Yukon Land Claims and Self-Government Agreements - Annual Report 2011-2012

On November 4th, 2015, the Prime Minister announced the new cabinet of the 29th Canadian ministry. The Honourable Carolyn Bennett was named Minister of Indigenous and Northern Affairs. The Department's new applied title is Indigenous and Northern Affairs Canada and is reflected on the cover of this report. However, the report itself refers to the Department as Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Canada to reflect its name during the 2011-2012 time period.

QS-Y386-010-EE-A1
Catalogue: R1-12E
ISSN: 1921-5274

QS-Y386-010-EE-A1
Catalogue: R1-12E-PDF
ISSN: 2291-9961

© Her Majesty the Queen in Right of Canada, represented by the Minister of Indigenous and Northern Affairs, 2016

 

PDF version (480 Kb, 50 pages)

 

Table of contents

Introduction

Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Canada is pleased to provide the 2011-2012 annual report on the implementation of the Yukon Land Claims and Self-Government Agreements. This report covers 12 months from April 1, 2011 – March 31, 2012. Implementing the Agreements presents opportunities and challenges. Progress is being achieved through a relationship defined by mutual respect and a commitment to fulfilling the obligations set out in the agreements.

This report stems from the March 16, 1987, Fifth Report of the Standing Committee on Public Accounts where it was recommended that the Minister of Indian Affairs and Northern Development table annual reports on all Aboriginal claims settlements.

In addition, in the 2003 Report of the Auditor General of Canada, the Auditor General noted that Indian and Northern Affairs Canada (now known as Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Canada) should work with the other signatories of the land claims agreements to overhaul the annual reports and make them more results based.

The inclusion of the Implementation Working Group's Work Plan for 2011-2012 (Appendix A) provides results-based reporting on implementation activities for the year, including priority items, expected outcomes/results, activities, timeframes and actual performance. The Implementation Working Group is an ad hoc committee comprised of Implementation Representatives from the Parties to the Umbrella Final Agreements, and all eleven Yukon First Nation Final and Self-Government Agreements.

First Nations, Government of Yukon, Umbrella Final Agreement boards and committees and all federal departments operating in the Yukon were asked to provide information about their implementation achievements and challenges during the 2011-2012 fiscal year. This report includes the submissions provided by each respondent group, edited for length and consistency. Perception of the Parties may not be shared. In cases where groups did not provide submissions, contact information and a general description of their mandates are provided.

First Nations

Carcross/Tagish First Nation

P.O. Box 130, Carcross, Yukon, Y0B 1B0
Phone: 867-821-4251
Fax: 867-821-4802
E-mail: reception@ctfn.ca
Web: www.ctfn.ca

The Carcross/Tagish First Nation is a self-governing people with the main community and administrative headquarters located in Carcross, about 70 km. south east of Whitehorse. Other communities include the traditional village site of Tagish, about 30 km. east of Carcross. The First Nation has approximately 800 members, most of whom live in Carcross, Tagish and other communities in the Yukon. The Carcross/Tagish people are of both Athapascan and Tlingit ancestry. The Carcross/Tagish First Nation Final and Self-Government Agreements came into effect on January 9, 2006.  The Final Agreement includes 1561.5 sq. km. of Settlement Land.  The First Nation owns 1,036 sq. km. of Category A Settlement Land which includes both surface and subsurface rights, and 518 sq. km. of Category B Settlement Land which includes surface rights only. The remaining 7.51 sq. km. is Fee Simple Settlement Land.

Activities in 2011-12

Carcross/Tagish First Nation established a priority and planning process with the community, staff and leadership in order to identify priorities and manage outcomes.

Following a special community assembly and work by a Constitutional Review Committee, the constitution was amended to prepare for the election of a Khà' Shade Héni (Chief) and Council in early 2012/2013.

Carcross/Tagish First Nation has passed and begun to implement a Family Act. The Act supports community responsibility through the establishment of a Family Council. At this time, Carcross/Tagish First Nation is currently in dispute resolution with Canada and Yukon over implementation of this file.

Carcross/Tagish First Nation's Health and Wellness Department successfully completed phase one of a Transitional Employment Program that targets low-income individuals and is in the process of implementing phase two which teaches job readiness skills.

Carcross/Tagish First Nation did not agree to a new Self-Government Financial Transfer Agreement as presented by Canada. Carcross/Tagish First Nation continued to advocate politically and administratively to get a more equitable agreement for the First Nation. Discussions continued between Carcross/Tagish First Nation and Canada to try and come to an agreement acceptable to both Parties.

Although work continued on Program and Services Transfer Agreement files with respect to Alcohol and Drug Services and Human Resources and Skills Development Canada, there was reduced activity in negotiations due to the shift in focus to the Self-Government Financial Transfer Agreement negotiations.

The primary challenge faced by Carcross/Tagish First Nation is implementing its agreements without adequate resources.

Champagne and Aishihik First Nations

1 Allen Place (P.O. Box 5310)
Haines Junction, Yukon, Y0B 1L0
Phone: 867-634-4200
Fax: 867-634-2108
Web: www.cafn.ca

304 Jarvis Street
Whitehorse, Yukon, Y1A 2H2
Phone: 867-456-6888
Fax: 867-667-6202
E-mail: reception@cafn.ca

Champagne and Aishihik First Nations are a self-governing people with the main community and administrative headquarters located in Haines Junction, about 150 km. west of Whitehorse. Other communities in the Champagne and Aishihik Traditional Territory where Champagne and Aishihik First Nations provide services include Canyon Creek, Takhini River subdivision and Champagne. The First Nation also has administrative offices in Whitehorse. The First Nation has approximately 1238 members, about 712 of whom reside in the Yukon. The Champagne and Aishihik First Nations people are of Southern Tutchone and Tlingit ancestry. The Champagne and Aishihik First Nations Final and Self-Government Agreements came into effect on February 14, 1995. The Final Agreement includes 2,427 sq. km. of Settlement Land. The First Nation owns 1,230 sq. km. of Category A Settlement Land which includes both surface and subsurface rights and 1,165 sq. km. of Category B Settlement Land which includes surface rights only. The remaining 31.5 sq. km. is Fee Simple Settlement Land.

Activities in 2011-12

Governance
Champagne and Aishihik First Nations' Executive Council Office worked on developing new processes for administrative reviews, including either a Tribunal or an Ombudsman process.

Champagne and Aishihik First Nations hosted the Right Honourable Stephen Harper, Prime Minister of Canada, at the Da Kų Cultural Centre in August, 2011. The Prime Minister was joined by the Honourable Leona Aglukkaq, Minister of Health and Minister of the Canadian Northern Economic Development Agency, and the Honourable Darrell Pasloski, Premier of Yukon, as well as the Honourable Ryan Leaf, Member of Parliament for the Yukon. The Government of Canada supported the new visitor centre through the Economic Action Plan - Improving Parks Canada's National Historic Sites and Visitor Facilities program.

CAFN Constitution
Following a two-year review, a new Constitution was approved at a Special General Assembly in February, 2012.

Economic Development
Community meetings were held to develop Champagne and Aishihik First Nations' economic development plan. The plan was created with input from Champagne and Aishihik First Nations' citizens and corporations (Dakwakada Development Corporation and the Champagne Aishihik Community Corporation).

Champagne and Aishihik First Nations signed a Memorandum of Understanding with the Village of Haines Junction and Dakwakada Development Corporation to:

  • work together to develop a renewable energy development strategy for Champagne and Aishihik First Nations' Traditional Territory that respects and reflects economic, environmental and community interests;
  • promote an equal relationship that fosters dialogue to assess energy project potential and identify priorities; and
  • enhance economic opportunities for Champagne and Aishihik First Nations within the Traditional Territory.

Registry and Citizen Support
Legal work continued on a draft Citizenship Act to resolve outstanding enrolment issues and to provide clear guidelines on Citizenship. There was an increase to Champagne and Aishihik First Nations' status membership as a result of Canada's Gender Equity in Indian Registration Act.

Regional and Settlement Land Use Planning
Champagne and Aishihik First Nations worked with the Yukon Land Use Planning Council, the Government of Yukon, and neighbouring First Nations to start the Kluane Regional Land Use Plan. Work began on Settlement Land use planning after the identification of six regions within the Traditional Territory. These regions were prioritized and work started on the Aishihik region. This planning will assist in resource development decisions as well as the Regional Land Use Planning process.

Environmental Assessment
There were 41 environmental assessment projects reviewed under the Yukon Environmental Socio-economic Assessment Act within the Traditional Territory, bringing the total number of assessments up to 262.

Kusawa Park
Champagne and Aishihik First Nations rejoined talks with Kwanlin Dün First Nation, the Carcross/Tagish First Nation and the Government of Yukon to work on development and implementation of a park management plan for Kusawa Park.

Resource Revenue Sharing
The Government of Canada and the Government of Yukon entered into a new Resource Revenue Sharing regime effective in 2011-2012. The Government of Yukon began consultations with Self-Governing Yukon First Nations to meet the obligations in Chapter 23 of the Final Agreement, the Northern Affairs Program Devolution Transfer Agreement and the Yukon Oil and Gas Accord. On March 9, 2012, Self-Governing Yukon First Nations submitted a revenue sharing proposal to the Government of Yukon to negotiate a revenue sharing arrangement for new, increased royalties to Yukon First Nations.

Program and Service Transfer Agreements
Little activity occurred in negotiations of Programs and Services Transfer Agreements due to the shift in focus to the Resource Revenue Sharing. A Programs and Services Transfer Agreement for a specified period was concluded for the Canadian Heritage Aboriginal Language Initiative program. Champagne and Aishihik First Nations further assumed the National Anti-Drug Strategy Program.

Fiscal Harmonization
Champagne and Aishihik First Nations participated in the second round of engagement sessions in March, 2012. Champagne and Aishihik First Nations worked with other Self-Governing Yukon First Nations to respond to the Government of Canada's Issues and Principles Paper.

Implementation Working Group
A heritage sub-group of the Implementation Working Group continued to develop a heritage manual pursuant to Chapter 13 of the Final Agreements.

The Chapter 22 sub-group of the Implementation Working Group continued with the review of the economic development measures by receiving assistance from the First Nations Statistical Agency and the Yukon Bureau of Statistics to define a common set of performance measures to be consistently applied over time.

Champagne and Aishihik First Nations continued to contribute to and support the Government of Yukon Representative Public Service Plan as per Schedule A Chapter 22 of its Final Agreement.

First Nation of Nacho Nyak Dun

P.O. Box 220, Mayo, Yukon, Y0B 1M0
Phone: 867-996-2265
Fax: 867-996-2267
E-mail: main@nndfn.com
Web: www.nndfn.com

The First Nation of Nacho Nyak Dun is a self-governing people with the main community and administrative headquarters located in Mayo, about 410 km. north of Whitehorse. The First Nation has approximately 635 members, most of whom live in Mayo and Whitehorse. The First Nation of Nacho Nyak Dun Final and Self-Government Agreements came into effect on February 14, 1995. The Final Agreement includes 4,749 sq. km. of Settlement Land. The First Nation owns 2,408 sq. km. of Category A Settlement Land which includes both the surface and subsurface rights, and 2,331 sq. km. of Category B Settlement Land which includes surface rights only. The remaining 9 sq. km. is Fee Simple Settlement Land.

Activities in 2011-12

The First Nation of Nacho Nyak Dun and Canada agreed to a new Self-Government Financial Transfer Agreement. The new Self-Government Financial Transfer Agreement provides significant new money for "general governance" responsibilities (the functions of Chief and Council, General Assembly, and Administration and Finance department), but does not provide additional money for Programs and Services or Final Agreement implementation. There is a commitment to enter into exploratory discussions regarding local government services, natural resources, and environmental assessment with the Government of Canada regarding these matters, which are intended to inform any negotiations which the Parties may agree to enter into for purposes of amending the Self-Government Financial Transfer Agreement.

The First Nation of Nacho Nyak Dun has contributed to and supported the development of a Representative Public Service Plan with the Government of Yukon. This will enhance opportunities for Nacho Nyak Dun Citizens to obtain employment with the Government of Yukon.

The First Nation of Nacho Nyak Dun contributed to the development of a work plan and Terms of Reference which they approved and commenced for the Chapter 22 Economic Development Measures Review mandated by Section 22.9.2 of the First Nation of Nacho Nyak Dun Final Agreement.

The First Nation of Nacho Nyak Dun has contributed to and supported the development and approval of a Terms of Reference, plus commenced the development of a heritage manual mandated by Chapter 13 of the First Nation of Nacho Nyak Dun Final Agreement. Among other things, this manual will define a number of terms in Chapter 13 of the First Nation of Nacho Nyak Dun Final Agreement, such as "ethnographic heritage resources," "paleontological heritage resources" and "archaeological heritage resources." These definitions will provide certainty for the ownership of heritage resources in the First Nation of Nacho Nyak Dun Traditional Territory.

The Northern Tutchone First Nations, which are comprised of the First Nation of Nacho Nyak Dun, Selkirk First Nation and Little Salmon/Carmacks First Nation, were in the planning and discussion stages with the Government of Canada and the Government of Yukon on a draft Administration of Justice Agreement Framework. Caucus meetings took place prior to the actual Administration of Justice Agreement meetings, and were focused on subjects including general updates on the negotiations, agreement on a framework, priorities for each Northern Tutchone community, and the Government of Canada or the Government of Yukon's response to matters. Throughout the year, many discussions were held on subjects related to the draft Administration of Justice Agreement Framework, as well as work plans, tentative meeting scheduling and reporting requirements. To date, progress on this file has been very slow. Once an Administration of Justice Agreement Framework has been signed, negotiators will commence drafting the actual Administration of Justice Agreement for the Northern Tutchone First Nation communities.

Kluane First Nation

P.O. Box 20, Burwash Landing, Yukon, Y0B 1V0
Phone: 867-841-4274
Fax: 867-841-5900
E-mail: reception@kfn.ca

Kluane First Nation is a self-governing people with the main community and administrative headquarters located in Burwash Landing on the shores of Kluane Lake, about 285 km. west of Whitehorse. The Kluane First Nation has approximately 210 members, most of whom live in Burwash Landing or Whitehorse. The Kluane First Nation people are of Southern Tutchone and Tlingit ancestry and belong to the Athapascan language group. The Kluane First Nation Final and Self-Government Agreements came into effect on February 2, 2004. The Final Agreement includes 913 sq. km. of Settlement Land. The First Nation owns 647 sq. km. of Category A Settlement Land which includes both surface and subsurface rights, and 259 sq. km. of Category B Settlement Land which includes surface rights only. The remaining 7 sq. km. is Fee Simple Settlement Land.

