to support structural mitigation projects that also enhance community resilience.
b INAC did not include the same or a comparable performance indicator in the Performance Measurement Framework in this fiscal year.
Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2016–2017 Planned spending 2016–2017 Actual spending
(authorities used)
2016–2017 Difference
(actual minus planned)
67,165,877 118,316,479 51,150,602
The difference between planned spending and actual spending primarily reflects additional funding provided through Supplementary Estimates to reimburse First Nations and emergency management service providers for on-reserve response and recovery activities.
Human resources (full-time equivalents)
2016–2017 Planned 2016–2017 Actual 2016–2017 Difference
(actual minus planned)
21 24 3

Sub-Program 4.1.1: Political Development and Intergovernmental Relations

Description

This sub-program facilitates the growth of strong, effective and efficient government structures in the North. The devolution of responsibilities for land and resource management to territorial governments will strengthen northern governance. This sub-program also supports legislation and policy initiatives, the advancement of intergovernmental processes, collaboration with Inuit organizations and governments, the appointment of Territorial Commissioners and general federal-territorial relationships. In addition, it ensures that circumpolar cooperation activities reflect Canadian interests and grants are provided to territorial governments for hospital and physician services.

Results achieved
Expected results Performance indicators Targets Actual results
Devolution of land and resource management to the Government of Nunavut Completion of devolution phases in Nunavut against the five-phase devolution process (five-phase process: protocol, agreement-in-principle, final agreement, legislation, and implementation) Complete Phase 2 by March 31, 2017 2016–2017: change of approach, Nunavut Devolution Agreement-In-Principle to be completed by March 31, 2019
2015–2016: not applicablea
2014–2015: not applicablea
Canadian interests are advanced through international circumpolar cooperation activities Percentage of projects actioned under the Arctic Council and supported by INAC that reflect collaborative engagement from federal and territorial governments, and Canadian Indigenous stakeholders 100% by March 31, 2017 2016–2017: 100%
2015–2016: not applicablea
2014–2015: not applicablea
a INAC did not include the same or a comparable performance indicator in the Performance Measurement Framework in this fiscal year.
Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2016–2017 Planned spending 2016–2017 Actual spending
(authorities used)
2016–2017 Difference
(actual minus planned)
77,648,425 76,077,789 (1,570,636)
Human resources (full-time equivalents)
2016–2017 Planned 2016–2017 Actual 2016–2017 Difference
(actual minus planned)
50 56 6
The difference between planned and actual full-time equivalents primarily reflects the addition of the human resources for the Inuit Relations activity under this sub-program.

Sub-Program 4.1.2: Nutrition North

Description

This sub-program aims to improve access to perishable nutritious food for residents of isolated northern communities that lack year-round surface or marine transport. The sub-program provides a retail-based subsidy to registered retailers and suppliers to help reduce the cost of perishable nutritious food in the eligible communities. It is supported by an advisory board that gives Northerners a direct voice in the sub-program.

Results achieved
Expected results Performance indicators Targets Actual results
Residents in eligible communities have access to nutritious perishable food at a subsidized rate Percentage of compliance/audit reports demonstrating that subsidies have been fully passed on to consumers 100% by March 31, 2017 2016–2017: 100%
2015–2016: 100%
2014–2015: not applicablea
Percentage implementation of the new requirement for major northern retailers to show subsidy saving at the till receipt 100% by March 31, 2017 2016–2017: 100%
2015–2016: not applicablea
2014–2015: not applicablea
Annual percentage variation in the quantity of subsidized items shipped by air 3 to 5% by March 31, 2017 2016–2017: 5.3%b
2015–2016: not applicablea
2014–2015: not applicablea
a INAC did not include the same or a comparable performance indicator in the Performance Measurement Framework in this fiscal year.
b In 2016–2017, the program revised the community eligibility criteria for the subsidy and expanded the program coverage to 37 new communities that lack year-round surface transportation, for a total of 121 eligible communities.
Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2016–2017 Planned spending 2016–2017 Actual spending
(authorities used)
2016–2017 Difference
(actual minus planned)
57,151,800 74,414,396 17,262,596
The difference between planned spending and actual spending primarily reflects additional funding provided through Supplementary Estimates to expand the Nutrition North Canada program (Budget 2014 and Budget 2016), offset by funding to be re-profiled to future years and reallocations to other departmental priorities.
Human resources (full-time equivalents)
2016–2017 Planned 2016–2017 Actual 2016–2017 Difference
(actual minus planned)
11 12 1
The difference between planned and actual full-time equivalents primarily reflects additional funding provided through Supplementary Estimates to expand the Nutrition North Canada program (Budget 2014 and Budget 2016), offset by funding to be re-profiled to future years and reallocations to other departmental priorities.

