ARCHIVED - James Bay and Northern Quebec Agreement and The Northeastern Quebec Agreement 1998-1999 Annual Report - 1999-2000 Annual Report

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Author: Public Works and Government Services Canada
Date: Ottawa, 2002
ISBN:0-662-65953-8
QS-Q036-006-BB-A1

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Table of Contents


Minister's Foreword

As the Minister responsible for the co-ordination of all activities related to the fulfilment of the federal obligations established by the James Bay and Northern Quebec Agreement (JBNQA) and the Northeastern Quebec Agreement (NEQA), I am pleased to present the annual reports for 1998-1999 and 1999-2000 on the implementation of these agreements. The reports also account for activities and expenditures made on behalf of the Cree, Inuit and Naskapi of Quebec under other federal programs.

In March 1999, the Crees of Waskaganish, the Grand Council of the Crees (of Quebec), Quebec, and Canada concluded an agreement worth $45 million for the construction of an access road to Waskaganish. Canada's financial contribution to this project amounted to $24 million. In accordance with intentions established at the Cree-Canada Round Table in June 1998, progress was made at sectoral tables for environment, justice, and policing. In 1999-2000, one particularly important table, chaired by Human Resources Development Canada (HRDC), was established to reach a comprehensive agreement on the delivery of regular HRDC programs as well as special training programs required to meet obligations under Section 28 of the JBNQA. Indian and Northern Affairs Canada (INAC) provided $2.6 million, in 1999-2000, to purchase fire protection equipment for Cree communities. Negotiations continued towards multi-year agreements to fund the Cree Outfitting and Tourism Association, and the Cree Native Arts and CRAfts Association, while a one-year agreement was reached to fund the Cree Trappers Association.

With respect to the Inuit, major progress was made concerning housing in Nunavik. In March 1999, a $10-million interim agreement was signed between Quebec, Canada and the Makivik Corporation to construct and maintain 43 new prefabricated houses, with Canada contributing $5 million. During 1999-2000, the parties undertook intensive research leading to negotiations, with the expectation that a long-term agreement on housing in Nunavik would be signed shortly.

In the summer of 1999, the first project under the $30-million 10-year Marine Infrastructure agreement between Makivik and Canada was completed in Kangiqsualujjuaq. Later in 1999-2000, through INAC, an additional $4.9 million was provided to finance the purchase of equipment to accelerate the Marine Infrastructure work. Minister's Foreword In November 1999, Canada, Quebec and the Makivik Corporation signed a Political Agreement to establish a Nunavik Commission, whose purpose would be to propose a form of government for Nunavik. Since the start of Commission proceedings, INAC has closely collaborated with commissioners in preparing and holding the first public hearings in Nunavik.

With respect to the Naskapi and the NEQA, a new five-year agreement on funding for capital assets of their community was concluded in July 1999. This agreement provides for building a free-standing fire station, building a new residential sector, constructing a warehouse, and expanding the band office. Negotiations continued concerning the operation of power facilities in Schefferville and the acquisition of hydraulic rights from Newfoundland.

As described in this Report as a whole, the two years under review have seen steady progress in implementing aspects of the JBNQA. The existence of Implementation Agreements with the Inuit and Naskapi has proved beneficial in ongoing relations and in facilitating problem resolution.

The Cree-Canada Round Table process launched a number of initiatives which will bring important benefits to Cree communities. However, the process of arriving at agreements through negotiation can be difficult and frustratingly slow, to both observers and participants. Both parties are intent on progress, but different understandings, priorities and expectations still affect our ability to advance.

Federal departments and organizations have worked together to make permanent contributions to strengthening Cree, Inuit and Naskapi communities as contemplated in the JBNQA and NEQA. The Government of Canada will continue to build on that progress.

The Honourable Robert Nault, P.C., M.P.
Minister of Indian Affairs and Northern Development

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Introduction

The James Bay and Northern Quebec Agreement (JBNQA) was signed on November 11, 1975 by the Cree and Inuit peoples of Quebec, the governments of Canada and Quebec, the James Bay Development Corporation, the James Bay Energy Corporation and Hydro Quebec. Three years later, on January 31, 1978, the Naskapi of Schefferville signed a similar agreement, the Northeastern Quebec Agreement (NEQA).

The JBNQA and NEQA are the first comprehensive land claim agreements signed in modern times by Canada and Aboriginal people. The agreements include self-government components and lay the foundations for a new relationship between the Cree, the Inuit and the Naskapi and the Government of Canada.

The territory covered by the JBNQA and NEQA is comprised of more than 1,000,000 square kilometres of land in Quebec between the 48th and 62nd parallels. It was once part of a larger federal territory known as Rupert's Land.

A century ago, the Parliament of Canada transferred two vast stretches of Rupert's Land to Quebec, with Quebec's consent. The first transfer took place in 1898 and Quebec's borders were extended northward to the 52nd parallel. The second transfer occurred in 1912 and Quebec's borders were extended northward again as far as Hudson Strait and the 62nd parallel and eastward as far as Labrador. The 1912 Quebec Boundaries Extension Act carried certain obligations for the Quebec government, including the obligation to reach an agreement on landrelated issues with the Aboriginal inhabitants. However, discussions regarding these matters would not begin until more than 60 years later.

The inhabitants of these northern lands, which are barren but incredibly diverse in terms of climate and resources, are Indian and Inuit peoples with significantly different cultures, methods of social organization and languages. The Cree, the Inuit and the Naskapi follow a traditional way of life in which they harvest a large number of wildlife and marine resources. Many continue to earn their living by hunting, fishing and trapping. When the Quebec government launched its hydroelectric power development activities in Northern Quebec, the land claims and other claims of the Aboriginal people living on these lands had not yet been settled. In 1972, the Quebec Cree and Inuit went to court in order to halt the hydroelectric work.

In November 1973, Judge Albert Malouf of the Quebec Superior Court ordered that all work be stopped immediately, in particular because Quebec had not yet fulfilled its obligation under the 1912 Act. In 1974, the Quebec Court of Appeal reversed Judge Malouf's decision, but in late 1973, the parties had already begun negotiations to reach a final agreement. These negotiations culminated in the signing of the JBNQA in 1975.

Subsequently, in 1978, the Naskapi Band of Schefferville signed the Northeastern Quebec Agreement with the Government of Quebec and certain crown corporations, the Government of Canada, the Grand Council of the Crees (of Quebec) and the Northern Quebec Inuit Association, establishing similar rights to those acquired by the Cree under the JBNQA.

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Principal Provisions of the JBNQA and the NEQA

Under the terms of the James Bay and Northern Quebec Agreement and the Northeastern Quebec Agreement, Aboriginal communities of the region have exchanged their rights and territorial interests for other rights and benefits, as specified in the agreements.

The JBNQA and NEQA define the land regime applicable to the Cree, the Inuit and the Naskapi, as well as their rights in many areas, such as resource management, economic development, policing and administration of justice, health and social services and environmental protection.

In terms of compensation, the Cree received $133,815,678 (including $19,447,615 from the Government of Canada) and the Inuit received $91,184,322 (including $13,272,384 from the Government of Canada) for a total of $225 million under the JBNQA. The Naskapi received $9 million (including $1,310,010 from the Government of Canada) under the NEQA.

In addition, a sum of $ 2,809,773 (including $1,226,943 from the Government of Canada) was provided to the Cree under Section 25.1.15 of the JBNQA and a sum of $525,428 was provided by the Government of Canada to the Inuit under Sections 25.1.16 and 3 of the Complementary Agreement No. 2 (JBNQA).

The Cree, Inuit and Naskapi are also entitled to a range of services and programs to which the federal and provincial governments contribute annually. The following additional lump-sum payments have been provided as a result of the signing of specific agreements, many of which are associated with complementary agreements to the JBNQA:

Funds provided by Canada

Cree:
$10 million under the Chisasibi Agreement (1978).

Inuit:
$22.8 million under the JBNQA Implementation Agreement (1990).

Naskapi:
$1.7 million under the NEQA Implementation Agreement (1990);

$0.9 million under the Job Creation Strategy for the Naskapi Agreement (1997).

Funds provided by Quebec

Cree:
$40 million under the Chisasibi Agreement (1978);

$25.5 million under the Sakami Lake Agreement (1979);

$112 million under the La Grande Agreement (1986);

$18 million under the Mercury Agreement (1986);

$50 million (for the Chisasibi and Wemindji communities) under the Opimiscow - La Grande Agreement (1992).


Inuit:
$48 million under the Kuujjuaq Agreement (1988).

Lands

Under the JBNQA and NEQA, a land regime was instituted in the territory covered by the agreements. It divides the territory into three categories of lands (I, II and III) and specifies the total land area in each: over 14,000 square kilometres of territory are category I lands, 150,000 square kilometres are category II lands and 1,000,000 square kilometres are category III lands. It also specifies the rights pertaining to each category.

Category I lands, where the villages are located, are set aside exclusively for the Aboriginal communities that are signatories to the two agreements. Cree and Naskapi Category I lands are further subdivided into categories IA and IB: "A" for lands under the jurisdiction of Canada, and "B" for those under that of Quebec. Category IA and IA-N lands (N standing for Naskapi lands) falling under federal jurisdiction are governed by local Aboriginal administrations, as defined in the Cree-Naskapi (of Quebec) Act. Category IB and IB-N lands under Quebec jurisdiction are governed by corporations composed exclusively of Aboriginals. Inuit lands fall under provincial jurisdiction and are governed by public corporations composed mainly of Inuit.

Category II lands, usually located around the villages, come under provincial jurisdiction. However, the Aboriginal people participate in the management of hunting, fishing and trapping and the development of outfitting operations. They also have exclusive hunting, fishing and trapping rights on these lands.

Category III lands are Quebec public lands where Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal peoples may hunt and fish. However, Aboriginal people exercise certain rights on these lands under the agreements. They have exclusive rights to the harvesting of certain aquatic species and fur-bearing animals; they participate in the administration and development of the territory; and enjoy, until the year 2015, a right of refusal in the event of applications to set up or transfer new outfitting operations. The Aboriginal people must, however, relinquish this right for 30 percent of transfers or new outfitting operations proposed by non- Aboriginal people.

  
Land Area (KM2) for Category I and II Defined by the JBNQA in 1975 and the NEQA in 1978, by Beneficiary Group
  Category I Lands Category II Lands Category III Lands
Cree IA* 3,295.39      
  IB 1,992.98     Cree, Inuit and
Naskapi exercise
Native harvesting
rights in category
III Lands
  IB special 252.96    
    5,541.33   68,790.39
Inuit I 8,152.01   81,596.58
Naskapi IA-N 41.92      
  IB-N 284.90 II-N 4,144.00  
    326.82      
Total   14,020.16   154,530.97 910,711**

* Following acceptance by the Government of Canada from the Government of Quebec, in 1999, of the final transfer of Category IA lands, the Cree IA lands cover 3,299.6 km2.

Federal lands Sources: Government of Canada, Natural Resources Canada, Legal Surveys, Division, Quebec Client Liaison Unit.

Provincial lands Sources: Gouvernement du Québec, Ministère des Ressources naturelle, Direction de l'enregistrement et du morcellement. ** Ministère du Conseil exécutif, Secrétariat aux affaires autochtones.

Category III lands as defined in Section 1, Annex 1 of the Complementary Agreement No. 1, JBNQA.

Environmental and Social Protection

The JBNQA and the NEQA provide for consultative bodies to advise governments on policies and regulations that may have an impact on the environment and the social conditions of Aboriginal communities.

For this purpose, two committees have been set up: the James Bay Advisory Committee on the Environment (JBACE) for the area south of the 55th parallel and the Kativik Environmental Advisory Committee (KEAC) for the area north of that parallel. Each committee includes representatives from Aboriginal communities in the territory and from the two levels of government. The JBACE Annual Report is available from the Secretariat of the James Bay Advisory Committee on the Environment, Environmental Assessment Division, Marie-Guyart Building, 6th Floor, 675, René-Lévesque Boulevard East, Québec City (Quebec) Canada G1R 5V7. The KEAC Annual Report is available from the Secretariat of the Kativik Environmental Advisory Committee, P.O. Box 1093, Station Terminus, Québec City (Quebec) Canada G1K 7B5.

The JBNQA also establishes evaluation procedures for development proposals. The Cree participate in the evaluation of projects affecting lands below the 55th parallel, whereas to the north of the 55th parallel it is the Inuit who participate in these evaluations. The federal administrator - appointed by the Governor in Council - is responsible for the evaluation process for projects under federal government jurisdiction. For matters under provincial jurisdiction, a provincial administrator is appointed by the Quebec government. Projects in Category I Cree lands come under the authority of the local Cree administrator.

