Yukon Land Claims and Self-Government Agreements - Annual Report 2010–2011

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Introduction

On March 16, 1987, the Fifth Report of the Standing Committee on Public Accounts recommended that the Minister of Indian Affairs and Northern Development table annual reports on all Aboriginal claims settlements.

In the 2003 Report of the Auditor General of Canada, the Auditor General noted that Indian and Northern Affairs Canada should work with the other signatories of the land claims agreements to overhaul the annual reports and make them more results based.

The inclusion of the Implementation Working Group's Work Plan for 2010–11 provides results-based reporting on implementation activities for the year.

First Nations, Government of Yukon, Umbrella Final Agreement boards and committees and all federal departments operating in the Yukon were asked to provide information about their implementation achievements and challenges during the fiscal year. This report includes the submissions provided by each respondent group, edited for length and consistency. Perception of the parties may not be shared. In cases where groups did not provide submissions, contact information and a general description of their mandates are provided.

First Nations

Carcross/Tagish First Nation

P.O. Box 130, Carcross, Yukon Y0B 1B0
phone 867-821-4251
fax 867-821-4802
e-mail reception@ctfn.ca
web www.ctfn.ca

The Carcross/Tagish First Nation is located in the community of Carcross, approximately 70 km south east of Whitehorse, and in the traditional village site of Tagish, approximately 30 km east of Carcross. The First Nation has approximately 800 members, most of whom live in Carcross, Tagish and other communities in the Yukon. The Carcross/Tagish people are of both Athapascan and Tlingit ancestry. The Carcross/Tagish First Nation Final and Self-Government Agreements came into effect on January 9, 2006 and include a land quantum of approximately 1,554 sq. km, of which 1,036 sq. km is Category A Land with surface and subsurface rights and 518 sq. km is Category B Land with surface rights only.

Activities in 2010–11

Carcross/Tagish First Nation has passed and begun to implement its Family Act. The Act supports community responsibility through the establishment of a Family Council.

Carcross/Tagish First Nation's Health and Wellness Department is implementing a Transitional Employment Program that targets low-income individuals.

The Heritage, Lands and Natural Resources Department is developing a land management policy. Community consultation began in December 2009.

The Capacity Development Department is working with the Government of Yukon's Department of Education to create a pilot project for Carcross/Tagish First Nation's early childhood education center (Ya Dak Du Hidi) and the Ghuch Tlâ Community School.

Carcross/Tagish First Nation is negotiating with the Government of Canada to renew its Financial Transfer Agreement, which expires March 31, 2012.

Carcross/Tagish First Nation's negotiating priorities for Programs and Services Transfer Agreements for the 2010–11 fiscal year included early childhood development.

There was little activity in negotiations of Programs and Services Transfer Agreements due to the shift in focus to the Financial Transfer Agreement negotiations. Specified Period Funding amendments were concluded on a National Anti-Drug Strategy; National Aboriginal Youth Suicide Prevention Strategy; and the Aboriginal Diabetes Initiative.

The primary challenge faced by Carcross/Tagish First Nation is implementing its agreements without adequate resources.

Champagne and Aishihik First Nations

1 Allen Place (P.O. Box 5310)
Haines Junction, Yukon Y0B 1L0
phone 867-634-4200
fax 867-634-2108
web www.cafn.ca

304 Jarvis Street
Whitehorse, Yukon Y1A 2H2
phone 867-456-6888
fax 867-667-6202
email reception@cafn.ca

Champagne and Aishihik First Nations is a self-governing people with its main community and administrative headquarters centred in Haines Junction and an office in Whitehorse. Total Champagne and Aishihik First Nations membership is approximately 1,228; about 693 members reside in the Yukon. The Champagne and Aishihik people are of Southern Tutchone ancestry and belong to the Athapascan language family. The Champagne and Aishihik First Nations Final and Self-Government Agreements came into effect on February 14, 1995 and include a land quantum of approximately 2,395 sq. km, of which 1,230 sq. km is Category A Land with surface and subsurface rights and 1,165 sq. km is Category B Land with surface rights only.

Activities in 2010–11

A new Chief and Council were elected in October 2010 for a 4 year term.

After almost 2 years of negotiations, a new Financial Transfer Agreement was approved by Chief and Council in February 2011. The effective date is April 1, 2010 with an expiry date of March 31, 2015.

Champagne and Aishihik First Nations held preliminary discussions on the effective delivery of programs and services. The priorities are local government services, natural and heritage resources and development assessment. Programs and Services Transfer Agreements, however, continue to face challenges due to differing priorities and understandings between Champagne and Aishihik First Nations, Government of Canada and the Government of Yukon.

Community consultations were held as part of Champagne and Aishihik First Nations' ongoing review of its Constitution.

In the area of Registry and Citizen Support, certain issues need to be resolved and policy and legislation are required. Government of Canada's recent Gender Equity in Indian Registration Act will likely increase the number of Champagne and Aishihik First Nations citizens.

There was little activity in negotiations of Programs and Services Transfer Agreements due to the shift in focus to the Financial Transfer Agreement negotiations. Specified Period Funding amendments were concluded on a National Anti-Drug Strategy; National Aboriginal Youth Suicide Prevention Strategy; and the Aboriginal Diabetes Initiative.

A heritage working sub-group of the Implementation Working Group was established to develop a heritage manual pursuant to Chapter 13 of the Final Agreements. In January 2011, a Chapter 22 working group was also established; members held their first meeting on February 14, 2011 and approved a Memorandum of Understanding and Terms of the Reference.

Champagne and Aishihik First Nations contributed to and supported the development of a Government of Yukon Representative Public Service Plan under Schedule A Chapter 22 of its Final Agreement.

Champagne and Aishihik First Nations requested that the Yukon Land Use Planning Council start the regional land use plan process for the Champagne and Aishihik Traditional Territory, pursuant to Chapter 11 of its Final Agreement.

First Nation of Nacho Nyak Dun

P.O. Box 220, Mayo, Yukon Y0B 1M0
phone 867-996-2265
fax 867-996-2267
e-mail main@nndfn.com
web www.nndfn.com

The First Nation of Nacho Nyak Dun represents the most northerly community of the Northern Tutchone language group. The First Nation of Nacho Nyak Dun is based in the community of Mayo, in central Yukon, and has a membership of approximately 635. The First Nation of Nacho Nyak Dun Final and Self-Government Agreements came into effect on February 14, 1995 and include a land quantum of approximately 4,739 sq. km, of which 2,408 sq. km is Category A Land with surface and subsurface rights and 2,331 sq. km is Category B Land with surface rights only.

Activities in 2010–11

First Nation of Nacho Nyak Dun and the Government of Canada agreed to a new Financial Transfer Agreement. The new Financial Transfer Agreement contains enhanced resources for general governance responsibilities, but did not contain enhanced resources for the areas of programs and services or Final Agreement implementation.

In January 2011, the First Nation of Nacho Nyak Dun and Tr'ondëk Hwëch'in signed a Memorandum of Understanding with the Yukon Employees Union and the Public Service Alliance of Canada, pledging mutual support and cooperation. The Memorandum of Understanding contains provisions that protect union jobs when the First Nation of Nacho Nyak Dun assumes responsibilities for government programs and services.

First Nation of Nacho Nyak Dun developed a Lands Act for its Traditional Territory.

First Nation of Nacho Nyak Dun supported the development of a Government of Yukon Representative Public Service Plan under Schedule A Chapter 22 of its Final Agreement.

A heritage working sub-group of the Implementation Working Group was established to develop a heritage manual pursuant to Chapter 13 of the Final Agreements. In January 2011, a Chapter 22 working group was also established; its members held their first meeting on February 14, 2011 and approved a Memorandum of Understanding and Terms of Reference.

First Nation of Nacho Nyak Dun continues to negotiate a Framework Administration of Justice Agreement with the Government of Canada. A Justice Committee is in place.

Implementation challenges include insufficient funding, a lack of human resources and lack of training.

Kluane First Nation

P.O. Box 20, Burwash Landing, Yukon Y0B 1V0
phone 867-841-4274
fax 867-841-5900
e-mail reception@kfn.ca

Kluane First Nation is based in the community of Burwash Landing on the shores of Kluane Lake, the territory's largest lake. The people of Kluane First Nation are of Southern Tutchone ancestry and belong to the Athapascan language family. The Kluane First Nation has approximately 210 members. The Kluane First Nation Final and Self-Government Agreements came into effect on February 2, 2004 and include a land quantum of approximately 906 sq. km of which 647 sq. km is Category A Land with surface and subsurface rights and 259 sq. km is Category B Land with surface rights only.

Kwanlin Dün First Nation

35 McIntyre Drive, Whitehorse, Yukon Y1A 5A5
phone 867-633-7800
fax 867-668-5057
e-mail reception@kwanlindun.com
web www.kwanlindun.com

Kwanlin Dün First Nation has a membership of approximately 1,130. A large number of its members live in the Whitehorse area, with the balance dispersed throughout Canada, the United States of America, (predominantly Alaska) and abroad. Kwanlin Dün First Nation is based in and around Whitehorse; about 75 percent of the territory's population live within its Traditional Territory. The Kwanlin Dün people have cultural affiliations with the Northern and Southern Tutchone as well as the Tagish from Marsh Lake. The Kwanlin Dün First Nation Final and Self-Government Agreements came into effect on April 1, 2005 and include a land quantum of approximately 1,035 sq. km, of which 647 sq. km is Category A Land with surface and subsurface rights and 388 sq. km is Category B Land with surface rights only.

Activities in 2010–11

In November 2010, a group of Members of Parliament were given a tour of the Kwanlin Dün community. They were members of the House of Commons Standing Committee on Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development.

Little Salmon/Carmacks First Nation

P.O. Box 135, Carmacks, Yukon Y0B 1C0
phone 867-863-5576
fax 867-863-5710
e-mail reception@lscfn.ca
web www.lscfn.ca

Little Salmon/Carmacks First Nation is situated in the community of Carmacks in central Yukon located about 160 km north of Whitehorse. Little Salmon/Carmacks First Nation has a membership of approximately 630. The people of Little Salmon/Carmacks are of Northern Tutchone ancestry and are part of the Athapascan language family. The Little Salmon/Carmacks First Nation Final and Self-Government Agreements came into effect on October 1, 1997 and include a land quantum of approximately 2,590 sq. km, of which 1,554 sq. km is Category A Land with surface and subsurface rights and 1,036 sq. km is Category B Land with surface rights only.

Activities in 2010–11

After approximately 4 years of reviews and a year and a half of negotiations, the Little Salmon/Carmacks First Nation Council approved a new Financial Transfer Agreement on February 28, 2011. The new Financial Transfer Agreement came into effect on April 1, 2010 and expires on March 31, 2015.