Kwanlin Dün First Nation

35 McIntyre Drive, Whitehorse, Yukon, Y1A 5A5
Phone: 867-633-7800
Fax: 867-668-5057
E-mail: reception@kwanlindun.com
Web: www.kwanlindun.com

Kwanlin Dün First Nation is a self-governing people with the main community and administrative headquarters located in Whitehorse. The First Nation has approximately 1,130 members, most of whom live in the Whitehorse area, with the balance dispersed throughout Canada, the United States of America (predominantly Alaska), and abroad. Approximately 75 percent of the territory's population lives within the Traditional Territory of the Kwanlin Dün First Nation. The Kwanlin Dün people have cultural affiliations with the Northern and Southern Tutchone, as well as the Tagish people from Marsh Lake. The Kwanlin Dün First Nation Final and Self-Government Agreements came into effect on April 1, 2005. The Final Agreement includes 1,043 sq. km. of Settlement Land, of which 647 sq. km. is Category A Settlement Land which includes both surface and subsurface rights, and 388 sq. km. of Category B Settlement Land which includes surface rights only. The remaining 7 sq. km. is Fee Simple Settlement Land.

Little Salmon/Carmacks First Nation

P.O. Box 135, Carmacks, Yukon, Y0B 1C0
Phone: 867-863-5576
Fax: 867-863-5710
E-mail: reception@lscfn.ca
Web: www.lscfn.ca

Little Salmon/Carmacks First Nation is a self-governing people with the main community and administrative headquarters located in Carmacks, about 177 km. north of Whitehorse. The Little Salmon/Carmacks First Nation has approximately 630 members. The Little Salmon/Carmacks people are of Northern Tutchone ancestry and are part of the Athapascan language group. The Little Salmon/Carmacks First Nation Final and Self-Government Agreements came into effect on October 1, 1997. The Final Agreement includes 2,598 sq. km. of Settlement Land. The First Nation owns 1,554 sq. km. of Category A Settlement Land which includes both surface and subsurface rights, and 1,036 sq. km. of Category B Settlement Land which includes surface rights only. The remaining 8 sq. km. is Fee Simple Settlement Land.

Activities in 2011-12

The Little Salmon/Carmacks First Nation Council set up the Standing Committee on Constitutional Development. The members discuss processes to move forward on problematic issues, resulting in several amendments to the Constitution that were proposed and approved.

Chief and Council held a Governance Strategic Planning session. Capital and Infrastructure and Health & Social Services staff held Strategic Planning Sessions to assess current standings and help guide future planning.

Construction continued on a new Health and Social Services building and day care building.

Negotiations were completed on Self-Government Financial Transfer Agreement amendments on Health Programs and Initiatives:

  • National Aboriginal Youth Suicide Prevention Strategy
  • Aboriginal Diabetes Initiatives
  • Maternal Child Health Programs

Regarding Human Resources and Social Development and the Aboriginal Skills and Employment Training Strategy, negotiations took place for a new Intergovernmental Agreement. A working group was formed to advance completion of a draft intergovernmental agreement.

The Northern Tutchone First Nations, which are comprised of the First Nation of Nacho Nyak Dun, Selkirk First Nation and Little Salmon/Carmacks First Nation, were in the planning and discussion stages with Government of Canada and Government of Yukon on a draft Administration of Justice Framework Agreement. Little Salmon/Carmacks First Nation attended meetings with other Northern Tutchone First Nations to establish interim measures, pending the settlement of an Administration of Justice Agreement as per Section 13.6.1 of the Self-Government Agreement.

Selkirk First Nation

P.O. Box 40, Pelly Crossing, Yukon, Y0B 1P0
Phone: 867-537-3331
Fax: 867-537-3902
E-mail: ea@selkirkfn.com
Web: www.selkirkfn.com

The Selkirk First Nation is a self-governing people with the main community and administrative headquarters located in Pelly Crossing, about 285 km. north of Whitehorse. Selkirk First Nation has approximately 658 members. The Selkirk First Nation is part of the Northern Tutchone language group. The Selkirk First Nation Final and Self-Government Agreements came into effect on October 1, 1997. The Final Agreement includes 4,749 sq. km. of Settlement Land. The First Nation owns 2,408 sq. km. of Category A Settlement Land which includes both surface and subsurface rights, and 2,331 sq. km. of Category B Settlement Land which includes surface rights only. The remaining 10 sq. km. is Fee Simple Settlement Land.

Activities in 2011-12

Negotiations for Programs and Services Transfer Agreements were held with the Government of Yukon and the Government of Canada for Alcohol and Drug Services. Negotiations did not conclude in 2011-2012. Selkirk First Nation and the other Self-Governing Yukon First Nations continued to negotiate a Yukon First Nation Labour Market Agreement.

Exploratory discussions occurred for Capital and natural resource programs. The exploratory discussions were to determine whether a Self-Government Financial Transfer Agreement amendment was required for funding in these areas. Discussions were not fruitful and the Parties will continue negotiations through the Self-Government Financial Transfer Agreement renewal negotiations.

Selkirk First Nation developed and implemented a Resource Royalty Policy.

The Northern Tutchone First Nations, which are comprised of the First Nation of Nacho Nyak Dun, Selkirk First Nation and Little Salmon/Carmacks First Nation, are in the planning and discussion stages with Government of Canada and Government of Yukon on a draft Administration of Justice Framework Agreement.

Selkirk First Nation began discussions on the development of a Trust. The discussions did not conclude in 2011-2012 and are ongoing with a target date of summer 2013.

Ta'an Kwäch'än Council

117 Industrial Road, Whitehorse, Yukon, Y1A 2T8
Phone: 867-668-3613
Fax: 867-667-4295
E-mail: admin@taan.ca
Web: www.taan.ca

The Ta'an Kwäch'än Council is a self-governing people with the main community and administrative headquarters located in the Whitehorse area. The First Nation takes its name from Tàa'an Män (Lake Laberge) in the heart of the Ta'an Kwäch'än Traditional Territory. The First Nation has approximately 432 members of which about half live in Whitehorse, with the balance living throughout the rest of Canada, in the United States of America (mostly Alaska), and abroad. The Ta'an Kwäch'än people are of Southern Tutchone ancestry. Ta'an Kwäch'än Council Final and Self-Government Agreements came into effect on April 1, 2002. The Final Agreement includes 785 sq. km. of Settlement Land. The First Nation owns 388 sq. km. of Category A Settlement Land which includes both surface and subsurface rights, and 388 sq. km. of Category B Settlement Land which includes surface rights only. The remaining 8 sq. km. is Fee Simple Settlement Land.

Teslin Tlingit Council

P.O. Box 133, Teslin, Yukon, Y0A 1B0
Phone: 867-390-2532
Fax: 867-390-2204
E-mail: admin@ttc-teslin.com
Web: www.ttc-teslin.com

The Teslin Tlingit Council is a self-governing people with the main community and administrative headquarters located in Teslin, 170 km. south of Whitehorse. The First Nation has approximately 732 members. The Teslin Tlingit people are Inland Tlingit-speaking people, and trace their ancestry to the Tlingit people who migrated inland from Alaskan coastal areas. The Teslin Tlingit Council Final and Self-Government Agreements came into effect on February 14, 1995. The Final Agreement includes 2,429 sq. km. of Settlement Land. The First Nation owns 1,230 sq. km. of Category A Settlement Land which includes both surface and subsurface rights, and 1165 sq. km. of Category B Settlement Land which includes surface rights only. The remaining 33 sq. km. is Fee Simple Settlement Land.

Activities in 2011-12

The Teslin Tlingit Council actively participated and contributed to support the activities of the Implementation Working Group to meet the expected outcomes/results of the Implementation Working Group 2011-2012 work plan. The work plan priorities included: the review of economic development measures provisions in Chapter 22 of the Umbrella Final Agreement and the Teslin Tlingit Council Final Agreement, Schedule A, Part 1 of Final Agreements – Representative Public Service Plan, Implementation Review Group recommendations 3.14 – future reviews; work on the Heritage Resources Manual in Chapter 13 of the Teslin Tlingit Council Final Agreement; the monitoring of the Umbrella Final Agreement Implementation Plan renewal discussions, communications, annual reports, and amendments; and the monitoring of the status of the Implementation Review Group Nine Year Review Recommendations.

Tr’ondëk Hwëch’in

1242 Front Street (P.O. Box 599), Dawson City, Yukon, Y0B 1G0
Phone: 867-993-7100
Toll-free: 1-877-993-3400
E-mail: wayne.potoroka@trondek.ca
Web: www.trondek.ca/index.php

Tr'ondëk Hwëch'in is a self-governing people with the main community and administrative headquarters located in Dawson City, at the confluence of the Yukon and Klondike rivers about 540 km. north-west of Whitehorse. The First Nation has approximately 1082 members, about 572 of whom reside in the Yukon. The Tr'ondëk Hwëch'in people are part of a larger Hän Nation, the language of which is an Athapascan dialect. The Tr'ondëk Hwëch'in Final and Self-Government Agreements came into effect on September 15, 1998. The Final Agreement includes 2,598 sq. km. of Settlement Land. The First Nation owns 1,554 sq. km. of Category A Settlement Land which includes both surface and subsurface rights, and 1,036 sq. km. of Category B Settlement Land which includes surface rights only. The remaining 8 sq. km. is Fee Simple Settlement Land.

Vuntut Gwitchin First Nation

P.O. Box 94, Old Crow, Yukon, Y0B 1N0
Phone: 867-966-3261
Fax: 867-966-3800
E-mail: info@vgfn.net
Web: www.vgfn.ca

The Vuntut Gwitchin First Nation is a self-governing people with the main community and administrative headquarters located in Old Crow, about 3 hours north of Whitehorse by air. Old Crow is the most northerly Yukon community and the only one not serviced by road. The First Nation has approximately 771 members. The Vuntut Gwitchin people belong to the Athapascan language group. The Vuntut Gwitchin First Nation Final and Self-Government Agreements came into effect on February 14, 1995. The Final Agreement includes 7,751 sq. km. of Settlement Land. The First Nation owns 7,744 sq. km. of Category A Settlement Land which includes both surface and subsurface rights. The remaining 7 sq. km. is Fee Simple Settlement Land.

Implementing bodies: Renewable Resources Councils

Background: Renewable Resources Councils

Renewable Resources Councils are local bodies who make management recommendations to Self-Governing Yukon First Nations, the Government of Yukon, and the Government of Canada. They are established where individual land claim agreements have been signed. To date, 10 of the 11 Self-Governing Yukon First Nations have established a Renewable Resources Council.

Renewable Resources Councils allow for local management of renewable resources — such as fish, wildlife, habitat and forest resources — in each Yukon First Nation's Traditional Territory. Renewable Resources Councils also support the Yukon Fish and Wildlife Management Board, including the Salmon Sub-Committee, by raising awareness of specific issues and providing local and traditional information.

The Councils have 6 to 10 members; half of whom are nominated by the respective First Nation, and half of whom are nominated by the Government of Yukon.

Alsek Renewable Resources Council

Executive Director: Susan Desjardins
P.O. Box 2077, Haines Junction, Yukon, Y0B 1L0
Phone: 867-634-2524
Fax: 867-634-2527
E-mail: admin@alsekrrc.ca
Web: www.alsekrrc.ca

The mandate of the Alsek Renewable Resources Council is to make management recommendations related to fish, wildlife and their habitat, as well as forest resources, as outlined in Chapters 16 and 17 of the Champagne and Aishihik First Nations Final Agreement. The Council's jurisdiction is the Champagne and Aishihik First Nations' Traditional Territory, which covers the communities of Haines Junction, Canyon Creek, Takhini, Mendenhall, Silver City, Kloo Lake, Aishihik and Klukshu.

Activities in 2011-12

Work on the Champagne and Aishihik Traditional Territory Integrated Wildlife Management Plan continued to be a priority and will require time and funding in the new fiscal year.

Champagne and Aishihik First Nations and Government of Yukon worked on implementing the Strategic Forest Management Plan for the Champagne Aishihik Traditional Territory. The Council members continued to attend working group meetings for fuel abatement, and promoted community consultation through partnerships with Government of Yukon Forest Resources, Parks Canada and the Village of Haines Junction.

The Dezadeash Lake Management Plan remains tabled, though it was expected to be finalized and implemented for the fiscal year 2012. A redrafted version was expected to be presented back to the Alsek Renewable Resource Council from the Yukon Government for review.

Council members continued to take the community's perspectives to the Bison and Elk Technical Team meetings on a biannual basis.

Work on trapping issues was a high priority for the Council in 2011-2012, including the review of expiring concessions, preliminary review of trapline allocation criteria with Champagne and Aishihik First Nations, and the incentive programs for trappers.

The Council distributed meat from outfitters to community groups for community functions.

The Council received, reviewed and provided community comments and concerns to the Yukon Environmental and Socio-Economic Assessment Board for proposals under review.

Proposed Yukon Wildlife Act Regulation changes for 2011-2012 were put forward and the Council supported the regulation change review process administered by the Yukon Fish and Wildlife Management Board.

The Council reviewed Scientist and Explorer Act permits for research projects.

Members of the Council developed relationships in the community by hosting an open house and meetings, all of which were well attended. The Council listened to and discussed concerns with the Champagne and Aishihik First Nations Chief and Council, and attended Champagne and Aishihik First Nations Elders meetings and the General Assembly.

The Council attended the 2011 Annual General Workshop of Renewable Resources Councils in Carmacks, the Annual Renewable Resources Council Chairs' Meeting in Whitehorse, public forestry meetings, a public meeting of the Yukon Environmental and Socio-Economic Assessment Board, and meetings of the Southern Lakes Wildlife Co-ordinating Committee. The Council communicated and worked with other Renewable Resources Councils on common issues.

The Council took part in the Wolf Conservation and Management Plan by hosting public meetings in Haines Junction, E-mailing information to the public and encouraging comments. The Council co-hosted a meeting with Government of Yukon to plan the Marshall Creek and Bear Creek Timber Harvest areas.

Members of the Council attended a "Mining 101" course delivered by the Yukon Mine Training Association and a Species at Risk workshop delivered by Environment Canada. The Council hired a summer student who worked in partnership with Yukon College to help deliver a wilderness and outdoor-based summer camp program for kids 10-15 years of age. The camp created awareness of the work of the Renewable Resources Councils and stewardship of renewable resources.

