Yukon Land Claims and Self-Government Agreements - Annual Report 2009–2010

Date: 2011

PDF Version  (1,166 Kb, 44 Pages)

Table of contents

Introduction

On March 16, 1987, the Standing Committee on Public Accounts Fifth Report recommended that the Minister of Indian Affairs and Northern Development table annual reports on all Aboriginal claims settlements.

In the 2003 Report of the Auditor General of Canada, the Auditor General noted that Indian and Northern Affairs Canada should work with the other signatories of the land claims agreements to overhaul the annual reports and make them more results-based.

The 2009–10 annual report has been compiled and redesigned in a much shorter format than previous years' reports. The inclusion of the Implementation Working Group Work Plan 2009–10 provides results-based reporting on implementation activities for the year. First Nations, Government of Yukon, Umbrella Final Agreement boards and committees and all federal departments operating in the Yukon were asked to provide information about their implementation achievements and challenges during the fiscal year. This report includes the submissions provided by each respondent group, edited for length and consistency. Perception of the parties may not be shared. In cases where groups did not provide submissions, a general description of their mandate and contact information is provided.

First Nations

Carcross/Tagish First Nation

P.O. Box 130, Carcross Y0B 1B0
phone: 867-821-4251
fax: 867-821-4802

The Carcross/Tagish First Nation is located in the community of Carcross, approximately 70 km south east of Whitehorse, and in the traditional village site of Tagish, approximately 30 km east of Carcross.

The First Nation has approximately 799 members, most of whom live in Carcross, Tagish and other communities in the Yukon. The Carcross/Tagish people are of both Athapascan and Tlingit ancestry. The Carcross/Tagish First Nation Final Agreement came into effect on January 9, 2006 and includes a land quantum of approximately 1,554 sq. km, of which 1,036 sq. km is Category A Land with surface and subsurface rights and 518 sq. km is Category B Land with surface rights only.

Champagne and Aishihik First Nations

1 Allen Place (P.O. Box 5310)
Haines Junction YT, Y0B 1L0
phone: 867-634-4200
web: Champagne and Aishihik First Nations

304 Jarvis Street
Whitehorse YT, Y1A 2H2
phone: 867-456-6888

Champagne and Aishihik First Nations is a self-governing people with its main community and administrative headquarters centred in Haines Junction and an office in Whitehorse. Total Champagne and Aishihik First Nations membership is 1203; about 677 members reside in the Yukon, including 293 in Whitehorse. The Champagne and Aishihik people are of Southern Tutchone ancestry and belong to the Athapascan language family. The Champagne and Aishihik First Nations Final Agreement came into effect on February 14, 1995 and includes a land quantum of approximately 2,395 sq. km, of which 1,230 sq. km is Category A Land with surface and subsurface rights and 1,165 sq. km is Category B Land with surface rights only.

Activities in 2009–10

A 1-year Continuation Agreement was negotiated to extend the Financial Transfer Agreement to March 31, 2011.

A review of the Champagne and Aishihik First Nations Constitution was initiated during the 2009 General Assembly and is scheduled to begin during the 2010–11 fiscal year.

Champagne and Aishihik First Nations and the Government of Yukon renewed their tax sharing agreement for personal income tax through to December 31, 2019.

During the 2009 General Assembly, Champagne and Aishihik First Nations, Canada and the Government of Yukon announced their partnership totalling $12 million for construction of the Champagne and Aishihik First Nations cultural centre in Haines Junction.

First Nation of Na-Cho Nyak Dun

P.O. Box 220, Mayo, YT Y0B 1M0
phone: 867-996-2265
fax: 867-996-2267
e-mail: main@nndfn.com
web: First Nation of Na-Cho Nyak Dun

The First Nation of Na-Cho Nyak Dun represents the most northerly community of the Northern Tutchone language group. The First Nation of Na-Cho Nyak Dun is based in the community of Mayo, in central Yukon, and has a membership of 602. The First Nation of Na-Cho Nyak Dun Final Agreement came into effect on February 14, 1995 and includes a land quantum of approximately 4,739 sq. km, of which 2,408 sq. km is Category A Land with surface and subsurface rights and 2,331 sq. km is Category B Land with surface rights only.

Kluane First Nation

P.O. Box 20, Burwash Landing, YT Y0B 1V0
phone: 867-841-4274
fax: 867-841-5900
e-mail: reception@kfn.ca

Kluane First Nation is based in the community of Burwash Landing on the shores of Kluane Lake, the territory's largest lake. The people of Kluane First Nation are of Southern Tutchone ancestry and belong to the Athapascan language family. The Kluane First Nation has approximately 210 members. The Kluane First Nation Final Agreement came into effect on February 2, 2004 and includes a land quantum of approximately 906 sq. km, of which 647 sq. km is Category A Land with surface and subsurface rights and 259 sq. km is Category B Land with surface rights only.

Kwanlin Dün First Nation

35 McIntyre Drive, Whitehorse, YT Y1A 5A5
phone: 867-633-7800
fax: 867-668-5057
e-mail: reception@kwanlindun.com
web: Kwanlin Dün First Nations

Kwanlin Dün First Nation has a membership of approximately 1,130. A large number of its members live in the Whitehorse area, with the balance dispersed throughout Canada, the United States of America (predominantly Alaska) and abroad. Kwanlin Dün First Nation is based in and around Whitehorse; about 75 percent of the territory's population live within its traditional territory. The Kwanlin Dün people have cultural affiliations with the Northern and Southern Tutchone as well as the Tagish from Marsh Lake. The Kwanlin Dün First Nation Final Agreement came into effect on April 1, 2005 and includes a land quantum of approximately 1,035 sq. km, of which 647 sq. km is Category A Land with surface and subsurface rights and 388 sq. km is Category B Land with surface rights only.

Activities in 2009–10

Through Yukon Asset Construction Agreements with the Government of Yukon, Kwanlin Dün First Nation crews worked on the construction of the Transitional Women's Living Unit at the new correctional centre and on the new terminal building at the Whitehorse airport.

At the end of September a ground-breaking ceremony was held for the Kwanlin Dün Cultural Centre.

More than 40 people were involved in Kwanlin Dün First Nation's new Healthy Aboriginal Adults Program.

Little Salmon/Carmacks First Nation

P.O. Box 135, Carmacks, YT Y0B 1C0
phone: 867-863-5576
fax: 867-863-5710
web: Little Salmon/Carmacks First Nation

Little Salmon/Carmacks First Nation is situated in the community of Carmacks in central Yukon located about 160 km north of Whitehorse. Little Salmon/ Carmacks First Nation has a membership of approximately 630. The people of Little Salmon/Carmacks are of Northern Tutchone ancestry and are part of the Athapascan language family. The Little Salmon/Carmacks First Nation Final Agreement came into effect on October 1, 1997 and includes a land quantum of approximately 2,590 sq. km, of which 1,554 sq. km is Category A Land with surface and subsurface rights and 1,036 sq. km is Category B Land with surface rights only.

Activities in 2009–10

Negotiations for renewal of the Financial Transfer Agreement commenced in April 2009. Although they were substantially concluded in December 2009, in late February 2010 Canada stated that it was not prepared to approve the agreement until new cost-sharing arrangements were included.

The draft Northern Tutchone First Nation Framework Agreement for Administration of Justice was substantially completed by May 2009.

Little Salmon/Carmacks First Nation and the Government of Yukon renewed their Personal Income Tax Sharing Agreement for a 10-year period. The agreement came into effect on January 1, 2010.

Selkirk First Nation

P.O. Box 40, Pelly Crossing, YT Y0B 1P0
phone: 867-537-3331
fax: 867-537-3902
e-mail: nelsonsg@selkirkfn.com
web: Selkirk First Nation

The Selkirk First Nation resides in the rural community of Pelly Crossing in central Yukon. The Selkirk First Nation is part of the Northern Tutchone language group and a member of the Northern Tutchone Council. Selkirk First Nation has a membership of approximately 495. The Selkirk First Nation Final Agreement came into effect on October 1, 1997 and includes a land quantum of approximately 4,739 sq. km, of which 2,408 sq. km is Category A Land with surface and subsurface rights and 2,331 sq. km is Category B Land with surface rights only.

Activities in 2009–10

In November 2009 Selkirk First Nation Chief and Council worked on a governance review. Selkirk First Nation hired a financial advisor to update its financial records and assess its financial status.

On November 5, 2009, a ceremony was held to mark the signing of a cooperation agreement between Selkirk First Nation and Capstone Resources regarding royalties from the company's Minto Mines, which is located on Selkirk First Nation's Category A land.

In 2009–10 Selkirk First Nation constructed 16 new houses: 12 funded by the Northern Housing Trust and 4 funded by Selkirk First Nation's investments.

On January 13, 2010 Western Copper hosted an open house on the proposed open pit Casino Mine, located within Selkirk First Nation's traditional territory.

Ta'an Kwäch'än Council

117 Industrial Road, Whitehorse, YT Y1A 2T8
phone: 867-668-3613
fax: 867-667-4295
e-mail: admin@taan.ca
web: Ta'an Kwäch'än Council

The Ta'an Kwäch'än Council takes its name from Tàa'an Män (Lake Laberge) in the heart of its traditional territory. Ta'an Kwäch'än Council has approximately 432 members. Approximately 50 percent of its members now live in Whitehorse, with the balance living throughout the rest of Canada, in the United States of America (mostly Alaska) and abroad. About 75 percent of the territory's population live within its traditional territory. The Ta'an Kwäch'än people are of Southern Tutchone ancestry. The Ta'an Kwäch'än Council Final Agreement came into effect on April 1, 2002 and includes a land quantum of approximately 776 sq. km, of which 388 sq. km is Category A Land with surface and subsurface rights and 388 sq. km is Category B Land with surface rights only.