The management plan for the Tsâwnjik Chu (Nordenskiold) Habitat Protection Area was finalized in April 2010 and signed off on October 29, 2010.

Little Salmon/Carmacks First Nation has been working with the Government of Yukon to consider options for final reclamation of the BYG Mine.

There was little activity in negotiations of Programs and Services Transfer Agreements due to the shift in focus to the Financial Transfer Agreement negotiations. Specified Period Funding amendments were concluded for: National Anti-Drug Strategy; National Aboriginal Youth Suicide Prevention Strategy; and the Aboriginal Diabetes Initiative.

Little Salmon/Carmacks First Nation and the other Self-Governing Yukon First Nations continued negotiations by way of a working group on a Yukon First Nation Labour Market Agreement.

A heritage working sub-group of the Implementation Working Group was established to develop a heritage manual pursuant to Chapter 13 of the Final Agreements. In January 2011, a Chapter 22 working group was also established; members held their first meeting on February 14, 2011 and approved a Memorandum of Understanding and Terms of Reference.

Little Salmon/Carmacks First Nation joined Selkirk First Nation as interveners in Western Copper's application to the Yukon Water Board for a water licence for its Carmacks Copper project. The water licence was denied on May 10, 2010. Western Copper appealed the decision to the Yukon Supreme Court, which upheld the ruling in February 2011. In March 2011, the company appealed the Supreme Court decision to the Yukon Court of Appeal.

Construction continued on a new Health and Social Services Building and day care.

Selkirk First Nation

P.O. Box 40, Pelly Crossing, Yukon Y0B 1P0
phone 867-537-3331
fax 867-537-3902
e-mail ea@selkirkfn.com
web www.selkirkfn.com

The Selkirk First Nation resides in the rural community of Pelly Crossing in central Yukon. The Selkirk First Nation is part of the Northern Tutchone language group and is a member of the Northern Tutchone Council, whose membership consists of the Selkirk First Nation, Little Salmon/Carmacks First Nation and the First Nation of Nacho Nyak Dun. Selkirk First Nation has a membership of approximately 623. The Selkirk First Nation Final and Self-Government Agreements came into effect on October 1, 1997 and include a land quantum of approximately 4,739 sq. km, of which 2,408 sq. km is Category A Land with surface and subsurface rights and 2,331 sq. km is Category B Land with surface rights only.

Activities in 2010–11

In April 2011, a new Chief and Council were elected.

Selkirk First Nation approved the new Financial Transfer Agreement in February 2011, after a year and a half of negotiations.

There was little activity in negotiations of Programs and Services Transfer Agreements due to the shift in focus to the Financial Transfer Agreement negotiations. Specified Period Funding amendments were concluded for: National Anti-Drug Strategy; National Aboriginal Youth Suicide Prevention Strategy; and the Aboriginal Diabetes Initiative.

Selkirk First Nation and the other Self-Governing Yukon First Nations continued negotiations by way of a working group on a Yukon First Nation Labour Market Agreement.

A heritage working sub-group of the Implementation Working Group was established to develop a heritage manual pursuant to Chapter 13 of the Final Agreements. In January 2011, a Chapter 22 working group was also established; members held their first meeting on February 14, 2011 and approved a Memorandum of Understanding and Terms of Reference.

A new warehouse was constructed to house water delivery equipment.

An increase in activity in the mining sector required additional time and resources. This was a challenge for Selkirk First Nation's already understaffed department.

Selkirk First Nation is an affected First Nation in the Faro Mine remediation and is a party to the Oversight Committee. Discussions took place regarding contract opportunities.

Selkirk First Nation joined Little Salmon/Carmacks First Nation as interveners in Western Copper's application to the Yukon Water Board for a water licence for its Carmacks Copper project. The water licence was denied on May 10, 2010. Western Copper appealed the decision to the Yukon Supreme Court, which upheld the ruling in February 2011. In March 2011, the company appealed the Supreme Court decision to the Yukon Court of Appeal.

Implementation of the cooperation agreement between Selkirk First Nation and Capstone Resources (operator of the Minto Mine, which is located on Selkirk First Nation's Category A land) was another challenge for staff, who did not have expertise in this area.

Ta'an Kwäch'än Council

117 Industrial Road, Whitehorse, Yukon Y1A 2T8
phone 867-668-3613
fax 867-667-4295
e-mail admin@taan.ca
web www.taan.ca

The Ta'an Kwäch'än Council takes its name from Tàa'an Män (Lake Laberge) in the heart of its Traditional Territory. Ta'an Kwäch'än Council has approximately 432 members. Approximately 50 percent of its members now live in Whitehorse, with the balance living throughout the rest of Canada, in the United States of America (mostly Alaska) and abroad. About 75 percent of the Yukon's population live within its Traditional Territory. The Ta'an Kwäch'än people are of Southern Tutchone ancestry. Ta'an Kwäch'än Council Final and Self-Government Agreements came into effect on April 1, 2002 and include a land quantum of approximately 776 sq. km, of which 388 sq. km is Category A Land with surface and subsurface rights and 388 sq. km is Category B Land with surface rights only.

Teslin Tlingit Council

P.O. Box 133, Teslin, Yukon Y0A 1B0
phone 867-390-2532
fax 867-390-2204
e-mail admin@ttc-teslin.com
web www.ttc-teslin.com

The Teslin Tlingit Council is based in the community of Teslin, 170 km south of Whitehorse on the Alaska Highway. The Teslin Tlingit Council membership is approximately 732. The Teslin Tlingit people are Inland Tlingit-speaking people and trace their ancestry to the Tlingit people who migrated from Alaskan coastal areas. The Teslin Tlingit Council Final and Self-Government Agreements came into effect on February 14, 1995 and include a land quantum of approximately 2,395 sq. km, of which 1,230 sq. km is Category A Land with surface and subsurface rights and 1165 sq. km is Category B Land with surface rights only.

Activities in 2010–11

After a year and a half of negotiations, a new Financial Transfer Agreement was approved by the Executive Council in February 2011. The new Financial Transfer Agreement came into effect on April 1, 2010 and expires on March 31, 2015.

Preliminary discussions took place on the financing and effective delivery of programs and services, including an overview of current arrangements. The areas of priority are local government services, natural resources, heritage and development assessment.

On February 21, 2011, the Teslin Tlingit clan leaders and Teslin Tlingit Council's Chief Executive Officer Peter Johnston signed an Administration of Justice Agreement with the Government of Canada and the Government of Yukon. The agreement was the result of more than a decade of negotiations and hard work by Teslin Tlingit Council's negotiating team and chief executive officers past and present. With the agreement Teslin Tlingit Council can implement negotiated justice responsibilities, including resolving and adjudicating Teslin Tlingit Law, constitution, legislation and disputes between clans.

There was little activity in negotiations of Programs and Services Transfer Agreements due to the shift in focus to the Financial Transfer Agreement negotiations. Specified Period Funding amendments were concluded on a National Anti-Drug Strategy; National Aboriginal Youth Suicide Prevention Strategy; and the Aboriginal Diabetes Initiative.

Teslin Tlingit Council and the other Self-Governing Yukon First Nations continued negotiations by way of a working group on a Yukon First Nation Labour Market Agreement.

A heritage working sub-group of the Implementation Working Group was established to develop a heritage manual pursuant to Chapter 13 of the Final Agreements. In January 2011, a Chapter 22 working sub-group was also established; members held their first meeting on February 14, 2011 and approved a Memorandum of Understanding and Terms of Reference.

Teslin Tlingit Council contributed to and supports the development of a Government of Yukon Representative Public Service Plan under Schedule A of Chapter 22 of its Final Agreement.

Teslin Tlingit Council requested that the Yukon Land Use Planning Council start the regional land use planning process for the Teslin Tlingit Traditional Territory, pursuant to Chapter 11 of its Final Agreement.

Teslin Tlingit Council started working towards a fully developed economic development strategy by initiating a 3 phase project called "Reviving Our Economy."

Tr'ondëk Hwëch'in

1242 Front Street (P.O. Box 599), Dawson City, Yukon Y0B 1G0
phone 867-993-7100
toll-free 1-877-993-3400
e-mail wayne.potoroka@trondek.ca
web www.trondek.ca/index.php

Tr'ondëk Hwëch'in is based in the community of Dawson City, at the confluence of the Yukon and Klondike rivers. The total Tr'ondëk Hwëch'in membership is approximately 1,082; more than 572 reside in the Yukon. The people of Tr'ondëk Hwëch'in are part of a larger Hän Nation. The Hän language they speak is an Athapascan dialect. The Tr'ondëk Hwëch'in Final and Self-Government Agreements came into effect on September 15, 1998 and include a land quantum of approximately 2,590 sq. km, of which 1,554 sq. km is Category A Land with surface and subsurface rights and 1,036 sq. km is Category B Land with surface rights only.

Activities in 2010–11

Tr'ondëk Hwëch'in and the Government of Canada agreed to a new Financial Transfer Agreement. The Financial Transfer Agreement provides enhanced resources for general governance responsibilities, but does not contain enhanced resources for Tr'ondëk Hwëch'in's needs in the areas of programs and services or land claim implementation.

In January 2011, Tr'ondëk Hwëch'in and the First Nation of Nacho Nyak Dun signed a Memorandum of Understanding with the Yukon Employees Union and the Public Service Alliance of Canada, pledging mutual support and cooperation. The Memorandum of Understanding contains provisions that protect union jobs when Tr'ondëk Hwëch'in assumes responsibility for government programs and services.

Vuntut Gwitchin First Nation

P.O. Box 94, Old Crow, Yukon Y0B 1N0
phone 867-966-3261
fax 867-966-3800
e-mail info@vgfn.net
web www.vgfn.ca

Vuntut Gwitchin First Nation and the Vuntut Gwitchin Government are based in the community of Old Crow, the most northerly Yukon community. Vuntut Gwitchin First Nation membership is approximately 771. The Vuntut Gwitchin people belong to the Athapascan language family. The Vuntut Gwitchin First Nation Final and Self-Government Agreements came into effect on February 14, 1995 and include a land quantum of approximately 7,744 sq. km, all of which is Category A Land with surface and subsurface rights.

Activities in 2010–11

In November 2010, a new Chief and Council were elected. Since then, the Vuntut Gwitchin Government has put significant resources into departmental strategic planning, with a vision of upholding the Financial Transfer Agreement and Programs and Services Transfer Agreements and the governance models that were implemented 15 years ago.

The primary challenge faced by Yukon First Nations is successfully implementing their agreements.

When the new Chief and Council took office in January 2011, they reactivated the Porcupine Caribou lobby and received $15,000 from the Government of Yukon through a new contribution agreement for the 2010–11 fiscal year.