Carcross/Tagish Renewable Resources Council

Secretariat: Linda Thornton
P.O. Box 70, Tagish, Yukon, Y0B 1T0
Phone: 867-399-4923
Fax: 867-399-4978
E-mail: carcrosstagishrrc@gmail.com

The mandate of the Carcross/Tagish Renewable Resources Council is to make management recommendations regarding fish, wildlife and their habitat, and forest resources as outlined in Chapters 16 and 17 of the Carcross/Tagish First Nation Final Agreement.

The Council was established in February 2010. Fiscal year 2011-2012 was the Council's second year of operation.

Activities in 2011-12

The Carcross/Tagish Renewable Resources Council worked closely with Government of Yukon Department of Highways to raise awareness of the Carcross caribou herd crossing the Alaska Highway. Posters were published and flashing signs were placed at strategic points at the north and south ends of the corridor used by the caribou on the Alaska Highway.

The Council facilitated the installation of public information signs at two locations along the Six Mile River to raise awareness about migrating water fowl.

The Council submitted a proposal for a Southern Lakes Chinook Salmon Enhancement project for funding under the Yukon River Panel Restoration and Enhancement Fund.

The Council underwent a financial audit in 2011-2012.

Carmacks Renewable Resources Council

Secretariat: Kimberley Ayles-McKay
P.O. Box 122, Carmacks, Yukon, Y0B 1C0
Phone: 867-863-6838
Fax: 867-863-6429
E-mail: carmacksrrc@northwestel.net

The mandate of the Carmacks Renewable Resources Council is to make management recommendations related to fish, wildlife and their habitat, and forest resources, as outlined in Chapters 16 and 17 of the Little Salmon/Carmacks First Nation Final Agreement.

Activities in 2011-12

The Carmacks Renewable Resources Council achieved considerable success this year by raising its profile in the community. Numerous meetings and workshops were coordinated in an effort to bring information to the community and generate discussions on local fish and wildlife issues. The outcome of these engagements allowed the Carmacks Renewable Resources Council to develop meaningful recommendations that accurately reflected the voice of the community.

Thirteen projects under review by the Yukon Environmental and Socio-economic Assessment Board were located within, adjacent to, or required access through the habitat range of the Klaza caribou herd. Protecting the herd and its habitat for future generations as a healthy and vibrant caribou population remains the largest challenge for the Council. The Council also provided comments to the Yukon Environmental and Socio-economic Assessment Board on numerous mining projects, identifying the key valued wildlife components that may be impacted by project activities.

The 16th Annual General Workshop of Renewable Resources Councils was held in Carmacks from November 4-6, 2011. The agenda included the Yukon Environmental and Socio-economic Assessment Board and presentations by Yukon Government on Cumulative Effects Studies that addressed the Council's role in mining activities. The Council developed trapline recommendations intended to engage the Government of Yukon in enhancing the industry. The Council engaged in discussions on how the Renewable Resources Councils work with communities to effectively bring a local voice to management issues.

The Council provided support for a community meeting held by the Yukon Fish & Wildlife Management Board, and for the Yukon Government's Wolf Conservation and Management Plan Workshop. The Council compiled the comments received from the community to be included in a written submission to the Yukon Fish & Wildlife Management Board on the Plan.

The Council supported the community elk information exchange at a public meeting. The Council heard community concerns about the lack of public information about the management of the Braeburn elk herd. Community comments were summarized and provided for the Government of Yukon's elk biologist's report. Key recommendations included allowing a hunt within the core elk range to drive the herd away from the highway as safety was a key issue for the community.

The Moose Management Workshop was identified in the Council's work plan as an opportunity to educate local stakeholders (and invite school students) to explain how moose are managed within the Little Salmon/Carmacks First Nation Traditional Territory. It was a challenge for the Council to lead this project, and discussions with the Regional Biologist and Little Salmon/Carmacks First Nation Lands Department led to the understanding that this workshop would require significant planning and teamwork to successfully reach its goal of exchanging information with community members. The Council decided to pursue this matter in the coming year.

The Council coordinated a trapline event to coincide with Carmacks Winterlude. To fulfill its mandate of enhancing the trapping industry, the Council financially supported bringing a Fur-Handling Workshop to Carmacks which was hosted by the Yukon Trappers Association. The public and twelve active trappers were invited to learn how to increase their profits in fur harvest sales by handling fur using the current techniques required by the auction houses. This created awareness for young people who participated and showed immense interest in fur-handling techniques.

The Council made a request to the Yukon Fish and Wildlife Management Board that the public review of the Aishihik Wood Bison Herd Management Plan be postponed as the original date in mid-December was considered too busy for meaningful consultation and the Council were aware of community concerns on bison management issues. The Council supported the review by providing a community supper and providing comment cards for attendees to note their bison concerns. The Council compiled the comments in a written summary and provided a letter of recommendation to the Review Team.

Dän Keyi Renewable Resources Council

Secretariat: Pauly Wroot
P.O. Box 50, Burwash Landing, Yukon, Y0B 1V0
Phone: 867-841-5820
Fax: 867-841-5821
E-mail: dankeyirrc@northwestel.net

The mandate of the Dän Keyi Renewable Resources Council is to make management recommendations related to fish, wildlife and their habitat, and forest resources, as outlined in Chapters 16 and 17 of the Kluane First Nation Final Agreement.

Activities in 2011-12

The Dän Keyi Renewable Resources Council underwent a financial audit in 2011-2012.

The Council worked with the Government of Yukon to create a new interpretative sign to educate the public about management and conservation of the local Kluane caribou herd. The sign was installed along the section of the Alaska Highway frequented by the herd.

The Council also worked with Government of Yukon to have signs installed in key locations along the Alaska Highway where the Dall sheep are known to congregate and cross the road at certain times of the year. Simple signs with an illustration of a male Dall sheep were installed to educate the traveling public to use caution as sheep are occasionally on the highway.

The Council initiated work with the Kluane First Nation, Government of Yukon and Parks Canada to develop a Moose Management Strategy for the Kluane First Nation Core Area. This is a joint effort with these governments and is expected to continue into 2013.

The Council continued to monitor the work being done by Yukon Energy Corporation on the proposed Gladstone Lake diversion project.

The Council provided recommendations and worked with the Government of Yukon's Community Services Branch in relation to improvements being made to the Destruction Bay Solid Waste Transfer Station.

The Council rented a new office at lots 50 and 51 in Destruction Bay; the mailing address remains unchanged.

Dawson District Renewable Resources Council

Secretariat: Linda Taylor
P.O. Box 1380, Dawson City, Yukon, Y0B 1G0
Phone: 867-993-6976
Fax: 867-993-6093
E-mail: dawsonrrc@northwestel.net

The mandate of the Dawson District Renewable Resources Council is to make management recommendations related to fish, wildlife and their habitat, and forest resources, as outlined in Chapters 16 and 17 of the Tr'ondëk Hwëch'in Final Agreement.

Activities in 2011-12

The Dawson District Renewable Resources Council underwent a financial audit in 2011-2012.

The Council received funding from the Yukon River Panel Restoration and Enhancement Fund for a Salmon Spawning and Rearing Access Restoration project. The project, which was approved by Government of Yukon, as per the Council's mandate, aimed to restore salmon access to rearing habitat and encourage community stewardship.

The objectives of the project were to:

  • restore chinook salmon stocks through increased access to rearing and overwintering habitat;
  • involve, educate and provide experience for two students from the Robert Service School;
  • build community capacity and stewardship for the restoration of salmon stocks and habitat;
  • increase knowledge of salmon utilization of small streams in central Yukon;
  • salvage salmon fry from isolated pools in the Klondike River floodplain; and
  • develop a monitoring program for future assessment and restoration.

Two high school students were hired to assist with the field work. Only 66 juvenile Chinook salmon were captured in 2011. Fisheries and Oceans Canada provided technical support for the project which started July 4 and ended August 5. Factors for the low number of captured salmon could be the result of a low brood year and high water or the earlier start date compared to previous years. A public day was held August 4, where elders and children were taken out for the day to view the operation.

The Council continued to workclosely with Government of Yukon, Tr'ondëk Hwëch'in and the public to complete the Dawson Forest Resources Management Plan. Two meetings were held in the fall of 2011 and the draft plan was in the process of being approved by the Government of Yukon. Council anticipates public consultation on the plan to take place during the summer and fall of 2012.

The Council had grave concerns regarding the moose population in the White Gold area, and work with the Dawson Regional Biologist was instrumental in completing a moose survey for the area in March. The Council also held a public open house to educate the public about the moose population in the White Gold area.

A well attended public meeting was held in Dawson on April 19 to gather public input for the Wolf Conservation and Management Plan.

The Council continued to be involved in the Dawson Regional Land Use Planning process. Members attended a two day workshop in Dawson on January 18 and 19, 2012.

Laberge Renewable Resources Council

Secretariat: Charolette O’Donnell
101 Copper Road, #202, Whitehorse, Yukon, Y1A 2Z7
Phone: 867-393-3940
Fax: 867-393-3941
E-mail: labergerrc@northwestel.net

The mandate of the Laberge Renewable Resources Council is to make management recommendations related to fish, wildlife and their habitat, and forest resources, as outlined in Chapters 16 and 17 of the Ta'an Kwäch'än Council Final Agreement.

Activities in 2011-12

The Laberge Renewable Resources Council was an active participant at various meetings and workshops. Members participated on the Yukon River Panel Working Group, the Elk Management Technical Team and the Yukon Inter Tribal Watershed Council. The Council attended the Yukon Fish and Wildlife Management Board Annual Co-Chair Meeting, the Wood Bison Technical Team meeting, the Salmon Sub-Committee meeting, a meeting with Government of Yukon, Forest Resources, the Outfitter Quota Guideline meeting, and the Wildlife Regulation changes meeting. Council members also took part in the 2011 Annual General Workshop of Renewable Resources Councils in Carmacks, the Yukon Environment Forum and the Yukon Species at Risk Working Group. The Council reviewed project proposals and provided written comments to the Yukon Economic and Socio-Economic Assessment Board and the Yukon Water Board.

Two board member's positions expired January, 2012 and by March, 2012 no new appointments had been made. The implication of these two vacancies made the performance and decision making process for the Council difficult when a quorum was required. The Council worked to build trust and a close working relationship between members of the Council so that all members could participate equally.

In September 2010 the Council and staff attended a retreat at the Takhini Hot Springs and used the time to develop a Strategic Plan for 2011-2012 and to build relationships.

Mayo District Renewable Resources Council

Secretariat: Barb Shannon
P.O. Box 249, Mayo, Yukon, Y0B 1M0
Phone: 867-996-2942
Fax: 867-996-2948
E-mail: mayorrc@northwestel.net

The mandate of the Mayo District Renewable Resources Council is to make management recommendations related to fish, wildlife and their habitat, and forest resources, as outlined in Chapters 16 and 17 of the First Nation of Nacho Nyak Dun Final Agreement.

The Mayo District Renewable Resources Council responded to a high number of project proposals for review under the Yukon Environmental and Socio-Economic Assessment Act. The Council has been diligent in communicating with the community to provide information and updates on the current fish and wildlife issues within the First Nation of Nacho Nyak Dun's Traditional Territory.

Activities in 2011-12

The Council received five applications for open traplines, and five re-issuance applications. The Government of Yukon and First Nation of Nacho Nyak Dun worked towards 70 percent First Nation trapline allotment, and for better utilization of existing traplines.

The Council continued to develop a positive working relationship with Victoria Gold for the company's proposed Eagle Gold heap leaching project. The company held regular community meetings and corresponded with the Council.

Wildlife data collection surveys continued for unclassified areas throughout the vast untallied areas which are heavily explored for mineral resources.

The implications of Yukon Energy's Mayo Lake Enhancement Project throughout the watershed continued to concern the Council. There was no reply to the Council's submitted concerns about application for the drawdown of water on Mayo Lake. The concern is that there is risk and uncertainty regarding potential effects to fisheries resources.

North Yukon Renewable Resources Council

Secretariat: Erin Linklater
P.O. Box 80, Old Crow, Yukon, Y0B 1N0
Phone: 867-996-3034
Fax: 867-966-3036
E-mail: nyrrc@northwestel.net

The mandate of the North Yukon Renewable Resources Council is to make management recommendations related to fish, wildlife and their habitat, and forest resources, as outlined in Chapters 16 and 17 of the Vuntut Gwitchin First Nation Final Agreement.

Selkirk Renewable Resources Council

Secretariat: Brenda Bosely
P.O. Box 32, Pelly Crossing, Yukon, Y0B 1P0
Phone: 867-537-3937
Fax: 867-537-3939
E-mail: selkirkrrc@northwestel.net

The mandate of the Selkirk Renewable Resources Council is to make management recommendations related to fish, wildlife and their habitat, and forest resources, as outlined in Chapters 16 and 17 of the Selkirk First Nation Final Agreement.

Teslin Renewable Resources Council

Secretariat: Bernice Schonewille
P.O. Box 186 , Teslin, Yukon, Y0A 1B0
Phone: 867-390-2323
Fax: 867-390-2919
E-mail: teslinrrc@northwestel.net

The mandate of the Teslin Renewable Resources Council is to make management recommendations related to fish, wildlife and their habitat, and forest resources, as outlined in Chapters 16 and 17 of the Teslin Tlingit Council Final Agreement.

Activities in 2011-12

The Teslin Renewable Resources Council, together with the Teslin Tlingit Council Lands and Resources Department, planned a "Take a Kid Trapping" project to promote trapping among youth within the Teslin Tlingit Council Traditional Territory. Unfortunately, the project was not completed as planned, but the Council gained valuable knowledge for planning future projects of this nature.

The Yukon Outfitters Association and the Teslin Tlingit Council each provided financial incentives to trappers who focused on harvesting wolves on their traplines. In May 2012, a dinner meeting with area trappers was held to hear their suggestions and concerns. At the meeting, the current Standard Operating Guidelines for the Council were reviewed and comments received.

As partners in the Nisutlin River Delta National Wildlife Area Management Plan, the Teslin Renewable Resources Council and the Teslin Tlingit Council continued to work with Environment Canada, Canadian Wildlife Services on matters related to the Delta Area. New signs were posted to identify boundaries and explain activities that are allowed in the Area. The partners to the Plan jointly developed the information and agreed on the placement of the signs and kiosks in specific locations to promote awareness of the Area.