Activities in 2009–10

Ta'an Kwäch'än Council held a youth leadership training session in August 2009 and a traditional medicine workshop in October 2009.

Ta'an Kwäch'än Council participated in an education summit to formalize education direction and in local college meetings to make recommendations for improving the delivery of current and new programs for First Nations people.

Teslin Tlingit Council

P.O. Box 133, Teslin, YT Y0A 1B0
phone: 867-390-2532
fax: 867-390-2204
e-mail: admin@ttc-teslin.com
web: Teslin Tlingit Council

The Teslin Tlingit Council is based in the community of Teslin, 170 km south of Whitehorse on the Alaska Highway. Teslin Tlingit Council membership is approximately 732. The Teslin Tlingit people are Inland Tlingit-speaking people and trace their ancestry to the Tlingit people who migrated from Alaskan coastal areas. The Teslin Tlingit Council Final Agreement came into effect on February 14, 1995 and includes a land quantum of approximately 2,395 sq. km, of which 1,230 sq. km is Category A Land with surface and subsurface rights and 1, 165 sq. km is Category B Land with surface rights only.

Activities in 2009–10

At the December 2009 meeting of the General Council, Teslin Tlingit Council Administration was given the mandate to conduct a referendum to determine if Teslin Tlingit Council citizens want to select or elect their Chief and Deputy Chief.

Teslin Tlingit Council and Government of Yukon carried out a joint land development project to make a total of 19 recreational cottage lots available to the public through a lottery.

Teslin Tlingit Council launched its Community Pandemic Preparedness Plan on February 4, 2010.

Tr'ondëk Hwëch'in

1242 Front Street (P.O. Box 599), Dawson City, YT Y0B 1G0
phone: 867-993-7100 toll-free 1-877-993-3400
e-mail: wayne.potoroka@gov.trondek.com
web: Tr'ondëk Hwëch'in

Tr'ondëk Hwëch'in is based in the community of Dawson City, at the confluence of the Yukon and Klondike rivers. Total Tr'ondëk Hwëch'in membership is approximately 1,082; more than 572 reside in the Yukon. The people of Tr'ondëk Hwëch'in are part of a larger Hän Nation. The Hän language they speak is an Athapascan dialect. The Tr'ondëk Hwëch'in Final Agreement came into effect on September 15, 1998 and includes a land quantum of approximately 2,590 sq. km, of which 1,554 sq. km is Category A Land with surface and subsurface rights and 1,036 sq. km is Category B Land with surface rights only.

Activities in 2009–10

Tr'ondëk Hwëch'in Chief and Council formally approved the new Financial Transfer Agreement, but in late February, 2010, Canada stated that it was not prepared to approve the agreement until new cost sharing arrangements were included.

The primary challenges faced by Tr'ondëk Hwëch'in governance continue to be lack of capacity and high turnover of employees.

One of the major achievements in 2009–10 was the completion and approval of the Tombstone Park Management Plan.

At the August 2009 General Assembly Tr'ondëk Hwëch'in mandated the establishment of the Tr'ondëk Hwëch'in Trust to manage Chapter 19 compensation funds.

Vuntut Gwitchin First Nation

P.O. Box 94, Old Crow, YT Y0B 1N0
phone: 867-966-3261
fax: 867-966-3800
e-mail: reception@vgfn.net
web: Vuntut Gwitchin First Nation

Vuntut Gwitchin First Nation and Vuntut Gwitchin Government are based in the community of Old Crow, the most northerly Yukon community. Vuntut Gwitchin First Nation membership is approximately 771. The Vuntut Gwitchin people belong to the Athapascan language family. The Vuntut Gwitchin First Nation Final Agreement came into effect on February 14, 1995 and includes a land quantum of approximately 7,744 sq. km, all of which is Category A Land with surface and subsurface rights.

Activities in 2009–10

Vuntut Gwitchin Government approved a new 10-year Community Capital Infrastructure Program involving approximately $40 million in projects.

Canada's Northern Strategy funded 3 new houses from June 2009 to March 2010; 2 more will be constructed in the 2010–11 fiscal year.

The North Yukon Regional Land Use Plan was accepted by Vuntut Gwitchin Government and the Government of Yukon and is now being implemented.

Vuntut Gwitchin Government, with its partners in the plan, issued a Joint Letter of Understanding on the planning process for the Recommended Peel Watershed Regional Land Use Plan on January 25, 2010.

In November 2009, the Vuntut Gwitchin Government and Government of Yukon Department of Education formed a partnership through the Northern Strategy initiative for the 3-year Old Crow Experiential Learning Project.

Implementing Bodies: Renewable Resources Councils

Renewable Resources Councils are local management bodies. They are established by the parties of each individual land claim agreement; 10 of the 11 self-governing First Nations have an established Renewable Resources Council.

Renewable Resources Councils allow for local management of renewable resources — such as fish, wildlife, habitat and forests — in each First Nation's traditional territory. Renewable Resources Councils also support the Yukon Fish and Wildlife Management Board by raising awareness of specific issues and providing local and traditional information.

The councils have 6 to 10 members; half are nominated by the respective First Nation, and half by the Government of Yukon.

Alsek Renewable Resources Council

Executive Director: Susan Desjardins
phone: 867-634-2524
fax: 867-634-2527
e-mail: admin@alsekrrc.ca
web: Alsek Renewable Resource Council

The mandate of the Alsek Renewable Resources Council is to assist in management decisions related to fish, wildlife and their habitat, and forests, as outlined in the Champagne and Aishihik First Nations Final Agreement. The council's jurisdiction is the Champagne and Aishihik traditional territory, which includes the communities of Haines Junction, Canyon Creek, Takhini, Mendenhall, Silver City, Kloo Lake, Aishihik and Klukshu.

Carcross/Tagish Renewable Resources Council

P.O. Box 70, Tagish, YT, Y0B 1T0
phone: 867-399-4923
fax: 867-399-4978
e-mail: carcrosstagishrrc@gmail.com

The mandate of the Carcross/Tagish Renewable Resources Council is to make management recommendations regarding fish, wildlife and their habitat, and forest resources as outlined in Chapters 16 and 17 of the Carcross/Tagish First Nation Final Agreement. The Carcross /Tagish Renewable Resources Council was established in February 2010. Fiscal year 2010–11 was its first full year of operation.

Carmacks Renewable Resources Council

P.O. Box 122, Carmacks, YT, Y0B 1C0
phone: 867-863-6838
fax: 867-863-6429
e-mail: carmacksrrc@northwestel.net

The mandate of the Carmacks Renewable Resources Council is to assist in management decisions related to fish, wildlife and their habitat, and forest resources, as outlined in Chapter 16 and 17 of the Little Salmon/Carmacks First Nation Final Agreement.

Dän Keyi Renewable Resources Council

Secretariat: Wendy Martin
P.O. Box 50, Burwash Landing, YT Y0B 1V0
phone: 867-841-5820
fax: 867-841-5821
e-mail: dankeyirrc@northwestel.net

The mandate of the Dän Keyi Renewable Resources Council is to assist in management decisions related to fish, wildlife and their habitat, and forests, as outlined in the Kluane First Nation Final Agreement.

Dawson District Renewable Resources Council

Secretariat: Linda Taylor
P.O.
Box 1380, Dawson City, YT Y0B 1G0
phone: 867-993-6976
fax: 867-993-6093
e-mail: dawsonrrc@northwestel.net

The mandate of the Dawson District Renewable Resources Council is to assist in management decisions related to fish, wildlife and their habitat, and forests, as outlined in the Tr'ondëk Hwëch'in Final Agreement.

Activities in 2009–10

The Council underwent a financial audit in 2009–10.

The Council received funding from the Yukon River Panel Restoration and Enhancement Fund for the Spawning and Rearing Access Restoration project.

The Council signed a contribution agreement with the Forestry Department of the Government of Yukon to take a leading role in the forest management process.

Laberge Renewable Resources Council

Secretariat: Charolette O'Donnell
102 Copper Road, #202, Whitehorse, YT, Y1A 2Z6
phone: 867-393-3940
fax: 867-393-3940
e-mail: labergerrc@northwestel.net

The mandate of the Laberge Renewable Resources Council is to assist in management decisions related to fish, wildlife and their habitat, and forests, as outlined in the Ta'an Kwäch'än Council Final Agreement.

Mayo District Renewable Resources Council

Secretariat: Barb Shannon
P.O. Box 249, Mayo, YT Y0B 1M0
phone: 867-996-2942
fax: 867-996-2948
e-mail: mayorrc@northwestel.net

The mandate of the Mayo District Renewable Resources Council is to assist in management decisions related to fish, wildlife and their habitat, and forests, as outlined in the First Nation of Na-Cho Nyak Dun Final Agreement.

Activities in 2009–10

In 2009–10 the Council held 20 regular meetings and 10 special meetings.

The Council was involved in the redraft of the Mayo Fish and Wildlife Management Plan, which entered its second 5-year schedule.

The Mayo Community Ecological Monitoring Project gives the Council regular reports on its work.

The Council has joined with the 2 other Northern Tutchone Renewable Resources Councils — Carmacks and Selkirk — in discussions on trapping issues and the Yukon River salmon run.

The Council had to make recommendations on a number of trapline re-issuance applications and dealt with 4 local outfitters' quota negotiations during the fiscal year.

The draft Peel Watershed Land-Use Plan was a main focus for Mayo District Renewable Resources Council. Council members met with the Peel Watershed Commission on several occasions.

Alexco's Bellekeno Underground Development is a large project that affects a large area near Keno. Spin-off drilling, mining and production projects, as well as the Elsa Reclamation project will require reviews by the Council for many years.