The NEQA includes similar provisions assuring the Naskapi of participation in the environmental and social protection of the territory covered by that agreement. Economic Development Compensation funds paid under the agreements by the governments of Quebec and Canada and by Hydro-Québec are administered by three organizations. The Cree Board of Compensation, the Makivik Corporation and the Naskapi Development Corporation handle the funding of projects for the economic development of their respective communities in Northern Quebec.

In addition, under the agreements, the Cree, Inuit and Naskapi continue to benefit, in the same way as other Aboriginal peoples, from the economic development programs offered by the two governments.

Education

The JBNQA provided for the establishment of the Cree School Board and the Kativik School Board. Both of these boards, which operate under Quebec's jurisdiction, possess special powers and ensure that educational programs are culturally relevant to the communities.

Under the NEQA, educational services for the Naskapi are provided for by a school created to fulfill the needs of the Naskapi community. The Eastern Quebec Regional School Board is responsible for its general administration. In addition, the Naskapi Education Committee was set up to perform the same advisory functions as those assigned to school committees under the Education Act at the time, and now known as the Education Act for the Cree, Inuit and Naskapi Native Persons.

The JBNQA and the NEQA established that Canada and Quebec would contribute to the funding of these institutions on the basis of annual operating and capital budgets approved by each. The proportion to be contributed by Canada was set at 75 percent of the approved budgets of the Cree School Board and the Naskapi school, and 25 percent of the approved budgets of the Kativik School Board.

Hunting, Fishing and Trapping

The Hunting, Fishing and Trapping Co-ordinating Committee (HFTCC) was created under the JBNQA and is comprised of government and Aboriginal experts. Federal representatives are from INAC, Environment Canada and Fisheries and Oceans Canada (DFO). The Committee's role is to study, manage and, in certain cases, monitor and regulate the hunting, fishing and trapping regime. In most matters, the Co-ordinating Committee plays an advisory role to the Quebec and Canadian governments. It must also make recommendations to the two levels of government. It holds annual meetings in the northern communities to explain its activities and consult with local people about its mandate and broad objectives. Sub-committees, also made up of Aboriginal and government representatives, have been formed to deal with specific issues such as big game, parks, fishing, outfitting operations, marketing of caribou meat and land use. More information on the HFTCC and its activities is available on the HFTCC Web site : http://www.cccpp-HFTCC.com/indexe.html or from the Secretariat of the Hunting, Fishing and Trapping Co-ordinating Committee, 393, St-Jacques Street, Room 369, Montréal (Quebec) Canada H2Y 1N9.

Local and Regional Administrations

With the passage of Cree-Naskapi (of Quebec) Act in 1984, the Cree communities and the Naskapi community became incorporated. They have local administrations with the power to adopt by-laws concerning public order, environmental protection, taxation for local purposes, roads and transportation, local business and the use of lands and resources. Two additional bodies - the Cree Board of Compensation and the Cree Regional Authority (CRA) - were set up under Quebec legislation.

The Inuit communities of Nunavik, located above the 55th parallel, are incorporated as municipalities under Quebec legislation. The Kativik Regional Government is their regional structure, and the Makivik Corporation was set up to protect the interests of the Inuit with regard to the implementation of the JBNQA. Both organizations were established under Quebec legislation.

Cree-Naskapi (of Quebec) Act

In 1984, the Parliament of Canada passed the Cree- Naskapi (of Quebec) Act to implement JBNQA and NEQA provisions regarding local government for the communities. This Act supersedes the Indian Act, except for matters pertaining to Indian status. It institutes a form of self-government and establishes the land management system for Category IA (Cree) and IA-N lands (Naskapi).

Cree-Naskapi Land Registry

The setting up and operation of a registry of rights and interests pertaining to Category IA and IA-N lands and buildings on those lands is provided for under the Cree-Naskapi (of Quebec) Act. The Land Registry System, which reports to INAC, includes the Central Land Registry Office and the Cree and Naskapi local offices.

Cree-Naskapi Commission

The Cree-Naskapi (of Quebec) Act also provided for the establishment of the Cree-Naskapi Commission (CNC), whose role is to investigate any representation submitted to it relating to implementation of the Act. It must also produce biennial reports on the application of the Act, following hearings. These reports are submitted to the Minister of Indian Affairs and Northern Development to be tabled in Parliament. The Cree-Naskapi Commission is made up of no more than three commissioners appointed by the Governor in Council, on the recommendation of the Cree Regional Authority and the Naskapi community.

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Background Summary of JBNQA and NEQA Implementation

The process of implementing the JBNQA and the NEQA has taken longer and has become more complex than anticipated.

In 1981, the House of Commons Standing Committee on Indian Affairs and Northern Development urged the federal government to address outstanding issues related to the JBNQA. After a departmental report, the Tait Report, was submitted in 1982, the federal government introduced a series of measures to address JBNQA implementation-related problems.

In June 1986, the federal Cabinet approved a process for fulfilling government obligations under the JBNQA and the NEQA. A federal negotiator, Mr. Andrew Croll, was appointed in order to direct this process.

In September 1990, the federal government signed the JBNQA Implementation Agreement with the Inuit and the NEQA Implementation Agreement with the Naskapi Band of Quebec. These agreements released the federal government from certain obligations under the JBNQA and NEQA. In return, the federal government paid a one-time grant of $22.8 million to the Inuit and $1.7 million to the Naskapi. The government made other commitments to these communities. Many activities have been launched within the framework of the agreements. Various working groups and procedures have been established, including procedures for settling disputes and the establishment of a JBNQA Implementation Forum with the Inuit. In 1990, the Department established the James Bay Implementation Office.

Discussions between the federal government and the James Bay Cree Nation regarding JBNQA implementation continued. In May 1992, the federal government signed an agreement providing for the building of a village for the Oujé-Bougoumou Cree and the setting up of a fund for the community's economic and social development. Having agreed that the Cree-Canada relationship was in need of rejuvenation and reform, the Government of Canada and the Cree Nation entered into a set of discussions and negotiations to renew and define this relationship and pursue the process of meeting their respective responsibilities under the JBNQA, the Constitution and the laws of Canada. To facilitate discussions between the federal ministers and the leaders of the James Bay Cree Nation in the context of these shared objectives, the parties agreed to establish a Round Table, bringing together the federal ministers concerned and the leaders of the James Bay Cree Nation. The Cree-Canada Round Table came into existence in 1998. Chief negotiator for the Crees was then Dr. Ted Moses. In 1999-2000, Dr. Moses was elected Grand Chief of the Grand Council of the Crees (of Quebec), and his former responsibilities as chief negotiator were assumed by Bill Namagoose.

Since the signing of the JBNQA and the NEQA, several federal departments and agencies have undertaken to meet the federal government's obligations under the agreements. Most of them also provide, within their respective mandates, funding for government programs to which the beneficiaries have continued access.

The signing of the agreements has brought about many changes in the role and jurisdiction of the federal government and the Department of Indian Affairs and Northern Development with respect to the Cree, Inuit and Naskapi.

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Indian and Northern Affairs Canada

In 1982, the Minister of Indian Affairs and Northern Development was given overall responsibility for co-ordinating all federal government activities related to implementation of both the JBNQA and the NEQA. To ensure that the federal government's obligations were met, the Department established the Quebec Claims Secretariat in February 1984. This organization later became known as the Northern Quebec Claims Implementation Secretariat. In 1986, the Department's Negotiations and Implementation Directorate at Headquarters assumed the responsibilities of the Northern Quebec Claims Implementation Secretariat, a situation which continued until the early 1990s. The James Bay Implementation Office then assumed these responsibilities.

Since the signing of the JBNQA and NEQA and the passing of legislation which established the Cree and Naskapi local administrations and regional government for Inuit communities, INAC's role has evolved from that of being a direct service provider to that of negotiator of financial agreements such that these communities could deliver their own programs. The Department still provides technical expertise in many areas and participates in the land and environmental management regimes covered by the agreements.

James Bay Implementation Office

The James Bay Implementation Office (JBIO) was created in November 1990 after the federal government signed implementation agreements with the Inuit and the Naskapi Band of Quebec. The JBIO is part of the Implementation Branch (Claims and Indian Government) of INAC and is located in Hull, Quebec.

Mandate

The JBIO's responsibilities include:

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1998-1999 Annual Report

Summary of Federal Government expenditures [Note 1]. ($), 1994-1999

  1994-1995 1995-1996 1996-1997 1997-1998 1998-1999
Indian and Northern
Affairs Canada
109,493,023 122,829,350  147,479,910
[Note 2]
 153,257,661 
[Note 3]
142,549,472  
[Note 4]
Canada Mortgage and
Housing Corporation

[Note 5]
42,289,524 43,713,641 37,865,052 36,899,544 37,605,100
Human Resources
Development Canada
8,599,218 10,103,816 11,341,260 13,797,812 13,834,170
Solicitor General Canada 2,913,253 4,750,889
[Note 6]
65,757,931 5,815,476 6,630,942
Health Canada 4,119,744 5,526,116 5,761,864 6,329,014 6,370,798
Transport Canada 1,452,271 986,726 2,206,666 4,115,661 3,314,833
National Defence 1,986,600 1,023,000 1,074,000 840,000 1,938,000
Canadian Heritage 2,258,260 2,135,492 1,842,141 1,774,719 1,834,424
Industry Canada 3,720,246 279,042  
[Note 7]
881,580 445,868 774,576
Natural Resources Canada
Canadian Forest Service
429,700 453,200 333,250 458,600 676,073
Environment Canada  
[Note 8]
650,527 188,898 
[Note 9]
176,740 685,059 401,024
Fisheries and Oceans Canada 1,959,100 847,169 744,470 367,205 380,000
Canada Economic Development 250,367 486,261 424,291 450,489 270,000
Justice Canada 40,000 40,000 nil 92,785 202,903
Total 180,161,833 193,363,600 215,889,155 225,329,893 216,782,315
Federal Expenditures between 1994 and 1999: $1,031,526,796
 

Activities and Expenditures of Federal Departments and Agencies, 1998-1999

Indian and Northern Affairs Canada

In 1998-1999, the total funding from Indian and Northern Affairs Canada allocated to Cree, Inuit, and Naskapi communities under the JBNQA and the NEQA, and as part of federal programs, reached $142,549,472. This figure excludes $23.6 million paid to the Quebec Government as part of a federal contribution towards funding the construction of the access road to Waskaganish. It also excludes $2.5 million distributed through Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation to the Société d'habitation du Québec under a special initiative on housing for the Inuit of Nunavik.

Population

As of June 30, 1998, there were 21,418 beneficiaries of the agreements, including 12,389 Cree in nine communities, 8,318 Inuit in 14 northern municipalities and 711 Naskapi in a single community.

Education

Education expenditures totalled $71,466,854, including the following:

  Cree Inuit Naskapi Total
Education services $47,664,421 $12,799,033 $1,838,849 $62,302,303
School infrastructure 4,523,911 2 ,203 119 394,025 7,121,055
Post-secondary students 323,598 88,14124,380 436,119
Total $52,511,930 $15,090,293 $2,257,254 $69,859,477
Number of students* 3,339 2,817 183 6,339

* Figures for 1998-1999 school year include pre-school to secondary students, and are supplied by the Quebec Department of Education

  Cree Inuit Naskapi Total
Science and technology
summer camps
$45,252 $53,143 $1,682 $100,077
Co-operative Education 237,221 198,948 9,665 445,834
Summer Career Placements 234,521 130,111 9,253 373,885
Work Experience Opportunities 166,785 104,283 nil 271,068
Total $683,779 $486,485 $20,600 $1,190,864
Capital, operations and maintenance

During 1998-1999, $57,954,807 was allocated to capital, operations and maintenance and to infrastructure projects in Cree, Inuit, and Naskapi communities, $10,915,583 in capital and $41,450,574 for operations and maintenance, and $5,588,650 for infrastructure projects. The breakdown of these expenditures by beneficiary group is as follows:

Cree
  • $9,942,583 in capital funding;
  • $38,730,623 for the operation and maintenance of communities;
  • $150,000 to purchase firefighter's uniforms;
  • $750,000 to the Cree Trappers' Association, as Federal participation in the construction of facilities in each Cree community, and to purchase equipment for the Association;
  • $550,000 to improve infrastructures in Waswanipi: the extension of the water and sewer system, drainage, roads, and layout work towards servicing a new public building in the community;
  • $700,000 in Nemaska to install an additional drinking water tank and further water tank for fire protection;
  • $217,450 to Wemindji for the operation and maintenance of the water and sewer systems, and to acquire computer equipment for Read Access to INAC's Indian Registration Systems; and
  • $33,100 for the decontamination of a house in Waskaganish.
 