There was little activity in negotiations of Programs and Services Transfer Agreements due to the shift in focus to the Financial Transfer Agreement negotiations. Specified Period Funding amendments were concluded on a National Anti-Drug Strategy; National Aboriginal Youth Suicide Prevention Strategy; and the Aboriginal Diabetes Initiative.

The Vuntut Gwitchin Government received $35,000 from the Government of Yukon for infrastructure. This money supports General Assembly Resolution 2009-15 to build a land-based cultural and wellness camp.

The Vuntut Gwitchin Government received $25,000 from Service Canada's New Horizons for Seniors Program to build an elders camp, which will be based at the same location as the cultural camp.

On March 31, 2011, the Vuntut Gwitchin Government approved its First Appropriation Act. The budget, which totals $18,833,782, is the Vuntut Gwitchin Government's largest. It includes $4.685 million in major capital projects that are already underway.

Implementing bodies: Renewable Resources Councils

Background: Renewable Resources Councils

Renewable Resources Councils are local management bodies. They are established where individual land claim agreements have been signed; 10 of the 11 Self-Governing First Nations have established a Renewable Resources Council.

Renewable Resources Councils allow for local management of renewable resources — such as fish, wildlife, habitat and forest resources — in each First Nation's Traditional Territory. Renewable Resources Councils also support the Yukon Fish and Wildlife Management Board by raising awareness of specific issues and providing local and traditional information.

The Councils have 6 to 10 members; half of which are nominated by the respective First Nation, and half of which are nominated by the Government of Yukon.

Alsek Renewable Resources Council

Executive Director: Susan Desjardins
P.O. Box 2077, Haines Junction, Yukon Y0B 1L0
phone 867-634-2524
fax 867-634-2527
e-mail admin@alsekrrc.ca
web www.alsekrrc.ca

The mandate of the Alsek Renewable Resources Council is to assist in management decisions related to fish, wildlife and their habitat, and forest resources, as outlined in Chapters 16 and 17 of the Champagne and Aishihik First Nations Final Agreement. The Council's jurisdiction is the Champagne Aishihik Traditional Territory, within which are located the communities of Haines Junction, Canyon Creek, Takhini, Mendenhall, Silver City, Kloo Lake, Aishihik and Klukshu.

Activities in 2010–11

On April 15, 2010, the Alsek Renewable Resources Council met with Government of Yukon and Parks Canada to work on ways to inform and educate the public about bear conflicts.

In April the Council attended the annual Renewable Resources Councils Chairs' meeting hosted by the Yukon Fish and Wildlife Management Board.

Carcross/Tagish Renewable Resources Council

P.O. Box 70, Tagish, Yukon Y0B 1T0
phone 867-399-4923
fax 867-399-4978
e-mail carcrosstagishrrc@gmail.com

The mandate of the Carcross/Tagish Renewable Resources Council is to make management recommendations regarding fish, wildlife and their habitat, and forest resources as outlined in Chapters 16 and 17 of the Carcross/Tagish First Nation Final Agreement.

The Council was established in February 2010. Fiscal year 2010–11 was its first full year of operation.

Activities in 2010–11

The Carcross/Tagish Renewable Resources Council set up an office in the Tagish Community Hall and established operating and financial accountability policies and procedures as well as mechanisms to communicate with the public.

The Council hosted public meetings in Tagish, Marsh Lake and Carcross to raise awareness of its role and responsibilities in the Southern Lakes area.

The Council established positive working relationships with government biologists and conservation officers, and Carcross/Tagish First Nation Lands Branch personnel.

The Council underwent a financial audit in 2010–11.

Carmacks Renewable Resources Council

P.O. Box 122, Carmacks, Yukon Y0B 1C0
phone 867-863-6838
fax 867-863-6429
e-mail carmacksrrc@northwestel.net

The mandate of the Carmacks Renewable Resources Council is to assist in management decisions related to fish, wildlife and their habitat, and forest resources, as outlined in Chapters 16 and 17 of the Little Salmon/Carmacks First Nation Final Agreement.

Activities in 2010–11

The Carmacks Renewable Resources Council revised its operating procedures, incorporating a new financial policy to ensure that effective controls are in place.

The Council continued its community consultation on the revised Community Fish and Wildlife Work Plan.

The impact of mining exploration on the Klaza Caribou Herd is an ongoing concern.

Another ongoing challenge is meeting Final Agreement obligations to secure approximately 70 percent of traplines for First Nations people.

Dän Keyi Renewable Resources Council

Secretariat: Wendy Martin
P.O. Box 50, Burwash Landing, Yukon Y0B 1V0
phone 867-841-5820
fax 867-841-5821
e-mail dankeyirrc@northwestel.net

The mandate of the Dän Keyi Renewable Resources Council is to assist in management decisions related to fish, wildlife and their habitat, and forest resources, as outlined in Chapters 16 and 17 of the Kluane First Nation Final Agreement.

Activities in 2010–11

The Dän Keyi Renewable Resources Council underwent a financial audit in 2010–11.

The Council continues to monitor the work being done by Yukon Energy Corporation on the Gladstone Lake diversion project.

The Council continues to work with the Government of Yukon to ensure that the sheep on Sheep Mountain have sufficient escape routes along the Alaska Highway.

The Council held 2 well-attended workshops: the first on being bear aware, and the other on snare making.

Dawson District Renewable Resources Council

Secretariat: Linda Taylor
P.O. Box 1380, Dawson City, Yukon Y0B 1G0
phone 867-993-6976
fax 867-993-6093
e-mail dawsonrrc@northwestel.net

The mandate of the Dawson District Renewable Resources Council is to assist in management decisions related to fish, wildlife and their habitat, and forest resources, as outlined in Chapters 16 and 17 of Tr'ondëk Hwëch'in's Final Agreement.

Laberge Renewable Resources Council

Secretariat: Charolette O'Donnell
102 Copper Road, #202, Whitehorse, Yukon Y1A 2Z6
phone 867-393-3940
fax 867-393-3940
e-mail labergerrc@northwestel.net

The mandate of the Laberge Renewable Resources Council is to assist in management decisions related to fish, wildlife and their habitat, and forest resources, as outlined in Chapters 16 and 17 of the Ta'an Kwäch'än Council Final Agreement.

Mayo District Renewable Resources Council

Secretariat: Barb Shannon
P.O. Box 249, Mayo, Yukon Y0B 1M0
phone 867-996-2942
fax 867-996-2948
e-mail mayorrc@northwestel.net

The mandate of the Mayo District Renewable Resources Council is to assist in management decisions related to fish, wildlife and their habitat, and forest resources, as outlined in Chapters 16 and 17 of the First Nation of Nacho Nyak Dun Final Agreement.

Activities in 2010–11

The Mayo District Renewable Resources Council sponsored 2 successful trapper training courses; Certification – 10 participants and Wolf Snaring – 4 participants.

The Council continued to work with Victoria Gold on the company's proposed Eagle Gold heap-leaching project. The Council held numerous community educational workshops.

Council members continue to be frustrated with the state of trapping in the Traditional Territory and in the Yukon in general.

There has been no follow up with the Government of Yukon on the timber harvest plans in the area under the new Forest Resources Act.

The implications throughout the watershed of Yukon Energy's Mayo B project continue to concern the Council.

North Yukon Renewable Resources Council

Secretariat: Nick Gray
P.O. Box 80, Old Crow, Yukon Y0B 1N0
phone 867-966-3034
fax 867-966-3036
e-mail nyrrc@northwestel.net

The mandate of the North Yukon Renewable Resources Council is to assist in management decisions related to fish, wildlife and their habitat, and forest resources, as outlined in Chapters 16 and 17 of the Vuntut Gwitchin First Nation Final Agreement.

Selkirk Renewable Resources Council

Secretariat: Brenda Bosely
P.O. Box 32, Pelly Crossing, Yukon Y0B 1P0
phone 867-537-3937
fax 867-537-3939
e-mail selkirkrrc@northwestel.net

The mandate of the Selkirk Renewable Resources Council is to assist in management decisions related to fish, wildlife and their habitat, and forest resources, as outlined in Chapters 16 and 17 of the Selkirk First Nation Final Agreement.

Activities in 2010–11

The Selkirk Renewable Resources Council held several community meetings in both Pelly Crossing and Whitehorse regarding current activities and future plans for the Minto Mine. In some cases community meetings were followed by technical meetings.

The Council did not undertake any new projects this year. The Council continued to work on the food preservation handbook. The main goal of this initiative is to reduce the waste of meat and fish.

Council members (3) attended the March 2011 meeting of the Yukon River Panel in Whitehorse. It was very well attended, mostly by American participants.

The Council and the Selkirk First Nation Lands and Resources Department had 2 very successful community meetings. The goal was to strengthen communications and eliminate duplication of activities.

The Council had a booth at the Environment Fair in Whitehorse, Yukon in April 2010. The Council distributed information on the proposed Macmillan River Habitat Protection Area and awarded prizes to the participants who had learned most about the Habitat Protection Area.

The Northern Tutchone Renewable Resources Council is comprised of the 3 Renewable Resources Councils in the traditional territories in the Mayo, Pelly and Carmacks regions. Members of the Northern Tutchone Renewable Resources Council collaborate on issues of common concern.

The May Gathering is an annual event of the Northern Tutchone. It addresses concerns pertaining to the management of fish and wildlife and their habitat.

Teslin Renewable Resources Council

Secretariat: Bernice Schonewille
P.O. Box 186 , Teslin, Yukon Y0A 1B0
phone 867-390-2323
fax 867-390-2919
e-mail teslinrrc@northwestel.net

The mandate of the Teslin Renewable Resources Council is to assist in management decisions related to fish, wildlife and their habitat, and forest resources, as outlined in Chapters 16 and 17 of the Teslin Tlingit Council Final Agreement.

Activities in 2010–11

The Teslin Renewable Resources Council provided support for a Trapper Education Course, in April 2011, led by Frank Johnstone, a Teslin Renewable Resources Council member.

In March 2011, Government of Yukon Department of Environment staff retrieved satellite collars from 8 moose that were part of a 3 year study that ended this year. Throughout the project, the Teslin Renewable Resources Council and Teslin Tlingit Council received regular updates by the project team.

Council members cooked lunch for more than 100 people who came to Teslin Renewable Resources Council's annual community barbecue.

As partners in the management plan for the Nisutlin River Delta National Wildlife Area, the Teslin Renewable Resources Council and the Teslin Tlingit Council continue to work with the Canadian Wildlife Services on matters related to the delta. The review of the plan will not be completed until the Government of Yukon and Environment Canada finalize regulatory and enforcement issues within the area.

The Teslin Lake Bird Observatory operated from August to early October, 2010. The Teslin Renewable Resources Council provides some financial support to the station.

Government of Yukon Department of Environment's Fish and Wildlife Branch conducted a survey of moose in the Nisutlin area in the late fall of 2010, in response to concerns about the population raised by Teslin residents, Teslin Tlingit Council and the Teslin Renewable Resources Council.