North Yukon Renewable Resources Council

Secretariat: Nick Gray
P.O. Box 80, Old Crow, YT Y0B 1N0
phone: 867-966-3034
fax: 867-966-3036
nyrrc@northwestel.net

The mandate of the North Yukon Renewable Resources Council is to assist in management decisions related to fish, wildlife and their habitat, and forests, as outlined in the Vuntut Gwitchin First Nation Final Agreement.

Selkirk Renewable Resources Council

Secretariat: Noreen Hirtle
P.O. Box 32, Pelly Crossing, YT Y0B 1P0
phone: 867-537-3937
fax: 867-537-3939
e-mail: selkirkrrc@northwestel.net

The mandate of the Selkirk Renewable Resources Council is to assist in management decisions related to fish, wildlife and their habitat, and forests, as outlined in the Selkirk First Nation Final Agreement.

Teslin Renewable Resources Council

Secretariat: Bernice Schonewille
P.O. Box 186, Teslin, YT Y0A 1B0
phone: 867-390-2323
fax: 867-390-2919
e-mail: teslinrrc@northwestel.net

The mandate of the Teslin Renewable Resources Council is to assist in management decisions related to fish, wildlife and their habitat, and forests, as outlined in the Teslin Tlingit Council Final Agreement.

Activities in 2009–10

In 2009 a mid-term review of the Teslin Fish and Wildlife Management Plan was scheduled to take place between the partners of the plan: Teslin Tlingit Council, Teslin Renewable Resources Council and Government of Yukon Department of Environment.

The Teslin Moose Habitat Study continued through the 2009–10 fiscal year. The study area extends from Johnsons Crossing north to Ross River, west to the shores of Lake Laberge and east to Frances Lake.

The Teslin Renewable Resources Council organizes and sponsors an annual public information session for the community each June. This year included events on forestry research in the Teslin region; the Nisutlin River Delta National Wildlife Area; and the forest bird survey in the Teslin region.

Teslin Renewable Resources Council, together with the Teslin Tlingit Council, spends an immense amount of time on trapping within the traditional territory and on lobbying for Yukon trappers.

As partners in the management plan for the Nisutlin River Delta National Wildlife Area, Teslin Renewable Resources Council and the Teslin Tlingit Council continue to work with Canadian Wildlife Services on matters related to the delta.

The Teslin Lake Bird Observatory operated April to mid-June and August to mid- September, 2009. The Teslin Renewable Resources Council also provides some financial support to the station.

Other Implementing Bodies

Dispute Resolution Board

P.O. Box 31675, Whitehorse, YT Y1A 6L3
phone: 867-668-3562 toll free 1-866-367-6551
fax: 867-668-4474
e-mail: drb.ufa@northwestel.net
web: Yukon Dispute Resolution Board & Enrollment Office

The Dispute Resolution Board facilitates a comprehensive resolution process to assist in resolving disputes arising from the interpretation, administration and implementation of settlement agreements, settlement legislation or disputes referred to it by the parties to the Umbrella Final Agreement.

Activities in 2009–10

The Dispute Resolution Board held 11 meetings during the 2009–10 fiscal year, including the Council of Yukon First Nations General Assembly on July 14–16, 2009 and Mediation Yukon Society's Strategic Planning meeting in March 2010.

The Board met with the Implementation Representative and Legal Advisor of Indian and Northern Affairs Canada to discuss the proposed amendments to section 11 of the Yukon First Nation Land Claims Settlement Act by removing references to the Enrollment Commission.

The Board continues to field enquiries regarding the enrollment process within the Yukon and refers individuals to the appropriate Yukon First Nation Citizenship Registries.

North Yukon Planning Commission

c/o Yukon Land Use Planning Council
307 Jarvis Street, Suite 201, Whitehorse, YT Y1A 2H3
phone: 867-667-7397
fax: 867-667-4624
e-mail: ylupc@planyukon.ca

The North Yukon Planning Commission began its work in 2004. On July 29, 2009, the Yukon and Vuntut Gwitchin Governments approved the Commission's North Yukon Land Use Plan, the first regional land-use plan approved in the Yukon. The North Yukon Planning Commission was dissolved once the final recommended plan was accepted. The Commission will be reappointed if a review of the plan is undertaken.

Peel Watershed Planning Commission

c/o Yukon Land Use Planning Council
307 Jarvis Street, Suite 201, Whitehorse, YT Y1A 2H3
phone: 867-667-2374
fax: 867-667-4624 toll free 1-866-353-2374
e-mail: peel@planyukon.ca
Twitter @PWPC

The Peel Watershed Planning Commission is responsible for developing and recommending a draft regional land use plan for the Peel watershed planning region. The Commission is composed of 6 public members nominated by the First Nation of Na-Cho Nyak Dun, the Gwich'in Tribal Council, jointly by Government of Yukon/Vuntut Gwitchin First Nation, jointly by Government of Yukon/Tr'ondëk Hwëch'in and 2 by the Government of Yukon.

Activities in 2009–10

The Peel Watershed Planning Commission released its Recommended Plan on December 2, 2009 and a summary document in February 2010. The Commission's task was to draft a plan that addressed the starkly drawn conflicts over how to manage lands and resources in the planning region. The Recommended Plan is being reviewed by the Governments of Yukon, Na-Cho Nyak Dun, Tr'ondëk Hwëch'in, Gwich'in Tribal Council, Vuntut Gwitchin and members of the public.

Training Policy Committee

4078 – 4th Avenue, Suite 21, Whitehorse, YT Y1A 4K8
phone: 867-668-7812
fax: 867-668-7825
e-mail: tpc@northwestel.net

The Training Policy Committee was established by Chapter 28 of the Umbrella Final Agreement and the Yukon First Nations Land Claims Settlement Act. The Committee supports Yukon First Nations people in obtaining training to implement land claim agreements and to fully participate in economic opportunities arising from implementation. The Training Policy Committee works with First Nations who require assistance in developing training plans to obtain funds from the Yukon Indian People Training Trust.

Activities in 2009–10

The Committee published the second edition of Training Programs in the Yukon: Resource Guide. This booklet lists all the training programs in the Yukon and is available from the Training Policy Committee office.

The following proposals were approved through the allocated training fund:

  • Carcross/Tagish First Nation offered a Pursuit of Excellence program and identified positive behavioural changes as result of these workshops;
  • Ta'an Kwäch'än Council offered an Advancement of Excellence seminar that was a continuation of the Pursuit of Excellence program. Funding was provided for a training program for a Human Resources coordinator, Implementation coordinator and Finance clerk; and
  • The First Nation of Na-Cho Nyak Dun offered a Heritage and Cultural Education Skills program with support from the allocated training fund and the Endowment Income Fund.

Yukon Environmental and Socio-economic Assessment Board

309 Strickland Street, Suite 200, Whitehorse, YT Y1A 2J9
phone: 867-668-6420 toll free 1-866-322-4040
fax: 867-668-6425
e-mail: yesab@yesab.ca
web: Yukon Environmental and Socio-economic Assessment Board

The Yukon Environmental and Socio-economic Assessment Board was established under the Yukon Environmental and Socio-economic Assessment Act. The Act sets out a process to assess the environmental and socio-economic effects of projects and other activities in the Yukon or that might affect the Yukon. This is a requirement of Chapter 12 of the Umbrella Final Agreement and Yukon First Nations Final Agreements.

Activities in 2009–10

The Yukon Environmental and Socio-economic Assessment Board remained involved in the 5-year review of the Yukon Environmental and Socio-economic Assessment Act. The Observation and Conclusions Report was released.

Open houses were held in all Designated Office communities and public meetings were held in Teslin for the Red Mountain all-season tote road, in Whitehorse for the Whistle Bend Subdivision, in Ross River for the proposed Mactung Mine project, and in Dawson City for the Callison Industrial Subdivision and the Dawson Waste Water Treatment Plant project. Public meetings also took place throughout Yukon in the fall of 2009 for the review of Designated Office Rules.

There were 261 project proposal submissions to the Designated Offices, most in the area of residential, commercial and industrial land development. Submissions in the placer and quartz mining sectors increased this year; the number related to forestry, agriculture and power generation remained relatively unchanged from the previous fiscal year.

The Executive Committee received one new project during the year, the proposed Silver Hart Mine. The past 996 Designated Office-level project assessments took an average of 34.5 days each.

Yukon Fish and Wildlife Management Board

106 Main Street, 2nd floor, Whitehorse, YT P.O. Box 31104, Whitehorse, YT Y1A 5P7
phone: 867-667-3754
fax: 867-393-6947
e-mail: officemanager@yfwmb.ca
web: Yukon Fish and Wildlife Management Board

The Yukon Fish and Wildlife Management Board is an advisory body established under Chapter 16 of the Final Agreements and consists of 12 members appointed by the territorial Minister of Environment. The Council of Yukon First Nations and the Government of Yukon each nominate 6 members.

Since its responsibility lies with issues that affect the entire Yukon, the Board focuses its efforts on territorial policies, legislation and other measures to help guide management of fish and wildlife, conserve habitat and enhance the renewable resources economy. The Board influences management decisions through public education and by making recommendations to Yukon, Federal and First Nations governments. Recommendations and positions are based on the best technical, traditional and local information available.

Activities in 2009–10

In June 2009 the Board reviewed its long-term strategic goals at its annual "On the Land" meeting. The Board finalised its 20:20 Vision initiative. In partnership with Renewable Resources Councils and the Salmon Sub-Committee, the Board hosted a 2-day symposium in Whitehorse to discuss Yukoners' vision for fish and wildlife. The Board awarded its annual Sharing the Land Scholarship to a Whitehorse student.