Inuit
INAC provided Makivik Corporation $3,118,100 for the following infrastructure projects:
  • $3 million, including $1 million from Transport Canada, $1 million from Fisheries and Oceans Canada, and $1 million from INAC, as first annual payment under the $30-million 10-year (1998-2008) Northern Quebec Marine Infrastructure Agreement;
  • $57,500 in annual funding under the Chisasibi Inuit Housing Agreement (1996-2006); and
  • $60,600 dollars to cover part of the costs of equipment for the Nunavik Research Centre.
 
Naskapi
  • $973,000 in capital funding for the Naskapi community of Kawawachikamach;
  • $2,719, 951 for operation and maintenance of the community; and
  • $70,000 to repair water and sewer systems.
Electricity

Discussions on the provision of electricity supply at Waskaganish resumed at the end of 1998, when a preliminary tripartite meeting between the Waskaganish community, Hydro Quebec and INAC was held. The three parties then agreed to conduct rounds of bilateral discussions among themselves during 1999. The next tripartite meeting concerning the electricity transfer was put off until summer. However, the intensive negotiations that led to the signing of the agreement to build the road to Waskaganish ruled out holding other discussions regarding electricity among the parties prior to the end of 1998-1999.

During 1998-1999, the Department allocated $2,428,376 for electricity expenditures in Waskaganish.

Social Development

The Quebec Government provides social assistance services for most of the communities in the territory covered by the agreements. INAC delivers these services in the communities of Mistissini, Waswanipi and Kawawachikamach. During 1998-1999, it spent $2,971,670 - of which $28,418 was used to evacuate the population of Eastmain during a forest fire. This amount is distributed as follows:

Eastmain
$28,418
 
Mistissini
1,004,258
 
Waswanipi
997,488
 
Kawawachikamach
951,506
 
Total
$2,971,670

The Federal Government also participates in community social development by funding initiatives promoting health and better quality of life through the National Strategy for the Integration of Persons with Disabilities (SIPD) and the Federal Family Violence Initiative (IFV). The following amounts were provided in 1998-1999:

  Cree Inuit Naskapi Total
SNIPH $21,346 $25,744 $1,764 $48,854
IVF 140,938 169,200 11,635 321,773
Total $162,284 $194,944 $13,399 $370,627
Economic Development

INAC participates in Aboriginal economic development by directly funding Community Economic Development Organizations (CEDOs) as well as other sectoral organizations. CEDOs offer technical and financial support required to complete projects in key sectors of economic development such as tourism and outfitting operations. These organizations may become important springboards for creating businesses to strengthen local economies and increase economic opportunities and jobs in communities.

In 1998-1999, the Department provided:

  Cree Inuit Naskapi Total
Total $1,115,956 $915,441 $61,324 $2,092,721

The amount provided to the Cree includes $196,080 to cover the operating costs of the Cree Trappers' Association, with $35,600 being paid to the Cree Regional Authority for Cree Arts and CRAfts activities.

Environment

During 1998-1999, the Cree Regional Authority received $595,969 from the Department to continue work on investigation and restoration of contaminated sites, as part of the Environmental Issues Inventory and Remediation Plan in Cree communities.

Two sites, one in Wemindji and the other in Nemaska, were part of a detailed investigation; one site in Waskaganish was part of a preliminary investigation under a project aimed at adding Category IA lands to the community; and six sites contaminated by petroleum products were restored in Eastmain and in Waswanipi. Detailed investigation work was completed for Transport Canada, at the Nitchequon Camp Site, located some 250 kilometres north of Mistissini.

In 1998-1999, as during the previous year, groundwater quality monitoring was carried out on several waste disposal sites and on other contaminated sites.

Resource Access Negotiations

The Resource Access Negotiations Program (RAN) supports natural resources development by First Nations and Inuit by helping communities and their organizations set up business partnerships and stimulate investments in the natural resources sector.

In 1998-1999, the Department allocated $45,050 to the Mistissini community under RAN. This funding was aimed at covering expenditures related to sub-contract negotiation in the mining sector.

Indian Registration

INAC and the Cree and Naskapi communities are responsible for Indian registration. During 1998-1999, the Department provided $94,407 to the Cree and $4,698 to the Naskapi for their participation in maintaining the registry. The Cree also received $7,200 and the Naskapi $3,150 towards the purchase of computer material providing Read Access to INAC's Indian Registration.

Cree-Naskapi Land Registry

During 1998-1999, the Department's Central Land Registrar coordinated the activities of local Cree and Naskapi community registry offices. Comparing to previous years, the number of transactions registered by the service increased appreciably this year.

Upon the request of the Standing Joint Committee for the Scrutiny of Regulations, minor changes were made to the Cree-Naskapi Land Registry Regulations, in collaboration with all partners concerned. The Central Land Registrar also visited, on an ad hoc basis, communities that had expressed a need to provide local registrars with training and to meet with Band Councils. Mapmaking and colour mosaics were produced in 1998-1999 for Chisasibi, Eastmain, Waskaganish, and Wemindji communities.

During this period, the registration of mortgages in Cree and Naskapi territory clearly progressed.

Initiatives under "Gathering Strength: Canada's Aboriginal Action Plan"

During 1998-1999, INAC provided funds to carrying out the following projects in Cree, Inuit, and Naskapi communities, as part of initiatives under "Gathering Strength: Canada's Aboriginal Action Plan":

Other Financial Assistance

The Cree Regional Authority was allocated $700,000 from INAC to cover negotiations regarding implementation of the JBNQA. The CRA was allocated $18,500 to conduct an assessment of Cree community fire protection needs and to prepare an appropriate action plan. $5,000 was also allocated to the CRA to develop a promotional document designed for youth.

Funding of $25,000 was allocated to the Waskaganish community to carry out a study examining the various needs of the Cree people living outside their affiliated communities. In addition, the Department allocated $46,817 to Mistissini towards funding a computerization project for the Land Registry System Service. Ouje-Bougoumou received $50,000 to undertake the preparation of a capital plan.

The Naskapi Nation of Kawawachikamach was allocated financial aid to the amount of $73,000 to cover the costs of negotiation of the five-year agreement for Capital funding, and of the translation of the JBNQA into Naskapi.

The Makivik Corporation received a INAC grant of $282,500 towards the cost of implementing the JBNQA. The Kativik Regional Government received $5,000 to develop promotional material on programs aimed at improving job market employability and integration of Nunavik Youth.

Cree-Naskapi Commission

During 1998-1999, the Cree- Naskapi Commission was allocated $646,855 for its activities.

             
INAC Expenditures ($), 1998-1999
  Cree Inuit Naskapi Total
Education services $47,664,421 $12,799,033 $1,838,849 $62,302,303
School Infrastructure 4,523,911 2,203,119 394 025 7,121,055
Post-secondary Assistance 323,598 88,141 24,380 436,119
Cultural Centres 194,376 222,137 n/a 416,513
Employment programs 683,779 486,485 20,600 1,190,864
  53,390,085 15,798,915 2,277,854 71,466,854
Capital 9,942,583 n/a 973,000 10,915,583
Operation and Maintenance 38,730,623 n/a 2,719,951 41,450,574
Infrastructure-related projects 2,400,550 3,118,100 70,000 5,588,650
  51,073,756 3,118,100 3,762,951 57,954,807
Electricity Waskaganish 2,428,376 n/a n/a 2,428,376
Social Assistance 2,020,164 n/a 951,506 2,971,670
SIPD-IVF Programs 162,284 194,944 13,399 370,627
  2,182,448 194,944 964,905 3,342,297
Economic Development 1,115,956 915,441 61,324 2,092,721
Environment 595,969 n/a nil 595,969
Resource Access Negotiations 45,050 nil nil 45,050
Indian Registration 101,607 n/a 7,848 109,455
Education Reform 296,296 154,975 nil 451,271
Water and Sewer Initiative 1,710,000 nil nil 1,710,000
Innovative Housing Initiative nil nil 500,000 500,000
  2,006,296 154,975 500,000 2,661,271
Other Financial Assistance 845,317 287,500 73,000 1,205,817
Sub total $113,784,860 $20,469,875 $7,647,882 $141,902,617
Cree-Naskapi Commission n/a n/a n/a 646,855
Total       $142,549,472

Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation

The Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation (CMHC), in co-operation with INAC, is directly involved in the Cree and Naskapi communities through its housing program funded under section 95 of the National Housing Act.

The Housing Program for the Inuit is administered by the Société d'habitation du Québec, under Federal- Provincial cost-sharing agreements.

In 1999, 43 new subsidized housing units were added to the housing stock in Nunavik, under a one-year $10 million agreement between the Governments of Canada and Quebec.

In 1999, as part of the Youth Employment Strategy, three young Cree and six young Inuit received a grant from the CMHC to gain experience in housing matters in their community.

CMHC Expenditures ($), 1998
  Cree Inuit Naskapi Total
Federal subsidies $8,931,200 $27,909,200 $764,700 $37,605,100
Number of subsidized units 1,629 1,674 109 3,412

Human Resources Development Canada

In early 1999, agreements were renewed with the Kativik Regional Government for the Inuit, with the Cree Regional Authority for the Cree communities, and with the Assembly of First Nations of Quebec and Labrador for the Naskapi. These agreements reflect the new Aboriginal Human Services Development Strategy.

  
HRDC Expenditures ($), 1998-1999
  Cree Inuit Naskapi Total
Aboriginal Labour Market Program $ 4,796,351 $5,716,703 $307,112 $10,820,166
First Nations and Inuit Child Care Initiative 1,170,321 1,027,000 73,425 2,270,746
Youth Employment Initiatives 221,254 215,790 6,214 443,258
Transitional Jobs Fund 300,000 nil nil 300,000
HRDC activities nil nil nil nil
Total $6,487,926 $6,959,493 $386,751 $13,834,170

Solicitor General of Canada

During 1998-1999, the Aboriginal Policing Directorate of the Department of the Solicitor General of Canada followed up on the implementation of the three tripartite agreements on police services, one with the Cree Regional Authority, one with the Naskapi, and one with the Kativik Regional Government, each involving the Quebec Government.

Correctional Service of Canada (CSC) pursued its strategy of developing and delivering programs specially tailored to Aboriginal people. CSC continued to provide liaison officer services in each institution through Native Paralegal Services of Quebec which is responsible for counselling Aboriginal offenders in federal penitentiaries and providing correctional planning to facilitate the safe re-entry of Aboriginal offenders into society.

In addition, funds were allocated to various treatment programs in the areas of substance abuse, sexual violence, literacy training. CSC also provided funding for the accommodation, supervision and treatment in halfway houses during parole.

  
Solicitor General Canada expenditures ($), 1998-1999
  Cree Inuit Naskapi Total
Tripartite agreements $2,937,240 $3,304,086 $200,200 $6,441,526
Native Paralegal Services of Quebec 21,733 15,866 nil 37,599
Adapted correctional programs* 27,639 20,178 nil 47,817
Parole-related services 39,000 65,000 nil 104,000
  88,372 101,044 nil 189,416
Total $3,025,612 $3,405,130 $200,200 $6,630,942

* These amounts do not include the direct costs of incarceration.

Health Canada

During 1998-1999, Health Canada's Medical Services Branch, Quebec Region, provided $6,370,798 for various health care programs in the Cree, Inuit and Naskapi communities.

The Department primarily funded projects in the areas of: AIDS prevention, diabetes, tuberculosis, mental health, alcohol, drugs and solvent abuse. In addition, they contributed to funding of the Brighter Future program for child development, and financially participated in the Prenatal Nutrition Program (including development) and in the new Head Start Initiative, so as to help communities improve the physical and mental wellbeing of children and their families.

Health Canada is also encouraging students in these communities to work in the healthcare sector through the Indian and Inuit Health Careers Program. No request was made regarding this program for this year. The Department also paid for Non-Insured Health Benefits for beneficiaries living outside their affiliated communities.

  
Health Canada expenditures ($), 1998-1999
  Cree Inuit Naskapi Total
National Native Alcohol and
Drug Abuse Program
$650,800 $692,716 $47,000 $1,390,516
Solvent Abuse 144,163 124,231 8,009 276,403
Brighter Futures 1,062,436 924,354 59,636 2,046,426
Prenatal Nutrition 114,032 96,242 6,172 216,446
Prenatal Development 13,848 10,309 639 24,796
Head Start Initiative 226,631 nil nil 226,631
Mental Health 789,269 697,512 45,160 1,531,941
Aids nil 10,000 nil 10,000
Diabetes 50,000 nil nil 50,000
Training - Tuberculosis nil 15,000 nil 15,000
Indian and Inuit Health Careers nil nil nil nil
Non-Insured Health Benefits 369,001 209,622 4,016 582,639
Total $3,420,180 $2,779,986 $170,632 $6,370,798

Transport Canada

Transport Canada pursued its initiatives among the Cree, Inuit, and Naskapi communities, investing a total of $3,314,833 during 1998-1999.