In the summer of 2010, Government of Yukon Department of Environment and the Yukon Fish and Wildlife Management Board agreed to jointly undertake a review of the Yukon Wolf Conservation and Management Plan. The Teslin Renewable Resources Council has sought a review of the plan since 1999. In February 2011, the Teslin Renewable Resources Council hosted a community workshop to allow area residents to meet with the committee that was reviewing the plan.

Other implementing bodies

Dispute Resolution Board

P.O. Box 31675, Whitehorse, Yukon Y1A 6L3
phone 867-668-3562
toll free 1-866-367-6551
fax 867-668-4474
e-mail drb.ufa@northwestel.net
web www.drbyukon.ca

The mandate of the Dispute Resolution Board is set out under Chapter 26 of the Umbrella Final Agreement and the Yukon First Nation Final Agreements. The Board facilitates an out-of-court, non-adversarial alternative dispute resolution process to resolve disputes arising from the interpretation, administration or implementation of settlement agreements or settlement legislation.

The Board is operating with a full panel of 3 Board members, who were appointed in January 2009 for 3 year terms. The Board is supported by an Executive Director and an on-call employee.

Activities in 2010–11

The Dispute Resolution Board held a workshop with the former Council of Yukon First Nations negotiator, Dave Joe, on August 6, 2010, to explore the history and intent of the Umbrella Final Agreement Chapter 26 (Dispute Resolution). A follow-up workshop was held in December 2010 with former Government of Yukon Negotiator, Barry Stuart.

In March 2011, the Board held a strategic planning session. The Board is in the process of implementing the goals identified in its 3 year plan. Main goals of the plan are to raise the profile of the Board and recruit more mediators and arbitrators with knowledge and experience of the aboriginal land claim process.

The Board received a request for mediation in March and contacted the parties to confirm their willingness to proceed to mediation.

The Board continues to field questions regarding the land claims enrollment process, to direct individuals to the appropriate First Nation and to assist First Nation citizenship offices when requested.

Peel Watershed Planning Commission

c/o Yukon Land Use Planning Council
307 Jarvis Street, Suite 201, Whitehorse, Yukon Y1A 2H3
phone 867-667-7397
fax 867-667-4624
Toll free 1-866-353-2374
e-mail peel@planyukon.ca
Twitter PWPC

The Peel Watershed Planning Commission is responsible for developing and recommending a draft regional land use plan for the Peel watershed planning region. The commission is composed of 6 public members nominated by First Nation of Nacho Nyak Dun, the Gwich'in Tribal Council, jointly by Government of Yukon/Vuntut Gwitchin First Nation, jointly by Government of Yukon/ Tr'ondëk Hwëch'in and 2 by Government of Yukon.

Activities in 2010–11

The First Nation of Nacho Nyak Dun, Vuntut Gwitchin First Nation, Tr'ondëk Hwëch'in, Gwich'in Tribal Council and Government of Yukon provided comments on the Recommended Peel Watershed Regional Land Use Plan, in late February, 2011.

Training Policy Committee

4078 – 4th Avenue, Suite 21, Whitehorse, Yukon Y1A 4K8
phone 867-668-7812
fax 867-668-7825
e-mail tpced@northwestel.net
web www.tpcyukon.ca

The Training Policy Committee was established under Chapter 28 of the Umbrella Final Agreement. The goal is to invest in high-quality training and initiatives for developing skilled Yukon First Nation beneficiaries, leading to self-sufficiency.

Activities in 2010–11

The Yukon Indian People Training Trust supported 3 Tr'ondëk Hwëch'in projects: pursuit of excellence, cooperative education and post-secondary education.

The Training Policy Committee launched the Yukon Training Database on the website of the Yukon Mine Training Association.

The Committee issued a call for proposals for heritage and resources projects.

The Committee participated as a member and signatory for the Comprehensive Skills and Trades Training Strategy, part of the Government of Yukon Labour Market Framework.

The Committee coordinated the Umbrella Final Agreement Executive Directors' forum. The Committee also presented at the "First Nation Governance: Sharing Our Knowledge" conference. In addition, it sponsored the Assembly of First Nations conference, "Building on Success."

The Committee revised its reporting requirements for applications to the Yukon Indian People Training Trust.

Yukon Environmental and Socio-economic Assessment Board

309 Strickland Street, Suite 200, Whitehorse, Yukon Y1A 2J9
phone 867-668-6420
toll free 1-866-322-4040
fax 867-668-6425
e-mail yesab@yesab.ca
web www.yesab.ca

The Yukon Environmental and Socio-economic Assessment Board was established under the Yukon Environmental and Socio-economic Assessment Act. The Act sets out a process to assess the environmental and socio-economic effects of projects and other activities in the Yukon or that might affect the Yukon. This is a requirement of Chapter 12 of the Umbrella Final Agreement and Yukon First Nations' Final Agreements.

Major accomplishments for the year include:

  • Completion of the new Rules for Evaluations Conducted by a Designated Office. This involved a thorough public process that included the participation of numerous organizations, governments, industry sectors and individuals. The new Designated Office Rules, which came into effect in August 2010, have improved the process by allowing more appropriate timelines for projects;
  • The Board continued its involvement in the 5 year review of the Yukon Environmental and Socio-economic Assessment Act;
  • Due to an influx of quartz mineral exploration proposals in the area of the White, Stewart and Yukon rivers confluence, known as the White Gold District, the Board conducted cumulative effects studies to assist in these assessments;
  • In 2010-11, the Board received 256 project applications; and
  • The Board has conducted over 1,200 project assessments since implementation in 2005.

Challenges for the future:

  • Indications that the number and complexity of projects being submitted to Designated Offices along with the growing number of large projects at the Executive Committee level will provide capacity challenges to the organization;
  • Baseline information gaps and the need for information to stay current will necessitate the Board's requirement to update the White Gold studies and to initiate new cumulative effects studies in other hot spots in the Yukon; and
  • Capacity constraints in relation to Governments (First Nation, Yukon and Canada) have the potential impact on the Yukon Environmental and Socio-economic Assessment Act process.

Yukon Fish and Wildlife Management Board

106 Main Street, 2nd floor, Whitehorse, Yukon
P.O. Box 31104, Whitehorse, Yukon Y1A 5P7
phone 867-667-3754
fax 867-393-6947
e-mail officemanager@yfwmb.ca
web www.yfwmb.ca

The Yukon Fish and Wildlife Management Board is an advisory body consisting of 12 members appointed by the Government of Yukon Minister of Environment. The Council of Yukon First Nations and the Government of Yukon each nominate 6 members.

Since its responsibility lies with issues that affect the entire Yukon, the Board focuses its efforts on territorial policies, legislation and other measures to help guide management of fish and wildlife, conserve habitat and enhance the renewable resources economy. The Board influences management decisions through public education and by making recommendations to the Government of Yukon, the Government of Canada, and First Nation governments. Recommendations and positions are based on the best technical, traditional and local information available.

Yukon Geographical Place Names Board

P.O. Box 31164, Whitehorse, Yukon Y1A 5P7
phone 867-393-3982
fax 867-393-3904
e-mail yukonplacenames@yknet.ca
web www.yukonplacenames.ca

The Yukon Geographical Place Names Board was established in 1987 to research and approve geographical names in the Yukon. The Board is comprised of 6 members: 3 are nominated by the Government of Yukon and 3 by the Council of Yukon First Nations. Their duties are to contribute expertise on linguistic place names and community use and keep informed of issues relating to toponomy in the Yukon.

Activities in 2010–11

The Board held 3 meetings to review place name submissions from various First Nations. It also held a recording session at the Yukon Native Language Centre to record Southern Tutchone place names submitted for consideration.

In October 2010, a Board member attended the annual meeting of the Geographic Names Board of Canada in Moncton, New Brunswick.

Aerial photo documentation takes place annually to provide complete information on place names recommended for approval by the Government of Yukon Minister of Tourism and Culture.

Engaging First Nations' expertise in the place names process is necessary, but there are challenges in resolving linguistic and jurisdictional issues.

Yukon Heritage Resources Board

412 Main Street, Whitehorse, Yukon Y1A 2B7
phone 867-668-7150
fax 867-668-7155
e-mail YHRB@northwestel.net
web www.yhrb.ca

The mandate of the Yukon Heritage Resources Board, as set out in the Yukon First Nation Final Agreements and the Yukon's Historic Resources Act, is to make recommendations to the federal, territorial, and Yukon First Nation governments on issues that affect the territory's heritage resources. The Board may also be asked to make determinations pursuant to Chapter 13, section 13.3.2.1 (ownership of contested heritage resources) and section 13.3.6 (management of ethnographic objects and paleontological or archaeological objects) of the Final Agreements.

Activities in 2010–11

The Yukon Heritage Resources Board continued to meet the quarterly financial and progress reporting obligations and annual audit obligation set out in its Transfer Payment Funding Agreement.

The Board completed the first phase of consultation with the parties to the Final Agreements on its draft rules of procedure for determining ownership of contested heritage resources.

The Board submitted input to the Chapter 13 Heritage Manual Drafting Committee regarding the scope and content of the manual and participated in committee meetings in an observer capacity.

The Board recommended that the wreck of the A.J. Goddard sternwheeler be designated a Yukon territorial historic site; the designation was finalized on June 9, 2010. Designation of Fort Selkirk as a territorial historic site, as previously recommended by the Board, was finalized on August 6, 2010. The Fort Selkirk site is co-owned and co-managed by the Government of Yukon and Selkirk First Nation under the terms set out in the Selkirk First Nation Final Agreement.

Board members participated in a wide variety of outreach activities, conferences, training, events, and information sessions throughout the year and continued to work in partnership with Yukon heritage groups to organize the Yukon Territorial Heritage Fair.

The Board initiated the process of creating a strategic plan to guide its activities for the next 5 years.

Yukon Land Use Planning Council

307 Jarvis Street, Room 201, Whitehorse, Yukon Y1A 2H3
phone 867-667-7397
fax 867-667-4624
e-mail ylupc@planyukon.ca
web www.planyukon.ca

The Yukon Land Use Planning Council helps the Government of Yukon, Yukon First Nations and regional planning commissions coordinate their efforts to conduct regional land use planning. This planning is necessary to resolve conflicts related to land use and resources. The plans ensure that the use of lands and resources is consistent with social, cultural, economic and environmental values. These plans build upon the traditional knowledge and experience of the residents of each region.

Yukon Salmon Sub-Committee

P.O. Box 31094, Whitehorse, Yukon Y1A 5P7
phone 867-393-6728
fax 866-914-7708
e-mail executivedirector@yssc.ca
web www.yssc.ca

The Yukon Salmon Sub-Committee is a public advisory body established under Chapter 16 of the Umbrella Final Agreement. The Yukon Fish and Wildlife Management Board, the federal Minister of Fisheries and Oceans, and the First Nations of the Alsek, Porcupine and Yukon River drainage basins each nominate 2 members to the Sub-Committee.