Yukon Geographical Place Names Board

P.O. Box 31164, Whitehorse, YT Y1A 5P7
phone: 867-393-3982
fax: 867-667-7006
e-mail: yukonplacenames@yknet.ca
web: Yukon Geographic Place Names Board

In 1986, the responsibility for naming geographical features in the Yukon was transferred from the Department of Indian and Northern Affairs Canada to the Government of Yukon. In 1987, as part of this transfer, the Government of Yukon established the Yukon Geographical Names Board to undertake the job of researching and approving geographical names. In 1995, under the Umbrella Final Agreement, the Yukon Geographical Names Board was replaced by the Yukon Geographical Place Names Board. The duties and responsibilities of the Yukon Geographical Place Names Board are outlined in Chapter 13 of the Final Agreements.

Activities in 2009–10

At the first meeting of the fiscal year, the Board discussed the new financial reporting requirements of the Government of Yukon Department of Tourism and Culture.

At its meeting on November 10, 2009, the Board completed its review of place name submissions from the First Nation of Na-Cho Nyak Dun. As a result of its deliberations in successive meetings, the Board recommended 16 applications and sent them to the territorial Minister of Tourism and Culture for final review and official approval.

At its February 11, 2010, meeting, the Board met with representatives of the Teslin Tlingit Council to initiate the review of its place name applications.

The Board also considered two traditional names submitted by the Kluane First Nation. The Board's March 18, 2010, meeting was devoted to a review of several place name applications by Champagne and Aishihik First Nations.

Aerial photo documentation took place in September 2009. The area photographed included Kusawa Lake and sections of the Mendenhall and Takhini rivers.

Yukon Heritage Resources Board

412 Main Street Whitehorse, YT Y1A 2B7
phone: 867-668-7150
fax: 867-668-7155
e-mail: YHRB@northwestel.net
web: Yukon Heritage Resources Board

The duties and responsibilities of the Yukon Heritage Resources Board are outlined primarily in Chapter 13 of the Final Agreements and the Yukon's Historic Resources Act.

Activities in 2009–10

The Board continued to hold informational and feedback sessions with the parties to the Final Agreements on the Draft Rules of Procedure for Determining Ownership of Heritage Resources under Chapter 13 of Yukon First Nation Final Agreements.

The Board evaluated the nomination of the wreck of the A.J. Goddard for Yukon historic site designation and made recommendations to the territorial Minister about designation.

The Board continued to focus on training in the 4 high-priority areas identified in the Umbrella Final Agreement Implementation Plan: board procedures and functions; board mandate; provisions of the Umbrella Final Agreement; and cross-cultural orientation and education.

The Government of Yukon Minister of Tourism and Culture approved the Yukon Heritage Resources Board recommendation that 8 projects be supported by the Yukon Historic Resources Fund.

The Board changed to a new system of quarterly activity and financial reporting required under the new Transfer Payment Funding Agreement.

Yukon Land-Use Planning Council

307 Jarvis Street, Room 201, Whitehorse, YT Y1A 2H3
phone: 867-667-7397
fax: 867-667-4624
e-mail: ylupc@planyukon.ca

The Yukon Land Use Planning Council was established under Chapter 11 of the Umbrella Final Agreement. The Council includes 1 member of the Council of Yukon First Nations and 1 member nominated by the territorial government and 1 member nominated by the federal government. The Yukon Land Use Planning Council's primary role is to make recommendations to the Government of Yukon and each affected Yukon First Nation on several matters:

  • land use planning, including policies, goals and priorities;
  • identification of planning regions and priorities for the preparation of regional land-use plans;
  • the general terms of reference, including timeframes, for each regional landuse planning commission;
  • the boundary of each planning region; and
  • such other matters as government and each affected Yukon First Nation may agree on.

Yukon Salmon Sub-Committee

106 Main St., Whitehorse, 2nd floor P.O. Box 31094, Whitehorse, YT, Y1A 5P7
phone: 867-393-6725
fax: 866-914-7708
e-mail: executivedirector@yssc.ca
twitter Yukon Salmon Sub-Committee

The Yukon Salmon Sub-Committee of the Yukon Fish and Wildlife Management Board was created in 1993 under the Umbrella Final Agreement. Chapter 16 of the Umbrella Final Agreement recognizes the Yukon Salmon Sub-Committee as the main instrument of salmon management in the Yukon.

The Sub-Committee is funded by an annual contribution from Fisheries and Oceans Canada. It may make recommendations to the federal Minister and to Yukon First Nations on all matters related to salmon, their habitats and management, including legislation, research, policies and programs.

The members of the Yukon Salmon Sub-Committee come from all parts of the Yukon and represent both First Nations and non-First Nations populations. The composition of the Sub-Committee is structured to ensure diversity and balance. Its members represent the Yukon Fish and Wildlife Management Board, Department of Fisheries and Oceans, and the First Nations of the Alsek, Porcupine and Yukon rivers drainage basins.

Yukon Surface Rights Board

100 Main Street, Suite 206, Whitehorse P.O. Box 31201, Whitehorse YT Y1A 5P7
phone: 867-667-7695
fax: 867-668-5892
e-mail: info@yukonsurfacerights.ca
web: Yukon Surface Rights Board

The primary role of the Yukon Surface Rights Board is to resolve access disputes between people who own or have an interest in the surface of the land and those with access rights to the land. The Board's process starts when the parties to the dispute are unable to reach an agreement and a party applies to the Yukon Surface Rights Board.

The Yukon Surface Rights Board's jurisdiction derives from several statutes: the Yukon Surface Rights Board Act (Canada); the Quartz Mining Act (Yukon); the Placer Mining Act (Yukon), Oil and Gas Act (Yukon), the Expropriation Act (Canada), the Radiocommunication Act (Canada), and individual Yukon First Nation Final Agreements.

Applicants must attempt to resolve their disputes through negotiation before they apply to the Board. If the dispute is not resolved by negotiation, either party may submit an application to the Board.

Activities in 2009–10

During the 2009–10 fiscal year the Board carried out a range of initiatives:

  • completed and posted its
    web site;
  • completed the draft template of the French version of the Board's
    web site;
  • participated in board development and training opportunities; and
  • maintained an active membership in the Council of Canadian Administrative Tribunals.

No applications were made to the Board during the 2009–10 fiscal year.

Government of Yukon

Overview

Government of Yukon Michael Hale, Implementation Representative
Director, Implementation P.O. Box 2703, Whitehorse, YT Y1A 2C6
phone: 867-667-8797
fax: 867-667-3599
e-mail: Michael.Hale@gov.yk.ca
web: Government of Yukon

The Government of Yukon undertakes a broad range of implementation activities that touch on every aspect of governance in the territory. All parties recognize that the Government of Yukon and Yukon First Nations can best improve implementation by building Yukon First Nation capacity, increasing cost-effectiveness, improving efficiencies, sharing information and coordinating approaches.

The 2009 Yukon Forum, held in conjunction with an Inter-governmental Forum, advanced work on the Northern Strategy's Trust Fund and how the governments would engage with the Canadian Northern Economic Development Agency. The Government of Yukon also provided support for concluding Yukon First Nations Financial Transfer Agreements with Canada.

A key challenge is education. Over the course of 2009–10, the Government of Yukon's Department of Education worked in partnership with Yukon First Nations to plan, implement, monitor and review phases of "New Horizons: Our Commitment to the Future," an initiative that followed on the Education Reform Project and Education Act review. In addition, the Department's First Nation Programs and Partnerships Unit facilitates the development of First Nations curriculum and resource material. The Yukon First Nations Advisory Committee works with stakeholders to improve the results and experiences of First Nation students.

Significant work was done in capacity development and joint field work for lands and resources. This included a pilot project to foster Yukon First Nation oil and gas employment opportunities and creating opportunities for Yukon First Nations through the Faro mine closure process.

Funding was provided to the Alaska Highway Aboriginal Pipeline Coalition, comprised of Yukon First Nations along the highway-right-of-way, to facilitate the establishment of an environmental and socio-economic impact benefits agreement and regulatory framework.

The Government of Yukon also provided funding for a range of initiatives, including wellness and support workers for several Yukon First Nations and mediation training in Carcross to help all Yukoners navigate the complex network of Government of Yukon and Yukon First Nation wildlife laws.

Department of Energy, Mines and Resources

Land use

Energy, Mines and Resources, with the Land Claims Implementation Secretariat and the Department of Environment, is responsible for creating, maintaining and monitoring Orders-in-Council withdrawal orders for Special Management Areas, and for preparing technical reviews of administrative plans for Special Management Areas.

In 2009–10, Energy, Mines and Resources maintained the prohibition and withdrawal orders for the North Slope and Old Crow Flats required by the Inuvialuit and Vuntut Gwitchin First Nation Final Agreements. The Department also worked with the Department of Environment on the Pickhandle Lake Habitat Protection Area and on completing the administrative plan for the Old Crow Flats Special Management Area.

Energy, Mines and Resources is responsible for meeting the Government of Yukon's land claim obligations for regional land-use planning. This includes coordinating the government's participation in planning processes and implementation funding for the land-use planning commissions.

In 2009, the Government of Yukon and Vuntut Gwitchin First Nation approved the North Yukon Regional Land Use Plan. In January 2010 the Government of Yukon and Vuntut Gwitchin First Nation developed and signed a memorandum of understanding for the implementation of the Plan, and began implementation.

The Peel Land Use Planning Commission released its Recommended Peel Watershed Regional Land Use Plan in December 2009. The 5 parties signed a letter of understanding in January 2010 that outlined how they would work together to review the Plan and respond to the Commission.

In 2009–10, the parties finalized the Dawson Regional Land Use Planning Commission's terms of reference and nominated members to the Commission.

Forest resources

In 2009–10, Energy, Mines and Resources continued to work with Champagne and Aishihik First Nations to jointly implement the Strategic Forest Management Plan.

Energy, Mines and Resources and Tr'ondëk Hwëch'in worked together on the Dawson Forest Management Plan. The Plan includes both settlement and nonsettlement lands and is targeted for completion in 2011.