Under the contribution agreement respecting the transfer of management of the Kuujjuaq Airport, Transport Canada paid $1,001,000 to the Kativik Regional Government. Investments totalling $1,024,800 were also made in Kuujjuaq for the aggregate required for the foundation and paving of the main landing strip. The Kuujjuaq airport improvements undertaken this year will be completed in 2001-2002.

In 1998-1999, the Schefferville Naskapi and the Innu nation of Matimekush-Lac-John (Schefferville) received $217,733, the Eastmain Cree $178,700, the Waskaganish Cree $175,100, and the Wemindji Cree $165, 700 under their contracts to operate and maintain their respective airports.

At the Schefferville Airport, outdoor renovations totalled $273,500 and repairs on the landing strip, $167,6000. An electric fence costing $33,200 was also installed to improve security.

Transport Canada negotiated with the Naskapi and the Innu nation of Matimekush-Lac-John (Schefferville) for the purpose of founding a joint non-profit organization charged with the complete transfer of management of the Schefferville Airport. An agreement is expected to be signed in April 1999.

Transport Canada allocated $1 million through INAC to Makivik Corporation under the Northern Quebec Marine Infrastructure Agreement.

Under a memorandum of understanding between Transport Canada and the Kativik Regional Government, the Northern Quebec Region now has a Marine Inspector, at a cost of $77,500 in 1998-1999.

  
Transport Canada expenditures ($), 1998-1999
  Cree Inuit Naskapi Total
Airport management n/a $1,001,000 n/a $1,001,000
Operation and Maintenance 519,500 n/a 217,733 737,233
Capital n/a 1,024,800 474,300 1,499,100
Training n/a 77,500 n/a 77,500
Northern Quebec Marine
Infrastructure Agreement
n/a * n/a *
Total $519,500 $2,103,300 $692,033 $3,314,833

* The amount of $1 million provided through INAC is not included in the table.

National Defence

Land Forces Quebec Area (LFQA) is responsible for two activities: the Canadian Ranger and Junior Ranger Programs. During 1998-1999, the Department of National Defence allocated $1,938,000 for these programs.

The Canadian Rangers are volunteers between the age of 18 and 65 who provide support, if needed, for members of the Canadian Forces in remote and isolated areas. The LFQA currently supports 14 Canadian Rangers patrols comprised within the 2nd Canadian Rangers' Patrol Group (2 CRPG) on the territory covered by the agreements, with some 450 members, mainly Inuit, participating in this program. On January 1st, 1999, the avalanche at Kangiqsualujjuaq (George River) killed nine and injured several others. The Patrol Rangers from this community took the lead in attempts to save lives and free the bodies that had been buried in the snow; they went into action in the middle of the night, in almost total darkness. In the following hours, the Kuujjuaq Patrol Rangers took over, bringing support and first aid to the townspeople, who were in a state of shock.

In March 1999, the 2nd CRPG Canadian Rangers were awarded the Chief of the Defence Staff Commendation for their courage and outstanding intervention during this disaster.

The Department also offers a free activity program (Junior Rangers) for Youth between the age of 12 and 18 based on traditional Native culture and disciplines, and on modern living habits. More than 350 young girls and boys from the JBNQA and NEQA areas participated in this program.

In 1998, the Department of National Defence cosigned an agreement with Environment Canada, the Kativik Regional Government and the Quebec government for environmental clean-up and restoration at 42 Mid-Canada Line sites.

Canadian Heritage

The Citizens' Participation Directorate of the Department of Canadian Heritage supports a wide range of activities in Northern Quebec, particularly Aboriginal communication networks, friendship centres, protection of Aboriginal languages and cultures, support for Aboriginal organizations, and initiatives to improve the situation of Aboriginal women. During 1998-1999, Canadian Heritage provided support amounting to $1,834,424 to Aboriginal communities in Northern Quebec, as follows:

Canadian Heritage Expenditures ($), 1998-1999
Northern Native Broadcast Access Program
James Bay Cree Communications Society
$292,200
Taqramiut Nipingat Incorporated (TNI)
907,317
 
Aboriginal Representative Organizations Program
 
Makivik Corporation
201,645
 
Native Friendship Centre Program
 
Senneterre Native Friendship Centre Inc.*
114,158
Val-d'Or Native Friendship Centre Inc.*
171,237
 
Cree Indian Friendship Centre of Chibougamau Inc.
142,697
 
Aboriginal Women's Program
 
Cree Women' Council
5,170
Total
$1,834,424

* The services Provided by these Native friendship centers are not offered exclusively to the agreements beneficiaries.

Industry Canada

Industry Canada, through Aboriginal Business Canada, expended $774,576 during 1998-1999 on 20 projects, including the establishment of Aboriginal businesses, and the development of a variety of business and marketing plans.

Industry Canada expenditures ($), 1998-1999
  Cree Inuit Naskapi Total
Aboriginal Business Canada $545,375 $229,201 nil $774,576
Total       $774,576

Natural Resources Canada

The Department of Natural Resource Canada (NRCan) is active on the territory covered by the JBNQA and NEQA through the Canadian Forest Service and Geomatics Canada.

Canadian Forest Service

In 1998-1999, the Canadian Forest Service proceeded with the implementation of the First Nations Forestry Program (FNFP). Jointly funded by INAC and the Department of Natural Resource Canada, the objective of this program is to increase the forest development capabilities of Aboriginal communities. In addition to a forestry component, the program offers components focussing on the economic development of Aboriginal Forestry-that is, the development of Aboriginal businesses, cooperation between communities, and partnerships with the forest industry.

In 1998-1999, projects and activities covered by the FNFP were completed in the Cree communities of Waswanipi, Mistissini, and Ouje-Bougoumou.

The A-Pit-See-Win Cooperative of Waswanipi received $68,700 to carry out checkerboard clear-cutting and regeneration cutting, site preparation work and reforesting over an area of 575 hectares, for a total of 480,000 trees planted. Over 60 kilometres of road construction and renovation were also completed.

In addition to the FNFP contribution, Waswanipi received $532,900 from the Canada Model Forests Program to implement the Cree Model Forest of Waswanipi.

The Eenatuk Forestry Corporation of Mistissini received a contribution of $60,883 and carried out checkerboard clear-cutting, release cutting, site preparation work, and precommercial thinning over a total area of 575 hectares. In addition, a total of 200,000 trees were planted, and 11 kilometres of forest roads were built.

In Ouje-Bougoumou, a $13,600 contribution was used to organize a geomatics training activity related to forestry. Two community members were thus able to perfect their knowledge in this field.

Canadian Forest Service expenditures ($), 1998-1999
  Cree Inuit Naskapi Total
First Nation Forestry Program $143,183 n/a nil $143,183
Canada's Model Forest Network 532,890 n/a nil 532,890
Total       $676,073
Geomatics Canada

Geomatics Canada, a branch of the Department of Natural Resource Canada, is active in the territory covered by the agreements through the Quebec Client Liaison Unit of its local representative, the Eastern Regional Operations Centre, Legal Survey Division.

In the region's Aboriginal communities, the Quebec Client Liaison Unit is mainly involved in managing survey contracts, aerial photography, map verification, and mapping. In 1998-1999, it performed these activities to produce colour mosaics for the communities of Chisasibi, Eastmain, Waskaganish, and Wemindji.

The Quebec Client Liaison Unit also produces descriptions of the extent and location of property interests that must be registered on Cree and Naskapi lands. It regularly provides professional advice and opinions on land management and the land tenure system; implementation of the land information system (LIS); and questions originating in geomatics-related disciplines.

Environment Canada and the Canadian Environmental Assessment Agency

Environment Canada and the Canadian Environmental Assessment Agency (CEAA) work jointly with INAC and Fisheries and Oceans Canada on implementing the environmental protection and social environment regimes provided under sections 22 and 23 of the JBNQA, and the hunting, fishing, and trapping regime provided under section 24.

Environment Canada

In 1998-1999, Environment Canada, through their representatives on the James Bay Advisory Committee on the Environment, the Kativik Environmental Advisory Committee, and the Hunting, Fishing, and Trapping Co-ordinating Committee, continued to assist in the implementation of the environmental protection and social environment regimes, as well as the hunting, fishing, and trapping regime. This year, an Environment Canada representative chaired the James Bay Advisory Committee on the Environment. For 1998-1999, Environment Canada's expenditures related to these activities totalled $40,000.

The Canadian Wildlife Service (CWS) maintained its efforts to preserve the migratory bird populations found on the territory covered by the conventions. The CWS's expenditures of $100,000 were devoted to preparing American Black Duck and Canada Goose inventories, studying and conducting band work on the Canada Goose, and preparing the dispersal study of the Harlequin Duck. Funding of Native participation in the winter meeting of the Atlantic Flyway Council's Technical Committee was also maintained.

Environment Canada's participation in the tripartite agreement concluded with the Department of National Defence and the Kativik Regional Government required expenditures of $60,000 in 1998-1999. The agreement covers the investigation, restoration, dismantling and renovation of 42 Mid-Canada Line sites along the 55th parallel in Quebec.

Environment Canada operated 18 meteorological stations of the Atmospheric Environment Program on the territory covered by the agreements, including three upper-air stations. In 1998-1999, the Department also established three lighTNIng stations, located in La Grande-4, in Wemindji, and in Kuujjuarapik.

Canadian Environmental Assessment Agency

Under sections 22 and 23 of the JBNQA, the Canadian Environmental Assessment Agency supports the federal administrator and provides advice and administrative support to the various committees established under the JBNQA. CEAA's expenditures in 1998-1999 were $201,024. This includes the $95,000 Federal contribution towards the maintenance and the joint funding, with the Quebec Government, of the James Bay Advisory Committee on the Environment, and of the Kativik Environmental Advisory Committee. The operating expenditures of the Evaluating Committee are also included in these contributions, as well as the costs linked to the activities of the federal review panels (COFEX - North and COFEX - South). Throughout the year, CEAA was responsible for providing the executive secretariats of both these evaluating committees.

In 1999, CEAA contributed to the environmental evaluation of an access road project in Waskaganish, through COFEX-South, and to a marine infrastructures project in Kangiqsualujjuaq, in which COFEXNorth participated. During the environmental evaluation of these two projects, CEAA acted to facilitate and synchronize as much as possible the various phases of the environmental evaluating processes, in accordance with the JBNQA and the Canadian Environmental Assessment Act.

Finally, the Canadian Environmental Assessment Agency opened a new regional office in Sainte-Foy, Quebec which is responsible for managing CEAA activities related to sections 22 and 23 of the JBNQA.

Environment Canada and CEAA Expenditures ($), 1998-1999
Environment Canada Committees expenditures
$40,000
Canadian Wildlife Service
100,000
 
Mid-Canada Line Agreement
60,000
 
200,000
 
 
Canadian Environmental Assessment Agency
201,024
 
Total
$401,024

Fisheries and Oceans Canada

Fisheries and Oceans Canada administers several research and development projects in Northern Quebec through its Laurentian region.

Through the Laurentian Region Science Branch, the Department participates with INAC, Environment Canada and the CEAA in implementing the social and environmental protection regimes, as stipulated in sections 22 and 23 of the JBNQA. Through the Laurentian Fisheries Management Branch, it participates in the hunting, fishing, and trapping regime, as stipulated in section 24.

In 1998-1999, DFO allocated $1 million through INAC to Makivik Corporation under the Northern Quebec Marine Infrastructure Agreement.

North Shore and Northern Quebec Sector - Fisheries management

In 1998-1999, the Aboriginal Fisheries Strategy (AFS) and the five-year (1996-2000) Northern Quebec beluga management plan continued. As in the past, activities were carried out jointly by the 14 Nunavik municipal corporations, the Hunting, Fishing and Trapping Association of Nunavik, the Makivik Corporation, the Kativik Regional Government, and DFO.

For the last quarter of 1999, the Department provided funding to assign a community officer, on a seasonal basis, to the municipal corporation of each of the 14 Nunavik communities. This officer's duties included statistical monitoring of the beluga and walrus hunt, beluga sample gathering and relaying of weekly harvest data. DFO also provided funds under the contribution agreement between DFO and the Makivik Corporation to provide expertise, tools and necessary equipment to analyse the harvested samples. For the fourth year in a row, funding was allocated under an agreement with the Kativik Regional Government to coordinate the work and observation patrols of six Aboriginal fishery guardians and to plan patrols by a DFO-hired multidisciplinary officer in Inukjuak.

