ARCHIVED - The James Bay and Northern Quebec Agreement and the Northeastern Quebec Agreement Annual Report: 2000-2001, 2001-2002, 2002-2003

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Author: © Minister of Public Works and Government Services Canada 
Date: Ottawa, 2007 
ISBN: 978-0-662-49947-
QS-Q036-007-BB-A1

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Table of Contents


Foreword

On behalf of the department of Indian and Northern Affairs Canada, responsible for the co-ordination of all activities of the Government of Canada related to its responsibilities established by the James Bay and Northern Quebec Agreement and the Northeastern Quebec Agreement, I am pleased to present the 2000-2001, 2001-2002 and 2002-2003 annual reports on the implementation of these agreements.

Each report covers the period of April 1 through March 31 of the years in question and accounts for the activities and expenditures made on behalf of the Cree, Inuit and Naskapi pursuant to the James Bay and Northern Quebec Agreement and the Northeastern Quebec Agreement. The reports also cover activities and expenditures made under other federal programs.

During the period under review, determined efforts have been made to fulfill the federal obligations arising from the James Bay and Northern Quebec Agreement and the Northeastern Quebec Agreement. Achievements include the signing of a two-year agreement on essential sanitation services with the Cree and a three-year agreement on the funding of the operations of the Cree Outfitting and Tourism Association in March 2002, a five-year agreement on housing in Nunavik with the Inuit and the Government of Quebec, financial support for the Nunavik Commission concerning the establishment of the Nunavik Government, and the renewal of the five-year operations and maintenance agreement for the Naskapi community.

The outcomes achieved during 2000-2001, 2001-2002 and 2002-2003 are the result of the work accomplished in partnership with the Cree, Inuit and Naskapi, based on mutual respect and trust, with the support of a number of federal departments and agencies.

Terry Sewell
Director General
Implementation Branch
Claims and Indian Government

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Introduction

The James Bay and Northern Quebec Agreement (JBNQA) was signed on November 11, 1975 by the Cree and Inuit peoples of Quebec, the governments of Canada and Quebec, the James Bay Development Corporation, the James Bay Energy Corporation and Hydro-Québec. Three years later, on January 31, 1978, the Naskapi of Schefferville signed a similar agreement, the Northeastern Quebec Agreement (NEQA).

The JBNQA and NEQA are the first comprehensive land claim agreements signed in modern times by Canada and Aboriginal people. The agreements include local-government components and lay the foundations for a new relationship between the Cree, the Inuit and the Naskapi and the Government of Canada.

The territory covered by the JBNQA and NEQA is comprised of more than 1,000,000 square kilometres of land in Quebec between the 48th and 62nd parallels. It was once part of a larger federal territory known as Rupert's Land.

A century ago, the Parliament of Canada transferred two vast stretches of Rupert's Land to Quebec, with Quebec's consent. The first transfer took place in 1898 and Quebec's borders were extended northward to the 52nd parallel. The second transfer occurred in 1912 and Quebec's borders were extended northward again as far as Hudson Strait and the 62nd parallel and eastward as far as Labrador. The 1912 Quebec Boundaries Extension Act carried certain obligations for the Quebec government, including the obligation to reach an agreement on land-related issues with the Aboriginal inhabitants. However, discussions regarding these matters would not begin until more than 60 years later.

The inhabitants of these Northern lands, which are barren but incredibly diverse in terms of climate and resources, are Indian and Inuit peoples with significantly different cultures, methods of social organization and languages. The Cree, the Inuit and the Naskapi follow a traditional way of life in which they harvest a large number of wildlife and marine resources. Many continue to earn their living by hunting, fishing and trapping. When the Quebec government launched its hydroelectric power development activities in Northern Quebec, the land claims and other claims of the Aboriginal people living on these lands had not yet been settled. In 1972, the Quebec Cree and Inuit went to court in order to halt the hydroelectric work.

In November 1973, Judge Albert Malouf of the Quebec Superior Court ordered that all work be stopped immediately, in particular because Quebec had not yet fulfilled its obligation under the 1912 Act. In 1974, the Quebec Court of Appeal reversed Judge Malouf's decision, but in late 1973, the parties had already begun negotiations to reach a final agreement. These negotiations culminated in the signing of the JBNQA in 1975.

Subsequently, in 1978, the Naskapi Band of Schefferville signed the Northeastern Quebec Agreement with the Government of Quebec and certain Crown corporations, the Government of Canada, the Grand Council of the Crees (of Quebec) and the Northern Quebec Inuit Association, establishing similar rights to those acquired by the Cree under the JBNQA.

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Principal Provisions of the JBNQA and NEQA

Under the terms of the James Bay and Northern Quebec Agreement and the Northeastern Quebec Agreement, Aboriginal communities of the region have exchanged their rights and territorial interests for other rights and benefits, as specified in the agreements.

The JBNQA and NEQA define the land regime applicable to the Cree, the Inuit and the Naskapi, as well as their rights in many areas, such as resource management, economic development, policing and administration of justice, health and social services and environmental protection.

In terms of compensation, the Cree received $133,815,678 (including $19,447,615 from the Government of Canada) and the Inuit received $91,184,322 (including $13,272,384 from the Government of Canada) for a total of $225 million under the JBNQA. The Naskapi received $9 million (including $1,310,010 from the Government of Canada) under the NEQA.

In addition, a sum of $2,809,773 (including $1,226,943 from the Government of Canada) was provided to the Cree under Section 25.1.15 of the JBNQA and a sum of $525,428 was provided by the Government of Canada to the Inuit under Sections 25.1.16 and 3 of the Complementary Agreement No. 2 (JBNQA).

The following additional lump-sum payments have been provided as a result of the signing of specific agreements, many of which are associated with complementary agreements to the JBNQA:

The Cree, Inuit and Naskapi are also entitled to a range of services and programs to which the federal and provincial governments contribute annually.

Lands

Under the JBNQA and NEQA, a land regime was instituted in the territory covered by the agreements. It divides the territory into three categories of lands (I, II and III) and specifies the total land area in each: over 14,000 square kilometres of territory are category I lands, 150,000 square kilometres are category II lands and 1,000,000 square kilometres are category III lands. It also specifies the rights pertaining to each category.

Category I lands, where the villages are located, are set aside exclusively for the Aboriginal communities that are signatories to the two agreements. Cree and Naskapi Category I lands are further subdivided into categories IA and IB: "A" for lands under the jurisdiction of Canada, and "B" for those under that of Quebec. Category IA and IA-N lands (N standing for Naskapi lands) falling under federal jurisdiction are governed by local Aboriginal administrations, as defined in the Cree-Naskapi (of Quebec) Act. Category IB and IB-N lands under Quebec jurisdiction are governed by corporations composed exclusively of Aboriginals. Inuit lands fall under provincial jurisdiction and are governed by public corporations composed mainly of Inuit.

Category II lands, usually located around the villages, come under provincial jurisdiction. However, the Aboriginal people participate in the management of hunting, fishing and trapping and the development of outfitting operations. They also have exclusive hunting, fishing and trapping rights on these lands.

Category III lands are Quebec public lands where Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal peoples may hunt and fish. However, Aboriginal people exercise certain rights on these lands under the agreements. They have exclusive rights to the harvesting of certain aquatic species and fur-bearing animals; they participate in the administration and development of the territory; and enjoy, until the year 2015, a right of refusal in the event of applications to set up or transfer new outfitting operations. The Aboriginal people must, however, relinquish this right for 30 percent of transfers or new outfitting operations proposed by non-Aboriginal people.