Sub-Program 4.1.3: Climate Change Adaptation and Clean Energy

Description

Through the Climate Change Preparedness in the North program and the Northern REACHE program (Responsible Energy Approach for Community Heating and Electricity), this sub-program provides funding support to Northern communities, governments, and organizations to address the impacts of climate change and to plan and construct renewable energy and energy efficiency projects.

Results achieved
Expected results Performance indicators Targets Actual results
Territorial governments and northern Indigenous communities identify adaptation measures to address risks and opportunities arising from climate change Percentage of completed risk assessments and adaptation plans that identify adaptation measures 50% by March 31, 2019 2016–2017: not applicablea
2015–2016: not applicableb
2014–2015: not applicableb
Renewable energy and energy efficiency projects are planned, constructed, and operational Percentage of projects funded at each stage (i.e. planning, construction, operation) By March 31, 2017:
Planning stage: 60%
Construction stage: 40%
Planning stage
2016–2017: 62% (15 projects)
2015–2016: not applicableb
2014–2015: not applicableb

Construction stage
2016–2017: 38% (9 projects)
2015–2016: not applicableb
2014–2015: not applicableb
a The first year of the program was used to engage with Indigenous and northern communities and design the program, and as such no projects were funded.
b INAC did not include the same or a comparable performance indicator in the Performance Measurement Framework in this fiscal year.
Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2016–2017 Planned spending 2016–2017 Actual spending
(authorities used)
2016–2017 Difference
(actual minus planned)
94,072 7,136,522 7,042,450
The difference between planned spending and actual spending primarily reflects additional funding provided through Supplementary Estimates for the Northern Responsible Energy Approach for Community Heat and Electricity program (Budget 2016), and jointly for the Climate Change Adaptation and Clean Energy program in the North program and First Nation Adapt program (Budget 2016).
Human resources (full-time equivalents)
2016–2017 Planned 2016–2017 Actual 2016–2017 Difference
(actual minus planned)
1 15 14
The difference between planned and actual full-time equivalents primarily reflects additional funding provided through Supplementary Estimates for the Northern Responsible Energy Approach for Community Heat and Electricity program (Budget 2016), and jointly for the Climate Change Adaptation and Clean Energy program in the North program and First Nation Adapt program (Budget 2016).

Sub-Program 4.2.1: Northern Contaminants

Description

This sub-program engages Northerners and scientists in researching and monitoring long-range contaminants in the Canadian Arctic. The data generated by this sub-program is used to assess ecosystem and human health, and the findings of these assessments inform policy, resulting in action to eliminate contaminants from long-range sources. This supports the safety and security of traditional country foods that are important to the health of Northerners and northern communities. The sub-program also contributes scientific data to contaminants-related international agreements and assessments, helping to position Canada as an international leader in Arctic science. These international agreements will improve the health of Arctic people and wildlife over the long term.

Results achieved
Expected results Performance indicators Targets Actual results
Contaminants-related risk to ecosystem and human health is reduced Percentage decrease in concentrations of previously identified contaminants in human and wildlife populations in the North 5 to 10% decrease in three indicator persistent organic pollutants concentrations over 1990 levels by March 31, 2017 2016–2017: 80% decrease in concentrations in Arctic biotaa
2015–2016: 80% decrease in concentrations in Arctic biotaa
2014–2015: not applicableb
1 to 3% decrease in Mercury concentrations over 2013 levels by March 31, 2020 2016–2017: not availablec
2015–2016: not availablec
2014–2015: not applicableb
Contaminants-related research results are widely available for domestic and international policy use Percentage of current Northern Contaminants Program research, results and information that is accessible nationally and internationally 100% by March 31, 2017 2016–2017: 95%
2015–2016: 96%
2014–2015: not applicableb
Northerners participate in contaminants research Percentage of Northern Contaminants Program-funded projects in which Northerners are identified as project leaders and/or team members 100% of 2013–2014 baseline year by March 31, 2017 2016–2017: 113%
2015–2016: 114%
2014–2015: not applicableb
a This result is calculated with aggregate data, based on several datasets, looking at specific Persistent Organic Pollutants (POPs) that were listed under the Stockholm Convention on POPs when it entered into force in 2004.
b INAC did not include the same or a comparable performance indicator in the Performance Measurement Framework in this fiscal year.
c There is no consistent trend in mercury concentrations in wildlife populations across the Arctic; however, some datasets are beginning to show signs of decrease.
Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2016–2017 Planned spending 2016–2017 Actual spending
(authorities used)
2016–2017 Difference
(actual minus planned)
4,037,428 5,082,110 1,044,682
The difference between planned spending and actual spending primarily reflects internal reallocations to address priorities in this area.
Human resources (full-time equivalents)
2016–2017 Planned 2016–2017 Actual 2016–2017 Difference
(actual minus planned)
11 10 (1)