Energy, Mines and Resources also worked in partnership with Teslin Tlingit Council to implement the approved Teslin Forest Management Plan through the development of a timber harvest plan.

Energy, Mines and Resources, Kwanlin Dün First Nation, Carcross/Tagish First Nation and Ta'an Kwäch'än Council signed the terms of reference to establish a Joint Forest Management Planning Initiative for Whitehorse.

Energy, Mines and Resources works collaboratively with First Nations to develop small-volume timber harvest plans to ensure that small forest operators can acquire a wood supply.

Energy, Mines and Resources Forest Management Branch is acquiring new aerial photography to update forest inventory data for the Teslin and Whitehorse areas.

In 2009–10, Energy, Mines and Resources worked with First Nations to complete the new Forest Resources Regulation.

Department of Environment

Special Management Areas

Technical committees consisting of Government of Yukon and First Nation representatives were established for Kusawa Territorial Park and Agay Mene Natural Environment Park. Experience from other special management areas indicates a need for a variety of data developed in conjunction with First Nations.

Work related to Asi Keyi Territorial Park will require liaison with Kluane First Nation and White River First Nation. Working with White River First Nation includes aspects of common law since it is still an Indian Act Band. Preparations for implementing the provisions of the Pickhandle Lakes Habitat Protection Area under the Kluane First Nation Final Agreement included meeting with Kluane First Nation and White River First Nation.

A 5-year review was conducted of the Fishing Branch Habitat Protection Area/ Wilderness Preserve Management Plan. The jointly developed Park and Human- Bear Management Plan for Fishing Branch Wilderness Reserve and Vuntut Gwitchin First Nation settlement lands was updated and implemented.

Discussions were held with Tr'ondëk Hwëch'in to finalize the 2003 recommended Tombstone Park Management Plan; the Plan was approved in August 2009. A joint operations committee was established to oversee activities in the Park and review applications for use permits. The 3-year Holland America Interpretive Agreement was renewed for 1 year in 2009.

Southern Lakes Wildlife Coordinating Committee

The Committee's work included assessment of high-priority moose management issues and community meetings. On January 14, 2010, the Committee submitted its recommendations to Government of Yukon and First Nations regarding caribou management.

Department of Highways and Public Works

Contracting opportunities

The Department of Highways and Public Works fulfills the Government of Yukon's obligation under land claims agreements by routinely sending notices of Government of Yukon public tenders and requests for proposals to all Yukon First Nations. For its public works projects in rural Yukon, Highways and Public Works typically includes provisions in tender packages and contracts that require companies to demonstrate best efforts at hiring local and First Nations Department of Environment Department of Highways and Public Works businesses and individuals. Project activities in 2009–10 related to Yukon Asset Construction Agreements included work with Kwanlin Dün First Nation and Carcross/Tagish First Nation.

Department of Justice

Aboriginal Law Group

The Aboriginal Law Group advises Government of Yukon Departments and other groups within Legal Services Branch on issues related to the interpretation and implementation of the Final Agreements and Self-Government Agreements. The Aboriginal Law Group provided advice to the Solicitors' Group on the lease agreement between Kwanlin Dün First Nation and the Government of Yukon for the public library in Kwanlin Dün First Nation's building currently under construction on settlement land.

The Aboriginal Law Group participated in the ongoing negotiations for the Teslin Tlingit Council Administration of Justice Agreement with Canada.

Extension agreements to the interim justice provisions in the Self-Government Agreements were signed for 6 First Nations: Champagne and Aishihik First Nations, Kwanlin Dün First Nation, Kluane First Nation, Ta'an Kwäch'än Council, Vuntut Gwitchin First Nation and Teslin Tlingit Council. The provisions were reinstated through Order in Council for 3 First Nations: the First Nation of Na- Cho Nyak Dun, Little Salmon/Carmacks First Nation and Selkirk First Nation.

The Aboriginal Law Group participated in negotiations for Administration of Justice Framework Agreements with Canada and 7 Yukon First Nations: Champagne and Aishihik First Nations, Tr'ondëk Hwëch'in, First Nation of Na- Cho Nyak Dun, Vuntut Gwitchin First Nation, Ta'an Kwäch'än Council, Little Salmon/Carmacks First Nation and Selkirk First Nation.

The Aboriginal Law Group participated in exploratory discussions on an Administration of Justice Agreement with Canada and Kwanlin Dün First Nation.

Executive Council Office

Development Assessment Branch

The Development Assessment Branch is responsible for the implementation of the development assessment process under Chapter 12 of the Umbrella Final Agreement, Yukon Environmental and Socio-economic Assessment Act and regulations throughout the government. The Branch also allocates annual Yukon Environmental and Socio-economic Assessment Act implementation funding from the Government of Canada.

The Branch is the Government of Yukon's designated representative on the steering committee for the 5-year review of the Yukon Environmental and Socioeconomic Assessment Act. The Government of Yukon, along with the other parties and First Nations, is reviewing the report recommendations, determining courses of action and working to develop the final review report during 2010–11.

Yukon Bureau of Statistics

The Government of Yukon Bureau of Statistics was contracted by the First Nation of Na-Cho Nyak Dun to conduct the Silver Trail Labour Skills Survey. The initiative was sponsored by the First Nation of Na-Cho Nyak Dun, the Government of Yukon Department of Economic Development, Alexco Resource Corporation and Victoria Gold Corporation. The information from the survey is owned by the First Nation of Na-Cho Nyak Dun and will be kept in a database by them.

Government of Canada

Federal departments operating in the Yukon

Yukon First Nation Final Agreements set out obligations for all federal departments operating in the Yukon.

Indian Affairs and Northern Development Canada

Dionne Savill, co/Implementation Representative
Director, Governance
300 Main Street, Room 415C, Whitehorse, YT Y1A 2B5
phone: 867-667-3398
fax: 867-667-3801
e-mail: Dionne.savill@aandc-aadnc.gc.ca

Allan Burnside, co/Implementation Representative
Director, Treaty Management – Yukon/BC
25 Rue Eddy, Room 1550, Gatineau, QC K1A 0H4
phone: 819-953-1745
fax: 819-994-7043
e-mail: Allan.burnside@aandc-aadnc.gc.ca

Indian Affairs and Northern Development Canada is 1 of the federal departments responsible for meeting the Government of Canada's obligations and commitments to First Nations. Most of the Department's programs are delivered through partnerships with Aboriginal communities and through federal-provincial or federal-territorial agreements.

Administration of Justice Agreements

Negotiations with several self-governing Yukon First Nations on Administration of Justice Agreements have commenced and are at various stages of engagement. Canada, Government of Yukon and Teslin Tlingit Council were in the process of concluding negotiations on the first Administration of Justice Agreement in the territory.

Intergovernmental Forum

The main objective of the Intergovernmental Forum is to develop a shared vision for governance and program and service delivery in Yukon within the context of land claims, Self-Government Agreements and the Northern Affairs Program's Devolution Transfer Agreement.

The Forum's structure and the process it follows are set out in the Intergovernmental Forum Protocol.

In November 2009 the parties met in Haines Junction. The Forum included an overview and discussion of the Canadian Northern Economic Development Agency in the territory and an update on the negotiations of Financial Transfer Agreements.

Programs and Services Transfer Agreements

Programs and Services Transfer Agreements allow Yukon First Nations to assume responsibility and funding for any government program or service within their jurisdiction.

In 2009–10, an agreement was reached with the First Nation of Na-Cho Nyak Dun for the transfer of Health Canada programs on HIV/AIDS and FASD. These programs were transferred to 8 of the 11 self-governing Yukon First Nations in 2007.

Programs and Services Transfer Agreements discussions included Alcohol and Drug Services, Aboriginal Human Resources Development, Child and Family Welfare and Education. The parties' ability to reach agreements on these and other files was supported by a strong focus on renewing Financial Transfer Agreements, but complicated by financial and other difficulties inherent in the assumption of responsibility by First Nations for Government of Yukon programs.

Financial Transfer Agreement

Canada entered into negotiations in April 2009 with Champagne and Aishihik First Nations, Little Salmon/Carmacks First Nation, First Nation of Na-Cho Nyak Dun, Selkirk First Nation, Teslin Tlingit Council, Tr'ondëk Hwëch'in, and Vuntut Gwitchin First Nation for renewal of their Financial Transfer Agreements.

Discussions commenced in late 2009–10 fiscal year with Carcross/Tagish First Nation, Kluane First Nation, Kwanlin Dün First Nation and Ta'an Kwäch'än Council regarding a review and subsequent renegotiation of the Financial Transfer Agreement based on the model approved by the other 7 self-governing Yukon First Nations.

Taxation

Tax Administration Agreements on both federal and territorial personal income tax are now in place with 10 of the 11 self-governing Yukon First Nations. These have been in effect for periods of 5 to 10 years and have resulted in increased revenues for self-governing First Nations.

Tax Administration Agreements on the First Nations Goods and Services Tax are in place with all 11 self-governing Yukon First Nations.

Implementation

In response to a recommendation in the 2007 Implementation Review of Yukon First Nation Final and Self-Government Agreements, the Implementation Working Group continued to develop a mandate that would formalize its role as the primary instrument for monitoring and resolving common implementation issues related to Yukon agreements. Although significant progress has been made on development of the mandate, the parties have been unable to reach agreement on how the Implementation Working Group will report to the signatories. If the parties reach agreement, the Implementation Working Group has agreed that its mandate will be brought into effect by an amendment to the non-contractual portion of the Umbrella Final Agreement and Final Agreement Implementation Plans.

The Implementation Working Group continued work on a multi-year strategic communication plan. It is anticipated that a communications sub-group will be established, and a work plan and budget for this work was tabled at the Implementation Working Group meeting in June 2010.