In the course of aerial patrols carried out each year in Nunavik, the Fisheries Management Branch representatives visited all of the territory communities to meet with their Inuit partners.

Science Branch

The Maurice Lamontagne Institute conducted several research projects in Northern Canada, including numerous oceanographic missions. However, budget cuts forced many initiatives to be postponed. Management has maintained a critical number of research projects, some of which in collaboration with the Arctic and Central Regions, from Inuit organizations and universities, such as:

Oceans Directorate

A research project in the field of human health has been initiated in 1998. Among the compounds studied, PCB generally represents one of the most threatening organic contaminant groups for human health.

Fisheries and Oceans Canada expenditures ($), Laurentian region, 1998-1999
  Cree Inuit Naskapi Total
Northern Quebec Marine Infrastructure Agreement n/a * n/a *
Community officers expenditures n/a $138,000 n/a $138,000
Agreement with Makivik Corporation n/a 12,000 n/a 12,000
Agreement with Kativik Regional Government n/a 230,000 n/a 230,000
Total n/a 380,000 n/a $380,000

* The amount of $1 million provided through INAC is not included in the table.

Canada Economic Development

Canada Economic Development (CED) was formerly known as the Federal Office of Regional Development (Quebec). Its priorities for 1998-1999 included technological development aimed at strengthening small and medium-size enterprises (SMEs), developing markets, fostering entrepreneurship and a sound businesses climate, spurring local economic development, and enhancing the capacity of regions to adapt. These priorities are aimed, on the one hand, to enable all regions of Québec to achieve their potential, and, on the other, to more specifically aid certain target clienteles-in particular, youth, Aboriginals and rural populations-to become a part of an entrepreneurial dynamic. CED allocated funding to Inuit communities under the IDEA-SME Program which provides services and funds activities in the following areas: innovation, research and development, and design; development of market and export trade; and, entrepreneurship and business climate development.

Under the Community Futures Program, the Community Futures Development Corporation (CFDC) made available to Cree communities an investment fund of over $1 million to support strategic projects proposed by businesspeople. It also provides business start-up and management consulting services. During 1998-1999, the CFDC received $240,000 for its operations.

Canada Economic Development expenditures ($), 1998-1999
  Cree Inuit Naskapi Total
IDEA-SME Program nil $ 30,000 nil $30,000
Community Futures Program 240,000 nil nil 240,000
Total $240,000 30,000 nil $270,000

Justice Canada

The Department of Justice, through the Aboriginal Justice Directorate, in partnership with Aboriginal communities and the provinces, develops long-term community based programming that facilitates the transfer of responsibilities for the administration of justice to Aboriginal people and encourages a reduction in crime and incarceration rates.

In 1998-1999, a number of discussions took place with the Cree, Inuit and the Naskapi of Quebec to pave the way to developing and implementing new communitybased programs under the Aboriginal Justice Strategy.

The Aboriginal Justice Directorate, through the Native Courtworker Program also made the following contribution during 1998-1999: Cree $98,643; Inuit $84,069; and Naskapi $20,191, for a total of $202,903.

Canadian Food Inspection Agency

In 1999, the Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) inspected the meat produced at a commercial caribou slaughter in Northern Quebec. A team of two inspectors and a veterinarian travelled to Lake Mollet in order to supervise the slaughter of caribou in temporary facilities managed by Nunavik Arctic Foods. The Agency also certified the meat for sale in interprovincial and international markets. The CFIA inspectors and veterinarian stayed four weeks at Lake Mollet, during which time they inspected nearly 4000 caribou carcasses. The CFIA and the Kawawachikamach Naskapi Band of Quebec also signed a Caribou Inspection Service Agreement. However, inspections were cancelled at the request of the Naskapi because the 1998 migration route of the caribou did not allow for profitable harvesting of this resource.

Return to Table of Contents 





1999-2000 Annual Report

Highlights

During 1999-2000, the following activities highlight the implementation of the JBNQA and NEQA:

Respecting the Cree

Respecting the Inuit

Respecting the Naskapi

2000-2001 Preliminary Report on Implementation Activities

Summary of Federal Government expenditures [Note 10]. ($), 1995-2000

  1995-1996 1996-1997 1997-1998 1998-1999 1999-2000
Indian and Northern
Affairs Canada
122,829,350 147,479,910
[Note 11]
153,257,661 
[Note 12]
142,549,472 
[Note 13]
160,476,808  
[Note 14]
Canada Mortgage and
Housing Corporation

[Note 15]
43,713,641 37,865,052 36,899,544 37,605,100 37,620,700
Human Resources
Development Canada
10,103,816 11,341,260 13,797,812 13,834,170 15,040,039
Health Canada 5,526,116 5,761,864 6,329,014 6,370,798 7,611,209
Transport Canada 986,726 2,206,666 4,115,661 3,314,833 7,263,476 
[Note 16]
Solicitor General Canada 4,750,889 5,757,931 5,815,476 6,630,942 6,675,144
National Defence 1,023,000 1,074,000 840,000 1,938,000 2,021,000
Canadian Heritage 2,135,492 1,842,141 1,774,719 1,834,424 1,834,424
Natural Resources Canada
Canadian Forest Service
453,200 333,250 458,600 676,073 655,100
Canada Economic Development 486,261 424,291 450,489 270,000 555,299
Justice Canada 40,000 nil 92,785 202,903 529,265
Industry Canada 279,042  
[Note 17]
881,580 445,868 774,576 520,537
Environment Canada  
[Note 18]
188,898 
[Note 19]
176,740 685,059 401,024 494,429
Fisheries and Oceans Canada 847,169 744,470 367,205 380,000 414,000
Total 193,363,600 215,889,155 225,329,893 216,782,315 241,711,430
Federal Expenditures between 1995 and 2000: $1,093,076,393

Activities and Expenditures of Federal Departments and Agencies, 1998-1999

Indian and Northern Affairs Canada

During 1999-2000, total funding allocated by Indian and Northern Affairs Canada to Cree, Inuit and Naskapi communities under the JBNQA and NEQA and federal programs amounted to $160,476,808. This sum excludes the last payment of $400,000 to the government of Quebec from the federal contribution to funding of the construction of an access road in Waskaganish.

Population

As at June 30, 1999, 21,910 people were beneficiaries of the agreements, including 12,674 Cree in nine communities, 8,510 Inuit in 14 northern municipalities and 726 Naskapi in a single community.

Education

The Department allocated $74,853,295 dollars for education expenditures including the following:

  • Education services and school infrastructure provided to the Cree School Board, the Kativik School Board, and the Central Québec School Board which serves the Naskapi, through the Quebec Department of Education, and expenditures for post-secondary provided directly from INAC.
  Cree Inuit Naskapi Total
Education services $49,812,446 $13,473,376 $1,952,449 $65,238,271
School infrastructure 3,487,419 3,713,496 246,867 7,447,782
Post-secondary students 273,470 62,754 40,175 376,399
Total $53,573,335 $17,249,626 $2,239,491 $73,062,392
Number of students* 3,375 2,919 198 6,492

* Figures for 1999-2000 school year include pre-school to secondary students, and are supplied by the Quebec Department of Education.

  • $299,402 to the Avataq Cultural Institute for the Inuit and $194,376 to the First Nation Confederacy of Cultural Education Centres / National Association of Cultural Education Centres for the James Bay Cree Cultural Centre; and
  • $1,297,065 to cover expenditures under INAC programs for Inuit and First Nations young people set up under the federal government Youth Employment Strategy, as follows:
  Cree Inuit Naskapi Total
Science and technology
summer camps
$45,021 $52,873 $1,673 $99,567
First Nations and Inuit
Co-operative Education
219,051 183,353 9,013 411,417
Summer Career Placements 278,148 154,336 11,033 443,517
Work Experience Opportunities 210,764 131,800 nil 342,564
Total $752,984 $522,362 $21,719 $1,297,065
Capital, operations and maintenance

During 1999-2000, $70,347,846 was allocated to capital, operations and maintenance and infrastructure-related projects in Cree, Inuit and Naskapi communities, $17,559,953 for capital projects and $43,717,054 for operations and maintenance, and $ 9,070,839 for particular infrastructure projects. Expenditures allocation by beneficiary group is the following:

Cree
  • $16,324,053 in capital works grants (including $2.6 million for the purchase of vehicles, materials and communications equipment in connection with fire prevention, and $3.78 million for the construction and renovation of police stations in all Cree communities);
  • $40,754,054 for operations and maintenance of communities;
  • $369,000 to the Cree Regional Authority complete purchasing of various fire fighting equipment in Cree communities and $201,499 to cover training costs for Cree participating in fire protection services and in marine search and rescue missions;
  • $24,000 to cover the cost of works required to complete connecting the medical clinic to the water supply and wastewater network of Waskaganish;
  • $90,000 for operations and maintenance of the Chisasibi community centre;
  • $192,000 for the purchase of equipment used to increase the pump capacity of the Mistissini water supply system, and $240,000 for continuing renovations work on the community's municipal infrastructure;
  • $105,000 to the Cree Regional Authority to cover the costs of a study on waste management in Cree communities on the east shore of James Bay; and
  • $29,840 for the purchase of a service vehicle to meet the needs of the electric power station at Waskaganish.
Inuit
INAC provided $ 7,819,500 to the Makivik Corporation for infrastructure projects as follows:
  • $7,612,000 allocated under the Northern Quebec Marine Infrastructure Agreement, including supplementary funds to finance the purchase of a second set of equipment required to accelerate work on infrastructure.
  • $57,500 in annual funding to the community of Chisasibi under the Inuit Housing Agreement (1996-2006), to address the housing needs of the area's Inuit population; and
  • $150,000 to cover part of the costs of equipment for the Nunavik Research Centre.
Naskapi
  • $1,235,900 in capital funding grants to the Naskapi; and,
  • $2,963,000 for operations and maintenance of the community.
Electricity

In 1999-2000, the construction of the access road delayed new discussions regarding electric supply in Waskaganish. INAC spent $3,324,352 to supply electricity to Waskaganish.

Social Development

INAC provided $2,764,542—including $700 for the July 1998 evacuation of disaster victims in Eastmain— to social assistance services in Mistissini, Waswanipi and Kawawachikamach. In the remaining JBNQA communities, these services were provided by the government of Quebec. The sums provided by Canada break down as follows:

Eastmain
$700
 
Mistissini
981,988
 
Waswanipi
907,620
 
Kawawachikamach
874,234
 
Total
$2,764,542

The federal government also participates in community social development by funding initiatives promoting health and better quality of life through the National Strategy for the Integration of Persons with Disabilities (SIPD) and the Federal Initiative on Family Violence (IFV). The following amounts were provided in 1999-2000:

  Cree Inuit Naskapi Total
SNIPH $19,559 $25,744 $1,764 $47,067
IVF 112,001 169,200 11,635 292,836
Total $131,560 $194,944 $13,399 $339,903
Economic Development

INAC participates in Aboriginal economic development through direct funding of Community Economic Development Organizations (CEDOs) and other sectoral organizations. These organizations provide technical and financial assistance to projects related to economic development.

In 1999-2000, the Department provided:

  Cree Inuit Naskapi Total
Total $1,232,806 $870,441 $52,623 $2,155,870

Funding allocated to the Cree included $381,880 for the Cree Trappers' Association, and $35,600 for the Cree Regional Authority to support Cree arts and CRAfts activities.

Environment

During 1999-2000, the Cree Regional Authority received $423,509 from INAC for projects under the Environment Issues Inventory and Remediation Plan in Cree communities.

Investigation work was performed in Chisasibi, Mistissini, Wemindji and Nemaska. A site along the Waskaganish access road was restored, and petroleum products storage installations in Eastmain were eliminated. Groundwater quality monitoring was carried out at waste disposal sites and contaminated sites in several Cree communities. Finally, a geo-referenced database was developed and set up for CRA offices-in particular, to manage data collected within the framework of the Inventory over the last several years.

 INAC allocated $58,483 to cover the cost of restoration and investigation of two sites in Waskaganish. Collection reservoirs for waste oils were also installed in Nemaska and Mistissini. INAC also spent $98,832 to complete investigation work and groundwater quality monitoring on two sites that had been contaminated by petroleum products in Kawawachikamach, and to complete the installation of above ground collection and storage reservoirs for waste oils and other hazardous products in that community.

Indian Registration

INAC and the Cree and Naskapi communities are responsible for Indian registration records. During 1999-2000, the Department provided $95,817 to the Cree and $4,481 to the Naskapi, for their participation in maintaining the registry.