Land Area (km2) for Category I and II Defined by the JBNQA in 1975 and the NEQA in 1978, by Beneficiary Group

  Category I Lands Category II Lands Category III Lands
Cree IA 3,295.39*     Cree, Inuit and
Naskapi exercise
Native harvesting
rights on
Category III Lands
IB 1,992.98    
IB special 252.96    

  5,541.33   68,790.39

Inuit I 8,152.01   81,596.58

Naskapi IA-N 41.92    
IB-N 284.90 II-N 4,144.00

 
  326.82      

Total   14,020.16   154,530.97 910,711**

* Following acceptance by the Government of Canada from the Government of Quebec, in 1999, of the final transfer of Category IA lands, the Cree IA lands cover 3,299.6 km2.
** Ministère du Conseil exécutif Secrétariat aux affaires autochtones
Sources:
Federal lands: Government of Canada; Natural Resources Canada; Legal Surveys Division; Quebec Client Liaison Unit
Provincial lands: Gouvernement du Québec; Ministère des Ressources naturelles; Direction de l'enregistrement et du morcellement
Category III lands as defined in Section 1, Annex 1 of the Complementary Agreement No. 1, JBNQA.

Environmental and Social Protection

The JBNQA and the NEQA provide for consultative bodies to advise governments on policies and regulations that may have an impact on the environment and the social conditions of Aboriginal communities.

For this purpose, two committees have been set up: the James Bay Advisory Committee on the Environment (JBACE) for the area south of the 55th parallel and the Kativik Environmental Advisory Committee (KEAC) for the area north of that parallel. Each committee includes representatives from Aboriginal communities in the territory and from the two levels of government. The JBACE Annual Report is available from the Secretariat of the James Bay Advisory Committee on the Environment, Environmental Assessment Division, Marie-Guyart Building, 6th Floor, 675, René-Lévesque Boulevard East, Québec City (Quebec) Canada G1R 5V7. The KEAC Annual Report is available from the Secretariat of the Kativik Environmental Advisory Committee, P.O. Box 1093, Station Terminus, Québec City (Quebec) Canada G1K 7B5.

The JBNQA also establishes evaluation procedures for development proposals. The Cree participate in the evaluation of projects affecting lands below the 55th parallel, whereas to the north of the 55th parallel it is the Inuit who participate in these evaluations. The federal administrator - appointed by the Governor in Council - is responsible for the evaluation process for projects under federal government jurisdiction. For matters under provincial jurisdiction, a provincial administrator is appointed by the Quebec government. Projects in Category I Cree lands come under the authority of the local Cree administrator.

The NEQA includes similar provisions assuring the Naskapi of participation in the environmental and social protection of the territory covered by that agreement.

Economic Development

Compensation funds paid under the agreements by the governments of Quebec and Canada and by Hydro-Québec are administered by three organizations. The Cree Board of Compensation, the Makivik Corporation and the Naskapi Development Corporation handle the funding of projects for the economic development of their respective communities in Northern Quebec.

In addition, under the agreements, the Cree, Inuit and Naskapi continue to benefit, in the same way as other Aboriginal peoples, from the economic development programs offered by the two governments.

Education

The JBNQA provided for the establishment of the Cree School Board and the Kativik School Board. Both of these boards, which operate under Quebec's jurisdiction, possess special powers and ensure that educational programs are culturally relevant to the communities.

Under the NEQA, educational services for the Naskapi are provided for by a school created to fulfill the needs of the Naskapi community. The Eastern Quebec Regional School Board is responsible for its general administration. In addition, the Naskapi Education Committee was set up to perform the same advisory functions as those assigned to school committees under the Education Act at the time, and now known as the Education Act for the Cree, Inuit and Naskapi Native Persons.

The JBNQA and the NEQA established that Canada and Quebec would contribute to the funding of these institutions on the basis of annual operating and capital budgets approved by each. The proportion to be contributed by Canada was set at 75 percent of the approved budgets of the Cree School Board and the Naskapi school, and 25 percent of the approved budgets of the Kativik School Board.

Hunting, Fishing and Trapping

The Hunting, Fishing and Trapping Co-ordinating Committee (HFTCC) was created under the JBNQA and is comprised of government and Cree, Inuit and Naskapi experts. Federal representatives are from Indian and Northern Affairs Canada (INAC), Environment Canada and Fisheries and Oceans Canada. The Committee's role is to study, manage and, in certain cases, monitor and regulate the hunting, fishing and trapping regime. In most matters, the Co-ordinating Committee plays an advisory role to the Quebec and Canadian governments. It must also make recommendations to the two levels of government. It holds annual meetings in the Northern communities to explain its activities and consult with local people about its mandate and broad objectives. Sub-committees, also made up of Aboriginal and government representatives, have been formed to deal with specific issues such as big game, parks, fishing, outfitting operations, marketing of caribou meat and land use. More information on the HFTCC and its activities is available on the HFTCC Web site   or from the Secretariat of the Hunting, Fishing and Trapping Co-ordinating Committee, 383, St-Jacques Street, Room C220, Montréal (Quebec) Canada H2Y 1N9.

Local and Regional Administrations

With the passage of Cree-Naskapi (of Quebec) Act in 1984, the Cree communities and the Naskapi community became incorporated. They have local administrations with the power to adopt by-laws concerning public order, environmental protection, taxation for local purposes, roads and transportation, local business and the use of lands and resources. Two additional bodies - the Cree Board of Compensation and the Cree Regional Authority (CRA) - were set up under Quebec legislation.

The Inuit communities of Nunavik, located above the 55th parallel, are incorporated as municipalities under Quebec legislation. The Kativik Regional Government is their regional structure, and the Makivik Corporation was set up to protect the interests of the Inuit with regard to the implementation of the JBNQA. Both organizations were established under Quebec legislation.

Cree-Naskapi (of Quebec) Act

In 1984, the Parliament of Canada passed the Cree-Naskapi (of Quebec) Act to implement JBNQA and NEQA provisions regarding local government for the communities. This Act supersedes the Indian Act, except for matters pertaining to Indian status. It institutes a form of self-government and establishes the land management system for Category IA (Cree) and IA-N (Naskapi) lands.

Cree-Naskapi Land Registry

The setting up and operation of a registry of rights and interests pertaining to Category IA and IA-N lands and buildings on those lands is provided for under the Cree-Naskapi (of Quebec) Act. The Land Registry System, which reports to INAC, includes the Central Land Registry Office and the Cree and Naskapi local offices.

Cree-Naskapi Commission

The Cree-Naskapi (of Quebec) Act also provided for the establishment of the Cree-Naskapi Commission (CNC), whose role is to investigate any representation submitted to it relating to implementation of the Act. It must also produce biennial reports on the application of the Act, following hearings. These reports are submitted to the Minister of Indian Affairs and Northern Development to be tabled in Parliament. The Cree-Naskapi Commission is made up of no more than three commissioners appointed by the Governor in Council, on the recommendation of the Cree Regional Authority and the Naskapi community.

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Background Summary of JBNQA and NEQA Implementation

The process of implementing the JBNQA and the NEQA has taken longer and has become more complex than anticipated.

In 1981, the House of Commons Standing Committee on Indian Affairs and Northern Development urged the federal government to address outstanding issues related to the JBNQA. After a departmental report, the Tait Report, was submitted in 1982, the federal government introduced a series of measures to address JBNQA implementation- related problems.

In June 1986, the federal Cabinet approved a process for fulfilling government obligations under the JBNQA and the NEQA. A federal negotiator, Mr. Andrew Croll, was appointed in order to direct this process.

In September 1990, the federal government signed the JBNQA Implementation Agreement with the Inuit and the NEQA Implementation Agreement with the Naskapi Band of Quebec. These agreements released the federal government from certain obligations under the JBNQA and NEQA. In return, the federal government paid a one-time grant of $22.8 million to the Inuit and $1.7 million to the Naskapi. The government made other commitments to these communities. Many activities have been launched within the framework of the agreements. Various working groups and procedures have been established, including procedures for settling disputes and the establishment of a JBNQA Implementation Forum with the Inuit. In 1990, INAC established the James Bay Implementation Office.