The Nisutlin River Delta National Wildlife Area Management Plan was in the final stage of the review process. The Government of Yukon and Environment Canada, Canada Wildlife Services continued to work together on the regulatory and enforcement issues within the Wildlife Area.

Council members participated in trips into the Nisutlin Bay area where the Department of National Defence erected signs warning the public of possible unexploded ordinances. It is believed that a Canadian Air Force plane may have crashed there in the 1940s during a training mission. However, neither the plane nor its cargo was located during an inspection in the summer of 2011.

Council members cooked lunch for more than 100 Teslin community members who attended the Council's annual barbecue and information session.

The Council provided some financial support to the Teslin Lake Bird Observatory for its operation in the fall of 2011.

The Council provided financial support for the "Wolves of the Yukon" book presentation and signing in Teslin.

The Council also made a financial contribution towards the summer science camp for local youth held in August 2011 at the Teslin Campus of Yukon College. The camp exposed youth to a variety of outdoor nature activities.

The Teslin Renewable Resources Council, Teslin Tlingit Council and the Government of Yukon determined that more local and traditional knowledge will be required to implement the Teslin Strategic Forest Management Plan.

A professor and team of graduate students from the University of Northern British Columbia worked with Council members, the Teslin Tlingit Council, the Government of Yukon, and local residents to better understand community concerns about forests. Changes, impacts on forest health, the harvesting of moose and plants for food/medicine and other values were considered. Open houses are expected to be held in 2012 and 2013.

The Council attended meetings to hear different areas of concern, and continued to be involved with the development of the Yukon Wolf Conservation and Management Plan. The Government of Yukon's Minister of Environment accepted the recommended plan in the spring of 2012. A majority of the wolf management proposals made by the Council were adopted into the Plan.

Other implementing bodies

Dispute Resolution Board

P.O. Box 31675, Whitehorse, Yukon, Y1A 6L3
Phone: 867-668-3562
Toll free: 1-866-367-6551
Fax: 867-668-4474
E-mail: drb.ufa@northwestel.net
Web: www.drbyukon.ca

The mandate of the Dispute Resolution Board is set out in Chapter 26 of the Umbrella Final Agreement and the Yukon First Nation Final Agreements. The Board facilitates mediation - an out-of-court, non-adversarial alternative dispute resolution process - to resolve disputes arising from the interpretation, administration or implementation of the Settlement Agreements or Settlement Legislation. If mediation is not successful, the Parties may access the more formal process of arbitration.

The three Board members are appointed for 3 year terms. The Board is supported by an Executive Director and an on-call employee.

Activities in 2011-12

On October 18, 2011, the Dispute Resolution Board held a workshop for its mediators, arbitrators, members and staff. The workshop was facilitated by former Council of Yukon First Nations negotiator, Dave Joe. Participants explored the history of the Yukon land claim process and reviewed the Umbrella Final Agreement chapters with a focus on references to the dispute resolution process.

During the fiscal year, the Board received three mediation referrals, of which two did not proceed to mediation. The third mediation was productive with the two Parties breaking to do some internal research before deciding if they would require a second session.

The Board advertised in the Yukon and British Columbia for mediators and arbitrators with knowledge of Aboriginal land claim issues. This resulted in a positive response and additions were made to the Board's roster of mediators and arbitrators.

The Board met with the Chair and Executive Director of the Yukon Surface Rights Board, to share strengths and challenges experienced.

The Board met with representatives of the Implementation Working Group to clarify the nomination and appointment process. The Implementation Working Group amended the Umbrella Final Agreement Implementation Plan to reflect a joint appointment process agreed to by the Parties.

Board member terms expired on January 14, 2012, and by March 31, 2012 new appointments had not been made. This resulted in the Board becoming inoperable. The Board consulted with Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Canada and arranged for the continued payment of operational expenses by putting Board funds in trust with a local legal firm. The summer student position was cancelled and the Parties to the Umbrella Final Agreement were notified of the situation.

Once operable, the Board continued to respond to questions regarding the Yukon land claims enrollment process, maintained the enrollment records and referred individuals to the appropriate First Nation citizenship offices.

Training Policy Committee

2166-2nd Avenue, Whitehorse, Yukon, Y1A 4P1
Phone: 867-668-7812
Fax: 867-668-7825
E-mail: tpced@northwestel.net
Web: www.tpcyukon.ca

The mandate of the Training Policy Committee is set out in Chapter 28 of the Umbrella Final Agreement and the Yukon First Nation Final Agreements. The Training Policy Committee works to ensure that self-governing Yukon First Nation people obtain training to fully participate in the opportunities arising from the implementation of the Settlement Agreements.

Activities in 2011-12

The Training Policy Committee issued a call for proposals for the development of generic training with closing dates of May 15 and December 15, 2011. The projects were for the following categories: Financial Management; Heritage and Culture Management; Human Resource Management; Justice; Lands and Resources Management; Management and Planning; Office Administration; and, Understanding Self-Government.

The Yukon Indian People Training Trust (the "Trust") financially supported Tr'ondëk Hwëch'in for the pursuit of excellence, co-operative education and post-secondary projects. The programs were well attended and beneficiaries learned new skills to enhance their employability and social interactions.

The Trust financially supported the Ta'an Kwäch'än Council for the heritage restoration project of the Frank Slim building located in Upper Lake Laberge. The trainees were guided by Elder Glenn Grady who shared oral traditions during the restoration work.

The Trust financially supported training for First Nation human resource managers on the Canada Labour Code. The training covered Section III of the Canada Labour Code, and regulations for Occupational Health & Safety. Participants identified a need for further human resource training.

The Committee developed and adopted a 1 year work plan, a 5 year Strategic Plan (2012-2017), and a 10 year work plan (2012-2022), all of which provide direction for activities within the existing budget.

Yukon Environmental and Socio-economic Assessment Board

309 Strickland Street, Suite 200, Whitehorse, Yukon, Y1A 2J9
Phone: 867-668-6420
Toll free: 1-866-322-4040
Fax: 867-668-6425
E-mail: yesab@yesab.ca
Web: www.yesab.ca

The Yukon Environmental and Socio-economic Assessment Board is established under the Yukon Environmental and Socio-economic Assessment Act. The Act sets out a process to assess the environmental and socio-economic effects of projects and other activities in Yukon that may affect the territory. The Act is created under Chapter 12 of the Umbrella Final Agreement and Yukon First Nations' Final Agreements.

Activities in 2011-12

The Board had one of the busiest years since its inception with a total of 324 projects submitted to Designated Offices for review. The Board received one project proposal for review by the Executive Committee in 2011: the Ketza River Mine. More than 40 outreach activities were conducted during the year and included presentations, open houses, and meetings with various organizations, First Nations, the Governments of Yukon and Canada, and the public.

The Board continued to develop sector-specific project proposal forms for forestry and land disposition. The new forms will include sector-specific questions that will improve the quality of the project proposals and make the process more efficient by encouraging the submission of information early in the process, rather than having to request more information during the review and assessment stages. Work on sector-specific forms for the quartz and placer sectors continued as a joint initiative with Government of Yukon's Mineral Resources Branch and the Yukon Water Board Secretariat (placer only) to develop combined application forms.

The Proponent's Guide to Water Information Requirements for Quartz Mining Project Proposals was completed and released. The Guide was developed with input from First Nations, Government of Yukon, Government of Canada, the Yukon Water Board and other technical experts.

The Board also produced Dam Guide: Design Expectations and Required Information with input from the Government of Yukon and the Yukon Water Board.

The Board completed and released Heritage Resource Information Requirements for Land Applications Proposals Policy.

The Board continued gathering wildlife data in the White Gold area to help inform cumulative effects assessments.

The Board continued its involvement in the Five-year Review of the Yukon Environmental and Socio-economic Act, and participated in the preparation of the "Draft Review Report-Interim," dated March 31, 2012.

A future challenge for the Board will be capacity constraints in relation to the ability of First Nations and governments to provide input into project proposals. This may have effects on the Yukon Environmental and Socio-economic Assessment Act process.

Baseline information gaps and the need for current information will require the Board to update the White Gold studies, and initiate new cumulative effects studies in other areas with high project activity.

Yukon Fish and Wildlife Management Board

106 Main Street, 2nd floor, Whitehorse, Yukon
P.O. Box 31104, Whitehorse, Yukon, Y1A 5P7
Phone: 867-667-3754
Fax: 867-393-6947
E-mail: officemanager@yfwmb.ca
Web: www.yfwmb.ca

The Yukon Fish and Wildlife Management Board was established under Chapter 16 of the Umbrella Final Agreement and all First Nation Final Agreements as the primary instrument of Fish and Wildlife Management in the Yukon. The Board is an advisory body consisting of 12 members appointed by the Government of Yukon's Minister of Environment. The Council of Yukon First Nations and the Government of Yukon each nominate six members. One Yukon nominee is appointed in consultation with Canada.

Since the Board's responsibilities lie with issues that affect the entire Yukon, the Board focuses its efforts on territorial policies, legislation and other measures to help guide management of fish and wildlife, habitat conservation and enhancing the renewable resources economy. The Board influences management decisions through public education and by making recommendations to the Government of Yukon, the Government of Canada, and First Nations. Recommendations and positions are based on the best technical, traditional and local information available.

Salmon Sub-Committee

P.O. Box 31094, Whitehorse, Yukon, Y1A 5P7
Phone: 867-393-6725
Fax: 866-914-7708
E-mail: executivedirector@yssc.ca
Web: www.yssc.ca

The Yukon Fish and Wildlife Management Board, Salmon Sub-Committee is a public advisory body established under Chapter 16 of the Umbrella Final Agreement and the Yukon First Nation Final Agreements. The Yukon Fish and Wildlife Management Board, the federal Minister of Fisheries and Oceans, and the First Nations located in the Alsek, Porcupine and Yukon River drainage basins each nominate two members to the Sub-Committee.

The Salmon Sub-Committee is established as the main instrument of salmon management in the Yukon, and may make recommendations to the federal Minister of Fisheries and Oceans and to Yukon First Nations on all matters related to salmon, their habitat and management, including: legislation; research; and, policies and programs. Additionally, the Umbrella Final Agreement requires that Sub-Committee members make up the majority of the Canadian representatives on the Yukon River Panel (established under the Yukon River Salmon Agreement between the Government of Canada and the United States of America).

Activities in 2011-12

The Salmon Sub-Committee made recommendations to the federal Minister of Fisheries and Oceans regarding the 2011 Yukon River salmon allocation. The Salmon Sub-Committee concurred with the 2011 Salmon Harvest Management Plan and recommended that it be accepted pursuant to Chapter 16 of the Umbrella Final Agreement.

Summary of Salmon Sub-Committee meeting and consultation activities:

  • four regular Sub-Committee meetings - three in Whitehorse (October, November, February/March), and one in Dawson City (May);
  • Sub-Committee alternates and official Yukon River Panel members attended two Yukon River Panel Meetings - Whitehorse (December) and Anchorage (March);
  • a public meeting for the Porcupine Drainage was held in January in Old Crow, Yukon; and
  • assisted with the organization of, and attended, the Yukon First Nations Salmon Stewards Summit in June, including facilitating the participation of the Yukon MP, Ryan Leef.

At their regular and orientation meetings the Salmon Sub-Committee was briefed on and discussed numerous habitat issues affecting Yukon salmon. This ensured the Committee had the right information and was able to fully understand the issues. Some specific topics included:

  • Yukon Queen river cruise – presentation by Yukon Environmental and Socio-Economic Assessment Board;
  • Gulf of Alaska By-Catch – presentation and briefing note by Fisheries and Oceans Canada, and Committee work including discussions with the Alaskan Commercial Processors Association;
  • McIntyre Creek Incubation and Hatchery Facility – presentation by Yukon College;
  • Ta'an Kwäch'än Council Video project – presentation of salmon culture prepared with youth, and Teslin Tlingit Council and Carcross/Tagish First Nation Research and Enhancement Projects;
  • proposed Changes to Section 35 of the Fisheries Act including communication with stakeholders – presentation to Yukon First Nations and Renewable Resources Councils; and
  • post season presentation from Fisheries and Oceans Canada about the Alsek, Porcupine, and Yukon River drainages.

The Salmon Sub-Committee continued to advise stakeholders of issues of concern through the following avenues:

  • updating the new website Yukon Salmon Sub-Committee and integrating the twitter feed (@yukonsalmon), Maintaining the website with timely meeting dates, minutes, and key documents;
  • participating in the Yukon River Drainage Fisheries Association newsletter with a letter to the Alaskan Fishing public and the United States fisheries managers;
  • submission to the Annual Report on Yukon Land Claims and Self-Government Agreements for 2011-2012;
  • presentation at the Species at Risk (Environment Canada) conference;
  • The Sub-Committee continues to support a variety of First Nation and community events, presentations and other initiatives through the donation of Sub-Committee promotional items for door prizes or promotion;
  • update of Sub-Committee information in the Government of Yukon - Yukon Fishing Regulations; and
  • development of a comprehensive Communications Strategy for the Face, Facts and Futures – Yukon Salmon marketing campaign. Supported with stakeholders interviews in Whitehorse and Carcross.

The Salmon Sub-Committee attended and participated in discussions on international Panels for the Pacific Salmon Treaty. Sub-Committee members met with their American counterparts on the Yukon River Panel in Whitehorse (December) and Anchorage (March) to discuss management issues for the Yukon River drainage basin. Fisheries and Oceans Canada and Salmon Sub-Committee members met and caucused as a Canadian team prior to these meetings. The Salmon Sub-Committee facilitated a pre-March Yukon River Panel meeting for the Salmon Sub-Committee with Fisheries and Oceans Canada and Government of Yukon.

Yukon Geographical Place Names Board

P.O. Box 31164, Whitehorse, Yukon, Y1A 5P7
Phone: 867-667-7500
Fax: 867-393-3904
E-mail: yukonplacenames@yknet.ca
Web: www.yukonplacenames.ca

The Yukon Geographical Place Names Board was established under Chapter 13 of the Umbrella Final Agreement and First Nation Final Agreements. The mandate is to research and approve geographical names in the Yukon. The Board is comprised of six members: three are nominated by the Government of Yukon and three by the Council of Yukon First Nations. The duties are to contribute expertise on linguistic place names, community use and to keep informed of issues relating to toponymy in the Yukon.

Activities in 2011-12

The Board held two meetings to review place name submissions from various First Nations. Two Board members, along with Board Secretariat, participated in a training workshop on Yukon First Nations' history and self-government.