Cree-Naskapi Land Registry

In 1999-2000, the Central Registrar, in collaboration with Cree and Naskapi communities, completed the opening of all local registration offices; the nine Cree offices and the single Naskapi office are now fully operational.

The community of Mistissini piloted a project for computerizing the data of various service registers. This computerized system is now accessible in all communities that wish to use it. A seminar on using this software was held in Mistissini in September 1999, at a cost to INAC of $18,000, for Cree and Naskapi local registrars. Further training on legal aspects, and on defining and mapping ownership interests was also provided.

In addition, aerial photos were made throughout the year and registration plans were completed for the communities of Nemaska, Mistissini, Ouje-Bougoumou, and Waswanipi. Colour mosaics and cartography were provided for these same communities.

Initiatives under "Gathering Strength: Canada 's Aboriginal Action Plan"

In follow-up to the initiatives of Gathering strength, INAC allocated the following amounts for completing projects in Cree, Inuit and Naskapi communities in 1999-2000:

  • Education Reform 

    $728,492 to the Cree School Board, $592,122 to the Kativik School Board and $30,000 to the Central Québec School Board for the Naskapi, to strengthen management and governance skills in education, improve the effectiveness of classroom instruction, encourage the participation of communities and parents, and support the transition from school to the job market.

  • Water and Sewer Initiative 

    $240,000 to continue work renovating municipal infrastructure in Mistissini, by installing and commissioning a wastewater treatment; $1 million for the costs of phase 1 of a project of aerated ponds for ha dling wastewater in Nemaska; and $500,000 for work to expand the wastewater treatment plant in Waskaganish.

  • Income security reform 

    $69,080 to provide training in the use of a computer to members of the Kawawachikamach community who are either seeking jobs or information related to the job market.
Governance, administration and accountability (previously Governance Capacity Building Initiative)
  • $25,000 to cover the cost of training young Cree from Waskaganish in video production, journalism and media relations, and $66,500 to develop and provide training programs for managers, employees and councillors of the Chisasibi Cree Nation in governance, management and financial accountability.
  • $84,741 for two projects submitted by the Makivik Corporation, one to improve the management and accounting skills of administrators and employees of the Hunting, Fishing and Trapping Association of Nunavik, and to assist and define the roles of various organizations in Nunavik devoted to wildlife management; the other to increase management skills within the Inuit Land Corporations.
  • $30,000 for the Naskapi Nation of Kawawachikamach to aid in developing an accounting and financial/ administration software.
Opportunity fund and resource acquisition Initiative
  • $75,000 to fund the construction of a Cree cultural village in Eastmain, $3,750 to assist start-up of an audiovisual company in Ouje-Bougoumou, $ 50,000 as participation in the construction of a gas station in Mistissini, and $25,000 to a construction firm in Chisasibi for the purchase of a heavy vehicle.
Other Financial Assistance

The Cree Regional Authority was allocated $557,500 to cover the costs related to negotiations surrounding implementation of the JBNQA and $65,000 for a feasibility survey on establishing a Cree Native Art and CRAft Association. INAC also allocated $45,000 to Mistissini to finish a project aimed at computerizing the Land Registry Service.

The Naskapi Nation of Kawawachikamach was granted $14,190 for the purpose of negotiating a renewed operations and maintenance agreement for the community.

The Makivik Corporation received $291,573 from INAC towards the costs of implementing the JBNQA. It also received $133,450 to carry out the "Anchorage" project (to collect information from the elderly about roads and safe traditional anchorage) and, to cover the costs of translating communications products into French for the 25th anniversary of the signing of the JBNQA.

Makivik Corporation was provided $7,000 to cover a portion of the costs associated with manpower training of employees at the Nunavik Research Centre and $5,000 to the Kativik Regional Government to produce promotional material on programs to improve the integration of Nunavik youth in the job market.

Nunavik Community Projects

INAC allocated $456,735 to support the community of Kangiqsualujjuaq and the region of Nunavik in their rebuilding process following the avalanche on January 1, 1999. Projects have been developed to provide special support for the community and to have a lasting impact, including initiatives related to youth, elders, women, the Canadian Rangers, job creation and the environment.

Nunavik Commission

In November 1999, Nunavik, Quebec and Canada signed a political accord establishing the Nunavik Commission, mandated to propose a form of government for Nunavik. In 1999-2000, INAC paid $160,000 as a federal contribution to this tripartite commission.

Cree-Naskapi Commission

During 1999-2000, INAC provided $725,745 to the Cree-Naskapi Commission to fund its activities and produce the Commission's 2000 biennial report on the implementation of the Cree-Naskapi (of Quebec) Act.

INAC Expenditures ($), 1999-2000
  Cree Inuit Naskapi Total
Education services $49,812,446 $13,473,376 $1,952,449 $65,238,271
School Infrastructure 3,487,419 3,713,496 246 867 7,447,782
Post-secondary Assistance 273,470 62,754 40,175 376,39
Cultural Centres 194,376 299,402 n/a 493,778
Employment programs 752,984 522,362 21,719 1,297,065
         
Capital 16,324,053 n/a 1,235,900 17,559,953
Operation and Maintenance 40,754,054 n/a 2,963,000 43,717,054
Infrastructure-related projects 1,251,339 7,819,500 nil 9,070,839
         
Electricity Waskaganish 3,324,352 n/a n/a 3,324,352
Social Assistance 1,890,308 n/a 874,234 2,764,542
NSIPD-IVF Programs 131,560 194,944 13,399 339,903
  2,021,868 194,944 887,633 3,104,445
Economic Development 1,232,806 870,441 52,633 2,155,870
Environment 481,992 n/a 98,832 580,824
Indian Registration 95,817 n/a 4,481 100,298
Education Reform 728,492 592,122 36,000 1,356,614
Water and Sewer Initiative 1,740,000 nil nil 1,740,000
Income Security Reform nil nil 69,080 69,080
Governance 91,500 84,741 30,000 206,241
Opportunity Fund 153,750 nil nil 153,750
  2,713,742 676,863 135,080 3,525,685
Other Financial Assistance 672,500 437,023 14,190 1,123,713
Community projects in Nunavik n/a 456,735 n/a 456,735
Nunavik Commission n/a 160,000 n/a 160,000
Sub total $123,393,218 $28,686,896 $7,652,949 $159,733,063
Land Registry/Seminar n/a n/a n/a 18,000
Cree-Naskapi Commission n/a n/a n/a 725,745
Total       $160,476,808

Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation

The Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation (CMHC), in co-operation with INAC, is directly involved in the Cree and Naskapi communities through its housing program funded under article 95 of the National Housing Act.

The housing program for the Inuit is administered by the Société d'habitation du Quebec under federalprovincial cost-sharing agreements.

In 1999-2000, 40 new subsidized housing units were added to the housing stock of Cree communities, and 4 units to that of the Naskapi community. In addition, in order to enhance the autonomy of the elderly in the Naskapi community, the CMHC paid the Naskapi $19,328 to adapt eight housing units.

As part of the Youth Employment Strategy, four young Cree and two young Inuit received financial aid from the CMHC to gain experience in housing matters in their community.

Finally, three training sessions on the subject of client liaison, real estate management and management of payments due and rent were given to the persons in charge of housing in various Cree communities.

CMHC Expenditures ($), 1999
  Cree Inuit Naskapi Total
Federal subsidies $8,742,100 $28,249,300 $629,300 $37,620,700
Number of subsidized units 1,629 1,674 113 3,456

Human Resources Development Canada

In 1999, in response to the recommendations of the Royal Commission on Aboriginal Peoples and using the expertise it has acquired over the past several years, HRDC will expand its human resource management partnerships with Aboriginal groups through a new five-year Aboriginal Human Resource Development Strategy (AHRDS), effective from April 1999 to March 2004. The Strategy will make it possible to: implement a broader range of human resource development programs to meet Aboriginal needs more effectively in the area of human resources development; in addition, it will enable the HRDC to pursue its objective of fostering increased autonomy of Aboriginal communities by supporting their efforts to take charge of development tools designed to improve the employability of their manpower and enhance its adaptability to the job market. This Strategy calls for greater accountability on the part of Aboriginal administrations.

The HRDC-Kativik Regional Government devolution agreement, which has been renewed until March 2004, conforms with the AHRDS and gives Inuit increased responsibilities in managing employment insurance funds and delivering employment and training services, plus employment insurance services, for all Nunavik communities. In addition, the KRG delivers all first-line Income Security Benefit services. The KRG also receives moneys for other HRDC activities which are not included in its agreement.

HRDC, INAC and the Cree Regional Authority have since April 1999 engaged in sectoral table negotiations towards a Cree-Canada Human Resource Development Agreement which will incorporate current regular HRDC programming, as well as additional programming to meet Canada's obligation under the JBNQA to target employment opportunities in the Cree territory. This agreement will also include provision for the administrative structure contemplated by the JBNQA.

The Naskapi receive AHRDS funding via the Assembly of First Nations of Quebec and Labrador, in keeping with the agreement on labour market, which will end on March 2004.

HRDC Expenditures ($), 1999-2000
  Cree Inuit Naskapi Total
Aboriginal Labour Market Program $5,516,851 $6,211,833 $329,605 $12,058,289
First Nations and Inuit Child Care Initiative 1,170,321 1,229,070 73,425 2,472,816
Youth Employment Initiatives 60,000 243,370 17,164 320,534
Transitional Jobs Fund nil nil nil nil
HRDC activities nil 188,400 nil 188,400
Total $6,747,172 $7,872,673 $420,194 $15,040,039

Solicitor General of Canada

During 1999-2000, the Aboriginal Policing Directorate of the Department of the Solicitor General of Canada oversaw implementation of three tripartite agreements for policing services with the government of Quebec and respectively, the Naskapi, the Cree Regional Authority and the Kativik Regional Government.

Along with representatives of the Cree and the government of Quebec, the Solicitor General continued to participate in discussions related to implementation of section 19.1 of the JBNQA (Cree units of the Sûreté du Québec)

The Solicitor General continued negotiations with representatives of the Naskapi and the government of Quebec to renew of the tripartite agreement on policing services. These negotiations led to an agreement covering April 1, 2000 to March 31, 2001. Correctional Service Canada (CSC) continued its strategy of developing and delivering programs specially tailored to Aboriginal culture and realities. In particular, CSC provided liaison officer services in each institution through Native Paralegal Services of Quebec, which is responsible for counseling Aboriginal offenders in federal penitentiaries and providing correctional planning to facilitate the re-entry of Aboriginal offenders into society.

In addition, CSC funded various correctional programs adapted to the needs of Aboriginal delinquents-particularly in the areas of substance abuse, family violence, and sexual violence.

CSC also provided funding for the accommodation, supervision and treatment in halfway houses during parole.

Solicitor General Canada expenditures ($), 1999-2000
  Cree Inuit Naskapi Total
Tripartite agreements $2,979,124 $3,304,086 $182,000 $6,465,210
Native Paralegal Services of Quebec 22,736 16,419 nil 39,155
Adapted correctional programs* 23,684 17,095 nil 40,779
Parole-related services 52,000 78,000 nil 130,000
  98,420 111,514 nil 209,934
Total $3,077,544 $3,415,600 $182,000 $6,675,144

*These amounts do not include the direct costs of incarceration.

Health Canada

During 1999-2000, Health Canada's Medical Services Branch, Quebec Region, provided $7,611,209 for various health care programs in the Cree, Inuit and Naskapi communities.

The Department primarily funded projects in the areas of mental health, diabetes, alcohol, drug and solvent abuse. In addition, it contributed to the Brighter Future program, which is focused on child development, and financially participated in the prenatal nutrition program (including the development), and in the Head Start program, so as to assist communities in improving the physical and mental well-being of children and their families.

This year saw the addition of the First Nations and Inuit Home and Community Program, covering a broad range of services in the area of nursing care.

Health Canada is also encouraging students in these communities to work in the health care sector through the Indian and Inuit Health Careers Program. No request was made with respect to this program this year. The Department also paid for Non-Insured Health Benefits for beneficiaries living outside their affiliated communities.

Health Canada expenditures ($), 1999-2000
  Cree Inuit Naskapi Total
National Native Alcohol and
Drug Abuse Program
$670,324 $713,497 $48,410 $1,432,231
Solvent Abuse 148,488 127,958 8,249 284,695
Brighter Futures 1,112,298 952,085 61,425 2,125,808
Prenatal Nutrition 117,453 99,129 6,357 222,939
Prenatal Development 13,848 10,309 639 24,796
Head Start Initiative 783,416 nil nil 783,416
Building Healthy
Communities Strategy
824,582 718,438 46,515 1,589,535
Home and Community Care 238,457 305,560 11,629 555,646
Diabetes 30,000 nil nil 30,000
Indian and Inuit Health Careers nil nil nil nil
Non-Insured Health Benefits 420,312 140,920 911 562,143
Total $4,359,178 $3,067,896 $184,135 $7,611,209

Transport Canada

Through its various programs, Transport Canada invested $7,263,476 in Cree, Inuit and Naskapi communities, during 1999-2000.