Discussions between the federal government and the James Bay Cree regarding JBNQA implementation continued. In May 1992, the federal government signed an agreement providing for the building of a village for the Oujé-Bougoumou Cree and the setting up of a fund for the community's economic and social development. Having agreed that the Cree-Canada relationship was in need of rejuvenation and reform, the Government of Canada and the James Bay Cree entered into a set of discussions and negotiations to renew and define this relationship and pursue the process of meeting their respective responsibilities under the JBNQA, the Constitution and the laws of Canada. To facilitate discussions between the federal ministers and the leaders of the James Bay Cree in the context of these shared objectives, in 1997 the parties agreed to establish a Round Table, bringing together the federal ministers concerned and the leaders of the James Bay Cree. The Cree-Canada Round Table came into existence in 1998. The Chief Negotiator for the Cree at that time was Mr. Ted Moses. In 1999-2000, Mr. Moses was elected Grand Chief of the Quebec Grand Council of the Crees, and his responsibilities as Chief Negotiator at the Cree-Canada Round Table were taken over by Mr. Bill Namagoose.

Since the signing of the JBNQA and the NEQA, several federal departments and agencies have undertaken to meet the federal government's obligations under the agreements. Most of them also provide, within their respective mandates, funding for government programs to which the beneficiaries have continued access.

The signing of the agreements has brought about many changes in the role and jurisdiction of the federal government and INAC with respect to the Cree, Inuit and Naskapi.

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Indian and Northern Affairs Canada

In 1982, the Minister of Indian Affairs and Northern Development was given overall responsibility for co-ordinating all federal government activities related to implementation of both the JBNQA and the NEQA. To ensure that the federal government's obligations were met, the Department established the Quebec Claims Secretariat in February 1984. This organization later became known as the Northern Quebec Claims Implementation Secretariat. In 1986, the Department's Negotiations and Implementation Directorate at Headquarters assumed the responsibilities of the Northern Quebec Claims Implementation Secretariat, a situation that continued until the early 1990s. The James Bay Implementation Office then assumed these responsibilities.

Since the signing of the JBNQA and NEQA and the passing of legislation that established the Cree and Naskapi local administrations and regional government for Inuit communities, INAC's role has evolved from that of being a direct service provider to that of negotiator of financial agreements such that these communities could deliver their own programs. The Department still provides technical expertise in many areas and participates in the land and environmental management regimes covered by the agreements.

James Bay Implementation Office

The James Bay Implementation Office (JBIO) was created in November 1990 after the federal government signed implementation agreements with the Makivik Corporation and the Naskapi Band of Quebec. The JBIO is part of the Implementation Branch (Claims and Indian Government) of INAC and is located in Gatineau, Quebec.

Mandate

The JBIO's responsibilities include:

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2000 - 2001 Annual Report

Summary of Federal Government Expenditures ($),1 1996-2001 

  1996-1997 1997-1998 1998-1999 1999-2000 2000-2001
Indian and Northern Affairs Canada 147,479,9102 153,257,6613 142,549,4724 160,476,8085 181,009,000
Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation 37,865,052 36,899,544 37,605,100 37,620,700 42,673,518
Human Resources Development Canada 11,341,260 13,797,812 13,834,170 15,040,039 11,796,730
Transport Canada 2,206,666 4,115,661 3,314,833 6,921,8166 9,620,068
Health Canada 5,761,864 6,329,014 6,370,798 7,611,209 8,069,540
Solicitor General Canada 5,757,931 5,815,476 6,630,942 6,675,144 6,699,353
Industry Canada 881,580 445,868 774,576 520,537 2,162,245
National Defence 1,074,000 840,000 2,438,0007 2,021,000 2,041,000
Canadian Heritage 1,842,141 1,774,719 1,834,424 1,834,424 1,836,345
Canada Economic Development 424,291 450,489 270,000 555,299 635,571
Environment Canada8 176,740 685,059 401,024 494,429 552,912
Natural Resources Canada Canadian Forest Service 333,250 458,600 676,073 655,100 543,450
Justice Canada - 92,785 202,903 529,265 508,456
Fisheries and Oceans Canada 744,470 367,205 380,000 414,000 487,000

Total 215,889,155 225,329,893 217,282,3157 241,369,7706 268,635,188

FEDERAL EXPENDITURES BETWEEN 1996 AND 2001: 1,168,506,321

1 Figures provided by each department
2 Excluding $100,300,000 paid by Indian and Northern Affairs Canada to settle a claim filed by the Quebec Ministère de l'Éducation and including $300,000 paid by Human Resources Development Canada under the job creation strategy for the Naskapi.
3 Including $1 million from Transport Canada and $1 million from Fisheries and Oceans Canada for the Northern Quebec Marine Infrastructure Program, $15,000 from Environment Canada for an environmental project and $655,000 to fund the Cree-Naskapi Commission. (For the 1993-1994, 1994-1995, 1995-1996 and 1996-1997 fiscal years, CNC received respectively, $655,000, $480,000, $655,000 and $480,000 for a total of $2,270,000. These expenditures are not included in the total amounts stated in this table; financial data prior to 1993 are available from INAC).
4 Excluding $2.5 million distributed through Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation to the Société d'habitation du Québec under a special initiative on housing for the Inuit of Nunavik and $23.6 million paid to the Government of Quebec as the first instalment of the federal contribution to funding the construction of the access road to Waskaganish.
5 Excluding the last instalment of $400,000 to the Government of Quebec for the federal contribution to funding the construction of the access road to Waskaganish.
6 Increase due to repairs to the Kuujjuaq and Schefferville airports. However, this total does not match the total shown in the 1999-2000 Annual Report because in this Report the expenditures made by Transport Canada have been adjusted to exclude a $341,660 grant that was in fact disbursed in 2000-2001.
7 This total does not match the total shown in the 1998-1999 and 1999-2000 Annual Reports because in the present Report the expenditures made by National Defence have been adjusted to include $500,000 disbursed in 1998-1999 for restoration of the Mid-Canada Line sites.
8 Including the expenditures of the Canadian Environmental Assessment Agency.

Activities and Expenditures of Federal Departments and Agencies, 2000-2001

Indian and Northern Affairs Canada

During 2000-2001, total funding allocated by Indian and Northern Affairs Canada (INAC) to Cree, Inuit and Naskapi communities under the JBNQA, the NEQA and federal programs amounted to $181,009,000.

Population

As at June 30, 2000, 22,339 people were beneficiaries of the agreements, including 12,906 Cree in nine communities, 8,687 Inuit in 14 Northern municipalities and 746 Naskapi in a single community.

Education

The Department allocated $79,838,302 to education expenses,* broken down as follows:

  CREE INUIT NASKAPI TOTAL
Education services $53,445,801 $16,222,247 $1,953,864 $71,621,912
School infrastructure 2,464,427 3,713,496 106,627 6,284,550

Total $55,910,228 $19,935,743 $2,060,491 $77,906,462
Number of students** 3,403 2,952 254 6,609

* As of 2000-2001, post-secondary education expenses paid directly by INAC will no longer be reported in the Annual Report. The figures will however be available from INAC.
** Figures for the 2000-2001 school year include preschool to secondary students, and are supplied by the Quebec Ministère de l'Éducation.

  CREE INUIT NASKAPI TOTAL
Science and technology summer camps $39,265 $51,236 $1,621 $92,122
Co-operative Education 277,306 217,540 9,013 504,064
Summer Career Placements 250,334 154,336 11,033 415,703
Work Experience 189,688 131,800 - 321,488

Total $756,593 $554,912 $21,872 $1,333,377

Capital, Operations and Maintenance

During 2000-2002, $85,547,395 was allocated to capital, operations and maintenance and to infrastructure projects in Cree, Inuit, and Naskapi communities. The figure includes $13,803,689 in capital, $45,252,962 for operations and maintenance, and $26,490,744 for infrastructure projects. The breakdown by beneficiaries is as follows:

Electricity

During 2000-2001, INAC allocated $2,828,778 for electricity expenditures in Waskaganish.