In August 2011, two Board members and the Board Secretariat attended the annual meeting of the Geographic Names Board of Canada in Dawson City, Yukon.

Aerial photo documentation takes place annually and is used to provide complete information on place names recommended for approval by the Government of Yukon, Minister of Tourism and Culture.

Engaging First Nations' expertise in the place names process is necessary, but there are challenges in resolving linguistic and jurisdictional issues.

Yukon Heritage Resources Board

412 Main Street, Whitehorse, Yukon, Y1A 2B7
Phone: 867-668-7150
Fax: 867-668-7155
E-mail: YHRB@northwestel.net
Web: www.yhrb.ca

The mandate of the Yukon Heritage Resources Board, as set out in the Yukon First Nation Final Agreements and the Yukon's Historic Resources Act, is to make recommendations to Government and Yukon First Nations on issues that affect the territory's heritage resources. The Board may also be asked to make determinations regarding ownership of heritage resources and management of ethnographic objects and paleontological or archaeological objects.

Activities in 2011-12

The Yukon Heritage Resources Board continued to meet the quarterly financial and progress reporting obligations, and annual audit obligation, set out in its Transfer Payment Funding Agreement.

The Board continues to participate as an observer on the Chapter 13 Heritage Manual Drafting Committee, and provides input on the manual development process as requested by the participating Parties.

In July 2011, the Board attended and assisted with a ceremony recognizing the designation of Fort Selkirk as a Yukon territorial historic site, held on location. Fort Selkirk is co-owned and co-managed by the Government of Yukon and the Selkirk First Nation under terms set out in the Selkirk First Nation Final Agreement.

In November 2011, the Board completed a new strategic plan that will guide the Board's priorities and activities for the next five years. Throughout the year, the Board undertook activities and training in order to meet the goals and objectives outlined in the newly-adopted strategic plan.

Throughout the year, board members participated in a wide variety of outreach activities including: conferences; training; events; information sessions; and, hosted meetings and events for the heritage community, Yukon Boards and Committees, and the public. The Board continued to work with several partners to organize the Yukon Territorial Heritage Fair.

Yukon Land Use Planning Council

307 Jarvis Street, Room 201, Whitehorse, Yukon, Y1A 2H3
Phone: 867-667-7397
Fax: 867-667-4624
E-mail: ylupc@planyukon.ca
Web: www.planyukon.ca

The Yukon Land Use Planning Council is an advisory board that makes recommendations regarding regional planning to the Government of Yukon and Yukon First Nations, and assists regional planning commissions with the planning processes. The Council is composed of three members, one each nominated by the Government of Canada, the Government of Yukon and the Council of Yukon First Nations.

Activities in 2011-12

The Council met eight times and held one strategic planning session.

The Council assisted the Peel Watershed Planning Commission with maintaining the Commission's financial administration system, dedicating the Council's Senior Planner to perform the Commission's work and organizing Commission meetings. The Council staff also coordinated the production of a summary document for the Final Recommended Plan.

The Council assisted the Dawson Regional Planning Commission with financial administration (policy and procedures) by establishing an office in Dawson, presenting at community consultation events and creating the Commission's website.

The Council continued to conduct conformity checks on projects occurring in the region covered by the North Yukon Regional Plan.

The focus of much of the activity of the Council involved updating the Council's 1998 recommendation regarding planning regions in the Territory. The Council recommended a new configuration in September 2011 to Yukon Government, Kluane First Nation, Ta'an Kwäch'än Council, Little Salmon / Carmacks First Nation, Champagne and Aishihik First Nations, Carcross/Tagish First Nation, Kwanlin Dün First Nation and Teslin Tlingit Council.

The Council hosted two regional planning workshops -The Story of Wooshitin wudidaa which examined the Atlin Taku Land Use Planand The Boom and Beyond workshop regarding regional planning in the Dawson Region.

Peel Watershed Planning Commission

c/o Yukon Land Use Planning Council
307 Jarvis Street, Suite 201, Whitehorse, Yukon, Y1A 2H3
Phone: 867-667-7397
Toll free: 1-866-353-2374
Fax: 867-667-4624
E-mail: peel@planyukon.ca

Under Chapter 11 of the Umbrella Final Agreement, the Peel Watershed Planning Commission is responsible for developing and recommending a draft regional land use plan for the Peel watershed planning region. The Commission is comprised of 6 members: one nominated by the First Nation of Nacho Nyak Dun; one nominated by the Gwich'in Tribal Council; one nominated jointly by Government of Yukon and the Vuntut Gwitchin First Nation; one nominated jointly by the Government of Yukon and the Tr'ondëk Hwëch'in; and, two nominated by the Government of Yukon.

Activities in 2011-12

The Commission operated from April 1 through to July 15, 2011, and held two meetings during this period (May 11, 2011 and July 15, 2011). Staff for the Commission was provided by the Yukon Land Use Planning Council and by local contractors. The Commission released its Final Recommended Plan on July 16, 2011. The Chair of the Commission made presentations about the Final Recommended Plan in July and August as the plan moved into the approval process.

Yukon Surface Rights Board

100 Main Street (Horwood’s Mall), Suite 206, Whitehorse, Yukon
P.O. Box 31201, Whitehorse, Yukon, Y1A 5P7
Phone: 867-667-7695
Fax: 867-668-5892
E-mail: info@yukonsurfacerights.com
Web: www.yukonsurfacerights.ca

The Yukon Surface Rights Board derives its jurisdiction from several statutes: the Yukon Surface Rights Board Act (Government of Canada); the Quartz Mining Act (Government of Yukon); the Placer Mining Act (Government of Yukon); Oil and Gas Act (Government of Yukon); the Expropriation Act (Government of Canada); the Radio Communication Act (Government of Canada); and, individual Yukon First Nation Final Agreements.

The primary role of the Board is to resolve access disputes between people who own or have an interest in the surface of the land, and those with access rights to the land. The Board hears and decides disputes related to access to or use of Yukon First Nation Settlement Land and, in certain circumstances, disputes involving access to or use of non-Settlement Land.

Applicants must attempt to resolve their disputes through negotiation before they apply to the Board. If the dispute is not resolved by negotiation, either party to the dispute may submit an application to the Board. The application must include supporting documentation required by the Yukon Surface Rights Board Act and the Board's Rules of Procedure.

Activities in 2011-12

In addition to fulfilling its legislative responsibilities, the Board:

  • updated its communications material, modeled on a new marketing theme;
  • raised awareness about the Board's role and process;
  • participated in Board development and training opportunities; and,
  • maintained an active membership in the Canadian Council for Administrative Tribunals.

No applications were made to the Board during the 2011-2012 fiscal year.

Government of Yukon

Michael Hale, Implementation Representative
Director, Implementation
P.O. Box 2703, Whitehorse, Yukon, Y1A 2C6
Phone: 867-667-8797
Fax: 867-667-3599
E-mail: Michael.Hale@gov.yk.ca
Web: www.gov.yk.ca

The Government of Yukon is actively engaged in implementation activities provided for in the Yukon First Nation Final and Self-Government Agreements. Many of these activities carry on from year to year as departments continue to work with Self-Governing Yukon First Nations.

Activities in 2011-12

Yukon Government departments were involved in working with Self-Governing Yukon First Nations in areas such as heritage, land use planning, economic development, justice and education. For this fiscal year, the Yukon Government would like to highlight the following activities:

  • the Yukon and Tr'ondëk Hwëch'in Departments of Education entered into a partnership agreement to clarify roles and responsibilities in regard to education priorities identified by Tr'ondëk Hwëch'in; 
  • the Yukon Department of Energy Mines and Resources supported the First Nation of Nacho Nyak Dun, Tr'ondëk Hwëch'in, and Vuntut Gwitchin First Nation in an application for funding from the Canadian Northern Economic Development Agency to prepare a feasibility study and business case for supplying Yukon natural gas to Yukon industrial and utility consumers;
  • the Yukon Department of Energy Mines and Resources completed the title transfer of the Tagish North West Mounted Police Heritage Site, and is in the process of finalizing title transfer for the Conrad Heritage Site to tenants in common with the Commissioner and Carcross/Tagish First Nation; and,
  • in an effort to build awareness and establish networks between First Nations, First Nation Development Corporations, and the mining sector, the Government of Yukon provided funding to the Selkirk Development Corporation, Nacho Nyak Dun Development Corporation, Kluane First Nation, Champagne and Aishihik First Nations, and Carmacks Development Corporation for representatives to attend various conferences and workshops.

Economic Development Branch

Chapter 22: Economic Development Measures

The Economic Development Branch continues to support Self-Governing Yukon First Nations in meeting their economic development objectives through planning, participating in regional economic activities and building local capacity. The Regional Economic Development branch:

  • completed, with Tr'ondëk Hwëch'in and the Canadian Northern Economic Development Agency, a draft Regional Economic Develop Plan for the Traditional Territory of the Tr'ondëk Hwëch'in. This plan is an obligation outlined in Chapter 22 of the Tr'ondëk Hwëch'in Final Agreement. The final draft is under review by each of the Parties;
  • assisted in building awareness and establishing networks between Yukon First Nations, First Nation Development Corporations, and the mining sector. The Government of Yukon provided funding to Selkirk Development Corporation, Nacho Nyak Dun Development Corporation, Kluane First Nation, Champagne and Aishihik First Nations, and Carmacks Development Corporation for representatives to attend various conferences and workshops. The conferences included the Canadian Aboriginal Minerals Association, Prospectors and Developers Association of Canada, Mineral Exploration Roundup, and the Mine Reclamation Workshop. The events helped promote relationships between the Yukon First Nations and the mining industry and in some circumstances, led to business contracts and employment opportunities for Yukon First Nations people. This is very important as mining activity in Yukon increased with three producing mines and two more in the feasibility stages;
  • assisted the First Nation of Nacho Nyak Dun with investment opportunity identification with Yukon Energy's Mayo B Hydro Enhancement Project in order to assist in preparations for the negotiation of an investment agreement with the Yukon Energy Corporation. With increased mining activity in Yukon, the demand for energy is also increasing so the energy sector is researching alternative sources of energy including wind energy in the Kluane and Mayo region;
  • provided funding to the Council of Yukon First Nations to participate in a workshop about liquefied natural gas as an alternate energy source. The information gathered at the workshop was disseminated to First Nation leadership in the communities; and,
  • assisted Selkirk First Nation to develop a successful funding submission to the Northern Strategy Trust, in order to undertake a Capacity Development and Governance project which was approved for $2.12 million over four years.  The Northern Strategy Trust was established by the Government of Canada as a contribution toward the implementation of the Northern Strategy, a plan to support the development of Canada's North. The department undertook management of the fund by developing the contribution agreements and ensuring that the terms of the agreements are met. Departmental advisors provided advice to Selkirk First Nation upon request. The funding for the four-year project concluded March 31, 2011.

The intent of Chapter 22 of the Yukon First Nations' Final Agreements is to provide Yukon First Nations with a mechanism that fosters economic growth, encourages employment and provides business opportunities to Yukon First Nations people.

Public Service Commission

Chapter 22: Schedule A - Government Employment

The Yukon Public Service Commission and Yukon First Nations jointly developed a comprehensive Final Agreement Representative Public Service Plan. This plan addresses capacity building, professional development and employment opportunities, all of which are designed to increase Aboriginal representation in the Yukon's public service and build effective intergovernmental relationships. Several Yukon Government departments, including the Public Service Commission, have begun implementing various provisions of the plan, specifically, recruitment and retention of Aboriginal people.

To date, there are nine Yukon First Nations actively participating in Final Agreement Representative Public Service Plan discussions. A bilateral working group is in place that meets quarterly and functions as an advisory body throughout the life of the Final Agreement Representative Public Service Plan, or until the obligations of Chapter 22 have been met.

Highway & Public Works

Chapter 22: Schedule A Yukon Asset Construction Agreements

In the Final Agreements of Kwanlin Dün First Nation, Carcross/Tagish First Nation and Kluane First Nation, there is an obligation for the Government of Yukon to extend economic opportunities to the First Nation when the dollar value of a construction project taking place in the traditional territory exceeds a specified amount. Parties discuss the proposed project and negotiate terms for how the First Nation will participate. The result is a Yukon Asset Construction Agreement that identifies specific training, employment and/or contracting opportunities for First Nation members and businesses.

After negotiating a Yukon Asset Construction Agreement, the department of Highway & Public Works remains directly involved in the implementation of the agreement and provides direction, monitoring progress in the achievement of outcomes, determining lessons learned and best practices for future agreements.

During 2011-2012, implementation of the following Yukon Asset Construction agreements continued:

  • Kwanlin Dün First Nation for the Whitehorse airport expansion;
  • Kwanlin Dün First Nation for the new corrections facility;
  • Kwanlin Dün First Nation for the Takhini Hotsprings Road upgrade; and,
  • Carcross/Tagish First Nation for roadwork along the Atlin Road.

Community Services - Emergency Measures Organization

Self-Government Agreements

The Emergency Measures Organization met with three self-governing Yukon First Nations to discuss and share information regarding emergency management roles and expectations. This is part of an ongoing process to build relationships with self-governing Yukon First Nations. An emergency management agreement outline was created to identify and inform areas of agreement and facilitate future discussions.