The Sub-Committee is established as the main instrument of salmon management in the Yukon and may make recommendations to the federal Minister of Fisheries and Oceans, and to Yukon First Nations on all matters related to salmon, their habitats and management, including legislation, research, policies and programs. Additionally, the Umbrella Final Agreement requires that Sub-Committee members make up the majority of the Canadian representatives on the Yukon River Panel (established under the Yukon River Salmon Agreement between the Government of Canada and the United States of America).

Activities in 2010–11

The Salmon Sub-Committee made recommendations to the federal Minister of Fisheries and Oceans regarding the 2010 Yukon River Salmon Allocation. The Sub-Committee concurred with the 2010 Salmon Harvest Management Plan and recommended that it be accepted pursuant to Chapter 16 of the Umbrella Final Agreement.

Sub-Committee members met with their American counterparts on the Yukon River Panel in Anchorage (December 2010) and Whitehorse (March 2011) to discuss management issues for the Yukon River drainage basin. The federal Department of Fisheries and Oceans and Sub-Committee members caucused as a Canadian team prior to these meetings.

In an effort to make informed recommendations to the federal Minister of Fisheries and Oceans the Sub-Committee facilitated and attended numerous meetings with various groups, including First Nations, Non-Government Organizations, Renewable Resources Councils, federal government officials and commercial fishers.

The issues discussed at the Sub-Committee level included the Mayo B hydro-electric dam, the Yukon Energy's Gladstone Lake diversion project, the Council of Yukon First Nations Salmon Summit, the Yukon Queen II – a Yukon River tour boat operated by Holland America Cruise Ship Company and the Yukon Environmental and Socio-economic Assessment Board process, Gulf of Alaska by-catch issue, and the Chinook Egg Transfer application.

Yukon Surface Rights Board

100 Main Street (Horwood's Mall), Suite 206,
P.O. Box 31201, Whitehorse, Yukon Y1A 5P7
phone 867-667-7695
fax 867-668-5892
e-mail info@yukonsurfacerights.com
web www.yukonsurfacerights.com

The Yukon Surface Rights Board derives its jurisdiction from several statutes: the Yukon Surface Rights Board Act (Government of Canada); the Quartz Mining Act (Government of Yukon); the Placer Mining Act (Government of Yukon); Oil and Gas Act (Government of Yukon); the Expropriation Act (Government of Canada); the Radiocommunication Act (Government of Canada); and individual Yukon First Nation Final Agreements.

The primary role of the Board is to resolve access disputes between people who own or have an interest in the surface of the land and those with access rights to the land. The Board hears and decides disputes related to access to or use of Yukon First Nation Settlement Land and, in certain circumstances, disputes involving access to or use of non-Settlement Land.

Applicants must attempt to resolve their disputes through negotiation before they apply to the Board. If the dispute is not resolved by negotiation, either party of the dispute may submit an application to the Board. The application must include the supporting documentation required by the Yukon Surface Rights Board Act and the Board's Rules of Procedure.

Activities in 2010–11

In addition to fulfilling its legislative responsibilities, the Board has:

  • translated and fine tuned the Board's new internet site;
  • continued to update the Board member manual;
  • developed a Board policy document;
  • continued French translations of Board public documents;
  • continued communications with industry, the public, and the governments of Yukon, Canada, and First Nations;
  • participated in industry trade shows; and
  • continued training initiatives for tribunal members.

No applications were made to the Board during the 2010–11 fiscal year.

Government of Yukon

Michael Hale, Implementation Representative
Director, Implementation
P.O. Box 2703, Whitehorse, Yukon Y1A 2C6
phone 867-667-8797
fax 867-667-3599
e-mail Michael.Hale@gov.yk.ca
web www.gov.yk.ca

Implementation of the Yukon Final and Self-Government Agreements remains a key priority for the Government of Yukon. The nature and scope of the agreements means that virtually every department engages with these issues in their day-to-day work. Highlighted here are some examples of the implementation activities undertaken in 2010–11.

Government of Yukon and Self-Governing First Nations took a major step in developing a representative public service. Under the leadership of the Public Service Commission, Government of Yukon engaged with First Nation representatives to develop a comprehensive Representative Public Service Plan. The Plan will address training, capacity building, hiring opportunities and other related initiatives aimed at creating a public service in the Government of Yukon that better reflects the make-up of the population.

Equally important was the work on Yukon Asset Construction Agreements. There are 3 First Nations with negotiated provisions for Yukon Asset Construction Agreements in their Final Agreements, which help meet the objectives of Chapter 22. In 2010–11, Yukon Asset Construction Agreements were negotiated on projects in Whitehorse and Carcross. In Whitehorse, the benefits have focused primarily on jobs and contracting opportunities. In Carcross, the benefits have also including hiring provisions and other measures.

Another significant success was the creation of the Tsâwnjik Chu (Nordenskiold) Habitat Protection Area and the approval of a Management Plan. The Management Plan reflects years of work by both Little Salmon/Carmacks First Nation and the Government of Yukon. The Habitat Protection Area was a key component of Little Salmon/Carmacks First Nation's Final Agreement, and completing the Management Plan is an example of what can be accomplished when governments work cooperatively.

Fort Selkirk was formally designated a Historic Site. The designation builds on the Selkirk First Nation's heritage provisions in its Final Agreement.

Over the past year, Government of Yukon has also worked closely with Teslin Tlingit Council in a joint cottage lot development, which aims to bring both Crown and Settlement Land to market as part of the same initiative. It incorporates a lease system that provides recreational land to Yukoners in a way that preserves the First Nation's interests in Settlement Land.

A host of other projects deserve mention, including forestry regulation development, implementation of land use planning in North Yukon, and community planning for Carcross/Tagish First Nation.

Environment Yukon

Chapter 10: Habitat Protection Area and Special Management Areas
All existing information on Pickhandle Lakes Special Management Area was assembled for the Steering Committee and the Steering Committee started work. The Tagish River Habitat Protection Area Steering Committee was established.

Habitat
The Southern Lakes Wildlife Coordinating Committee submitted its final recommendations for caribou management. The Committee also finalized recommendations for moose management and a work plan for regional wildlife assessment.

Trapline Administration
The Government of Yukon Department of Environment is engaged in preliminary discussions with Tr'ondëk Hwëch'in on the development of a trapline manual.

Regional Biologists
The Department continued to staff regional biologists in areas, which cover all settled claim areas. These biologists provide information to Renewable Resources Councils and First Nations to help with program development and harvest management. The regional biologists provided information to support community work plans (Little Salmon/Carmacks First Nation) land use planning (Dawson Land Use Plan) and technical committee work (Pickhandle Lakes Steering Committee and Southern Lakes Wildlife Coordinating Committee).

First Nations Liaison Conservation Officer
Partially funded through land claims implementation funding, this has become a permanent position. This position supports a more coordinated approach to land claims implementation regarding harvesting renewable resources. The officer won the 2010 Premier's Aboriginal Employee Award of Excellence.

Chapter 11: Regional Land Use Planning
The Government of Yukon Department of Environment is the primary provider of environmental information to the Chapter 11 regional land use planning process set out in the Final Agreements. It also provides analysis on biodiversity, ecosystem management, fish and wildlife populations, habitat, parks values, recreation values, climate change and water quality. In 2010, the Department advanced work on the Dawson Land Use Plan by collecting data and preparing for consultation with parties and stakeholders.

Energy, Mines and Resources

Chapter 11: Regional Land Use Planning
The Department of Energy, Mines and Resources is responsible for meeting the Government of Yukon's land claim obligations for regional land use planning. This includes coordinating the government's participation in planning processes and implementation funding for the Yukon Land Use Planning Council and regional land use planning commissions.

The North Yukon Regional Land Use Plan is being implemented. This includes the establishment of a new Special Management Area (Summit Lake-Bell River), the development of baseline levels for surface disturbance, and conformity checks through the Yukon Environmental and Socio-economic Assessment Act process. Parties to the plan met once each quarter.

Public consultation on the Recommended Peel Watershed Regional Land Use Plan occurred from August to October 2010. The Letter of Understanding was renewed and updated in January 2011. The Government of Yukon provided its response to the Recommended Plan in January 2011.

The Dawson Regional Land Use Planning Commission hired staff and began its initial work.

Other Energy, Mines and Resources activities supporting regional land use planning include budget review and approvals; reviewing, approving and monitoring funding agreements; making Land Use Planning Council and Regional Land Use Planning Commission appointments; planning process development; and presentations at planning workshops.

Chapter 13 and Schedules: Heritage and Historic Sites
The Department of Energy, Mines and Resources, working with the Department of Tourism and Culture, is responsible for completing the title transfer of heritage sites under the Final Agreements. This includes technical research of land-related information, title searches and coordination of interdepartmental working groups.

The Department of Energy, Mines and Resources completed the waterfront reservation waiver for the Fort Selkirk Heritage Site. The Order in Council was passed in May 2010 and joint title was raised in the name of Selkirk First Nation and Government of Yukon. The Department of Energy, Mines and Resources also completed the waterfront reservation waivers for the Tagish North West Mounted Police Post and Conrad Heritage Sites, and commenced raising title in the name of Carcross/Tagish First Nation and Government of Yukon.

Chapter 17: Forest Resources
In 2010–11, Energy, Mines and Resources continued to work with Champagne and Aishihik First Nations to jointly implement the Strategic Forest Management Plan, including ongoing fuel abatement treatment plans in several communities near Haines Junction.

Energy, Mines and Resources and Tr'ondëk Hwëch'in worked together on the Dawson Forest Management Plan. The Plan includes both Settlement and non-Settlement Lands and is targeted for completion in 2011.

Energy, Mines and Resources is working in partnership with Teslin Tlingit Council to implement the approved Teslin Forest Management Plan through the development of a Timber Harvest Plan for the portion of the Traditional Territory east of the Teslin River.

Energy, Mines and Resources, Kwanlin Dün First Nation, Carcross/Tagish First Nation and Ta'an Kwäch'än Council signed terms of reference to establish a joint forest management planning initiative for the area surrounding Whitehorse. The planning team held some initial meetings.

Energy, Mines and Resources is working collaboratively with First Nations in the development of small-volume timber harvest plans to ensure that small forest operators can acquire a secure wood supply.

Energy, Mines and Resources Forest Management Branch acquired new aerial photography to update forest inventory data for the Teslin and Whitehorse areas, including Settlement Lands. It is now working on photo interpretation, which is essential for forest management planning.

Energy, Mines and Resources continued to work with First Nations on implementing the Forest Resources Act.