Social Development

INAC provided $2,931,622 for social assistance services in Mistissini, Waswanipi and Kawawachikamach. In the remaining JBNQA communities, these services were provided by the Government of Quebec. The sums provided by Canada break down as follows:

Mistissini
Waswanipi
Kawawachikamach
$1,118,212
1,037,260
776,150

Total
$2,931,622

The federal government also participates in community social development by funding initiatives promoting health and better quality of life through the National Strategy for the Integration of Persons with Disabilities (NSIPD) and the Federal Initiative on Family Violence (IFV). The following amounts were provided during 2000-2001:

  CREE INUIT NASKAPI TOTAL
NSIPD $21,346 $25,744 - $47,090
IFV 140,938 169,200 - 310,138

Total $162,284 $194,944 - $357,228

Economic Development

INAC participates in Aboriginal economic development through the direct funding of Community Economic Development Organizations (CEDOs) and other sector-based organizations. These organizations support projects that promote economic development by providing technical and financial assistance. During 2000-2001, the Department provided the following amounts:

CREE INUIT NASKAPI TOTAL
$1,394,470 $1,014,556 $52,056 $2,461,082

Funding allocated to the Cree included $381,880 for the Cree Trappers' Association, $130,600 for the Cree Regional Authority to support Cree arts and crafts activities, and $95,000 to support the creation of the Cree Outfitting and Tourism Association established in December 2000.

INAC also supports natural resources development by First Nations and Inuit through the Resource Access Negotiations (RAN) Program, which helps the communities and their organizations set up business partnerships and stimulate investments in the natural resources sector.

During 2000-2001, the Department allocated $85,000 to the Mistissini community under the RAN. It also allocated $85,000 to the Waswanipi community to cover costs related to the negotiation of outsourcing contracts in the mining sector, and $85,000 to the Kawawachikamach community to conduct negotiations on hydroelectric exploitation of the Menehek dam.

Environment

During 2000-2001, the Cree Regional Authority received $142,389 from INAC to continue projects under the Environment Issues Inventory and Remediation Plan in Cree communities, and $5,641 under the Indian Environmental Assistance Fund. The Mistissini community received $28,980 to dispose of four tanks containing petroleum products.

The Naskapi received $200,000 from the Environment Issues Inventory and $35,000 to install waste oil storage tanks in Kawawachikamach.

INAC also allocated $58,050 to the Inuit for coordination of contaminants projects in Nunavik.

Indian Registration

INAC and the Cree and Naskapi communities are responsible for Indian registration records. During 2000-2001, the Department provided $99,405 to the Cree and $4,123 to the Naskapi for their participation in maintaining the registry.

Cree-Naskapi Land Registry

The number of transactions involving the registration of Cree and Naskapi land increased steadily during 2000-2001. Local registrars regularly register land allotments, particularly those related to commercial projects on Category 1A and 1 AN land and to residential construction. All registry offices are open and in operation, and local registrars are being trained on site in each community.

In addition, aerial photos were made throughout the year and registration plans were completed for the communities of Eastmain, Waskaganish, Wemindji, Chisasibi and Whapmagoostui, as well as colour mosaics and cartography for these same communities.

Initiatives under Gathering Strength: Canada's Aboriginal Action Plan

During 2000-2001, INAC allocated the following funds to Cree, Inuit and Naskapi projects under the various sections of Gathering Strength:

Investing in Education Reform (formerly Education Reform)

Water and Sewer initiative

Income Security Reform

Governance, Administration and Accountability (Previously Governance Capacity Building Initiative)

Environmental Management Capacity Building

Opportunity Fund and Resource Acquisition Initiative

Other Financial Assistance

The Cree Regional Authority received $515,000 from the Department to cover negotiation expenses related to implementation of the JBNQA.

The Makivik Corporation received $302,000 from INAC to cover a portion of the costs related to implementation of the JBNQA and $25,000 to cover consulting costs. The Corporation also received $9,800 to carry out community-based projects in Inuit communities.

The Naskapi Nation of Kawawachikamach was allocated $31,287 to promote Naskapi traditional knowledge.

Nunavik Commission

The Nunavik Commission was created in 1999, following a political agreement between Nunavik, Quebec and Canada, to provide a form of government in Nunavik. During 2000-2001, the Commission received $196,650 from INAC as the federal contribution. It also received $12,000 to fund its activities.

Cree-Naskapi Commission

INAC provided $650,745 to fund the activities of the Cree-Naskapi Commission, the mandate of which is to investigate and report every two years on disputes related to application of the Cree-Naskapi (of Quebec) Act.

INAC Expenditures ($), 2000-2001 

  CREE INUIT NASKAPI TOTAL
Education
Education services 53,445,801 16,222,247 1,953,864 71,621,912
School infrastructure 2,464,427 3,713,496 106,627 6,284,550
Cultural centres 194,376 404,087 - 598,463
Employment programs 756,593 554,912 21,872 1,333,377
 
  56,861,197 20,894,742 2,082,363 79,838,302
Capital expenditures 12,543,089 - 1,260,600 13,803,689
Operations and maintenance 41,980,795 - 3,272,167 45,252,962
Infrastructure-related projects 12,622,725 13,587 500 280,519 26,490,744
 
  67,146,609 13,587,500 4,813,286 85,547,395
Electricity - Waskaganish 2,828,778 - - 2,828,778
Social development
Social assistance 2,155,472 - 776,150 2,931,622
NSIPD-IFV programs 162,284 194,944 - 357,228
 
  2,317,756 194,944 776,150 3,288,850
Economic development 1,394,470 1,014,556 52,056 2,461,082
RAN 170,000 - 85,000 255,000
Environment 177,010 58,050 235,000 470,060
Indian registration 99,405 - 4,123 103,528
Initiatives under Gathering Strength  
Education reform 1,063,046 902,616 54,000 2,019,662
Water and sewer initiative 1,710,000 - - 1,710,000
Income security reform - - 117,935 117,935
Governance 165,000 305,000 26,866 498,866
Environmental management 35,000 13,580 9,480 58,060
Opportunity fund 12,000 25,000 34,000 71,000
 
  2,985,046 1,246,196 242,281 4,473,523
Other financial assistance 515,000 336,800 31,287 883,087
Nunavik Commission - 208,650 - 208,650
 
Subtotal 134,495,271 37,541,438 8,321,546 180,358,255
Cree-Naskapi Commission - - - 650,745

Total       181,009,000

Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation

The Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation (CMHC), in cooperation with INAC, is directly involved in the Cree and Naskapi communities through its housing program funded under section 95 of the National Housing Act.

The housing program for the Inuit is administered by the Quebec housing corporation, the Société d'habitation du Québec, under a federal-provincial cost-sharing agreement.

In 2000-2001, 50 new subsidized housing units were added to the Cree housing stock, while three new housing units were added to that of the Naskapi. In addition, the CMHC spent $5,350 to adapt three units to enhance the self-sufficiency of senior citizens in the Naskapi community.

In September 2000, Canada, Quebec, the Makivik Corporation, the Kativik Regional Government (KRG) and the Kativik Municipal Housing Bureau reached an agreement for $100 million over five years to implement a program to build approximately 350 subsidized housing units in Nunavik. The agreement is funded on a 50-50 basis by Canada (CMHC and INAC) and Quebec. In 2000-2001, CMHC contributed $5 million through INAC to the Makivik Corporation as the first federal contribution paid under this agreement.

As part of the Youth Employment Strategy, CMHC also provided financial assistance to enable 11 young Cree and one young Inuk to gain experience in housing matters in their community.

Four training sessions covering advice to clients, building management, arrears management and rent collection were provided to housing managers in the Cree communities.

CMHC Expenditures ($), 2000-2001

  CREE INUIT NASKAPI TOTAL
Federal subsidies* 8,965,647 33,000,000 707,871 42,673,518
Number of subsidized units 1,719 1,751 116  

* The amount of $5 million paid through INAC is not included in this table.

Human Resources Development Canada

In 2000-2001, the Aboriginal Human Services Development Strategy (AHSDS) was in its second year. During this period, the Cree, Inuit and Naskapi signatories to the Aboriginal Human Services Development Agreement (AHSDA) implemented a range of programs designed specifically to address their human resources development needs.