Environment Yukon

Chapter 10: Habitat Protection Area and Management Areas

The Objective of Chapter 10 of the Final Agreements is to maintain important features of the Yukon's natural or cultural environment for the benefit of Yukon residents while respecting the rights of Yukon Indian People and Yukon First Nations. Environment Yukon worked with Yukon First Nations to:

  • Develop a survey for area residents for the Pickhandle Lakes Habitat Protection Area. Information received from a community retreat, the survey and community meetings helped the steering committee prepare a management plan that reflects the interests and values of area residents.
  • Together with the Vuntut Gwitchin Government Heritage Department, completed a contract to gather and report on current and historical First Nation land use in the Summit Lake-Bell River Management Planning area. A final report was delivered by the contractor and a workshop was held by the Vuntut Gwitchin and Yukon Parks staff to present the highlights of the findings of the Vuntut Gwitchin Heritage Study.
    • With the delivery of the Vuntut Gwitchin Heritage Study and the subsequent workshop to present the findings, there have been some clear deliverables that will assist in gaining a better understanding of the protected area. The information will be used for the management planning and interpretive programming phases.
  • Develop and maintain solid working relationships with various Yukon First Nations and individuals through the First Nations Liaison Conservation Officer. This staff member works on preventing or resolving harvesting issues and continues to serve as a role model for First Nation youth. The officer contacts many First Nation harvesters at the field level and has been a valuable ambassador for the department. Over the next three years the First Nation Liaison Conservation Officer will play a central role in mentoring a new trainee as part of the succession plan for the position.
  • The Regional Biologists worked on:
    • gathering and summarizing technical information;
    • attending Dawson Land Use Planning steering committee meetings;
    • continuing to work on summarizing and presenting technical information;
    • summarizing information obtained since Tatlamun/Mandana plan implementation;
    • attending meetings with Teslin Tlingit Council/Teslin Renewable Resources Council, Champagne and Aishihik First Nations/Alsek Renewable Resources Council, and Vuntut Gwitchin/North Yukon Renewable Resources Council to provide technical support for the review and finalization of community fish and wildlife plans; and,
    • initiating discussions with Champagne and Aishihik First Nations/Alsek Renewable Resources Council.
Chapter 11: Regional Land Use Planning

Dawson Broad Ecosystem-Mapping

  • Community meetings were held in Dawson to collect stakeholder interests and issues which will be used to inform the Dawson Region Land Use Plan.
  • Departmental resources were identified for the technical review of the Recommended Peel Watershed Regional Land Use Plan which includes reviews or construction of models and maps.
  • Meetings were held to collect traditional knowledge from the Tr'ondëk Hwëch'in. The information will be collated and used to inform the Dawson Regional Land Use Plan.

Education

The Department of Education and the Kwanlin Dün First Nation entered into a Yukon Asset Construction Agreement for the F.H. Collins School replacement project. Phase 1 of the site work for the project was completed.

The Department of Education and the Tr'ondëk Hwëch'in Education Department have created a partnership agreement which clarifies roles and responsibilities in regard to the education priorities identified by the Tr'ondëk Hwëch'in.  Specific projects included dual trades exploration (welding), a course and assessment program for Tr'ondëk Hwëch'in camp courses, alternative programming for students, and the development of resources relating to the residential schools experience.  The goal is to ultimately enshrine this relationship in a section 17.7 programs and services transfer agreement, pursuant to the Self-Government Agreement for the assumption of responsibility of education within the Traditional Territory.

Energy, Mines and Resources

Chapter 11: Regional Land Use Planning

The Department of Energy Mines and Resources is responsible for meeting the Government of Yukon's land claim obligations for regional land use planning. This includes coordinating the government's participation in planning processes, and providing implementation funding to the Yukon Land Use Planning Council and Regional Land Use Planning Commissions.

The North Yukon Regional Land Use Plan continued to be implemented through the joint party implementation group with representatives of the Government of Yukon and Vuntut Gwitchin First Nation. Highlights of activities were:

  • protected area planning progressed for the Whitefish Lakes, Summit Lake and Bell River, as recommended in the Plan;
  • maps were updated to reflect the removal of the interim land withdrawal; and,
  • four projects under environmental assessment review were checked for conformity with the North Yukon Regional Land Use Plan.

The Minister of Energy Mines and Resources appointed the Dawson Regional Planning Commission in August 2010. In 2011-2012 Energy Mines and Resources participated as a member of the joint party technical working group, attended Planning Commission meetings, prepared the Government of Yukon's submissions to the Commission's Issues and Interest Summary, reviewed the Commission's Plan Vision and Goals, and provided resource management data for a regional database.

The Department worked with Vuntut Gwitchin First Nation, Tr'ondëk Hwëch'in, First Nation of Nacho Nyak Dun, and the Gwich'in Tribal Council to provide input to the Commission for the Final Recommended Peel Watershed Regional Land Use Plan. The interim subsurface withdrawal from entry for new mineral staking was extended to accommodate the final stages of the planning process. Public consultation was planned for later in 2012.

The Department continued working with First Nations with Traditional Territories in southern Yukon to configure the land use planning regions for that area. Other Energy Mines and Resources activities supporting regional land use planning included: budget review and approvals; reviewing, approving and monitoring funding agreements; preparing Council and Commission appointments; planning process development; and presentations at planning workshops.

Chapter 17: Forest Resources

In 2011-2012, the Department of Energy, Mines and Resources worked with self-governing Yukon First Nations on a number of initiatives to:

  • Completed a draft Dawson Forest Resources Management Plan which was recommended to the Government of Yukon and Tr'ondëk Hwëch'in for approval. The planning team included the Tr'ondëk Hwëch'in, the Dawson District Renewable Resources Council, and the regional forest industry. The Government of Yukon held a public review of the plan in late 2012.
  • Continued to collaborate with Carcross/Tagish First Nation, Kwanlin Dün First Nation, and Ta'an Kwäch'än Council on joint forest management planning for the Whitehorse and Southern Lakes planning area.
  • Signed an updated Forest Management Implementation Agreement with the Champagne and Aishihik First Nations. The Agreement is for the implementation priorities under the Integrated Landscape Plan and the Strategic Forest Management Plan for the Champagne and Aishihik First Nations Traditional Territory.
  • Continued to work with Teslin Tlingit Council to develop a wood supply in the East Teslin Landscape Unit. One approved Timber Harvest Plan was completed in 2011. The Plan provides opportunities for licenses and permits to be issued near the town of Teslin for the harvest of small volumes of wood as per the Teslin Forest Management Plan.
  • Acquired a new aerial photography for approximately 6 million hectares in south-central Yukon for use in the development of a forest inventory for the region.

Self-Government Agreements: Local Area Planning

The Department of Energy, Mines and Resources is responsible for fulfilling the local area planning and zoning obligations in the Carcross/Tagish First Nation, Kwanlin Dün First Nation and Tr'ondëk Hwëch'in Self-Government Agreements. For Local Area Planning in the 2011-2012 fiscal year, the Department of Energy, Mines and Resources:

  • Worked with the Tr'ondëk Hwëch'in to complete a joint local area planning process for the West Dawson and Sunnydale areas.  A local area plan was recommended to the Tr'ondëk Hwëch'in and Government of Yukon.  This was the first joint local area planning process undertaken by the Department. Government of Yukon is reviewing the plan.  
  • Worked with Carcross/Tagish First Nation on local area planning for the community of Carcross.  The Department assisted the planning committee with community meetings, mailing newsletters and attending steering committee meetings.  Carcross/Tagish First Nation and the Government of Yukon agreed to commence planning in Carcross and undertake planning for Tagish once the Carcross planning process is significantly advanced.  Completion of the Carcross planning process is targeted for 2013.
  • Worked with Kwanlin Dün First Nation on local area planning for the community of Marsh Lake.  The Department assisted the planning committee with community meetings, mailing newsletters and attending steering committee meetings.  Completion of the Marsh Lake planning is targeted for 2013.

Oil and Gas

The Department of Energy, Mines and Resources undertook a number of initiatives:

  • Worked with First Nations through the Aboriginal Pipeline Coalition to develop capacity for informed First Nation participation in future Alaska Highway pipeline development.
  • Met regularly with the Memorandum of Agreement First Nation Working Group on oil and gas legislation, with the objective of developing a common oil and gas regime.

Land Development

The Department of Energy Mines and Resources and Teslin Tlingit Council continued to work together on joint land development and planning initiatives for country residential lots on Sawmill Road and leased recreation lots at Morley Bay on Teslin Lake.

Chapter 13: Heritage

The Department of Energy Mines and Resources is responsible for completing the transfer of titles for heritage sites listed in the Final Agreements and working with the Department of Tourism and Culture to have the areas created as Heritage Sites under the Historic Resources Act.  In 2011-2012, the Department of Energy Mines and Resources completed the transfer of title for the Tagish North West Mounted Police Historic Site and is in the process of finalizing transfer of title for the Conrad Historic Site.

Government of Canada

Federal Departments Operating in the Yukon

Yukon First Nation Final Agreements set out obligations for all federal departments operating in the Yukon. The Government of Canada performed various implementation activities pursuant to all Yukon First Nation Final and Self-Government Agreements.

Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Canada

Dionne Savill, co/Implementation Representative
Director, Governance
300 Main Street, Room 415C, Whitehorse, Yukon, Y1A 2B5
Phone: 867-667-3398
Fax: 867-667-3801
E-mail: Dionne.Savill@aandc-aadnc.gc.ca

Allan Burnside, co/Implementation Representative
Director, Treaty Management – Yukon/B.C.
25 Rue Eddy, Room 1550, Gatineau, Quebec, K1A 0H4
Phone: 819-953-1745
Fax: 819-994-7043
E-mail: Allan.Burnside@aandc-aadnc.gc.ca

Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Canada is one of the federal departments responsible for implementing Yukon First Nation Final and Self-Government Agreements. The Department fulfills this role by negotiating various agreements pursuant to the Self-Government Agreements on behalf of the Government of Canada, representing the Government of Canada at the working group on tripartite implementation and by representing the Government of Canada at the Senior Financial Committee, pursuant to the Self-Government Financial Transfer Agreements.

Activities in 2011-12

Administration of Justice Agreements

The Teslin Tlingit Council Administration of Justice Agreement was signed by Government and the Teslin Tlingit Council on February 21, 2011. It came into effect on June 23, 2011, and is the first Administration of Justice Agreement to be completed under a Yukon Self-Government Agreement. This milestone was recognized with a signing ceremony in February and a celebratory community feast in July, both hosted by the Teslin Tlingit Council. In November 2011, the Government of Canada's negotiation mandate changed and federal negotiators hosted an information sharing session for self-governing Yukon First Nations and the Government of Yukon to explain negotiation mandate changes.

Programs and Services Transfer Agreements

Section 17 of the Self-Government Agreements allow Yukon First Nations to assume responsibilities and related funding for federal or territorial programming within their jurisdiction as outlined in Section 13 of the Yukon Self-Government Agreements.

In 2011–2012 Amendment Agreements were reached with all eleven self-governing Yukon First Nations for the assumption of responsibility for time-limited Health Canada programs (Aboriginal Diabetes, Maternal Child Health and National Aboriginal Youth Suicide Prevention) and for Canadian Heritage's Aboriginal Languages Initiative. The health program Agreements will expire on March 31, 2015 and the Aboriginal Languages Initiative Agreements expire on March 31, 2014. Negotiations continue in the area of Aboriginal human resources development (Government of Canada) as well as alcohol and drug services (Government of Yukon).

Dispute Resolution

Carcross/Tagish First Nation filed notice to the Yukon Dispute Resolution Board to refer matters to mediation pursuant to Section 24.0 of the First Nation's Self-Government Agreement. In September 2012, Canada and Carcross/Tagish First Nation worked with the Yukon Dispute Resolution Board and a mutually-acceptable mediator to discuss the matter at hand. Discussions that are part of the mediation are confidential to the Parties involved. The Parties to the mediation agreed to set the mediation process aside and have a tripartite discussion, including the Government of Yukon, to explore options outside of the mediation process.

Self-Government Financial Transfer Agreements

Renewed Self-Government Financial Transfer Agreements with three self-governing Yukon First Nations came into effect in April 2011. These agreements provide additional governance funding, a new approach to own source revenue and a process to discuss more efficient and effective delivery of programs and services by self-governing Yukon First Nations, Government of Yukon and Government of Canada.

Implementation

Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Canada has two senior officials who sit on the Implementation Working Group, an ad hoc committee, as co-representatives on behalf of the Government of Canada. The committee met monthly by teleconference and in person in June, October and January. The 2011-2012 Implementation Working Group Work Plan set out collective priorities to track activities and document expected outcomes/results, activities, timeframe and performance (Appendix 1).

A presentation on Yukon First Nation Self-Government continues to be delivered to federal departments operating in the Yukon Region.

Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada

300 Main Street, Room 320, Whitehorse, Yukon, Y1A 2B5
Phone: 867-667-5272
Fax: 867-393-6222
Web: www.agr.gc.ca

Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada provides information, research and technology, plus policies and programs to achieve an environmentally sustainable agriculture, agri-food and agri-based products sector that proactively manages risk, and a competitive and innovative agriculture.

Canada Border Services Agency

300 Main Street, Room 110, Whitehorse, Yukon, Y1A 2B5
Phone: 867-667-3963
Fax: 867-668-2869
Web: www.cbsa-asfc.gc.ca

Since December 2003, the Canadian Border Security Agency has been an integral part of the Public Safety Portfolio, which was created to protect Canadians and maintain a peaceful and safe society. The Agency is responsible for providing integrated border services that support national security and public safety priorities and facilitate the free flow of persons and goods, including animals and plants that meet all requirements as per the program legislation.

Canada School of Public Service

300 Main Street, Room 400, Whitehorse, Yukon, Y1A 2B5
Phone: 867-393-6713
Fax: 867-668-5033
Web: www.csps-efpc.gc.ca

Activities in 2011-12

The Whitehorse campus of the Canada School of Public Service delivered a broad variety of courses including: Workplace Stress Strategies; Essentials of Supervising; Fundamentals of Budget and Control; Mediating Conflict; and Writing in Clear Language. The Canada School of Public Service also hosted free armchair discussions and Lunch and Learn sessions on Energy Management; Employee Engagement in the Workplace; Leadership in Action; and Hospice & Healing.

The employees of Yukon First Nation governments were invited to and participated in all sessions. Yukon First Nations may request tailored delivery of any courses and have the option to access custom-designed courses. One custom-designed workshop, regarding human resource management, was delivered through the Council of Yukon First Nations and was open to human resource managers for all Yukon First Nations.

The School's Learning Advisor (appointed by the Minister of Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Canada) represents the Government of Canada on the Training Policy Committee, and is a trustee of the Yukon Indian People Training Trust created under the Umbrella Final Agreement. In 2011-2012, the Learning Advisor also participated in Yukon First Nation conferences in Whitehorse.

Canadian Heritage

300 Main Street, Room 205, Whitehorse, Yukon, Y1A 2B5
Phone: 867-667-3908
Fax: 867-393-6701
Web: www.pch.gc.ca

The Canadian Heritage Portfolio includes the Department and our major national cultural institutions. The department works together to promote culture, the arts, heritage, official languages, citizenship and participation as well as Aboriginal, youth and sport initiatives.

Activities in 2011-12

The implementation activities of the Department of Canadian Heritage continue to address the obligations of Chapter 13 of the individual Yukon First Nation Final Agreements and Implementation Plans. The Department remains a part of a whole of Government approach responding to treaty implementation obligations in the Yukon. The Department of Canadian Heritage continues to meet its obligations relative to First Nations' culture and heritage in the Yukon with various program elements available to all Yukon First Nations. Funding decisions are based on proposals that are assessed and determined to promote heritage and cultural development in Canada.