Local Area Planning – Self-Government Agreements
Energy, Mines and Resources is responsible for fulfilling the local area planning and zoning obligations in the Self-Government Agreements of Carcross/Tagish First Nation, Kwanlin Dün First Nation and Tr'ondëk Hwëch'in.

Energy, Mines and Resources Land Planning Branch collaborated with Tr'ondëk Hwëch'in to finalize a draft local area plan for West Dawson and Sunnydale for both Settlement and non-Settlement Lands.

Energy, Mines and Resources worked with Carcross/Tagish First Nation to implement its local area planning provisions for Carcross. The parties reached agreement on the terms of reference for the planning process and hired a consultant to assist with the development of the plan, which is expected to be completed by February 2012.

Energy, Mines and Resources worked with Kwanlin Dün First Nation to implement its local area planning provisions for Marsh Lake. The parties finalized the terms of reference for the planning process and hired a consultant to assist with the development of the plan, which is expected to be completed by August 2012.

Mayo B hydro-electric project and Carmacks-Stewart transmission line
Since 2009 Energy, Mines and Resources has worked in partnership with Yukon Energy Corporation, the Northern Tutchone First Nations (Selkirk First Nation, Little Salmon/Carmacks First Nation and the First Nation of Nacho Nyak Dun), the Government of Canada and the private sector on the Mayo B hydro-electric project and the construction of the Carmacks-Stewart transmission line. The transmission line is expected to come into service in June 2011.

Mayo B is anticipated to expand Yukon's hydro-electric capacity, without new dams, reservoirs or inundations. It is estimated to reduce the Yukon's reliance on diesel generation and to offset greenhouse gas emissions by approximately 25,000 tonnes a year. Construction of the Mayo B project is anticipated to be completed by March 2012.

The Government of Yukon signed a Memorandum of Understanding in 2009 and a Consultation Agreement in 2010 with the First Nation of Nacho Nyak Dun for the Mayo B project. The Agreements provide the framework for both governments to cooperatively address matters arising from First Nation of Nacho Nyak Dun's Final and Self-Government Agreements and the broader intergovernmental relationship with the First Nation of Nacho Nyak Dun. In 2010–11 Energy, Mines and Resources paid $41,800 to the First Nation of Nacho Nyak Dun under the Consultation Agreement.

Highways and Public Works

Yukon Asset Construction Agreements
The Final Agreements of Kwanlin Dün First Nation, Carcross/Tagish First Nation and Kluane First Nation contain a requirement for the Government of Yukon to extend economic opportunities to the First Nation when the dollar value of a construction project in the Traditional Territory exceeds a specified amount. Parties discuss the proposed project and negotiate how the First Nation will participate. The resulting Yukon Asset Construction Agreement identifies training, employment and/or contracting opportunities for First Nations members and businesses.

After negotiating a Yukon Asset Construction Agreement, Highways and Public Works remains directly involved in its implementation to provide direction as circumstances evolve, to monitor progress in achieving outcomes, and to determine lessons learned and best practices for future agreements.

During 2010–11, work continued during the implementation stage of the following Yukon Asset Construction Agreements:

  • with Kwanlin Dün First Nation for the Whitehorse airport expansion;
  • with Kwanlin Dün First Nation to provide project officer training for a Kwanlin Dün First Nation citizen as part of the expansion of facilities at the Whitehorse airport in 2010 and 2011;
  • with Kwanlin Dün First Nation for the new corrections facility; and
  • with Carcross/Tagish First Nation for roadwork along the Atlin Road (roadside clearing and grubbing of 9 km took place in 2010).

In addition, pre-negotiation work began on a Yukon Asset Construction Agreement with Kwanlin Dün First Nation for the new F.H. Collins School.

Government of Canada

Federal Departments Operating in the Yukon
Yukon First Nation Final Agreements set out obligations for all federal departments operating in the Yukon.

Indian and Northern Affairs Canada

Dionne Savill, co/Implementation Representative
Director, Governance
300 Main Street, Room 415C, Whitehorse, Yukon Y1A 2B5
phone 867-667-3398
fax 867-667-3801
e-mail Dionne.savill@aandc-aadnc.gc.ca

Allan Burnside, co/Implementation Representative
Director, Treaty Management – Yukon/British Columbia
25 Rue Eddy, Room 1550, Gatineau, Quebec K1A 0H4
phone 819-953-1745
fax 819-994-7043
e-mail Allan.burnside@aandc-aadnc.gc.ca

Indian and Northern Affairs Canada is one of the federal departments responsible for implementing Final and Self-Government Agreements. Indian and Northern Affairs Canada fulfills this role by negotiating various agreements pursuant to the Self-Government Agreements on behalf of the Government of Canada, representing the Government of Canada at the working group on trilateral implementation and by representing the Government of Canada at the Senior Financial Committee, pursuant to the Self-Government Financial Transfer Agreements.

Administration of Justice Agreements

Administration of Justice Agreements are being negotiated with 9 of Yukon's 11 Self-Governing Yukon First Nations. It is anticipated that the Government of Canada, the Government of Yukon and Teslin Tlingit Council will sign an Administration of Justice Agreement in 2011, the first in the territory.

Intergovernmental Forum

The purpose of the Intergovernmental Forum is to develop a shared vision for governance in the Yukon within the context of the Final and Self-Government Agreements. The Forum's structure and the process it follows are set out in the Intergovernmental Forum Protocol. An Intergovernmental forum was held on July 26, 2010.

Programs and Services Transfer Agreements

Section 17 of the Self-Government Agreements allows First Nations to assume responsibilities and related funding for federal or territorial programming within their jurisdiction, as outlined in Section 13 of the Self-Government Agreements.

In 2010–11 agreements were reached with several First Nations on the assumption of responsibility for time-limited Health Canada programs. Negotiations also continued in the areas of heritage and aboriginal human resources development (federal government) as well as alcohol and drug services (territorial government). The parties' ability to reach agreements on these and other files was supported by a strong focus on renewing Financial Transfer Agreements, but was complicated by financial and other difficulties inherent in the assumption of responsibility by First Nations for Government of Yukon programs.

Financial Transfer Agreements

Renewed Self-Government Financial Transfer Agreements with 7 of the Self-Governing Yukon First Nations came into effect in April 2010. These agreements provided additional governance funding, a new approach to own source revenues and a process to discuss more efficient and effective delivery of programs and services by Self-Governing Yukon First Nations, Government of Yukon and Government of Canada. Negotiations also commenced with the remaining 4 Self-Governing Yukon First Nations regarding the renewal of Self-Government Financial Transfer Agreements, based on the current model.

Implementation

In response to a recommendation in the 2007 Implementation Review of Yukon First Nation Final and Self-Government Agreements, the Implementation Working Group continued to develop a mandate which would formalize its role for monitoring and resolving common implementation issues related to Yukon agreements.

Although significant progress has been made on development of the mandate, the Parties have been unable to reach agreement on how the Implementation Working Group will report to the signatories. Implementation Working Group members agreed to set aside mandate discussions.

A Communications Sub-Group to the Implementation Working Group was established and a work plan and budget were tabled at the Implementation Working Group meeting in June 2010. The Terms of Reference and Communications Strategy were approved on September 23, 2010. The first project undertaken was the development of a series of podcasts on Self-Government, Land Claims and Implementation. These podcasts will be launched in the next fiscal year.

The Implementation Working Group's 2010-11 annual work plan (Appendix 1) sets out collective priorities to track activities.

The parties continue to review Chapter 22 (Economic Development Measures) of the Final Agreements. The parties appointed a sub-group of the Implementation Working Group to develop a terms of reference and outline the next steps and time frame.

The 2007–09 biennial report on Yukon Land Claims and Self-Government Agreements was tabled in Parliament on June 23, 2011. The annual report has been redesigned in a shorter format, which will be used starting with the 2009–10 annual report.

A presentation on Yukon Self-Government and Implementation commitments continues to be delivered to federal departments operating in the Yukon Region.

Agriculture and Agri-food Canada

300 Main Street, Room 320, Whitehorse, Yukon Y1A 2B5
phone 867-667-5272
fax 867-393-6222
web www.agr.gc.ca

Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada provides information, research and technology, and policies and programs to achieve an environmentally sustainable agriculture, agri-food and agri-based products sector, a competitive agriculture, agri-food and agri-based products sector that proactively manages risk, and an innovative agriculture, agri-food and agri-based products sector.

Canada Border Services Agency

300 Main Street, Room 110, Whitehorse, Yukon Y1A 2B5
phone 867-667-3963
fax 867-668-2869
web www.cbsa-asfc.gc.ca

Since December 2003, the Canadian Border Security Agency has been an integral part of the Public Safety Portfolio, which was created to protect Canadians and maintain a peaceful and safe society.
The Agency is responsible for providing integrated border services that support national security and public safety priorities and facilitate the free flow of persons and goods, including animals and plants that meet all requirements under the program legislation.

Canadian Northern Economic Development Agency

305 Main Street, Suite 215, Whitehorse, Yukon Y1A 2B3
300 Main Street, Room 415C, Whitehorse, Yukon Y1A 2B5
phone 867-667-3263
fax 867-667-3801
e-mail YTinfo@cannor.gc.ca
web www.cannor.gc.ca

The 2008 Speech from the Throne committed to establishing a new stand-alone agency focused on northern economic development, a key deliverable under the governments integrated Northern Strategy (Canada's Northern Strategy) Budget 2009: Canada's Economic Action Plan provided $50 million over 5 years to establish the new Canadian Northern Economic Development Agency. Canadian Northern Economic Development Agency's objective is to help provide the foundation for a prosperous economic future for those who live, work and support their families in the North. The Agency does this:

  • through delivery of a suite of economic development programs:
  • by developing policy and conducting research; and
  • by aligning the efforts of partners and stakeholders, particularly among federal organizations.

Canada School of Public Service

300 Main Street, Room 400, Whitehorse, Yukon Y1A 2B5
phone 867-393-6713
fax 867-668-5033
web www.csps-efpc.gc.ca

The Canada School of Public Service brings a unified approach to serving the common learning and development needs of public servants. It helps ensure that all public service employees across Canada have the knowledge and skills they need.

Activities in 2010–11

The Whitehorse campus of the Canada School of Public Service delivered a broad variety of courses, including Dealing with Employee Performance; Leading Strategically; Grants and Contributions; Writing Reports; Writing Briefing Notes; Writing Agendas and Minutes; Essentials of Managing; Writing E-mails; Interpersonal Communications; Staffing; and Developing Work Plans and Budgets.

The Canada School of Public Service also hosted free armchair discussions on the Truth and Reconciliation Committee; Coaching vs. Mentoring; and Employee Engagement. Lunch and Learn sessions on Career Pathway; Conflict Resolution; and Managing Your Workplace Stress were also offered. Employees of First Nations participated in all sessions.