Human Resources Development Canada (HRDC) thus continued to work towards the objective of strengthening the autonomy of Aboriginal communities by supporting their efforts to take charge of development tools in order to develop the employability of their workforce and its adaptation to the labour market. The AHSDS agreements provide for increased accountability on the part of Aboriginal administrations, which is reflected in the inclusion of targets in terms of the number of people rejoining the workforce, returning to school or developing their employability, or in terms of unemployment insurance benefit and social assistance that is not paid.

The Inuit participated in the AHSDS since their AHSDA provides for additional funding to manage employment and employment insurance programs and services, as well as front line services for the Income Security Program. This agreement includes more than $5 million from the AHSDS envelope.

The Naskapi also received their share of AHSDS funding for the Assembly of First Nations of Quebec and Labrador.

Negotiations with the CRA continued under the JBNQA throughout the year. The agreement signed in 1996 was renewed to give the Cree access to the funding required for the administration of a program and service delivery structure and to program funds.

Human Resources Development Canada Expenditures ($), 2000-2001

  CREE INUIT NASKAPI TOTAL
Labour Market Program 4,552,425 3,835,625 337,773 8,725,823
 
Inuit and First Nations Child
Care Initiative
1,170,321 1,229,070 77,208 2,476,599
Youth initiatives 330,726 248,640 14,942 594,308

Total 6,053,472 5,313,335 429,923 11,796,730

Transport Canada

Transport Canada pursued its initiatives among the Cree, Inuit and Naskapi communities, investing a total of $9,459,127 during 2000-2001.

The Department contributed $904,000 to the KRG for the management of Kuujjuaq Airport. Investments totalling $3,439,500 were also made in projects to complete the repairs to the landing strip and to replace the landing lights and other equipment.

Under their three-year management contracts, the Eastmain Cree received $180,000, the Waskaganish Cree received $175,000, and the Wemindji Cree $168,467. Transport Canada met with a representative of the three Cree airports in fall 2000 for discussions on the transfer of these airports to the communities in the near future.

Transport Canada also provided funding for the rehabilitation of facilities to bring them into line with environmental standards on two sites in the Quaqtaq region. Under the Airport Facilities Assistance Program, a grant was provided in 2000-2001 to upgrade the airport facilities and finance the purchase of equipment at Chissasibi.

The Société aéroportuaire de Schefferville, a non-profit organization comprising the Cree and Naskapi communities, received $172,000 to manage the airport. Other Transport Canada investments included $2,349,100 to repair the surface of the marshalling areas and to replace the visual aids, $159,800 for resurfacing the parking area and repairing the sewers and $218,200 for the purchase of heavy equipment.

The rehabilitation of facilities to bring them into line with environmental standards at two sites in the Quaqtaq region required the investment of $176,000 by Transport Canada.

In 2000-2001, Transport Canada also paid $1 million to the Makivik Corporation, through INAC, for the construction of marine infrastructure facilities in Nunavik. This contribution enabled marine infrastructures to be installed in the villages of Quaqtaq and Kangiqsualujjuaq.

Transport Canada expenditures in Inuit communities under the Marine Safety Inspection and Training Program totalled $76,541.

Transport Canada Expenditures ($), 2000-2001
  CREE INUIT NASKAPI TOTAL
Management - airport - 904,000 172,000 1,076,000
Operation and maintenance 523,467 - - 523,467
Airport facilities 1,259,100 3,439,500 2,727,100 7,425,700
Cape Hopes Advance/        
Quaqtaq Project - 176,700 - 176,700
Grant 341,660** - - 341,660
Training - 76,541 - 76,541
Nunavik Marine Infrastructure        
Program - * - *

Total 2,124,227 4,596,741 2,899,100 9,620,068

* The amount of $1 million paid through INAC is not included in this table.
** Although this grant was identified in 1999-2000, the money was paid in 2000-2001.

Health Canada

During 2000-2001, Health Canada Quebec Region's First Nations and Inuit Health Branch provided $8,069,540 for various health care programs in the Cree, Inuit and Naskapi communities.

Health Canada contributed to funding the "Brighter Futures" program for child development and participated financially in the Canada Prenatal Nutrition Program (including development) and the new Head Start Initiative, so as to help communities improve the physical and mental well-being of children and their families.

Last year, the First Nations and Inuit Home and Community Care Program was added to the nursing component. The program is in the development phase and should begin in 2002-2003.

Health Canada is also encouraging students in these communities to work in the healthcare sector through the Indian and Inuit Health Careers Program. No applications under this program were received this year. The Department also paid for non-insured Health Benefits for beneficiaries living outside their affiliated communities.

Health Canada Expenditures ($), 2000-2001
  CREE INUIT NASKAPI TOTAL
National Native Alcohol and Drug Abuse Program 689,884 721,418 50,410 1,461,712
Solvent Abuse 148,488 127,958 10,861 287,307
Brighter Futures 1,116,633 952,085 61,425 2,130,143
Prenatal Nutrition 117,453 99,129 6,357 222,939
Head Start Initiative 611,459 - - 611,459
Building Healthy Communities 820,246 718,437 46,515 1,585,198
Home and Community Care 549,998 779,378 26,359 1,355,735
Diabetes 242,802 143,134 9,111 395,047
Health Services/Tuberculosis - 20,000 - 20,000
Indian and Inuit Health Careers - - - -
Non-Insured Health Benefits 489,118 175,827 3,138 668,083

Total 4,296,963 3,561,539 211,038 8,069,540

Solicitor General of Canada

During 2000-2001, the Aboriginal Policing Directorate of the Department of the Solicitor General of Canada continued to implement three tripartite agreements on police services: one with the Cree Regional Authority, one with the Kativik Regional Government and one with the Naskapi, each involving the Government of Quebec.

Differences of opinion between the Government of Quebec and the Solicitor General regarding the interpretation of the NEQA prompted the Solicitor General to take temporary steps to enable the Department to participate in the funding of police services to the Naskapi.

During 2000-2001, the Correctional Service of Canada (CSC) pursued its strategy of developing and delivering programs specifically tailored to Aboriginal offenders and spent a total of $78,686 for the Cree and Inuit.

CSC maintained its Aboriginal Liaison Officer services in every institution, and funds were contributed through Native Paralegal Services of Quebec for the Cree and Inuit. This organization is responsible for assisting and counselling Aboriginal inmates in federal penitentiaries to facilitate their return to the community.

CSC also expanded its services to senior citizens and funded a range of correctional programs tailored to the needs of Aboriginal offenders. In addition, funds were allocated to various treatment programs in the areas of substance abuse and family violence. CSC also provided funding for the accommodation, supervision and treatment in halfway houses during parole.

Solicitor General Canada Expenditures ($), 2000-2001
  CREE INUIT NASKAPI TOTAL
Aboriginal Policing Directorate 3,056,581 3,356.086 208,000 6,620,667
Correctional Service        
Native Paralegal Services of Quebec 18,602 14,225 - 32,827
Services to senior citizens 7,512 5,036 - 12,548
Adapted correctional programs 16,020 12,251 - 28,271
Parole-related services 2,520 2,520 - 5,040

Subtotal 44,654 34,032 - 78,686
Total 3,101,235 3,390,118 208,000 6,699,353

Industry Canada

In 2000-2001, Industry Canada, through Aboriginal Business Canada, supported the development of a variety of business and economic development projects in the Cree, Inuit and Naskapi communities.

The funds were used to develop business plans specifically targeting the establishment and expansion of Aboriginal businesses and the development of a variety of business and marketing plans. As well, the First Nations program for Canada's SchoolNet assisted the Jimmy Sandy Memorial School, in Kawawachikamach, in linking its students to the information highway. The school received DirecPC satellite link-up equipment, a Pentium computer and internet access funding.

Industry Canada Expenditures ($), 2000-2001
  CREE INUIT NASKAPI TOTAL
Aboriginal Business Canada 773,789 1,339,456 34,000 2,147,245
First Nations Program for Canada's SchoolNet - - 15,000 15,000

Total 773,789 1,339,456 49,000 2,162,245

National Defence

Land Force Quebec Area (LFQA) is responsible for two activities: the Canadian Rangers and Junior Rangers programs. During 2000- 2001, the Department of National Defence allocated $2,041,000 to these programs.