Sub-Program 4.2.2: Science Initiatives

Description

This sub-program works to position Canada as a leader in Arctic science and technology through the establishment of the Canadian High Arctic Research Station. The Station will be a world-class, year-round, multidisciplinary facility on the cutting edge of Arctic issues that will anchor a strong research presence in Canada's Arctic to serve Canada and the world. It will advance Canada's knowledge of the Arctic in order to improve economic opportunities, environmental stewardship and the quality of life of Northerners and all Canadians.

Results achieved
Expected results Performance indicators Targets Actual results
Researchers have access to world-class Arctic infrastructure in the Canadian Northa Infrastructure is available for Polar Knowledge Canada and associated researchers Access to Canadian High Arctic Research Station infrastructure (interim office, triplex units, field and maintenance building, main research building) by July 1, 2017 2016–2017: completion expected August 2017b
2015–2016: not applicablec
2014–2015: not applicablec
a Commissioning will be completed by March 2018. A commissioning period is standard for any construction project to ensure that all systems (heating, ventilation, air conditioning, electrical, water, etc.) are in full working order before the facility is officially handed off to the owner. It is also anticipated that the facility will be transferred to Polar Knowledge Canada by March 2018.
b Infrastructure status is as follows: there is access to the two triplex units and interim office as of October 2016, while the field and maintenance building construction was completed by March 2017. Enclosure of the Main Research Building has been completed, and interior work is underway, with substantial completion expected in August 2017.
c INAC did not include the same or a comparable performance indicator in the Performance Measurement Framework in this fiscal year.
Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2016–2017 Planned spending 2016–2017 Actual spending
(authorities used)
2016–2017 Difference
(actual minus planned)
43,784,639 48,750,189 4,965,550
The difference between planned spending and actual spending primarily reflects additional funding provided through Supplementary Estimates for the Canadian High Arctic Research Station. This additional funding is partially offset by the deferral of activities associated with the Canadian High Arctic Research Station; this deferred funding that was not required in 2016–2017 has been carried forward and re-profiled to 2017–2018 when it will be available for the intended purpose.
Human resources (full-time equivalents)
2016–2017 Planned 2016–2017 Actual 2016–2017 Difference
(actual minus planned)
26 29 3

Sub-Program 4.3.1: Petroleum and Minerals

Description

This sub-program manages the petroleum and mineral resource interests of Northerners, Indigenous peoples and Canadians generally on federal lands in the Northwest Territories, Nunavut and the northern offshore. This sub-program: manages the rights to Crown petroleum and mineral resources; collects Crown royalties; participates in project assessments and land-use planning; and promotes Indigenous participation in resource development. It regularly engages federal, territorial and Indigenous organizations to consider socio-cultural and environmental sensitivities related to petroleum and mineral activities.

Results achieved
Expected results Performance indicators Targets Actual results
Petroleum and mineral resources on federal lands in NWT, Nunavut and northern offshore regions are managed for the benefit of Northerners and all Canadians Percentage of Canadian Frontier Landsa under license managed by INAC 30% by March 31, 2017 2016–2017: 24%
2015–2016: 26.7%
2014–2015: not applicableb
Percentage of total Canadian mineral exploration and deposit appraisal expenditures made in Nunavut 7% by March 31, 2017 2016–2017: 8%
2015–2016: 12.6%
2014–2015: 7.5%
a Lands under federal jurisdiction in northern areas, offshore Newfoundland and Labrador, offshore Nova Scotia, and other areas, such as the Gulf of St. Lawrence and Hudson Bay.
b INAC did not include the same or a comparable performance indicator in the Performance Measurement Framework in this fiscal year.
Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2016–2017 Planned spending 2016–2017 Actual spending
(authorities used)
2016–2017 Difference
(actual minus planned)
5,883,966 7,579,720 1,695,754
The difference between planned spending and actual spending primarily reflects incremental funding provided through Supplementary Estimates for the Arctic Regional Environmental Studies (Budget 2016).
Human resources (full-time equivalents)
2016–2017 Planned 2016–2017 Actual 2016–2017 Difference
(actual minus planned)
25 27 2

Sub-Program 4.3.2: Contaminated Sites

Description

This sub-program ensures that contaminated sites are managed to ensure the protection of human health, safety and the environment for all Northerners by assessing and remediating contaminated sites and supporting the employment and training of Northerners, particularly Indigenous people.