The Implementation Working Group's 2009-10 annual work plan (Appendix 1) sets out collective priorities to track activities.

A review of Chapter 22 (Economic Development Measures) must be completed by December 31, 2010. The parties appointed a sub-group of representatives to develop a terms of reference and outline next steps, time frame and plan to move this review forward.

A presentation on Yukon Self-Government and Implementation continues to be delivered to federal departments operating in the Yukon Region; this will continue into 2010–11. The following federal departments received the presentation during 2009–10: Service Canada, Canadian Northern Economic Development Agency, Industry Canada, Public Safety Canada, Natural Resources Canada and Environment Canada. A total of 39 federal employees attended these sessions.

Agriculture and Agri-food Canada

300 Main Street, Room 320, Whitehorse, YT Y1A 2B5
phone: 867-667-5272
fax: 867-393-6222
web: Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada

Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada provides information, research and technology, and policies and programs to achieve an environmentally sustainable agriculture, agri-food and agri-based products sector, a competitive agriculture, agri-food and agri-based products sector that proactively manages risk, and an innovative agriculture, agri-food and agri-based products sector.

Canada Border Services Agency

300 Main Street, Room 110, Whitehorse, YT Y1A 2B5
phone: 867-667-3963
fax: 867-668-2869
web: Canada Border Services Agency

Since December 2003, the Canadian Border Security Agency has been an integral part of the Public Safety Portfolio, which was created to protect Canadians and maintain a peaceful and safe society.

The Agency is responsible for providing integrated border services that support national security and public safety priorities and facilitate the free flow of persons and goods, including animals and plants that meet all requirements under the program legislation.

Department of Canadian Heritage

300 Main Street, Room 205, Whitehorse, YT Y1A 2B5
phone: 867-667-3908
fax: 867-393-6701
web: Patrimoine canadien

The implementation activities of the Department of Canadian Heritage address the obligations of Chapter 13 of the individual Yukon First Nation Self-Government Agreements and Implementation Plans. The Department's priority in the Yukon is to provide financial support to Yukon First Nations heritage resources and to build organizational capacity for the management of these resources.

Activities in 2009–10

Canadian Heritage officials continue to meet with Yukon First Nations representatives who are interested in developing — with Canada and the Government of Yukon — terms of reference, work plans and tripartite strategic plans as described under Sections 13.4.1 and 13.4.2 of Chapter 13.

A Programs and Services Transfer Agreement to assign funding for Aboriginal languages initiatives to 8 self-governing Yukon First Nations came into effect in 2008–09 and continued through 2009–10. Support for local language priorities for other Yukon First Nations continues to be administered through the Council of Yukon First Nations.

The Museum Assistance Program provided support to the Vuntut Gwitchin First Nation for Phase 3 of its Cultural Technology Project.

The Canadian Conservation Institute, which provides professional outreach and support to communities, presented a conservation workshop in Whitehorse.

The Canadian Museum of Civilization collaborated with the Vuntut Gwitchin First Nation Heritage Department (Yukon) and the Gwich'in Social and Cultural Institute (Northwest Territories) to develop a module on the Canadian Museum of Civilization's Gwich'in collection for the museum's
web site.

The Canadian Museum of Civilization distributed surplus copies of Catharine McClellan's publication, My Old People Say: An Ethnographic Survey of Southern Yukon Territory, to Yukon First Nations organizations and to communities. A Tr'ondëk Hwëch'in student participated in the museum's Aboriginal Training Program.

Canadian Northern Economic Development Agency (CanNor)

305 Main Street, Suite 215, Whitehorse YT Y1A 2B3 300 Main Street, Room 415C, Whitehorse YT Y1A 2B5
phone: 867-667-3263
fax: 867-667-3801
e-mail: YTinfo@cannor.gc.ca
web: Canadian Northern Economic Development Agency

The 2008 Speech from the Throne committed to establishing a new standalone agency focused on northern economic development, a key deliverable under the governments integrated Northern Strategy. Budget 2009: Canada's Economic Action Plan provided $50 million over 5 years to establish the new Canadian Northern Economic Development Agency. Canadian Northern Economic Development Agency's objective is to help provide the foundation for a prosperous economic future for those who live, work and support their families in the North.

In September 2009, the Northern Projects Management Office was established as a core program within the Canadian Northern Economic Development Agency, with its mandate to support economic development in Yukon, the Northwest Territories and Nunavut.

The Canadian Northern Economic Development Agency participated with the Government of Yukon and Tr'ondëk Hwëch'in in meetings related to Chapter 22 of the Tr'ondëk Hwëch'in Final Agreement to discuss regional economic development planning.

Canada School of Public Service

300 Main Street, Room 400, Whitehorse, YT Y1A 2B5
phone: 867-393-6810
fax: 867-668-5033

The Canada School of Public Service brings a unified approach to serving the common learning and development needs of public servants. It helps ensure that all public service employees across Canada have the knowledge and skills they need.

Activities in 2009–10

In 2009–10 the Learning Advisor participated in all meetings and functions related to the Yukon Indian People Training Trust and the Training Policy Committee. The Canada School of Public Service continued as the federal lead agency working with the Yukon First Nation Public Service initiative.

The Learning Advisor facilitated a 1-day session attended by representatives from all Yukon First Nations.

The Canada School of Public Service continues to provide input as a member of the Comprehensive Skills and Training Strategy working group, led by the Government of Yukon.

First Nations participated in several 2009–10 offerings, including the Leadership Development Program, Project Management and The Essentials of Supervising in the Public Service.

A Memorandum of Understanding was struck between the Canada School of Public Service and the Vuntut Gwitchin First Nation. Courses in Integrated Strategic Planning and Performance Management were tailored for and delivered to the Vuntut Gwitchin Government managers and directors in Old Crow. A further agreement was struck to deliver a Conflict Resolution Program to government employees and Old Crow citizens in 2010–11.

The Whitehorse office of the Canada School of Public Service hosted the winners of the Canada-Brazil Innovation Award. The Carcross/Tagish First Nation hosted the Brazilian participants (as well as the translator, the Canada School of Public Service Yukon and Ottawa representatives) for a half-day of information, carving demonstrations, dancing, meal and gift exchange.

The Whitehorse office of the Canada School of Public Service hired a Yukon First Nation intern under the YMCA Youth Internship Program.

Environment Canada

Environmental Protection Operations Directorate 91782 Alaska Highway, Whitehorse, YT, Y1A 5B7
phone: 867-667-3400
fax: 867- 667-7962
web: Environment Canada

Environment Canada's implementation activities primarily address obligations under the Umbrella Final Agreement and the Final Agreements of the 11 selfgoverning Yukon First Nations. The Department's activities are specifically linked to Chapter 16 (Fish and Wildlife Management); Chapter 10 (Special Management Areas), Chapter 11 (Land-Use Planning), Chapter 12 (Development Assessment), Chapter 14 (Water Management) and Chapter 18 (Non-Renewable Resources). Implementation activities in the Yukon are led by staff in the Environmental Protection Operations Directorate and the Canadian Wildlife Service. Environment Canada is the lead federal government department in these areas:

  • preserving and enhancing the quality of the natural environment;
  • conserving Canada's renewable resources;
  • conserving and protecting Canada's water resources;
  • forecasting weather and environmental change; and
  • enforcing rules relating to boundary waters.

Activities in 2009–10

Environment Canada is participating in the 5-year review of the Yukon Environmental and Socio-economic Assessment Act.

The Environmental Protection Operations Directorate worked with Yukon First Nations and implementing bodies on initiatives in the areas of environmental assessment, contaminated sites, spills and emergencies.

Yukon First Nations were invited to participate in various training opportunities coordinated by Environment Canada related to spills and emergency response. Environmental Protection Operations Directorate provided advice and technical expertise and supported capacity building in a number of ways.

Canadian Wildlife Service, Environment Canada

91780 Alaska Highway, Whitehorse, YT, Y1A 5X7
phone: 867-393-6700
fax: 867-393-7970
web: Environment Canada

Environment Canada's implementation activities in the Yukon are led by staff in the Environmental Protection Operations Directorate and the Canadian Wildlife Service.

Activities in 2009–10

The Northern Conservation Division of the Canadian Wildlife Service continued to work with 31 First Nations and the Governments of British Columbia, Yukon and Northwest Territories — along with the Yukon Fish and Wildlife Management Board and several Renewable Resources Councils — to draft the management plan for the Northern Mountain Population of Woodland Caribou (Special Concern). The Canadian Wildlife Service Northern Conservation Division worked with the Council of Yukon First Nations on increasing the capacity of Yukon First Nations to engage in the species-at-risk management cycle. The Canadian Wildlife Service Northern Conservation Division, together with the Government of Yukon Department of Environment and Council of Yukon First Nations, hosted a workshop on the Species at Risk Act.

The Canadian Wildlife Service and the Government of Yukon led and delivered 3 Arctic biodiversity monitoring programs in cooperation with Aboriginal organizations, territories and countries.

The Canadian Wildlife Service worked with the Teslin Renewable Resources Council, Teslin Tlingit Council and Government of the Yukon in managing and administrating Environment Canada's Nisutlin River Delta National Wildlife Area. The Canadian Wildlife Service worked with the Yukon Fish and Wildlife Management Board to review the conservation implications of allowing an earlier season opening for waterfowl hunting in the Yukon. The Canadian Wildlife Service is developing a Bird Conservation Region plan for an area that covers most of the Yukon.