Transport Canada allocated $951,000 to the Kativik Regional Government for the management of the Kuujjuaq Airport and $2,915,500 was spent in Kuujjuaq to produce granular material and regravel the secondary runway.

In 1999-2000, the Cree of Eastmain received $180,000, the Cree of Waskaganish $175,000, and the Cree of Wemindji $169,800 to cover the three-year operations and maintenance contracts for their airports. Work costing $109,600 was performed on the Wemindji and Waskaganish airport runways.

Under the Airport Capital Assistance Program, $341,660 was spent on airport facilities improvement projects and equipment purchasing projects in Chisasibi.

On April 21, 1999, Transport Canada announced the signing of an agreement with the Schefferville Airport Corporation, a non-profit organization formed jointly by the Innu nation of Matimekush-Lac-John (Schefferville) and the Naskapi community to assume the management of the Schefferville airport. Transfer of the management of the Schefferville airport includes leasing the airport until August 31, 2001 for the nominal sum of $1.00, as well as an annual funding agreement to allow the Schefferville Airport Corporation to absorb the airport deficit. In 1999- 2000, the Corporation received $140,316 to manage the airport. Runway upgrading work, at a cost of $2,188,300, was begun in 1999-2000.

During 1999-2000, the Department allocated $1 million through INAC to the Makivik Corporation under Northern Quebec Marine Infrastructure Agreement.

Transport Canada expended $92,300 under the program to provide marine safety training to Inuit communities.

Transport Canada expenditures ($), 1999-2000
  Cree Inuit Naskapi Total
Airport management n/a $951,000 $140,316 $1,091,316
Operation and Maintenance 524,800 n/a n/a 524,800
Capital 109,600 2,915,500 2,188,300 5,213,400
Airport Capital Assistance 341,660 n/a n/a 341,660
Training n/a 92,300 n/a 92,300
Northern Quebec Marine
Infrastructure Agreement
n/a * n/a *
Total $976,060 $3,958,80 $2,328,616 $7,263,476

* The amount of $1 million provided through INAC is not included in the table.

National Defence

Land Forces Quebec Area (LFQA) is responsible for two activities: the Canadian Ranger and Junior Ranger programs. During 1999-2000, the Department of National Defence allocated $2,021,000 for both these programs.

Involvement of the Canadian Rangers is particularly important for the Canadian Forces during search and rescue missions and during winter survival exercises in Northern Quebec. In November 1999, leaders of the Northern Quebec Rangers and their assistants took part in the first provincial training seminar of the Canadian Rangers, held in Saint-Jean-sur-Richelieu. Under the theme of "Meeting of the Leaders", this meeting enabled Rangers from across Quebec to share their experiences and to update this basic training, with the assistance of members of the Canadian Forces.

The Canadian Junior Rangers program is also a free activity program for Youth between the age of 12 and 18 based on traditional Native culture and disciplines, and on modern living habits. More than 350 young girls and boys from the JBNQA and NEQA areas participated in this program.

In 1998, the Department of National Defence co-signed an agreement with Environment Canada, the Kativik Regional Government and the Quebec government for clean-up and environmental restoration at 42 Mid- Canada Line sites along the 55th parallel.

Canadian Heritage

The Citizens' Participation Directorate of Canadian Heritage supports a wide range of activities in Northern Quebec, particularly Aboriginal communication networks, friendship centres, the protection of Aboriginal languages and cultures, support for Aboriginal organizations and initiatives to improve the situation of Aboriginal women. During 1999-2000, Canadian Heritage provided support amounting to $1,834,424 to Aboriginal communities in Northern Quebec, as follows:

Canadian Heritage Expenditures ($), 1999-2000
Northern Native Broadcast Access Program
James Bay Cree Communications Society
$292,200
Taqramiut Nipingat Incorporated (TNI)
907,317
 
Aboriginal Representative Organizations Program
 
Makivik Corporation
201,645
 
Native Friendship Centre Program
 
Senneterre Native Friendship Centre Inc.*
114,158
Val-d'Or Native Friendship Centre Inc.*
171,237
 
Cree Indian Friendship Centre of Chibougamau Inc.
142,697
 
Aboriginal Women's Program
 
Cree Women' Council
5,170
Total
$1,834,424

* The services Provided by these Native friendship centers are not offered exclusively to the agreements beneficiaries.

Natural Resources Canada

The Department of Natural Resources (NRCan) is active in the territory covered by the JBNQA and NEQA through the Canadian Forest Service and Geomatics Canada.

Canadian Forest Service

In 1999-2000, the Canadian Forest Service continued to implement the First Nation Forestry Program (FNFP), which is jointly funded by INAC and the Natural Resources Canada. The objective of this program is to increase the development the forestry capabilities of Aboriginal communities. In addition to a forestry component, it offers the following three additional components focussing on the economic development of Aboriginal forestry: development of Aboriginal businesses, co-operation between communities, and partnerships with non-Aboriginal industries.

In 1999-2000, the Cree communities of Waswanipi and Mistissini carried out projects and activities covered by the FNFP.

The Waswanipi Mishtuk Corporation received $64,000 to carry out checkerboard clear-cutting, precommercial thinning, site preparation and reforesting work on close to 600 hectares of land, for a total of 450,000 trees planted. It also built and repaired 60 kilometres of roads. In addition to FNFP funding, the community of Waswanipi received $531,500 from the Canada's Model Forest Program to implement the Cree Model Forest in Waswanipi.

The Eenatuk Forestry Corporation in Mistissini received an FNFP contribution of $59,600 and performed checkerboard clear-cutting, release cutting, site preparation and precommercial thinning over a total surface area of 590 hectares. In addition, it planted 350,000 trees and built 5 kilometres of roads.

Canadian Forest Service expenditures ($), 1999-2000
  Cree Inuit Naskapi Total
First Nation Forestry Program $123,600 n/a nil $123,600
Canada's Model Forest Network 531,500 n/a nil 531,500
Total $655,100     $655,100
Geomatics Canada

In 1999-2000, the Quebec Client Liaison Unit (the Eastern Regional Operations Centre's local representative of the Legal Survey Division of Geomatics Canada) drafted 7 parcel plans for the registration of interests in Cree lands. The Unit managed mapmaking and map verification contracts for the communities of Mistissini, Nemaska, Ouje-Bougoumou and Waswanipi. It had map manuscripts produced for the communities of Chisasibi, Eastmain, Waskaganish and Wemindji. In addition, the Unit began producing scale maps for use representing the ownership interests of the communities of Nemaska, Mistissini, Ouje-Bougoumou and Waswanipi.

At a seminar held in Montreal on November 17 and 18, 1999, the Quebec Client Liaison Unit produced a presentation on the basic principles governing defining and mapping procedures as part of registering lands covered by the agreements.

Environment Canada and the Canadian Environmental Assessment Agency

Environment Canada and the Canadian Environmental Assessment Agency (CEAA) participate jointly with INAC and Fisheries and Oceans Canada in the implementation of environmental and social protection regimes, as stipulated in sections 22 and 23 of the JBNQA, and the hunting, fishing and trapping regime, as stipulated in section 24.

Environment Canada

In 1999-2000, Environment Canada continued to assist in the implementation of the environmental and social protection regimes and the hunting, fishing and trapping regime through its representatives on the federal delegation to the James Bay Advisory Committee on the Environment (JBACE), the Kativik Environmental Advisory Committee and the Hunting, Fishing and Trapping Co-ordinating Committee. Environment Canada's expenditures related to implementing the JBNQA during 1999-2000 amounted to some $40,000.

Under the Northern Ecosystem Initiative, Environment Canada conducted an information and consultation tour among the major stakeholders in government, Aboriginal organizations, and committees established under the JBNQA. An amount of $60,000 from the Northern Ecosystem Initiative budget was provided for this consultation in 1999-2000. A consultation report was prepared summarizing the progress to date and comments.

During 1999-2000, the Canadian Wildlife Service of Environment Canada continued its efforts to preserve migratory bird populations that frequent the territory covered by the agreements. A study on the Barrow's Goldeneye dispersal was initiated, the findings of which will be very useful for the future management of this species of duck.

American Black Duck and Canada Goose surveys were carried out as part of joint Canada-United States activities established in the North American Waterfowl Management Plan. As in previous years, with respect to Canada Goose, a breeding study of the northern stock and bird-banding activities were carried out to ensure ongoing assessment of the species' status, and factors influencing its breeding habits.

Once again, the Canadian Wildlife Service provided funding to help Aboriginals attend the winter meeting of the Atlantic Flyway Council's Technical Committee. They presented the Aboriginal perspective and made a very positive contribution to this discussion of migratory bird hunting and conservation issues.

In June 1999, the Canadian Wildlife Service made a presentation on the draft legislation concerning endangered species to the Hunting, Fishing and Trapping Coordinating Committee, within the framework of the consultation process. It also kept the Committee informed of recent developments related to the bill.

During 1999-2000, expenditures by the Canadian Wildlife Service on the territory covered by the agreements amounted to some $75,000.

Environment Canada is co-signatory with the Department of National Defence, the Kativik Regional Government and the Quebec government of an agreement for investigating, restoring, dismantling and renovating 42 Mid-Canada Line sites along the 55th parallel in Quebec. In 1999-2000, under this agreement, Environment Canada provided scientific expertise amounting to some $60,000.

As advisor to Transport Canada, Environment Canada completed the first phase of a rehabilitation project involving a contaminated site located on the 61st parallel. In 1999-2000, the nature and scope of contamination at Cape Hopes Advance was assessed, and the description of the restoration project was completed in collaboration with the KRG, the Quaqtaq Land Corporation and the Makivik Corporation. In addition to cleaning up the environment, this project was designed to convey knowledge in this field to Aboriginal communities. Environment Canada spent $70,000 in connection with this project.

With the support of the KRG, the Kuujjuarapik Municipal Corporation and the Department of the Environment of Quebec, Environment Canada undertook a research to determine a means of using some 2000 barrels of abandoned bituminous binder that have been stored for approximately 50 years on the edge of the village of Kuujjuarapik. Trials were conducted to upgrade this bituminous binder which, under current conditions, presents a potential environmental hazard.

In addition, thanks to a financial contribution of $37,000 under the Northern Contaminants Program, a campaign for measuring the transport and deposit of mercury in Kuujjuarapik was conducted.

Under its Atmospheric Environment Program, Environment Canada operates 18 weather stations, three of which are aerology stations, in the territory covered by the agreements. It also operates a system of three lighTNIng stations, in La Grande-4, Wemindji and Kuujjuarapik, respectively. Environment Canada also provides a variety of meteorological services, such as weather forecasts, weather watch, marine forecasts, and flight forecasts, for the benefit of Northern residents and visitors.

Canadian Environmental Assessment Agency

The Canadian Environmental Assessment Agency assisted the federal administrator and various committees established under the JBNQA in accordance with sections 22 and 23. CEAA's related expenditures in 1999- 2000 were $152,429. This sum included the federal contribution of $101,000 dollars for the maintenance and joint funding with the Quebec government of the secretariats of the James Bay Advisory Committee on the Environment and the Kativik Environmental Advisory Committee. It also included a contribution towards the operating expenses of the Evaluating Committee (COMEV), and the costs related to the activities of the federal review panel (COFEX-North and COFEX-South).

In 1999-2000, the CEAA, Quebec office, performed executive secretariat duties for both review panels. It contributed to setting up a pilot project designed to assess an effective co-ordination process for use in connection with the environmental impact evaluation of projects requiring enforcement of the Canadian Environmental Assessment Act (CEAA) and the JBNQA. In addition, the CEAA consulted both advisory committees within the framework of the five-year examination prescribed under the Act.

The CEAA continued to contribute to the environmental impact evaluation of the access road project in Waskaganish through COFEX-South and of the Kangiqsualujjuaq marine infrastructures project through COFEX-North; in addition, it contributed to the assessment of another marine infrastructure project in Quaqtaq through COFEX-North. Throughout the entire process of evaluating the environmental impact of these projects, the CEAA made available its support to facilitate and synchronize as much as possible the various phases of the environmental impact evaluation process with the JBNQA and the CEAA. Concerning the Waskaganish access road in particular, CEEA developed and applied, in collaboration with the promoter, the community and environmental evaluation factors under the terms of the JBNQA and the CEAA, an approach to public consultations that was innovative, dynamic effective-and successful.