Results achieved
Expected results Performance indicators Targets Actual results
Contaminated sites are managed to ensure the protection of human health and the safety of the environment while bringing economic benefit to the North Percentage of high priority sitesa in Step 8 (implementation) through Step 10 (monitoring) of the Approach to Federal Contaminated Sites 45% by March 31, 2017 2016–2017: 48%
2015–2016: not applicableb
2014–2015: not applicableb
Percentage of people employed within Contaminated Sites projects that are Northerners and/or Indigenous peoplec 60% by March 31, 2017 2016–2017: 58%
2015–2016: not applicabled
2014–2015: not applicabled
a High priority sites: Sites classified as Class 1 sites as per the National Classification System for Contaminated Sites
b INAC changed the calculation of this performance indicator from the number of sites to a percentage of sites to report actual results more clearly. Therefore, there are no comparable results available for 2014–2015 and 2015–2016.
c This calculation is based on employment in person-hours.
d INAC changed the calculation of this performance indicator. Therefore, there are no comparable results available for 2014–2015 and 2015–2016.
Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2016–2017 Planned spending 2016–2017 Actual spending
(authorities used)
2016–2017 Difference
(actual minus planned)
28,055,668 143,214,458 115,158,790
The difference between planned spending and actual spending primarily reflects incremental funding provided through Supplementary Estimates for the assessment, management and remediation of federal contaminated sites (Federal Contaminated Sites Action Plan: Phase III and Budget 2016). This increase is partially offset by the deferral of activities associated with the Federal Contaminated Sites Action Plan. The associated funding has been re-profiled to future years when it will be available for the intended purpose.
Human resources (full-time equivalents)
2016–2017 Planned 2016–2017 Actual 2016–2017 Difference
(actual minus planned)
5 92 87
The difference between planned and actual full-time equivalents primarily reflects incremental funding provided through Supplementary Estimates (as noted above).

Sub-Program 4.3.3: Land and Water Management

Description

This sub-program manages the land and water interests of Northerners, Indigenous peoples, and other Canadians in Nunavut and in lands managed by the Department in the Northwest Territories and Yukon. This is achieved through: the development, approval and implementation of sound land use plans; environmental monitoring; administration of land rights; provision of inspection and investigation services for land use permits and water licences; and management of their securities.

Results achieved
Expected results Performance indicators Targets Actual results
Land and Water regimes in Nunavut and in lands managed by the department in NWT and the Yukon are managed for the benefit of Northerners and all Canadians Percentage of land and water authorizations (risk based approach), under the responsibility of the Department, inspected By March 31, 2017:
NWT = 15%
Nunavut = 25%
NWT:
2016–2017: 48%
2015–2016: 15%
2014–2015: 10%

Nunavut:
2016–2017: 27.5%
2015–2016: 33%
2014–2015: 29.5%
Percentage of requests for land authorizations, and water licences submitted for Ministerial decision, responded to within legislated time limit 100% by March 31, 2017 2016–2017: 100%
2015–2016: 100%
2014–2015: 80% (land),
100% (water)
Percentage of land use planning initiatives submitted for Ministerial decision responded to as per Northwest Territories and Nunavut legislationa 100% by March 31, 2017 2016–2017: no initiatives were submitted
2015–2016: not applicableb
2014–2015: not applicableb
a Mackenzie Valley Resource Management Act, Nunavut Planning and Projects Assessment Act, and Deh Cho First Nations Interim Measures Agreement
b INAC did not include the same or a comparable performance indicator in the Performance Measurement Framework in this fiscal year.
Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2016–2017 Planned spending 2016–2017 Actual spending
(authorities used)
2016–2017 Difference
(actual minus planned)
24,675,119 19,123,991 (5,551,128)
The difference between planned spending and actual spending primarily reflects the reallocations of funding to other departmental priorities.
Human resources (full-time equivalents)
2016–2017 Planned 2016–2017 Actual 2016–2017 Difference
(actual minus planned)
117 120 3
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