Department of National Defence

Department of National Defence, Joint Task Force North, Detachment Yukon

5096 5th Avenue, Whitehorse, YT Y1A 5T8
phone: 867-667-7301
fax: 867-667-7156
web: National Defence and the Canadian Armed Forces

Fisheries and Oceans Canada

419 Range Road, Room 100, Whitehorse, YT Y1A 3V1
phone: 867-393-6719
fax: 867-393-6738
web: Fisheries and Oceans Canada

Within the Yukon, the Umbrella Final Agreement and individual First Nation final agreements provide a framework for fisheries management through the Salmon Sub-Committee. The Treaties and Stock Assessment sectors of Fisheries and Oceans Canada work closely with First Nations to design and implement programs under the Aboriginal Fisheries Strategy. The goals of these programs are to be consistent with conservation principles and to reflect domestic and international planning processes.

Stock Assessment staff provide technical assistance to Aboriginal Fisheries Strategy projects. The Department also relies on the skills and experience of local First Nation technicians, many of whom have been employed in fishery-related programs for more than 20 years.

The Department maintains partnerships and communication with transboundary First Nations through co-management bodies established under the Pacific Salmon Treaty.

Health Canada – Northern Region

300 Main Street, Room 100, Whitehorse, YT Y1A 2B5
phone: 867- 393-6770
fax: 867-393-6772

Health Canada participated in Programs and Services Transfer Agreement negotiations as required. In fiscal year 2009–10 the Program and Services Transfer Agreement table's main priorities were Child and Family Services and Alcohol and Drug Services, both Government of Yukon programs, although both areas had interests for the federal government. Health Canada worked with Indian Affairs and Northern Development Canada negotiators at the Program and Services Transfer Agreement table to provide information regarding Health Canada's mental health and addictions programming. In addition, several Health Canada community-based programs were successfully transferred to the First Nation of Na-Cho Nyak Dun, including: First Nations and Inuit Community Care, Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder, HIV/AIDS, Aboriginal Diabetes Initiative, National Aboriginal Youth Suicide Prevention Strategy, and Maternal Child Health.

Industry Canada

300 Main Street, Room 205, Whitehorse, YT Y1A 2B5
phone: 867-667-5102
fax: 867-393-6711

Industry Canada's mission is to foster a growing, competitive, knowledge-based Canadian economy. The Department works with Canadians throughout the economy and in all parts of the country to improve conditions for investment, improve Canada's innovation performance, increase Canada's share of global trade and build a fair, efficient and competitive marketplace. Program areas include developing industry and technology capability, fostering scientific research, setting telecommunications policy, promoting investment and trade, promoting tourism and small business development, and setting rules and services that support the effective operation of the marketplace. Health Canada – Northern Region Industry Canada

Justice Canada

3162 Third Avenue, Whitehorse, YT Y1A 1G3
phone: 867-667-8110
fax: 867-667-3934

The Department of Justice has the mandate to support the dual roles of the Minister of Justice and the Attorney General of Canada. The Department supports the Minister of Justice in his responsibilities for 49 statutes and areas of federal law by ensuring a bilingual and bijural national legal framework principally within the following domains: criminal justice (including youth criminal justice); family justice; access to justice; Aboriginal justice; and, general public law and private international law. The Department also supports the Attorney General as the chief law officer of the Crown, both in terms of the ongoing operations of government as well as the development of new policies, programs and services for Canadians to support the Government's priorities. Specifically, the Department provides legal advice to all federal government departments and agencies, represents the Crown in civil litigation and before administrative tribunals, drafts legislation, and responds to the other legal needs of federal departments and agencies.

Natural Resources Canada

300 Main Street, Room 225, Whitehorse, YT Y1A 2B5
phone: 867-667-3957
fax: 867-393-6709

Settlement lands are transferred to Yukon First Nations through land claims settlement legislation. Natural Resources Canada is responsible for the legal surveying of Yukon First Nation settlement lands. Annual survey programs are based on recommendations made by First Nation Settlement Land Committees. Legal surveys of settlement land continue to be implemented by 9 of the 11 Yukon First Nations with Final Agreements.

Parks Canada Agency

300 Main Street, Room 200, Whitehorse, YT Y1A 2B5
phone: 867-667-3910
fax: 867-393-6701
e-mail: whitehorse.info@pc.gc.ca
web: Parks Canada

On behalf of the people of Canada, Parks Canada protects and presents nationally significant examples of Canada's natural and cultural heritage. It also fosters public understanding, appreciation and enjoyment of these places in ways that ensure their ecological and commemorative integrity for present and future generations.

Public Prosecution Service of Canada

300 Main Street, Room 200, Whitehorse, YT Y1A 2B5
phone: 867-393-6884
fax: 867-667-3988

Public Safety Canada

P.O. Box 1312, Yellowknife, NT
phone: 867-766-8443
web: Public Safety Canada

Public Works and Government Services Canada

800 Burrard Street, Room 641, Vancouver, BC V6Z 2V8
phone: 604-775-7628
fax: 604-775-6888

Public Works and Government Services Canada provides assistance, guidance and training to First Nations in the Yukon and Northern British Columbia in the area of contracting, procurement, acquisitions, capital planning and infrastructure development.

Public Works and Government Services Canada has branches in Vancouver and Victoria. Public Works and Government Services Canada also provides guidance and advice to all federal departments conducting procurement and contracting initiatives related to Self-Government Agreements on settlement and traditional lands in the Yukon and British Columbia.

Royal Canadian Mounted Police, "M" Division

4100 4th Avenue, Whitehorse, YT Y1A 1H5
phone: 867-633-8610
fax: 867-393-6792
web: Royal Canadian Mounted Police

The Royal Canadian Mounted Police provides services at National, Territorial and local levels. Nationally, the Royal Canadian Mounted Police has responsibility to enforce all federal statutes. Under the Territorial Police Services Agreement between the Government of Yukon and Public Safety Canada, it also enforces the Criminal Code and laws in force in the Yukon Territory and responds to priorities and objectives set by the Government of Yukon Minister of Justice. At the local level, Detachments work with municipal and First Nations leadership to identify and address community policing needs and priorities. The Royal Canadian Mounted Police also maintains a dialogue with First Nations leadership and follows discussions between First Nations, Government of Yukon and Public Safety Canada with respect to the administration of justice.

Service Canada

300 Main Street, Room 125, Whitehorse, YT Y1A 2B5
phone: 867-667-5083, ext. 226
fax: 867-668-6802
web: Service Canada

Representatives from Human Resources and Skills Development Canada, Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Canada and Self-Governing Yukon First Nations have been meeting to work towards an Intergovernmental Agreement for First Nations to assume responsibility for Aboriginal Skills Development. These agreements would replace the Aboriginal Skills and Employment Training Strategy, the successor program to the Aboriginal Human Resources Development Strategy. Between April 1, 2009 and March 31, 2010 there were 3 meetings and 1 conference call with the technical working group representatives.

Appendices

Appendix 1. Implementation Working Group: Work Plan 2009–10

TargetWork to date
Implementation Review Group Recommendation 3.5: Communications
Develop a multi-year communications strategy to increase understanding on
the part of the Yukon public of the Yukon Final Agreements and Self-Government Agreements
Working group formed; first meeting held October 5, 2009

Terms of Reference approved by Implementation Working Group

November 2009 Draft Communications Plan presented to Implementation Working Group

January 27, 2010 On target for Implementation Working Group to approve the final plan in June
2011
Implementation Review Group Recommendation 3.8: Implementation Working Group mandate
Establish an Implementation Working Group to deal with implementation matters pertaining to the Yukon Final Agreements and Self-Government Agreements Significant progress has been made on developing the mandate, but the parties have been unable to reach agreement on how the Implementation Working Group will report to the principals
Implementation Review Group Recommendation 3.9: Annual reports
Develop a new format for annual reports that provides information on the work undertaken by the Implementation Working Group and on progress regarding the recommendations in the Implementation Review Group report The Implementation Working Group approved the format for the work plan, which will be included in the 2009–10 annual report
Print the 2004–07 triennial report The 2004–07 report was printed and distributed in February 2010
Draft the 2007–09 biennial report

2007–08 portion of the biennial report

  • submissions were received from 3 of 11 Yukon First Nations; 19 of 20 boards and committees; 7 of 10 Government of Yukon departments; and 6 of 9 federal departments

2008–09 portion of the biennial report

  • submissions were received from 4 of 11 Yukon First Nations; 11 of 20 boards and committees; 6 of 10 Government of Yukon departments; and 4 of 9 federal departments
Implementation Review Group Recommendation 3.14: Future reviews
Amend Umbrella Final Agreement Implementation Plans, Final Agreement Implementation Plans and Self- Government Agreement Implementation Plans to include provisions for alternative means of conducting future reviews of implementation arrangements The parties representatives have been unable to schedule a meeting to discuss this matter
Implementation Review Group Recommendation 5.5: Interim justice arrangements
Develop a Record of Decision (RoD) that confirms the Implementation Working Group representative's understanding
of the operation of the AJA interim provisions set out at 13.6.0
Language was informally agreed to by the parties' Implementation Representatives at the Implementation Working Group meeting of September 28–29, 2009

A Record of Decision has been prepared, but the Government of Yukon needs to define internally exactly what the signing of the Record of Decision might mean in the context of implementation
Implementation Review Group Recommendation 5.9: Sharing Yukon First Nation laws and citizenship lists
Yukon First Nations will provide Canada and the Government of Yukon with accurate and up-to-date versions of all Yukon First Nation laws and constitutions Amended Activity Sheets, clarifying the government points of contact for the provisions of FN laws, were approved for distribution at the September 2009 meeting of the Implementation Working Group and distributed to First Nations and Council of Yukon First Nations by e-mail: on October 24, 2009

To date, only the Champagne and Aishihik First Nations amendment has been completed; other First Nations have not responded