The School's Learning Advisor (appointed by the Minister of Indian and Northern Affairs Canada) represents the Government of Canada on the Training Policy Committee and is a Yukon Indian People Training Trust trustee under the Umbrella Final Agreement.

The Canada School of Public Service had numerous discussions with the Council of Yukon First Nations regarding a Memorandum of Understanding to support capacity development through learning opportunities for First Nation governments in Yukon. The Learning Advisor provided facilitation and information at all meetings and events of the Yukon First Nation Public Service Initiative.

Environment Canada

Environmental Protection Operations Directorate
91782 Alaska Highway, Whitehorse, Yukon Y1A 5X7
phone 867-667-3400
fax 867- 667-7962
e-mail Rose.Berndt@ec.gc.ca
web www.ec.gc.ca

Environment Canada's implementation activities primarily address obligations under the Umbrella Final Agreement and Final Agreements with the 11 Self-Governing Yukon First Nations. The Department's activities are specifically linked to: Chapter 16 (Fish and Wildlife Management); Chapter 10 (Special Management Areas); Chapter 11 (Land Use Planning); Chapter 12 (Development Assessment); Chapter 14 (Water Management); and Chapter 18 (Non-Renewable Resources).

Activities in 2010–11

The Environmental Protection Operations Directorate worked with Yukon First Nations and boards/councils created under Final Agreements on initiatives in the areas of environmental assessment, contaminated sites, spills and emergencies.

The Directorate worked with the Yukon Environmental and Socio-economic Assessment Board and Yukon First Nations to implement the Yukon Environmental and Socio-economic Assessment Act; it also provided input on the 5 year review of the Act.

Environmental Protection Operations Directorate provided expert advice to the Yukon Water Board as a follow-up to the Decision Document and compliance promotion.

The Directorate provided advice and technical expertise to both the First Nation of Nacho Nyak Dun and Selkirk First Nation and contributed to developing capacity with these First Nations.

Canadian Wildlife Service, Northern Conservation Division

91780 Alaska Highway, Whitehorse, Yukon Y1A 5X7
phone 867-393-6700
fax 867-393-7970
e-mail Linda.Moen@ec.gc.ca
web www.ec.gc.ca

Environment Canada's Canadian Wildlife Service is primarily responsible for the management and conservation of migratory birds (as defined under the Canada/US Migratory Birds Convention) and their habitat; administration of the federal Species at Risk Act and of Species at Risk Act listed non-aquatic species not found within a national park, national historic site or other protected heritage area; and management of the National Wildlife Areas within Yukon. Canadian Wildlife Service participates in environmental assessments being conducted under the Yukon Environmental and Socio-economic Assessment Act and the Canadian Environmental Assessment Act within the Yukon; regional land use and resource management planning processes; and protected areas management and planning processes.

Activities in 2010–11

Canadian Wildlife Service, Northern Conservation Division worked with First Nations, governments, Boards and Renewable Resources Councils to complete the Management Plan for the Northern Mountain population of Woodland Caribou.

The Division worked collaboratively through the Porcupine Caribou Management Board on cooperative management of the Porcupine Caribou Herd.

In partnership with the Government of Yukon, the Division operated a conservation data centre focused on species listed in the Species at Risk Act.

Canadian Wildlife Service, Northern Conservation Division led the Arctic Borderlands Ecological Knowledge Co-op, along with First Nation, federal, territorial and state governments to monitor environmental change within the range of the Porcupine Caribou Herd and adjacent nearshore areas. The Division also led the Circumpolar Biodiversity Monitoring Program to improve the coordination of existing biodiversity monitoring across the Arctic.

The Division worked with the Champagne and Aishihik First Nations, Kwanlin Dün First Nation, Carcross/Tagish First Nation and Ta'an Kwäch'än Council on mapping and inventory of Baikal sedge in the Southern Yukon.

Canadian Wildlife Service, Northern Conservation Division, through the Southern Lakes Wildlife Coordinating Committee, worked closely with Carcross/Tagish First Nation, Ta'an Kwäch'än Council, Teslin Tlingit Council and Kwanlin Dün First Nation to assess the status of wildlife and wildlife habitat in the Southern Lakes region.

The Division worked with the Teslin Renewable Resources Council to collaboratively manage the Nisutlin River Delta National Wildlife Area.

Canadian Wildlife Service, Northern Conservation Division completed an assessment of the resources required for the division to fully implement the Yukon First Nation Final Agreements.

Department of National Defence

Department of National Defence, Joint Task Force (North) Detachment Yukon
5096 5th Avenue, Whitehorse, Yukon Y1A 5T8
phone 867-667-7301
fax 867-667-7156
web www.forces.gc.ca

Headquartered in Yellowknife, NT, with detachments in Whitehorse, Yukon and Iqaluit, Nunavut, the role of Joint Task Force North (JTFN) is to exercise Canadian sovereignty and contribute to safety, security, and defense operations north of the 60th parallel, to coordinate and lead Canadian Forces activities in the North, and to liaise with the territorial governments and people of the Northwest Territories, Yukon and Nunavut.

Activities in 2010–11

Joint Task Force North sent its Annual Activity Notification Letter to all of the Yukon First Nations and the Council of Yukon First Nations, the aim of which was to provide notification of planned JTFN activities taking place in the Yukon in fiscal year 2010-11, pursuant to 6.5.3 of the respective First Nations Final Agreements and the Umbrella Final Agreement.

Fisheries and Oceans Canada

419 Range Road, Room 100, Whitehorse, Yukon Y1A 3V1
phone 867-393-6719
fax 867-393-6738
web www.dfo-mpo.gc.ca

Within the Yukon, the Umbrella Final Agreement and individual First Nation Final Agreements provide a framework for fisheries management through the Salmon Sub-Committee. The Treaties and Stock Assessment sectors of Fisheries and Oceans Canada work closely with First Nations to design and implement programs under the Aboriginal Fisheries Strategy. The goals of these programs are to be consistent with conservation principles and to reflect domestic and international planning processes.

Stock Assessment staff provides technical assistance to Aboriginal Fisheries Strategy projects. The Department also relies on the skills and experience of local First Nation technicians, many of whom have been employed in fishery-related programs for more than 20 years.

The Department maintains partnerships and communication with transboundary First Nations through co-management bodies established under the Pacific Salmon Treaty.

Health Canada – Northern Region

300 Main Street, Room 100, Whitehorse, Yukon Y1A 2B5
phone 867-393-6770
fax 867-393-6772

The mandate of Health Canada – Northern Region is to:

  • ensure the availability of, or access to, heath services for First Nations and Inuit Communities;
  • assist First Nations and Inuit communities address health barriers, disease threats, and attain health levels comparable to other Canadians living in similar locations; and
  • build strong partnerships with First Nations and Inuit to improve the health system.

Activities in 2010–11

Health Canada participated in the Programs and Services Transfer Agreement negotiations as required.

Industry Canada

300 Main Street, Room 205, Whitehorse, Yukon Y1A 2B5
phone 867-667-5102
fax 867-393-6711
web www.ic.gc.ca

Industry Canada's mission is to foster a growing, competitive, knowledge-based Canadian economy. The Department works with Canadians throughout the economy and in all parts of the country to improve conditions for investment, improve the Government of Canada's innovation performance, increase the Government of Canada's share of global trade and build a fair, efficient and competitive marketplace. Program areas include developing industry and technology capability, fostering scientific research, setting telecommunications policy, promoting investment and trade, promoting tourism and small business development, and setting rules and services that support the effective operation of the marketplace.

Justice Canada

3162 Third Avenue, Whitehorse, Yukon Y1A 1G3
phone 867-667-8110
fax 867-667-3934
web www.justice.gc.ca

The Department of Justice has the mandate to support the dual roles of the Minister of Justice and the Attorney General of Canada. The Department supports the Minister of Justice in his responsibilities for 49 statutes and areas of federal law by ensuring a bilingual and bijural national legal framework principally within the following domains: criminal justice (including youth criminal justice); family justice; access to justice; Aboriginal justice; and general public law and private international law. The Department also supports the Attorney General as the chief law officer of the Crown both in terms of the ongoing operations of government as well as the development of new policies, programs and services for Canadians to support the Government's priorities. Specifically, the Department provides legal advice to all federal government departments and agencies, represents the Crown in civil litigation and before administrative tribunals, drafts legislation, and responds to the other legal needs of federal departments and agencies.

Natural Resources Canada

300 Main Street, Room 225, Whitehorse, Yukon Y1A 2B5
phone 867-667-3957
fax 867-393-670
web www.nrcan.gc.ca

Settlement Lands are transferred to Yukon First Nations through land claims settlement legislation. Natural Resources Canada is responsible for the legal surveying of Yukon First Nation Settlement Lands. Annual survey programs are based on recommendations made by First Nation Settlement Land Committees. Legal surveys of Settlement Land continue to be implemented by 9 of the 11 Yukon First Nations with Final Agreements.

Parks Canada Agency

300 Main Street, Room 205, Whitehorse, Yukon Y1A 2B5
phone 867-667-3910
fax 867-393-6701
e-mail whitehorse.info@pc.gc.ca
web www.pc.gc.ca

On behalf of the people of Canada, Parks Canada protects and presents nationally significant examples of Canada's natural and cultural heritage. It also fosters public understanding, appreciation and enjoyment of these places in ways that ensure their ecological and commemorative integrity for present and future generations.

Public Prosecution Service of Canada

300 Main Street, Room 200, Whitehorse, Yukon Y1A 2B5
phone 867-667-8100
fax 867-667-3979
web www.ppsc-sppc.gc.ca

The Public Prosecution Service of Canada is a federal government organization created on December 12, 2006. The organization is responsible for prosecuting offences under more than 50 federal statutes and for providing prosecution-related legal advice to law enforcement agencies. Cases prosecuted by the Public Prosecution Service of Canada include those involving drugs, organized crime, terrorism, tax law, money laundering and proceeds of crime, crimes against humanity and war crimes, Criminal Code offences in the territories, and a large number of federal regulatory offences, including the Canada Elections Act.

Public Safety Canada

269 Laurier Avenue West, Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0P8
phone 613-944-4875 or 1-800-830-3118
fax 613-954-5186
Teletypewriter (TTY) 1-866-865-5667
web www.publicsafety.gc.ca

Public Safety Canada exercises national leadership to ensure the safety and security of Canada and Canadians. The Department's mandate is to build a safe and resilient Canada through the development and implementation of innovative policies and programs and the effective engagement of domestic and international partners.

Implementation activities associated with the Public Safety Canada Portfolio (including the Correctional Service of Canada and the Royal Canadian Mounted Police) are linked to Section 13.6.2 of the Yukon Self-Government Agreements and the obligation to negotiate Administration of Justice Agreements on subject matters such as law enforcement and corrections.