The Canadian Rangers are volunteers between the ages of 18 and 65 who provide support, if needed, for members of the Canadian Forces in remote and isolated areas. The LFQA currently supports 19 Canadian Rangers patrols on the territory covered by the agreements, comprising approximately 450, mainly Inuit, members. The Department also offers a free activity program (Junior Rangers) for youth between the ages of 12 and 18 based on traditional Aboriginal culture and disciplines and on modern living habits. More than 375 young girls and boys from the JBNQA and NEQA areas participated in this program, which helped them to enhance their self-esteem, acquire a greater sense of responsibility, understanding and a feeling of belonging to their community. The success of the Junior Rangers program is the result of close cooperation between the Canadian Forces and the Kativik Regional Government. The involvement and interest of the communities in Nunavik have also been contributing factors to the establishment of a summer camp in which over 100 Junior Canadian Rangers participate every year. In July 2000, Camp Okpiapik was held at Imiujaq.

To mark the Millennium, the Canadian Forces organized an adventure expedition in July 2000, consisting of a crossing of Nunavik by canoe on the Rivière aux Feuilles from Hudson Bay to Ungava Bay. This expedition, which was a first in terms of both its scale and the challenge involved, comprised 80 young people, 32 of whom were Junior Rangers from Nunavik.

During the 2000-2001 fiscal year, the Department of National Defence allocated $2,041,000 to these two programs.

On July 22, 2000, the Department of National Defence announced an expansion of these programs, which confirms the importance of the Canadian Rangers in providing a military presence in remote and isolated regions of Canada and the success of the Junior Canadian Rangers program, which arranges organized activities for young people in remote and isolated communities. This announcement will result, for the JBNQA and NEQA territories, in the addition of 12 new Canadian Rangers and Junior Canadian Rangers patrols over the next seven years, primarily in Cree territory. A Junior Canadian Rangers Patrol was accordingly established at Waskaganish in 2001.

The Department of National Defence is, in addition, co-signatory of an agreement with Environment Canada, the Government of Quebec and the Kativik Regional Government, the promoter of the project, which is aimed at environmental clean-up and restoration at 42 Mid-Canada Line sites in Quebec along the 55th parallel. In September 1998, Environment Canada published a report outlining the results of analysis and recommendations stemming from a detailed inventory of a series of sites. The report confirmed, among other things, the presence of PCBs in the old buildings, together with limited hydrocarbon soil pollution. The analyses also showed that the surface water from which samples were taken was free of any chemical or toxicological contamination. A detailed inventory of the sites will be compiled by 2002 in order to confirm the presence of hazardous materials, to recover them for subsequent disposal and to proceed with the biorestoration of the identified sites.

In 2000-2001, nine sites received final clearance from the Government of Quebec: six north of Schefferville and three in the Kuujjuarapik region. The agreement has also generated significant socioeconomic benefits, as the projects have enabled many workers in the Inuit communities to acquire technical knowledge and skills in this field. Plans also call for projects for the re-use of some sites, such as the creation of a traditional teaching centre at site 336 (Geoffroy River) and a Youth Fishing Camp at site 339A, north of Kuujjuarapik.

Canadian Heritage

The Aboriginal Programs Directorate, formerly known as the Citizens' Participation Directorate, of the Department of Canadian Heritage supports a wide range of activities in Northern Quebec, particularly Aboriginal communication networks, friendship centres, protection of Aboriginal languages and cultures, support for Aboriginal organizations, and initiatives to improve the situation of Aboriginal women.

It also funded the new Urban Multipurpose Aboriginal Youth Centres Initiative, which is aimed at creating a network of urban multipurpose Aboriginal community youth centres that will provide accessible, Aboriginal community-based, culturally relevant and supportive projects, programs, services and counselling to urban Aboriginal youth, and will facilitate their participation in existing programs in order to improve their economic, social and personal prospects.

During 2000-2001, Canadian Heritage provided support amounting to $1,836,345 to Aboriginal communities in Northern Quebec, as follows:

Canadian Heritage Expenditures, ($), 2000-2001

Northern Native Broadcast Access Program
James Bay Cree Communications Society 292,200
Taqramiut Nipingat Incorporated (TNI) 907,317
Aboriginal Representative Organizations Program
Makivik CTorporation 201,645
Native Friendship Centre Program
Senneterre Native Friendship Centre Inc.* 114,158
Val-d'Or Native Friendship Centre Inc.* 171,237
Urban Multipurpose Aboriginal Youth Centres Initiative
Senneterre Native Friendship Centre Inc.* 45,903
Val-d'Or Native Friendship Centre Inc. 103,885

Total 1,836,345

* The services provided by these Native Friendship Centres are not restricted exclusively to the beneficiaries of the agreements.

Canada Economic Development

Canada Economic Development (CED) for Quebec Regions aims to promote the economic development of regions of Quebec where incomes and economic growth are low or where there is a shortage of opportunities for productive employment. It emphasizes long-term economic development, the creation of lasting employment and incomes and focuses its effort on small and medium sized enterprises as well as on fostering entrepreneurship.

The Cree and Inuit clienteles are served by the Northern Quebec Office, while the Naskapi community is served by the North Shore Office.

Through these two regional offices, CED promotes the development of business and the growth of competitiveness among SMEs through innovations and market development projects. Among other things, it supports the development of the local capacity to spur local economic development.

CED has contributed financially to the completion of a range of development projects in the Cree and Inuit communities under the Idea-SME, Regional Strategic Initiatives, Community Development and Youth Strategy programs.

The Idea-SME program provides services and funds activities in the following priority areas: innovation, research and development, design, market development and export, entrepreneurship and business climate development.

The Strategic Regional Initiatives (SRI) program provides support for major initiatives with a potential structural impact on the regional economy in the following areas: development of the regions' technological capacity, tourist development, support for the ability of the Quebec regions to attract, for their international outreach and for the regions' adjustment potential.

Under the Community Futures Program, the Community Futures Development Corporation (CFDC) made available to Cree communities an investment fund of over $1 million to support strategic projects proposed by local businesspeople. During 2000-2001, the CFDC received $230,000 for its operations.

Under the CED-CFDC Youth Strategy, the Cree also received $103,500 in 2000-2001. The aim of this program is to stem the migration of young people to the large urban centres. It contributes to helping young local entrepreneurs develop their business plans within their community by encouraging the creation, acquisition, expansion or modernization of a company by young people and by enhancing their employability. The strategy also aims to reinforce the social, cultural and economic involvement of young people in their own community.

Canada Economic Development Expenditures ($), 2000-2001

  CREE INUIT NASKAPI TOTAL
Idea-SME 97,599 5,500 - 103,099
Strategic Regional Initiatives 87,994 110,978 - 198,972
Community Futures Program 230,000 - - 230,000
Youth Strategy 103,500 - - 103,500

Total 519,093 116,478 - 635,571

Environment Canada

In 2000-2001, Environment Canada, through its representatives on the James Bay Advisory Committee on the Environment, the Kativik Environmental Advisory Committee and the Hunting, Fishing and Trapping Coordinating Committee, continued to assist in the implementation of the environmental protection and social environment regimes, as well as the hunting, fishing and trapping regime. For 2000-2001, Environment Canada's expenditures related to the implementation of the JBNQA totalled $40,000.

Northern Ecosystem Initiative

Following the consultation tour undertaken the previous year as part of the Northern Ecosystems Initiative, Environment Canada established a regional coordinating committee on which the main environmental participants in Arctic Quebec were invited to sit. The steering committee thus comprised representatives of the Cree, Inuit, Naskapi and Innu Aboriginal organizations. The Centre d'études nordiques (CEN) (Northern Studies Centre) and the Groupe d'études inuit et circumpolaires (GÉTIC) (Inuit and Circumpolar Studies Group) at Laval University are also on the Committee, as are Hydro-Québec, INAC and Environment Canada.