Agreements were reached with all eleven Self-Governing Yukon First Nations for the assumption of responsibility and related funding for the time-limited Department of Canadian Heritage Aboriginal Languages Initiative which will expire on March 31, 2014.

Canadian Northern Economic Development Agency

305 Main Street, Suite 215, Whitehorse, Yukon, Y1A 2B3
Phone: 867-667-3263
Fax: 867-667-3801
E-mail: YTinfo@cannor.gc.ca
Web: www.cannor.gc.ca

The Canadian Northern Economic Development Agency's objective is to help provide the foundation for a prosperous economic future for those who live, work and support their families in the North. The Agency does this:

  • through delivery of a suite of economic development programs;
  • by developing policy and conducting research; and
  • by aligning the efforts of partners and stakeholders, particularly among federal organizations.

The Northern Projects Management Office of Canadian Northern Economic Development Agency was established to improve the environmental review process for proposed major resource development and infrastructure projects in Canada's north. The Northern Projects Management Office also acts as a coordinator for federal Crown consultations with Aboriginal communities related to these projects.

Environment Canada

Environmental Protection Operations Directorate

91782 Alaska Highway, Whitehorse, Yukon, Y1A 5X7
Phone: 867-667-3400
Fax: 867- 667-7962
E-mail: Rose.Berndt@ec.gc.ca
Web: www.ec.gc.ca

Environment Canada's implementation activities primarily address obligations under the Yukon First Nation Final Agreements. The Department's activities are specifically linked to: Chapter 16 - Fish and Wildlife Management; Chapter 10 - Special Management Areas; Chapter 11 - Land Use Planning; Chapter 12 - Development Assessment; Chapter 14 - Water Management; and Chapter 18 -Non-Renewable Resources.

Activities in 2011-12

The Environmental Protection Operations Directorate worked with the Yukon Environmental and Socio-economic Assessment Board to implement the Yukon Environmental and Socio-economic Assessment Act through the review of various development projects.

Canadian Wildlife Service, Northern Conservation Division

91780 Alaska Highway, Whitehorse, Yukon, Y1A 5X7
Phone: 867- 393-6700
Fax: 867-393-7970
E-mail: Linda.Moen@ec.gc.ca
Web: www.ec.gc.ca

Environment Canada's Canadian Wildlife Service is responsible for the management and conservation of migratory birds (as defined under the Migratory Birds Convention Act, the federal act that implements the Canada/US Migratory Birds Convention); and for implementation of the federal Species at Risk Act with regard to listed non-aquatic species not found on federal lands within a national park, national historic site or other protected heritage area. The Canadian Wildlife Service also implements the Canada Wildlife Act which governs the management of the Nisutlin National Wildlife Area in Yukon. The Canadian Wildlife Service participates in environmental assessments conducted under the Yukon Environmental and Socio-economic Assessment Act and the Canadian Environmental Assessment Act within the Yukon; regional land use and resource management planning processes; and protected areas management and planning processes.

Activities in 2011-12

The Canadian Wildlife Service, Northern Conservation Division held a Species at Risk Workshop in Whitehorse in February 2012 which brought together representatives from Yukon, Northwest Territories and northern British Columbia First Nations, government, Boards and Renewable Resources Councils to discuss opportunities to better collaborate and cooperate for stewarding northern species at risk.

The Division worked collaboratively through the Porcupine Caribou Management Board on cooperative management of the Porcupine Caribou Herd.

In partnership with the Government of Yukon, the Division operated a conservation data centre focused on species listed in the Species at Risk Act.

The Division led the Arctic Council's Circumpolar Biodiversity Monitoring Program on behalf of Environment Canada and the Arctic Council. The Division also led the Arctic Borderlands Ecological Knowledge Cooperative which along with Yukon First Nation, federal, territorial and state governments to monitor environmental change within the range of the Porcupine Caribou Herd and adjacent nearshore areas.

In collaboration with the Gwitch'in Council International, the Arctic Athapaskan Council and the Inuit Circumpolar Council, the Division also led the Arctic Council's Conservation of Arctic Flora and Fauna's Circumpolar Biodiversity Monitoring Program to improve the coordination of existing biodiversity monitoring across the Arctic for assessment and reporting purposes.

The Division worked with the Champagne and Aishihik First Nations, Kluane First Nation, Tr'ondëk Hwëch'in, Kwanlin Dün First Nation, and Ta'an Kwäch'än Council on various species at risk field projects aimed at critical habitat mapping and completing inventories of a number of at risk species in the southern and central Yukon.

The Division, through the Southern Lakes Wildlife Coordinating Committee, worked closely with Carcross/Tagish First Nation, Ta'an Kwäch'än Council, Teslin Tlingit Council and Kwanlin Dün First Nation to assess the status of wildlife and wildlife habitat in the Southern Lakes region.

The Division collaborated with the Teslin Renewable Resources Council to manage the Nisutlin River Delta National Wildlife Area.

The Division participated in the Dawson Land Use Planning process established under the Tr'ondëk Hwëch'in Final Agreement.

Fisheries and Oceans Canada

419 Range Road, Room 100, Whitehorse, Yukon, Y1A 3V1
Phone: 867-393-6719
Fax: 867-393-6738
Web: www.dfo-mpo.gc.ca

In the Yukon, the Yukon First Nation Final Agreements provide the framework for bilateral fisheries management through the Salmon Sub-Committee of the Yukon Fish and Wildlife Management Board. Through this public advisory body, Fisheries and Oceans Canada works with Yukon First Nations on stock assessment and fisheries projects, building community resource management capacity in the process.

Activities in 2011-12

Fisheries and Oceans Canada continued to focus on communication and partnering with Yukon First Nations which was instrumental to support Yukon First Nations' management measures to achieve their conservation objectives.

The Department also maintained partnerships and communication with transboundary First Nations through co-management bodies established under the Pacific Salmon Treaty.

Health Canada

300 Main Street, Room 100, Whitehorse, Yukon, Y1A 2B5
Phone: 867- 393-6770
Fax: 867-393-6772

The mandate of Health Canada's Northern Region is to:

  • ensure the availability of, or access to, heath services for First Nations and Inuit Communities;
  • assist First Nations and Inuit communities in addressing health barriers, disease threats; and attaining health levels comparable to other Canadians living in similar locations; and
  • build strong partnerships with First Nations and Inuit to improve the health system.

Activities in 2011-12

Health Canada maintained relationships with the eleven self-governing Yukon First Nations and the Council of Yukon First Nations.

Amendment Agreements were reached with all eleven self-governing Yukon First Nations for the assumption of responsibility and related funding for time-limited Health Canada programs including Aboriginal Diabetes, Maternal Child Health and National Aboriginal Youth Suicide Prevention. These Amendment Agreements will expire on March 31, 2015.

Health Canada facilitated and funded (through Health Consultation) a contract with the Canadian Executive Services Organization through the Council for Yukon First Nations (as the chair of the Yukon Fist Nations Health and Social Development Commission) to assist all Yukon First Nations with the development of health plans.

Human Resources and Skills Development Canada

140 Promenade du Portage, Gatineau, Quebec, K1A 0J9
Phone: 819-654-3113
Fax: 819-994-3297
Web: www.esdc.gc.ca

The mandate of Human Resources and Skills Development Canada is to build a strong and competitive Canada, and does so by providing a variety of programs that support a skilled, adaptable and inclusive labour force and an efficient labour market.

Activities in 2011-12

Human Resources and Skills Development Canada met with representatives from the self-governing Yukon First Nations to reach an agreement to negotiate agreements which pertain to labour market development programming.

Under section 17 of the Yukon First Nation Self-Government Agreements, Canada is required to negotiate the assumption of programs from Human Resources and Skills Development Canada. The self-governing Yukon First Nations currently receive funding for labour market development programming through the Council of Yukon First Nations.

The Department tabled a draft labour market development agreement on January 24, 2012. As of March 31, 2012, the self-governing Yukon First Nations had yet to submit a formal response.

The Department began developing a Modern Treaty Implementation Policy that would enable more effective and efficient implementation of labour market development provisions in modern treaties.

Industry Canada

300 Main Street, Room 205, Whitehorse, Yukon, Y1A 2B5
Phone: 867-667-5102
Fax: 867-393-6711
E-mail:
Web: www.ic.gc.ca

Industry Canada's mission is to foster a growing, competitive, knowledge-based Canadian economy. The Department works with Canadians throughout the economy and in all parts of the country to improve conditions for investment, improve the Government of Canada's innovation performance, increase the Government of Canada's share of global trade and build a fair, efficient and competitive marketplace. Program areas include developing industry and technology capability, fostering scientific research, setting and enforcing telecommunications policy, promoting investment and trade, promoting tourism and small business development, and setting rules and services that support the effective operation of the marketplace.

Justice Canada

3162 Third Avenue, Whitehorse, Yukon, Y1A 1G3
Phone: 867-667-8110
Fax: 867-667-3934
Web: www.justice.gc.ca

The Department of Justice has the mandate to support the dual roles of the Minister of Justice and the Attorney General of Canada. The Department supports the Minister of Justice in his responsibilities for 49 statutes and areas of federal law by ensuring a bilingual and bijural national legal framework principally within the following domains:  criminal justice (including youth criminal justice); family justice; access to justice; Aboriginal justice; and general public law and private international law. The Department also supports the Attorney General as the chief law officer of the Crown both in terms of the ongoing operations of government as well as the development of new policies, programs and services for Canadians to support the Government's priorities.  Specifically, the Department provides legal advice to all federal government departments and agencies, represents the Crown in civil litigation and before administrative tribunals, drafts legislation, and responds to the other legal needs of federal departments and agencies.

National Defense

Joint Task Force (North) Detachment Yukon
5096 5th Avenue, Whitehorse, Yukon, Y1A 1L3
Phone: 867-667-7301
Fax: 867-667-7156
Web: http://www.forces.gc.ca/en/operations-regional-jtf-north/jtf-north.page

Headquartered in Yellowknife, Northwest Territories, with detachments in Whitehorse, Yukon and Iqaluit, Nunavut, the role of the Joint Task Force (North) is to: exercise Canadian sovereignty and contribute to safety, security, and defense operations in the three territories; coordinate and lead Canadian Armed Forces activities in the north; and liaise with federal, territorial, Aboriginal and municipal partners, as well as the citizens of the Northwest Territories, Yukon and Nunavut.

Activities in 2011-12

Pursuant to section 6.5.3 of the respective Yukon First Nations Final Agreements, the Joint Task Force (North) sent its Annual Activity Notification Letter to all of the Yukon First Nations and the Council of Yukon First Nations, to provide notification of planned Joint Task Force (North) activities taking place in the Yukon in fiscal year 2011-2012.

Natural Resources Canada, Surveyor General Branch

300 Main Street, Room 225, Whitehorse, Yukon, Y1A 2B5
Phone: 867-667-3957
Fax: 867-393-6709
Web: www.nrcan.gc.ca

Natural Resources Canada is responsible for the legal surveying of Yukon First Nation Settlement Land. Annual survey programs are based on recommendations made by First Nation Settlement Land Committees.

Activities in 2011-12

Work continued to complete the surveys of Settlement Land for nine of the eleven Yukon First Nations with Final Agreements. Survey programs for the First Nation of Nacho Nyak Dun and Selkirk First Nation are complete.

Parks Canada Agency

300 Main Street, Room 205, Whitehorse, Yukon, Y1A 2B5
Phone: 867-667-3910
Fax: 867-393-6701
E-mail: whitehorse.info@pc.gc.ca
Web: www.pc.gc.ca

On behalf of the people of Canada, Parks Canada protects and presents nationally significant examples of Canada's natural and cultural heritage. It also fosters public understanding, appreciation and enjoyment of these places in ways that ensure their ecological and commemorative integrity for present and future generations.

Activities in 2011-12

Parks Canada's Yukon Field Unit is responsible for the administration of two national parks and seven national historic sites in the Yukon, and one in British Columbia.

National Parks

  • Kluane National Park and Reserve
  • Vuntut National Park

National Historic Sites

  • Chilkoot Trail National Historic Site of Canada (British Columbia)
  • S.S. Klondike National Historic Site of Canada
  • Klondike National Historic Sites of Canada (encompasses 5 National Historic Sites ):
    • Dawson Historical Complex National Historic Site of Canada;
    • Dredge No. 4 National Historic Site of Canada;
    • S.S. KenoNational Historic Site of Canada;
    • The Former Territorial Court House National Historic Site of Canada; and
    • Discovery Claim National Historic Site of Canada

Parks Canada worked collaboratively with several Yukon First Nations to administer national parks and national historic sites, including incorporating traditional knowledge into much of the programming and the establishment of Management Boards. Elders shared knowledge of trails, plants, animals and were active in the development of displays for the Chilkoot Trail, Tachal Dhal in Kluane National Park, and Vuntut National Park.

In Dawson City, Parks Canada worked closely with Tr'ondëk Hwëch'in to develop and write the Management Plan for the newly-established Tr'ochëk National Historic Site which is owned and operated by Tr'ondëk Hwëch'in. A Historic Sites and Monuments Board of Canada commemorative plaque was unveiled.

In collaboration with Kluane First Nation and Champagne and Aishihik First Nations, Parks Canada completely re-developed the visitor centre exhibits and audio-visual products for the Kluane National Park and Reserve. This was done in anticipation of opening the Kluane National Park and Reserve Visitor Centre in the new Champagne and Aishihik First Nations Da Kų Cultural Centre in June 2012.

Parks Canada provided funding for the operation of the Kluane National Park Management Board, which facilitates First Nation and local stakeholder involvement in the management of Kluane National Park & Reserve in support of Parks Canada's mandate.

Vuntut National Park is in a multi-year agreement with the Government of Yukon, Government of Northwest Territories, the Council of Yukon First Nations, the Inuvialuit Game Council, the Dene Nation and the Métis Association of the Northwest Territories that make up the Porcupine Caribou Management Board.

A cooperation agreement exists between the North Yukon Renewable Resources Council, Parks Canada and the Vuntut Gwitchin First Nation which provides strategic direction, and allows the Parties to the agreement to provide recommendations and advice to one another on matters related to renewable resources, initiatives and education.