Activities in 2010–11

Public Safety Canada officials participated in the ongoing negotiations with the Teslin Tlingit Council on the implementation of its Administration of Justice Agreement and in the negotiations for Administration of Justice Agreement Framework Agreements between Canada, Yukon and several Yukon First Nations.

Officials from Public Safety Canada's Aboriginal Policing Directorate participate in implementation related activities in Yukon.

Public Works and Government Services Canada

800 Burrard Street, Room 641, Vancouver, British Columbia V6Z 2V8
phone 604-775-7628
fax 604-775-6888
web www.tpsgc-pwgsc.gc.ca

Public Works and Government Services Canada provides assistance, guidance and training to First Nations in the Yukon and Northern B.C. in the area of contracting, procurement, acquisitions, capital planning and infrastructure development. Public Works and Government Services Canada has branches in Vancouver and Victoria.

Public Works and Government Services Canada also provides guidance and advice to all federal departments conducting procurement and contracting initiatives related to Final and Self-Government Agreements on Settlement Lands in the Yukon.

Royal Canadian Mounted Police, "M" Division

4100 Fourth Avenue, Whitehorse, Yukon Y1A 1H5
phone 867-633-8610
fax 867-393-6792
web www.rcmp-grc.gc.ca

The Royal Canadian Mounted Police provides services at National, Territorial and local levels. Nationally, the Royal Canadian Mounted Police has responsibility to enforce all federal statutes. Under the Territorial Police Services Agreement between the Government of Yukon and Public Safety Canada, it also enforces the Criminal Code and laws in force in the Yukon Territory and responds to priorities and objectives set by the Government of Yukon Minister of Justice. At the local level, Detachments work with municipal and First Nations leadership to identify and address community policing needs and priorities. The Royal Canadian Mounted Police also maintains a dialogue with First Nations, Government of Yukon and Public Safety Canada with respect to the administration of justice.

Service Canada

300 Main Street, Room 125, Whitehorse, Yukon Y1A 2B5
phone 867-667-5083, ext. 226
fax 867-668-6802
web www.servicecanada.gc.ca

Activities 2010–11

Representatives from Human Resources and Skills Development Canada, Indian and Northern Affairs Canada and Self-Governing Yukon First Nations continue to meet to work towards an Intergovernmental Agreement for First Nations to assume responsibility for Aboriginal Skills Development. These agreements would replace the Aboriginal Skills and Employment Training Strategy, the successor program to the Aboriginal Human Resources Development Strategy.

Appendices

Appendix 1. Implementation Working Group: Work Plan 2010–11
TargetOverall taskActionsWork to date

* Note: The Implementation Working Group provides oversight for the work to amend Final Agreements, Self-Government Agreements and Implementation Plans only if the amendment affects 2 or more Yukon First Nation agreements.

Implementation Review Group Recommendation 3.5: Tripartite Communications Plan

Complete a tripartite communications plan

A sub-working group of the Implementation Working Group, comprised of communications specialists will develop a communications plan, to be endorsed by all Parties

Draft plan will be presented to the Implementation Working Group
The Parties will each review and endorse the plan

Draft plan has been completed
Terms of Reference for the communications working group and the Implementation Working Group communications plan were approved by the Implementation Working Group September 23, 2010
Implementation of the plan began in late March, including 10 podcasts, ad placement and initiation of the survey

Implementation Review Group Recommendation 3.8: Implementation Working Group Mandate Working Group

An Implementation Working Group that operates in an effective and efficient manner, with clear roles and responsibilities

Prepare an amendment to the Final Agreement and Umbrella Final Agreement Implementation Plans where the Parties could jointly agree to a more formalized Implementation Working Group

Achieve consensus on how the Implementation Working Group will report to the Principals
All Parties to confirm their support for the process
Complete the mandate amendments to the Final Agreements and Umbrella Final Agreement Implementation Plans

On September 22, 2010, the Implementation Working Group mandate working group proposed to the Implementation Working Group members to set aside mandate discussions. This was agreed to by the implementation representatives at the Implementation Working Group
On November 5, 2010, the mandate working group confirmed with the Implementation Working Group members that the Implementation Working Group mandate would be revisited no later than December 31, 2011
Mandate not completed – the parties could not come to agreement on the reporting structure.

Implementation Review Group Recommendation 8.2.3: Preparation of Materials, Boards and Committees Training

Materials and courses are available to adequately prepare appointees for their work

Assess the information and training that is available

Discuss the Government of Canada's findings

The Government of Canada's findings were forwarded to the Implementation Working Group in February and October 2010

Identify necessary training that is not now available

Identified in the Government of Canada's findings

Consider options to develop courses needed

It was confirmed at the October 2010 Implementation Working Group meeting that board and committee training should be removed from the Implementation Working Group work plan and left with the Boards and Committees

Implementation Review Group  Recommendation 8.3.8 and 8.3.9: Amendments to the Yukon Fish and Wildlife Enhancement Trust and the Yukon Indian People's Training Trust

Amended trusts that allow the trustees to be remunerated for their work on the trusts, provided that the source of funds is from outside of the trust

Cause the trusts to be amended

Confirm whether it is the settlors or the trustees who make the amendment
The responsible party to draft the amendment and have it approved as necessary

Legal counsel from all Parties began indenture work
The Parties met  with Executive Directors of both trusts to determine what changes were required and whether settlers needed to carry out any specific tasks
Awaiting legal advice from counsel

Umbrella Final Agreement 22.9.1: Review of Economic Development Measures

A completed review that informs the Parties on progress to date

Oversee the conduct of the review

First Nation governments to clarify for the Government of Canada and Government of Yukon how they wish to proceed with the review
Parties to agree to the process, develop a terms of reference and cause the review to be undertaken
Ensure that Representative Public Service Plans are included in the review

The Parties were unable to agree to a timeline and process for the review until January 2011.
A Terms of Reference and Memorandum of Agreement have been drafted, but not yet signed; a second Memorandum of Agreement was tabled in February 2011 as another option
A Chapter 22 Working Group was established in February 2011 and is currently in the initial phases of preparing review materials
Memorandum of Agreement and Terms of Reference are waiting to be finalized
Government of Yukon has initiated a Representative Public Service Plan process with Self-Governing First Nations, including development of a draft strategy and action plan

Umbrella Final Agreement 13.5.3.6: Heritage Resources Manual

Development of a manual of definitions of ethnographic, archaeological, paleontological and historic resources

Develop the manual as outlined in the Implementation Plan

Strike a working group to develop a Terms of Reference for a committee of specialists who will undertake the drafting of the manual

A Heritage Resources Manual Drafting Working Group was struck
2 meetings of the Working Group were held this fiscal year
Terms of Reference have been finalized

13.6.4.1: Amendments to Self-Government Agreements *

Allow First Nations to increase penalties for the violation of a Yukon First Nation law to $300,000 instead of $5,000

All Self-Government Agreements except those of Kwanlin Dün First Nation, Carcross/Tagish First Nation and Kluane First Nation need to be amended

Government of Yukon Order in Council 2005/155 and 2005/26
Government of Canada to request an Order in Council amendment

Federal Order in Council package for 13.6.4.1 is ready for 8 of 11 First Nations; the process has been held up by the need for a federal Order in Council for 13.6.6 for the Northern Tutchone First Nations to include them in this amendment as well (see 13.6.6 below).

13.6.6

Reinstate the interim provisions that expired

Self-Government Agreements for First Nation of Na-Cho Nyak Dun, Little Salmon/Carmacks First Nation and Selkirk First Nation need to be amended

Government of Yukon Order in Council 2010/25
Government of Canada to request an Order in Council amendment

Federal drafting of these documents has commenced

17.7–17.10

Provide the provisions found in Tr'ondëk Hwëch'in's Self-Government Agreement to all Yukon First Nations who have requested them

All Self-Government Agreements except those of Kwanlin Dün First Nation and Little Salmon/Carmacks First Nation need to be amended
Following up with Selkirk First Nation

Send French and English drafts to First Nations to undertake the process provided in Section 6 of their Self-Government Agreements

The Government of Canada has compiled a draft Annex E in French and English and sent it to Government of Yukon for review March 8, 2011

Appendix 2. Background

In 1989, the Government of Canada, the Government of Yukon and Council for Yukon Indians reached an agreement in principle that became the basis for the Umbrella Final Agreement. Shortly thereafter, the parties agreed that rather than negotiate a single territory-wide agreement, individual Final Agreements would embody the provisions of the Umbrella Final Agreement while also including specific provisions that were unique to each First Nation. The Umbrella Final Agreement also provided for the negotiation of separate Self-Government Agreements with each First Nation. The Umbrella Final Agreement was signed on May 29, 1993.

The 11 Self-Governing Yukon First Nations have almost 7,000 beneficiaries and 31,603 square kilometres of Settlement Land. The Self-Governing Yukon First Nations also receive financial compensation that is paid out over 15 years following the effective date of their agreement. In addition to compensation dollars, the Government of Canada also provides funding to Yukon First Nations and to various boards and committees for implementation of land claims.

Three Yukon First Nations — White River First Nation, Liard First Nation and Ross River Dena Council — have not concluded Final or Self-Government Agreements.

Appendix 3. Financial compensation payments

Chapter 19 of each Yukon First Nation Final Agreement provides for capital transfer payments to the Yukon First Nation on the anniversary of the signature date of its Final Agreement. The following settlement payments (net of negotiation loans) were made to Yukon First Nations.

Fiscal year Payments ($)Fiscal year Payments ($)

1994–1995

 9,380,366

2003–2004

12,219,606

1995–1996

 8,744,728

2004–2005

13,538,068*

1996–1997

 8,109,089

2005–2006

15,867,658*

1997–1998

12,163,681

2006–2007

17,539,080*

1998–1999

13,655,500

2007–2008

17,100,310*

1999–2000

12,977,994

2008–2009

17,076,472*

2000–2001

11,529,120

2009–2010

7,523,647

2001–2002

11,529,125

2010–2011

8,251,211

2002–2003

12,489,419

 

 

* official pre-rounding

Appendix 4. Costs of implementation

These funds were allocated by the Government of Canada to Council of Yukon First Nations and various boards and committees for implementation purposes.

Fiscal YearPayments ($)Fiscal YearPayments ($)

1994–1995

 10,504,745

2003–2004

3,295,667

1995–1996

 1,608,601

2004–2005

3,342,024

1996–1997

 2,175,012

2005–2006

3,528,223

1997–1998

 2,463,814

2006–2007

3,371,355

1998–1999

 2,426,573

2007–2008

3,424,803

1999–2000

 2,237,664

2008–2009

3,390,708

2000–2001

 2,430,336

2009–2010

3,537,410

2001–2002

 2,547,661

2010–2011

3,110,822

2002–2003

2,719,872