One of the first mandates of the Steering Committee was to formulate an integrated, focussed action plan. To achieve this, Environment Canada sponsored a workshop with the aim of agreeing on recommended strategic orientations in Northern Quebec. The workshop was held in Schefferville from January 30 to February 2, 2001. Part of the costs of the workshop went towards funding the preparation and participation in the workshop of the four Aboriginal organizations. A service contract was also given to the Band Council of the Kawawachikamach Naskapi to cover the logistical and organizational expenses involved in the event. A detailed report on the workshop was produced and is available in both official languages.

In addition, Environment Canada allocated funds from the Northern Ecosystems Initiative to the Makivik Corporation to participate in the inventory of abandoned mining sites in Nunavik.

Wildlife and Habitat Management

Under the Canada-United States Cooperation Agreement that forms part of the North American Waterfowl Management Plan, Environment Canada's Canadian Wildlife Service (CWS) prepared inventories of American black duck and Canada geese. In addition, the study of the reproduction and band work on the Canada goose were completed in order to continue the assessment of the status of the species and the factors impacting on reproduction in this group of birds. An inventory of colonies of eider ducks was also compiled in the Ungava Bay region. Environment Canada's involvement in this project totalled $75,000, $30,000 of which was contributed by the Northern Ecosystems Initiative. The CWS received support in implementing this project from numerous organizations, including the Makivik Corporation.

Environmental Protection

In 2000-2001, Environment Canada provided scientific expertise as a co-signatory to a tripartite agreement with the Department of National Defence, the Government of Quebec and the Kativik Regional Government covering the investigation, restoration and dismantling of 42 Mid-Canada Line sites along the 55th parallel in Quebec. Acting as an advisor to Transport Canada, Environment Canada also completed phase two of a rehabilitation project for a contaminated site at Cape Hopes Advance on the 61st parallel. In 2000-2001, restoration work was carried out in collaboration with the Kativik Regional Government, the Quaqtaq Land Corporation and the Makivik Corporation.

With the support of the Kativik Regional Government, the Kuujjuarapik Municipal Corporation and the Quebec Ministère de l'Environnement, Environment Canada continued the search for a solution to reuse some 2000 barrels of abandoned bituminous binding agents stored for half a century on the outskirts of the village of Kuujjuarapik.

With the aim of identifying the sources and quantifying the origins of atmospheric pollutants in Northern regions, a second intensive measuring campaign was conducted at Kuujjuarapik in spring 2001, coordinated by the Meteorological Service of Canada. The results of this campaign were presented in Montreal, Calgary, Minamata, Japan, and Grenoble, France. Environment Canada received funding for the second year running from the Northern Contaminants Program.

Meteorological Service of Canada

Environment Canada operated 18 meteorological stations of the Atmospheric Environment Program on the territory covered by the agreements, including three upper-air stations and a network of three lightening stations, located in La Grande-4, in Wemindji and in Kuujjuarapik. The Department also provides a range of meteorological services, including weather forecasting, warnings, meteorological monitoring, marine forecasts and air traffic forecasts for the benefit of Northern residents and visitors.

Canadian Environmental Assessment Agency

Under sections 22 and 23 of the JBNQA, the Canadian Environmental Assessment Agency (CEAA) supports the federal administrator and provides advice and administrative support to the various committees established under the JBNQA.

CEAA's expenditures in 2000-2001 were $153,972. This includes the $105,000 federal contribution towards the maintenance and the joint funding, with the Government of Quebec, of the James Bay Advisory Committee on the Environment (JBACE) and of the Kativik Environmental Advisory Committee (KEAC). The operating expenditures of the Evaluating Committee (COMEV) are also included in these contributions, as well as the costs linked to the activities of the federal review panels (COFEX-North and COFEX-South). Throughout the year, CEAA was responsible for providing the executive secretariats of both these evaluating committees.

During the year, the Quebec Regional Office (QRO) of the CEAA continued its efforts to harmonize the two federal environmental assessment processes required by the JBNQA and the Canadian Environmental Assessment Act (CEAA) for projects under the Nunavik Marine Infrastructures Program. Last year, a coordination mechanism for the procedures was established by the QRO, with the active participation of COFEX-North, the federal departments concerned, primarily INAC and DFO, and the Makivik Corporation, the projects' promoter. This mechanism, which anticipates using COFEX-North as a single window for the promoter, had been tested in the assessment of the second construction project at Quaqtaq.

On July 18, 2000, at the request of the QRO, this pilot project was assessed by all the stakeholders. The assessment served as a starting point for the formulation of a joint directive for the subsequent three projects provided for under the Marine Infrastructures Program, namely Umiujaq, Kangiqsujuaq and Kuujjuaq. The QRO organized a joint visit to the three sites from July 24 to 27, 2000, which gave the parties an opportunity for a closer assessment of the issues involved in each of the projects now subject to the new directive. The impact studies presented by the Makivik Corporation were forwarded to the various stakeholders during the winter of 2001. Following the Quaqtaq model, a joint public consultation was organized by the Kativik Environmental Quality Commissioner (KEQC, a provincial body), the Federal Review Committee and a representative for the CEAA for the Umiujaq and Kangiqsujuaq projects, in February and March 2001 respectively.

The QRO has produced an assessment report on the implementation of the coordination process at Quaqtaq, which will be used to formulate a viable, effective approach in the medium and long term for the assessment of future projects involving the SEAA and the JBNQA. The QRO also organized meetings with the federal administrator and representatives of the two advisory committees of the JBNQA and KEAC regarding the terms of reference and budgets of these committees.

The Canada-Quebec Working Group on administrative agreements related to the JBNQA and to KEAC comprises the QRO and Government of Quebec officials responsible for the implementation of the JBNQA. In 2000-2001, the Working Group produced a joint report that recommended approval of the operating budget of both committees. These recommendations were accepted by both parties.

The QRO and Environment Canada also continued to attend the sectoral table on the environment as part of the Cree-Canada round table process. At the meetings, the participants worked on developing a common understanding of the concerns raised by the Cree. The last meeting between the parties was held in July 2000.

Environment Canada and the Canadian Environmental Assessment Agency Expenditures ($), 2000-2001

Environment Canada
Committees' expenditures 40,000
Schefferville Workshop 60,000
Wildlife and Habitat Management 150,000
Environmental Protection 112,000
Northern Contaminants Program 37,000
 
Subtotal 399,000
Canadian Environmental Assessment Agency 153,912

Total 552,912

Natural Resources Canada

The Department of Natural Resources Canada (NRCan) is active on the territory covered by the JBNQA and NEQA through the Canadian Forest Service and Geomatics Canada.

Canadian Forest Service

In 2000-2001, the Canadian Forest Service (CFS) continued to implement the First Nations Forestry Program (FNFP). Jointly funded by INAC and NRCan, the objective of this program is to increase the forest development capabilities of Aboriginal communities. In addition to a forestry component, the program offers components focussing on the economic development of Aboriginal Forestry, namely, the development of Aboriginal businesses, cooperation between communities and partnerships with the forest industry.

In 2000-2001, contributions totalling $120,854 were distributed among the Cree communities of Waswanipi, Mistissini and Nemaska to fund projects and activities covered by the FNFP.

The Mishtuk Corporation of Waswanipi also carried out work on a site covering almost 700 hectares. This work consisted of checkerboard clear-cutting and regeneration cutting, pre-commercial thinning, site preparation work and reforestation for a total of 442,000 trees planted. Over 23 km of road construction and renovation were almost completed. The program's contribution also provided training on the use of the Global Positioning System (GPS) to four forestry technicians.

In addition, the Waswanipi Cree model forest, the 11th model forest in Canada, which was in its third year of operation, was able to carry out three projects with its industry and government partners: consultation, planning covering all the traditional trapping territory and the establishment of Cree standards. The partners renewed their interest in the project in hopes of developing concrete approaches and solutions.