While the Chilkoot Trail National Historic Site is located in British Columbia, the Yukon Field Unit is responsible due to geographical location and ease of operations. The site operates much like Parks' areas covered by Yukon First Nation land claim agreements. For example, staff, Elders' visits and traditional teachings on the trail are primarily citizens of the Carcross/Tagish First Nations.

The Aboriginal Leadership Development Program is a national, four-year training and development program for Aboriginal leaders within Parks Canada, and is aimed at the long-term retention of Aboriginal employees. In partnership with Yukon College since 2000, 124 participants from across the country have completed or are in the midst of completing their training. Program success hinges on continued support and participation from various Yukon First Nation Elders, Aboriginal leaders and community members.

Public Prosecution Service of Canada

300 Main Street, Room 200, Whitehorse, Yukon, Y1A 2B5
Phone: 867-667-8100
Fax: 867-667-3979
Web: www.ppsc-sppc.gc.ca

The Public Prosecution Service of Canada is a federal government organization created on December 12, 2006. The organization is responsible for prosecuting offences under more than 50 federal statutes and for providing prosecution-related legal advice to law enforcement agencies. Cases prosecuted by the Public Prosecution Service of Canada include those involving drugs, organized crime, terrorism, tax law, money laundering and proceeds of crime, crimes against humanity and war crimes, Criminal Code offences in the territories, and a large number of federal regulatory offences, including the Canada Elections Act.

Public Safety Canada

269 Laurier Avenue West, Ottawa, Ontario, K1A 0P8
Phone: 613-944-4875 or 1-800-830-3118
Teletypewriter (TTY) 1-866-865-5667
Fax: 613-954-5186
Web: www.publicsafety.gc.ca

Public Safety Canada exercises national leadership to ensure the safety and security of Canada and Canadians.  The Department's mandate is to build a safe and resilient Canada through the development and implementation of innovative policies and programs and the effective engagement of domestic and international partners.

Implementation activities associated with the Public Safety Canada Portfolio (including the Correctional Service of Canada and the Royal Canadian Mounted Police) are linked to Section 13.6.2 of the Yukon First Nation Self-Government Agreements and the obligation to negotiate Administration of Justice Agreements and Framework Agreements on subject matters such as law enforcement and corrections.

Activities in 2011-12

Public Safety Canada officials participated in the implementation of the Teslin Tlingit Council's Administration of Justice Agreement and in the ongoing negotiations for Administration of Justice Agreement Framework Agreements between Canada, Yukon and several Yukon First Nations.

Officials from Public Safety Canada's Aboriginal Policing Directorate participated in implementation related activities in Yukon.

Public Works and Government Services Canada

800 Burrard Street, Room 641, Vancouver, British Columbia, V6Z 2V8
Phone: 604-775-7628
Fax: 604-775-6888
E-mail:
Web: www.tpsgc-pwgsc.gc.ca

Public Works and Government Services Canada provides assistance, guidance and training to First Nations in the Yukon and Northern British Columbia in the areas of contracting, procurement, acquisitions, and capital planning and infrastructure development.

Public Works and Government Services Canada also provides guidance and advice to all federal departments conducting procurement and contracting initiatives related to Yukon Final and Self-Government Agreements in the Yukon.

Royal Canadian Mounted Police, "M" Division

4100 Fourth Avenue, Whitehorse, Yukon, Y1A 1H5
Phone: 867-633-8610
Fax: 867-393-6792
E-mail:
Web: www.rcmp-grc.gc.ca

The Royal Canadian Mounted Police provides services at National, Territorial and local levels. Nationally, the Royal Canadian Mounted Police has the responsibility to enforce all federal statutes. Under the Territorial Police Services Agreement between the Government of Yukon and Public Safety Canada, it also enforces the Criminal Code and laws in force in the Yukon Territory and responds to priorities and objectives set by the Government of Yukon Minister of Justice. At the local level, Detachments work with municipal and First Nations leadership to identify and address community policing needs and priorities. The Royal Canadian Mounted Police also maintains a dialogue with First Nations leadership and follows discussions between First Nations, Government of Yukon and Public Safety Canada with respect to the administration of justice.

Appendices

Appendix 1. Implementation Working Group: Work Plan 2011-12

REVIEW OF ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT MEASURE PROVISIONS (Umbrella and Yukon First Nation Final Agreements section 22.9.1)
Expected Outcomes/Results Activities Actual Performance
  1. Complete a review of the Umbrella Final Agreement chapter.
  2. Complete a review of specific provisions common to all Final Agreements.
  3. Complete review of specific provisions.
  4. Develop measures to complete the 2015 review.
  • Get Memorandum of Agreement signed by all Parties
  • Get Terms of Reference signed by all Parties
  • Each party to conduct internal work to determine what has been done for the implementation of all common provisions
  • Chapter 22 sub-working group to discuss individual results and determine final results of common provisions review
  • Each party to conduct internal work to determine what has been done for the implementation of all specific provisions
  • Parties to meet and discuss individual results and determine final results of specific provisions review
  • Chapter 22 sub-working group to draft report on review findings to present to Implementation Working Group
  • Chapter 22 sub-working group to determine what information and measures are needed to determine the effectiveness of provisions in achieving chapter objectives for 2015 review
  • Chapter 22 sub-working group to develop tools for evaluating effectiveness of provisions for 2015 review
  1. Although in most cases the deadline was not met, all Parties have signed the Memorandum of Agreement.
  2. To date, the Terms of Reference have been signed by Implementation Representatives for all Parties except Carcross/Tagish First Nation and Kwanlin Dün First Nation.
  3. The Chapter 22 sub-working group continues to meet to discuss the common provisions and the specific provisions review. To date, Yukon Government is the only party to share completed charts. The Chapter 22 sub-working group intends to finalize this work and provide a report to the Implementation Working Group in advance of July 2012.
  4. The Chapter 22 sub-working group and the Implementation Working Group continue to discuss how best to develop measurement tools in advance of a full and complete review of Chapter 22 in 2015. It is expected that this work will also be completed by July 2012.

 

Schedule A, Part 1 of Yukon First Nation Final Agreements – (Representative Public Service Plan)
Expected Outcomes/Results Activities Actual Performance
  1. A Representative Public Service Plan taking into account the Aboriginal / non-Aboriginal and gender make-up of the population of the Yukon
  2. A Representative Public Service Plan located in the Traditional Territory of the First Nation that reflects the Aboriginal / non-Aboriginal make-up of the population of the Traditional Territory of the First Nation
Yukon Government/Yukon First Nation Representative Public Service Plan Working Group
  • Develop strategy
  • Develop operational plan
  • Secure First Nation endorsement
  • Approve plan
Canada
  • Gather information internally regarding employment statistics in the Yukon and policy/legislative requirements around employment equity.
  • Share with the Implementation Working Group
Yukon Government/Yukon First Nation Representative Public Service Plan
  1. Has been completed and is currently being implemented by Yukon Government.
  2. Canada shared employment statistics with the Implementation Working Group at the October 2011 meeting.

 

Implementation Review Group Recommendation 3.14: Future Reviews
Expected Outcomes/Results Activities Actual Performance
The Parties agree to an effective method of conducting meaningful reviews through a working group or alternative means
  • Canada to develop a chart identifying all remaining review obligations in Yukon Agreements
  • Parties prepare internally for discussion at January 2012 Implementation Working Group
  1. Canada provided a chart of all remaining review obligations at the October 2011 Implementation Working Group.
  2. The future reviews discussion was not on the January 2012 agenda.

 

Heritage Resources Manual – Umbrella and Yukon First Nation Final Agreements section 13.5.3.6
Expected Outcomes/Results Activities Actual Performance
Development of a manual of definitions of ethnographic, archaeological, paleontological and historic resources
  • Strike a working group to develop a Terms of Reference for a committee of specialists who will undertake the drafting
  • The Committee will make initial recommendations regarding the contents of the Manual
  • Yukon Government and Yukon First Nations, via Implementation Working Group, will provide Canada with definitions to be used in the Manual, in addition to all other content, in draft form
  • Canada will provide Yukon Government and Yukon First Nations, via Implementation Working Group, with a response
  • The Committee will make final recommendations on the Manual.
  • Yukon Government and Yukon First Nations, via the Committee, will complete the manual by June 30, 2012
  1. Yukon Government has committed roughly $100,000 in funding for a facilitator and other components of the Heritage Manual group. To date, half of the funding has been spent with the remainder to be expended in 12/13
  2. The manual group met regularly and is working on the key components of the manual, as required.
  3. The Terms of Reference is complete, including a new timeline which requires that the committee make recommendations on a final manual by December 31st, 2012

 

Monitor Umbrella Final Agreement Implementation Plan Renewal Discussions
Expected Outcomes/Results Activities Actual Performance
 
  • Implementation Representatives for Canada, Yukon and Council of Yukon First Nations to provide status updates to Implementation Working Group.
  1. Umbrella Final Agreement Implementation Plan updates have been provided on a regular basis to the Implementation Working Group.

 

Communications
Expected Outcomes/Results Activities Actual Performance
 
  • Implementation of Implementation Working Group Strategic Communications Plan. Phase 1, which includes the household survey on land claims and self-government with a final report due by Sept. 30, 2011, is in progress. Phase 2, which includes the launch and implementation of a public awareness campaign aimed at increasing public knowledge of the agreements, is expected to begin later in 2011.
  • Voices of Vision: Yukon Aboriginal Self-Government podcast project launch, beginning National Aboriginal Day and including other events.
  1. The household survey on land claims and self-government is complete.
  2. Public Awareness Campaign is currently being developed.
  3. Podcast was launched at National Aboriginal Day.

 

Annual Reports
Expected Outcomes/Results Activities Actual Performance
Develop new shorter format for annual report
Complete 2009-2010 annual report
Produce 2010-2011 annual report
  • Contract drafting new format, draft will be reviewed by Implementation Working Group members prior to finalization of format.
  • Complete 2009-10 annual report in new format.
  • Commence work on 2010-11 annual report.
  1. New shorter format adopted.
  2. The 2009-2010 annual report was completed for design and layout in both English and French.
  3. The 2010-2011 annual report was completed for design and layout in English.

 

Amendments
Expected Outcomes/Results Activities Actual Performance
Amendments to Yukon Agreements are undertaken in a timely fashion
  1. Complete Yukon Self-Government Agreement Implementation Plan, section 13.1 amendment.
  2. Complete Yukon Self-Government Agreement sections 13.6.6 and 13.6.4.1 amendments.
  3. Undertake Final Agreement Implementation Plan Renewable Resource Council extensions.
  4. Develop a streamlined, 2-year process for the completion of amendments that will enable the speeding up of the process.
  5. Complete selected Yukon Self-Government Agreement, section 17.7 amendments.
  1. All Yukon First Nations have signed the amendment with the exception of Selkirk First Nation and Ta'an Kwäch'än Council (who indicated they wouldn't be participating).
  2. Not completed
  3. Signed amendments from Teslin Tlingit Council, Champagne/Aishihik First Nation and Vuntut Gwitchin First Nation (as of March 1, 2012)
  4. (updated the timeline and amendment list and will circulate to Implementation Working Group soon (Feb. 13. 2012)
  5. Follow up email to Implementation Working Group members Feb 2, 2012. Outstanding Yukon First Nations are: First Nation of Nacho Nyak Dun, Vuntut Gwitchin First Nation, Little Salmon/Carmacks First Nation, Selkirk First Nation, Ta'an Kwäch'än Council, Kluane First Nation, Carcross/Tagish First Nation.

 

Monitor the status of Implementation Review Group recommendations
Expected Outcomes/Results Activities Actual Performance
The status of Implementation Review Group recommendations is kept up-to-date
  • Update chart identifying status of Implementation Review Group recommendations
A sub group of the Implementation Working Group was formed at the October 2011 Implementation Working Group meeting to monitor the status of the Implementation Review Group recommendations. To date, this group has not met.

Appendix 2. Background

In 1989, the Government of Canada, the Government of Yukon and Council for Yukon Indians reached an agreement in principle that became the basis for the Umbrella Final Agreement. Parliament directed that an Umbrella Final Agreement would be negotiated and included in individual Final Agreements (modern treaties), while also including specific provisions that were unique to each First Nation. The Umbrella Final Agreement also provided for the negotiation of separate Self-Government Agreements with each First Nation. The Umbrella Final Agreement was signed on May 29, 1993.

The 11 self-governing Yukon First Nations have almost 7,000 beneficiaries and 31,603 square kilometres of Settlement Land. The Self-Governing Yukon First Nations also receive financial compensation that is paid over 15 years following the Effective Date of the Final Agreement. In addition to compensation dollars, the Government of Canada provides funding to Yukon First Nations and to various boards and committees for implementation of the Final and Self-Government Agreements.

Three Yukon First Nations —Liard First Nation, Ross River Dena Council, and White River First Nation — have not concluded Final or Self-Government Agreements.

Appendix 3. Financial compensation payments

Chapter 19 of each Yukon First Nation Final Agreement provides for capital transfer payments to the Yukon First Nation on the anniversary of the signature date of its Final Agreement. The following settlement payments (net of negotiation loans) were made to Yukon First Nations.

Fiscal year Payments ($) Fiscal year Payments ($)
1994–1995 9,380,366 2003–2004 12,219,606
1995–1996 8,744,728 2004–2005 13,538,068*
1996–1997 8,109,089 2005–2006 15,867,658*
1997–1998 12,163,681 2006–2007 17,539,080*
1998–1999 13,655,500 2007–2008 17,100,310*
1999–2000 12,977,994 2008–2009 17,076,472*
2000–2001 11,529,120 2009–2010 7,523,647
2001–2002 11,529,125 2010–2011 8,251,211
2002–2003 12,489,419 2011-2012 9,006,524
* official pre-rounding

Appendix 4. Costs of implementation

These funds were allocated by the Government of Canada to the Government of Yukon, the Council of Yukon First Nations and various boards and committees for implementation purposes.

Fiscal year Payments ($) Fiscal year Payments ($)
1994–1995 10,504,745 2003–2004 3,295,667
1995–1996 1,608,601 2004–2005 3,342,024
1996–1997 2,175,012 2005–2006 3,528,223
1997–1998 2,463,814 2006–2007 3,371,355
1998–1999 2,426,573 2007–2008 3,424,803
1999–2000 2,237,664 2008–2009 3,390,708
2000–2001 2,430,336 2009–2010 3,537,410
2001–2002 2,547,661 2010–2011 3,110,822
2002–2003 2,719,872 2011-2012 4,124,324
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