Environment Canada and CEAA Expenditures ($), 1999-2000
Environment Canada Committees expenditures
$40,000
Northern Ecosystem Initiative
60,000
 
Canadian Wildlife Service
75,000
 
Mid-Canada Line Agreement
60,000
 
Cape Hopes Advance Project
70,000
 
Northern Contaminants Program
37,000
342,000
Canadian Environmental Assessment Agency
$152,429
Total
$494,429

Fisheries and Oceans Canada

Fisheries and Oceans Canada administers several research and development projects in Northern Quebec through its Laurentian region. Through the Laurentian Region Science Branch, the Department participates with INAC, Environment Canada and CEAA in the implementation of social and environmental protection regimes, as stipulated in sections 22 and 23 of the JBNQA. Through the Laurentian Region Fisheries Management Branch, it participates in the hunting, fishing and trapping regime, as stipulated in section 24. DFO allocated $1 million through INAC to Makivik Corporation under the Northern Quebec Marine Infrastructure Agreement.

North Shore and Northern Quebec Sector - Fisheries management

In 1999-2000, implementation of the Aboriginal Fisheries Strategy (AFS) and the five-year (1996-2000) Northern Quebec beluga management plan continued. As in the past, activities were carried out jointly by the 14 Nunavik municipal corporations, the Hunting, Fishing and Trapping Association of Nunavik, the Makivik Corporation, the Kativik Regional Government and DFO.

Thanks to an agreement with Kativik Regional Government, the Department allocated funding for coordinating the work and the observation patrols of six Aboriginal fishery guardians, and provide liaison with a multidisciplinary agent in the employ of DFO, in Inukjuak. A community officer was assigned, on a seasonal basis, to the municipal corporation of each of the 14 Nunavik communities. The officers' duties included statistical monitoring of the beluga and walrus hunt, beluga sample gathering and relaying of weekly harvest data. In addition, funds were allocated under the contribution agreement between DFO and the Makivik Corporation to provide expertise, tools and necessary equipment to analyze the harvested samples.

In the course of aerial patrols carried out each year in Nunavik, Fisheries Management Branch representatives visited all of the territory communities to meet and talk with their Inuit partners. In addition, DFO commissioned two patrol vessels to expand monitoring activities on its territory.

There were no specific Department activities on JBNQA and NEQA territory in 1999-2000. However, the Department maintained contact with the Cree and Naskapi through the Hunting, Fishing and Trapping Coordinating Committee.

Science Branch

The Maurice Lamontagne Institute conducted several research project in Northern Quebec, including a considerable number of oceanographic missions. However, budget cuts entailed putting the majority of initiatives on hold. Among the critical research projects which did go forward, including a number conducted with the Central and Arctic administrative region, Inuit organizations and universities, it is worth mentioning:

  • Development of a precautionary approach for the beluga;
  • Sampling of beluga in Hudson Bay;
  • Diseases of marine mammals;
  • Study of the physical and biological processes of the North Water polynya;
  • Prediction of climate change using digital models.

Oceans Directorate

The Oceans Directorate recommenced its activities in Northern Quebec during 1999-2000, following a temporary hiatus during the integration of the Habitat Management and Marine Environment Sciences Division into the new Regional Science Branch set up following the adoption of the Oceans Act. The first project was conducted by the Contaminants and Ecotoxicology unit, in collaboration with Environment Canada, and was designed to determine the levels of PCBs in the aquatic resource, which plays a vital role in the Inuit communities along the shores of Labrador and in Nunavik.

Fisheries and Oceans Canada expenditures ($), Laurentian region, 1999-2000
  Cree Inuit Naskapi Total
Northern Quebec Marine Infrastructure Agreement n/a * n/a *
Community officers expenditures n/a $138,000 n/a $138,000
Agreement with Makivik Corporation n/a $144,000 n/a $144,000
Agreement with Kativik Regional Government n/a 270,000 n/a 270,000
Total n/a $414,000 n/a $414,000

* The amount of $1 million provided through INAC is not included in the table.

Canada Economic Development

Canada Economic Development (CED) implements programs to promote the start-up and development of small and medium-size enterprises (SMEs) in Northern Quebec. In 1999-2000, the CED pursued the same strategic priorities as in 1998-1999: technological development designed to strengthen SMEs; market development; developing entrepreneurship and a business climate; local economic development; and the capacity of regions to adapt. These priorities are aimed, on the one hand, to enable all region of Quebec to achieve their potential, and, on the other, to more specifically aid certain target clienteles-in particular, youth, Aboriginals, and rural populations-to become part of an entrepreneurial dynamic.

The IDEA-SME Program provides services and funds activities in the areas of innovation, research and development, and design; development of market and export trade; and, entrepreneurship and business climate development. In 1999-2000, CED provided financial assistance to Cree communities and Inuit communities under the IDEA-SME Program for projects mostly focused on developing the tourism potential and entrepreneurship, as well as community support for setting priorities for socioeconomic development. CED also fosters the economic growth of regions through its Regional Strategic Initiatives (RSI) program, which consists of developing strategies and action plans to promote the emergence of a socioeconomic environment conducive to strengthening the assets and competitive advantages of the regions of Quebec. In Northern Quebec, the major issues to which the program is addressed include, particularly, the development of communications infrastructures, information technologies and tourism, as well as support for adaptivity.

Under the RSI program, Inuit communities received funding to support the development of their technological capacity. Under the Community Futures Program, the Community Futures Development Corporation (CFDC) makes available to Cree communities an investment fund of over $1 million to support strategic projects proposed by businesspeople. In 1999-2000, $265,000 was provided to the CFDC for its operations budget.

Canada Economic Development expenditures ($), 1999-2000
  Cree Inuit Naskapi Total
IDEA-SME Program $82,599 $83,000 nil $165,599
Regional Strategic Initiatives nil 124,700 nil 124,700
Community Futures Program 265,000 nil nil 265,000
Total $347,599 $207,700 nil $555,299

Justice Canada

The Department of Justice, through the Aboriginal Justice Directorate, in collaboration with Aboriginal communities and the provinces, develops long-term community based programming that facilitates the transfer of responsibilities for the administration of justice to Aboriginal people and encourages a reduction in crime and incarceration rates.

Previous discussions with the Cree, Inuit and Naskapi resulted during 1999-2000 in the development and implementation of two community-based justice programs, jointly funded by the Aboriginal Justice Strategy and the Quebec government: the Naskapi Justice Healing Committee and the Cree Regional Authority Justice Initiative. Discussions in 1999-2000 have also paved the way for the addition of new programming, scheduled to commence in 2000-2001 with the Makivik Corporation: a justice program servicing up to six Inuit communities. This program will features two components, the Justice of the Peace Program and the Community Justice Committees. During 1999-2000, the Directorate provided funding in support of community consultation in Cree communities towards the report on "Justice for the Crees".

In addition to community-based justice programming through the Aboriginal Justice Strategy, the Directorate promotes the exchange of ideas and information between mainstream justice officials and Aboriginal community members through the Aboriginal Justice Learning Network and provides training tools to persons involved with the operation of communitybased programming.

Justice Canada also allocated, through the Native Courtworker Program, $107,785 to Cree communities, $86,341 to Inuit communities and $20,534 to the Naskapi community.

Justice Canada expenditures ($), 1999-2000
Aboriginal Justice Strategy
$274,605
Justice for the Crees Consultation
40,000
Native Courtworker Program
214,660
Total
$529,265

Canadian Food Inspection Agency

In 1999, the Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) inspected the meat produced at a commercial caribou slaughter in Northern Quebec. A team of two inspectors and a veterinarian travelled to Lake Mollet in order to supervise the slaughter of caribou in temporary facilities managed by Nunavik Arctic Foods. The Agency also certified the meat for sale in interprovincial and international markets. The CFIA inspectors and veterinarian stayed four weeks at Lake Mollet, during which time they inspected nearly 4000 caribou carcasses. The CFIA and the Kawawachikamach Naskapi Band of Quebec also signed a Caribou Inspection Service Agreement. However, inspections were cancelled at the request of the Naskapi because the 1998 migration route of the caribou did not allow for profitable harvesting of this resource.

Industry Canada

In 1999-2000, Industry Canada, through Aboriginal Business Canada, funded a total of 25 projects, including the establishment and expansion of Aboriginal businesses, the development of a variety of business and marketing plans and research and development towards the commercialization of technology.

Industry Canada expenditures ($), 1999-2000
  Cree Inuit Naskapi Total
Aboriginal Business Canada $504,037 nil $16,500 $520,537
Total       $520,537

The Canadian Food Inspection Agency

In 1999-2000, as in previous years, the Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) inspected the meat produced at a commercial caribou slaughter in Northern Quebec. A team of two inspectors and a veterinarian went to Lake Mollet east of Kuujjuarapik to supervise the slaughter of caribou at temporary facilities managed by Nunavik Arctic Foods. The Agency also certified the meat for sale in interprovincial and international markets. The hunting season, which had to be spread out over six weeks, was not as productive as it had been in previous years. Fewer than 3000 caribou were killed, as their migration route veered away from production facilities. The CFIA also concluded a service agreement with the Naskapi Nation of Kawawachikamach for caribou inspection. However, this activity was cancelled at the request of the Naskapi, as the migration route prevented making a profitable use of this resource.

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Footnotes

  1. These figures are supplied by the departments.(return to source paragraph)
  2. Excluding $100,300,000 paid by INAC to settle a claim filed by the Quebec Department of Education and including $300,000 from HRDC's financial participation under the job creation strategy for the Naskapi.(return to source paragraph)
  3. Including $1 million from Transport Canada and $1 million from Fisheries and Oceans Canada for the Northern Quebec Marine Infrastructure Program, $15,000 from Environment Canada for an environmental project and $655,000 to fund the Cree-Naskapi Commission (for the 1993-1994, 1994-1995, 1995-1996 and 1996-1997 fiscal years, CNC received respectively, $655,000, $480,000, $655,000 and $480,000 for a total of $2,270,000. These expenditures are not included in the total amounts stated in this table; financial data prior to 1993 are available at INAC).(return to source paragraph)
  4. Excluding $2.5 million distributed through Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation to the Société d'habitation du Québec under a special initiative on housing for the Inuit of Nunavik and $23.6 million paid to the Quebec Government as part of a federal contribution towards funding the construction of the access road to Waskaganish.(return to source paragraph)
  5. Calendar year.(return to source paragraph)
  6. Increase as the result of the agreements concluded in 1994 with the Cree and the Naskapi and the one concluded in 1995 with the Kativik Regional Government.(return to source paragraph)
  7. Decrease as a result of a national moratorium placed on Aboriginal Business Canada for the fiscal year 1995-1996.(return to source paragraph)
  8. Including expenditures of the Canadian Environmental Assessment Agency.(return to source paragraph)
  9. Decrease as a result of the termination of activities related to the environmental review of the Great Whale project shelved following a decision by the Quebec government.(return to source paragraph)
  10. These figures are supplied by the departments.(return to source paragraph)
  11. Excluding $100,300,000 paid by INAC to settle a claim filed by the Quebec Department of Education and including $300,000 from HRDC's financial participation under the job creation strategy for the Naskapi.(return to source paragraph)
  12. Including $1 million from Transport Canada and $1 million from Fisheries and Oceans Canada for the Northern Quebec Marine Infrastructure Program, $15,000 from Environment Canada for an environmental project and $655,000 to fund the Cree-Naskapi Commission (for the 1993-1994, 1994-1995, 1995-1996 and 1996-1997 fiscal years, CNC received respectively, $655,000, $480,000, $655,000 and $480,000 for a total of $2,270,000. These expenditures are not included in the total amounts stated in this table; financial data prior to 1993 are available at INAC).(return to source paragraph)
  13. Excluding $2.5 million distributed through Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation to the Société d'habitation du Québec under a special initiative on housing for the Inuit of Nunavik and $23.6 million paid to the Quebec Government as part of a federal contribution towards funding the construction of the access road to Waskaganish.(return to source paragraph)
  14. Excluding the last payment of $ 400 000 to the government of Quebec as federal contribution to funding of the construction of an access road in Waskaganish.(return to source paragraph)
  15. Calendar year.(return to source paragraph)
  16. Increases as the result of the agreements concluded in 1994 with the Cree and the Naskapi and the one concluded in 1995 with the Kativik Regional Government.(return to source paragraph)
  17. Decrease as a result of a national moratorium placed on Aboriginal Business Canada for the fiscal year 1995-1996.(return to source paragraph)
  18. Including expenditures of the Canadian Environmental Assessment Agency.(return to source paragraph)
  19. Decrease as a result of the termination of activities related to the environmental review of the Great Whale project shelved following a decision by the Quebec government.(return to source paragraph)
 
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