Tr'ondëk Hwëch'in is waiting for clarification of an outstanding technical issue regarding the signing of the document
Yukon First Nations to provide Canada and Government of Yukon with
citizenship lists that are updated annually
Champagne and Aishihik First Nations, the Council of Yukon First Nations and Kwanlin Dün First Nation submitted updated citizenship lists in the fall of 2008; other Yukon First Nations did not respond
Implementation Review Group Recommendation 5.10: Yukon First Nation access to information held by government
Develop a process that allows Yukon First Nations to access information held by government Canada can share the information of a personal or private nature under certain situations, but should the Yukon First Nation not keep the information secure, or use it for other purposes, Canada remains accountable to the individual

Canada's preferred option is for Yukon First Nations to pass their own legislation, removing Canada's accountability to the FN citizen

Canada has proposed entering into contracts that would outline what the information is to be used for and how it will be secured

Yukon First Nations were asked to identify what information they wish to obtain from Canada and how it will be used
Implementation Review Group Recommendation 8.2.3: Board training
All members of Umbrella Final Agreement boards and committees will have a sufficient level of training to understand the mandate and the applicable sections of the Final Agreements Indian Affairs and Northern Development Canada asked Umbrella Final Agreement boards and committees to submit an inventory of training materials that have already been developed

No materials were received by Indian Affairs and Northern Development Canada

Indian Affairs and Northern Development Canada Regional Office has undertaken research work on what materials may already be available and reported the findings to the Implementation Working Group on February 18, 2010
Implementation Review Group Recommendation 8.2.4: Advising boards of new responsibilities
Amend the Umbrella Final Agreement and Final Agreement Implementation Plans to ensure that the Party with Ministerial responsibility advises the Board or committee of any change in its responsibilities No work has been undertaken to date
Implementation Review Group Recommendation 8.2.9: Redistribution of board funding
In exceptional circumstances, the parties have the ability to redistribute funding between boards and committees. Implementation Working Group to discuss the process for this recommended in the Implementation Review Group report and the Umbrella Final Agreement and Final Agreement Implementation Plans are to be amended to reflect any changes in the process No work has been undertaken to date
Implementation Review Group Recommendation 8.3.2: Indemnification provisions (Yukon Surface Rights Board)
Canada to amend the Yukon Surface Rights Board Act to indemnify Board members from personal loss resulting from a Board decision Canada has completed the work required to amend the Yukon Surface Rights Board Act
Implementation Review Group Recommendation 8.3.4: Primary instrument of fish and wildlife management
Implementation Working Group to discuss how to develop educational materials that clearly identify the mandate, responsibilities and role of Renewable Resources Councils and the Yukon Fish and Wildlife Management Board No work has been undertaken to date
Implementation Review Group Recommendation 8.3.8 and 8.3.9: Remuneration of Yukon Indian People Training Trust
Trustees
Amend the Umbrella Final Agreement Implementation Plan to give the Council of Yukon First Nations the option of using implementation funding to pay
its nominees to the Training Policy
Committee for their work as trustees
No work has been undertaken to date
Amend the Yukon Indian People Training Trust and the Yukon Fish and Wildlife Enhancement Trust to allow trustees to
be paid for their work on the trust from sources other than the trust itself
Amendments have been submitted to respective legal counsels, who are considering them
Implementation Review Group Recommendation 9.4.3: Role of Regional Land Use Planning Commissions
Take whatever steps necessary for the parties to clearly identify the ongoing role of a regional land use planning commission (outlined in 12.7.0) after a plan is approved Some parties feel that if a regional land use planning commission is dissolved, the requirement for the Yukon Environmental and Socio-economic Assessment Board to request that the commission determine if a project conforms to the approved land-use plan (12.17.1) cannot be undertaken First Nations have been unable to reach consensus on an approach to resolve the matter Canada is of the view that regional land use planning commissions must continue in order to implement the process provided for in the Umbrella Final Agreement
Umbrella Final Agreement 13.5.3.6: Development of a Yukon Heritage Resources Manual
Develop a manual that provides definitions for ethnographic, archaeological, palaeontological and historic resources No work has been undertaken to date
Umbrella Final Agreement 22.9.1: Review of economic development measures
Determine what information is required to conduct a complete review of
the effectiveness of the economic development provisions of the Umbrella Final Agreement by 2015
Canada, the Government of Yukon and Tr'ondëk Hwëch'in have agreed to sign the Terms of Reference for the Yukon First Nation Final Agreement Chapter 22 Working Group

Champagne and Aishihik First Nations have rejected the Terms of Reference and will submit their concerns to the Government of Yukon (who drafted them) for consideration. Teslin Tlingit Council approved the Terms of Reference in November. Vuntut Gwitchin First Nation has authority to sign but will wait until the issue is resolved with Champagne and Aishihik First Nations
Amendment to Canada's Yukon First Nation Land Claims Settlement Act
Remove outdated references in the Act to the Enrolment Commission Canada has consulted on the amendment with Yukon First Nations, the Dispute Resolution Board (which has superseded the Enrolment Commission) and the Council of Yukon First Nations. Preparatory work has been completed
Final Agreement and Self-Government Agreement proposed amendments
Develop and maintain an up-to-date list of all proposed Final Agreement and Self-Government Agreement amendments resulting from the Implementation Review Group report Final Agreement, Self-Government Agreement and Implementation Plan amendments are being tracked by the Implementation Working Group in a document prepared by Canada
Final Agreement Implementation Plans and Self-Government Implementation Plans amendments
Canada will distribute copies of Final Agreement Implementation Plans and Self-Government Agreement Implementation Plans amendments to the parties once they have been completed No work has been undertaken to date
Amendments to Self-Government Agreements 13.6.4.1
Amend the agreements to allow Yukon First Nations to levy fines comparable to those under the Yukon Environmental and Socio-economic Assessment Act Canada must amend 13.6.6 (already okayed by Government of Yukon) to reinstigate interim provisions for Little Salmon/Carmacks First Nation, Selkirk First Nation and First Nation of Na-Cho Nyak Dun before amending 13.6.4.1

Amendment materials are complete; the amendment needs to go through approvals with all willing parties at the same time
Amendments to Self-Government Agreements to include the provisions of Tr'ondëk Hwëch'in Self-Government Agreement 17.7
Amend First Nation Self-Government Agreements with the provisions of the Tr'ondëk Hwëch'in Self-Government Agreement related to education All self-governing Yukon First Nations except Kwanlin Dün First Nation have requested that their Self-Government Agreements be amended to include the provisions of the Tr'ondëk Hwëch'in Self-Government Agreement

Schedules have been drafted and are being reviewed by the Government of Yukon

Appendix 2. Background

In 1989, the Government of Canada, the Government of Yukon and Council for Yukon Indians reached an agreement in principle that became the basis for the Umbrella Final Agreement. Shortly thereafter, the parties agreed that rather than negotiate a single territory-wide agreement, individual Final Agreements would embody the provisions of the Umbrella Final Agreement while also including specific provisions that were unique to each First Nation. The Umbrella Final Agreement also provided for the negotiation of separate Self-Government Agreements with each First Nation.

The Umbrella Final Agreement was signed on May 29, 1993. On the same date, Final and Self-Government Agreements were signed by 4 First Nations: Teslin Tlingit Council, Champagne and Aishihik First Nations, Vuntut Gwitchin First Nation and the First Nation of Na-Cho Nyak Dun.

Since that time, 7 other Final and Self-Government Agreements have been signed and brought into effect:

First NationSigning dateEffective date
Little Salmon/Carmacks First Nation July 21, 1997 October 1, 1997
Selkirk First Nation July 21, 1997 October 1, 1997
Tr'ondëk Hwëch'in July 16, 1998 September 15, 1998
Ta'an Kwäch'än Council January 13, 2002 April 1, 2002
Kluane First Nation October 18, 2003 February 2, 2004
Kwanlin Dün First Nation February 19, 2005 April 1, 2005
Carcross/Tagish First Nation October 22, 2005 January 9, 2006

The 11 Self-Governing Yukon First Nations have almost 7,000 beneficiaries and 31,603 square kilometres of settlement land. The Self-Governing Yukon First Nations also receive financial compensation that is paid out over 15 years following the effective date of their agreement. In addition to compensation dollars, Canada also provides funding to Yukon First Nations and to various boards and committees for implementation of land claims.

The remaining 3 Yukon First Nations — White River First Nation, Liard First Nation and Ross River Dena Council — have not concluded Final or Self-Government Agreements.

Appendix 3. Financial compensation payments

Chapter 19 of each Yukon First Nation Final Agreement provides for capital transfer payments to the Yukon First Nation on
the anniversary of the signature date of its Final Agreement. The following settlement payments (net of negotiation loans) were made to Yukon First Nations.

Fiscal yearPayments ($)Fiscal yearPayments ($)
* official pre-rounding
1994–1995 9,380,366 2002–03 12,489,419
1995–1996 8,744,728 2003–04 12,219,606
1996–1997 8,109,089 2004–05 13,538,068* official pre-rounding
1997–1998 12,163,681 2005–06 15,867,658* official pre-rounding
1998–1999 13,655,500 2006–07 17,539,080* official pre-rounding
1999–2000 12,977,994 2007–08 17,100,310* official pre-rounding
2000–2001 11,529,120 2008–09 17,076,472* official pre-rounding
2001–2002 11,529,125 2009–10 7,523,647

Appendix 4. Costs of implementation

These funds were allocated by Canada to the Council of Yukon First Nations and various boards and committees for implementation purposes.

Fiscal yearPayments ($)Fiscal yearPayments ($)
1994–1995 10,504,745 2002–03 2,719,872
1995–1996 1,608,601 2003–04 3,295,667
1996–1997 2,175,012 2004–05 3,342,024
1997–1998 2,463,814 2005–06 3,528,223
1998–1999 2,426,573 2006–07 3,371,355
1999–2000 2,237,664 2007–08 3,424,803
2000–2001 2,430,336 2008–09 3,390,708
2001–2002 2,547,661 2009–10 3,537,410
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