The Eenatuk Forestry Corporation of Mistissini received a contribution that allowed it to carry out work on an area of almost 800 hectares, including chequerboard clear cutting, site preparation work and the construction and improvement of 17 km of forest roads. In addition, a total of 300,000 trees were planted.

The community of Nemaska was able to provide training on the use of a portable sawmill and on cutting techniques to seven forestry workers

Canada Forest Service Expenditures ($), 2000-2001

  CREE INUIT NASKAPI TOTAL
First Nation Forestry Program 120,850 - - 120,850
Canada's Model Forest Network 422,600 - - 422,600

Total 543,450 - - 543,450

Geomatics Canada

Geomatics Canada, a branch of the Department of Natural Resources Canada, is active in the territory covered by the agreements through the Eastern Region Operation Centre, Legal Survey Division, specifically its Quebec Client Liaison Unit.

In the region's Aboriginal communities, the Quebec Client Liaison Unit is mainly involved in managing survey contracts, aerial photography, map verification, cartography and the production of colour mosaics. It also produced descriptions of the extent and location of property interests that must be registered on Cree and Naskapi lands.

In 2000-2001, the Bureau prepared 61 site plans for registering property interests on Cree land, while updating the plans representing the interests of each Cree and Naskapi community. It managed contracts for the conduct of aerial photography covering all category 1A lands in the communities of Eastmain, Waskaganish, Wemindji, Chisasibi and Whapmagoostui.

The Bureau has also designed a manual entitled Preparation of Land Registry Plans for Cree Communities to help local registrars submit their applications to be used in the preparation of site plans for the registration of property interests. In the context of this guide, one day's training was given at the local registry office in Waswanipi in June 2001. The concepts of positioning, land measurement and the preparation of sketches presented in the guide were explained. There are plans to provide this training to other Cree and Naskapi communities.

Justice Canada

The Department of Justice, through the Aboriginal Justice Directorate, in partnership with Aboriginal communities and the provinces, develops long-term community-based programming that facilitates the transfer of responsibilities for the administration of justice to Aboriginal people and encourages a reduction in crime and incarceration rates. In 2000-2001, the following Cree, Inuit and Naskapi community justice programs were funded through the Aboriginal Justice Strategy:

The Naskapi Healing Justice Committee

The Committee assists judges to help them determine appropriate sentences and offers counselling and support to offenders based on legal models such as mediation, de-judicialization, sentencing circles and arbitration by a Justice of the Peace. It supports the reintegration of members into the community.

The Cree Regional Authority Justice Initiative

In nine communities, the CRA has implemented alternative sentencing programs for members of its communities. The ultimate aim of the project was to gradually implement and maintain approaches aimed at promoting the development of community justice programs. To date, this approach has yielded results in two of the nine communities.

The Council of the Mistissini Cree Nation

In this program, a community justice group finds within the community itself solutions that are compatible with the existing laws and regulations. This group encourages increased participation by the local community, together with enhanced social control. It is currently dealing with cases of young offenders and will in future also handle adult cases.

The group plays an active mediation role in cases involving local disputes (including those over requests submitted by individuals), proposes alternatives and makes sentencing recommendations.

The Whapmagoostui Healing Justice Committee

Sponsored by the Whapmagoostui First Nation, the Whapmagoostui Healing Justice Committee seeks to find solutions to disputes within the community. This program enhances community participation in social control mechanisms.

This program handles cases involving young offenders as well as adult offenders. The scope of its activities is very broad, including mediation services, alternative sentencing and the provision of advice regarding sentencing.

The Makivik Corporation Justice Program

The Makivik Corporation administers a justice program for Inuit communities, comprising two components. The first component is a program to appoint Justices of the Peace. This program qualifies Justices of the Peace to issue search and arrest warrants, as well as releasing inmates on parole. The Justices of the Peace work in close cooperation with the Community Justice Committees and sit as permanent members of four of these committees. The second component is made up of the Community Justice Committees. Four committees have been established and these focus on mediation as part of the alternative sentencing program. They also make recommendations with regard to sentencing for both adult and young offenders.

Justice Canada has also provided funding for the Cree, Inuit and Naskapi under the Native Paralegal Assistance Program. This program promotes access to justice by helping Aboriginals in conflict with the justice system to obtain fair and equitable treatment that takes their cultural realities into account.

Justice Canada Expenditures ($), 2000-2001

  CREE INUIT NASKAPI TOTAL
Aboriginal Justice Strategy 94,421 155,737 17,147 267,305
Native Paralegal Assistance Program 111,475 94,861 32,815 241,151

Total 205,896 250,598 49,962 508,456

Fisheries and Oceans Canada

Fisheries and Oceans Canada (DFO) administers several research and development projects in Northern Quebec through its Laurentian Region.

Through the Laurentian Region Science Branch, the Department participates with INAC, Environment Canada and the CEAA in implementing the social and environmental protection regimes, as stipulated in section 22 and 23 of the JBNQA. Through the Laurentian Fisheries Management Branch, it participates in the hunting, fishing and trapping regime, as stipulated in section 24.

DFO is also a co-signatory to an agreement with INAC and Transport Canada under which an annual payment of $3 million is made for a 10-year period for the construction of marine infrastructures in the 14 Inuit communities in Nunavik in order to increase the capacity and safety of navigation, with a view to the development of economic ties between the communities and outside regions. In 2000-2001, DFO paid, through INAC, $1 million under this agreement to the Makivik Corporation.

Aboriginal Fisheries Division - Fisheries Management

In 2000-2001, the Department continued its activities to implement the Aboriginal Fisheries Strategy (AFS) and the three-year (2001-2003) Northern Quebec Beluga Management Plan jointly with the 14 Nunavik Municipal Corporation, the Hunting, Fishing and Trapping Association of Nunavik, the Makivik Corporation, and the Kativik Regional Government.

During 2000-2001, an agreement with the Kativik Regional Government allowed for the coordination of the work and the observation patrols of six Aboriginal fishery wardens and to plan patrols by a DFO-hired multidisciplinary officer in Inukjuak. This agreement also covers the hiring, on a seasonal basis, of community officers in each of the 14 communities in Nunavik. The contribution agreement between DFO and the Makivik Corporation provided funding for the expertise, tools and equipment required to analyze the samples collected and to carry out part one of a study of traditional Inuit knowledge.

As in the past, in the course of aerial patrols carried out each year in Nunavik, the Fisheries Management Branch representatives visited all the territory's communities to meet with their Inuit partners.

During 2000-2001, no specific activities were conducted on the Cree and Naskapi territories, but DFO maintained contacts with the Cree and Naskapi through the Joint Hunting, Fishing and Trapping Association.

Science Branch

The scientific activities conducted in 2000-2001 by the Regional Science Branch in the Canadian Arctic were a continuation of the work done in previous years. These research projects are often conducted in cooperation with the Central and Arctic Region of DFO, Inuit organizations and universities. A number of projects were carried out during the year, including the following two:

Oceans Directorate

In 2000-2001, the activities of the Regional Oceans and Environmental Branch in Arctic Quebec consisted of conducting surveys prior to the construction of marine infrastructures at Umiujaq and Kangiqsujuaq. These comprise the creation of a mooring area for boats formed by two rock breakwaters resulting in a modified area of approximately 20,000 m2 with a launching ramp and service area. The regional Oceans and Environment Directorate was also actively involved in the harmonization of the various federal environmental assessment processes, specifically the CEAA and JBNQA.

Fisheries and Oceans Canada, Laurentian Region Expenditures ($), 2000-2001

  CREE INUIT NASKAPI TOTAL
Northern Quebec Marine Infrastructure Agreement - * - *
Fisheries Management Branch
Community Officers' expenditures - 144,000 - 144,000
Agreement with Makivik Corporation - 64,000 - 144,000
Agreement with Kativik Regional Government - 270,000 - 270,000
 
Subtotal - 478,000 - 478,000
Science Branch
Program expenditures - - - -
Oceans Directorate
Program expenditures - 9,000 - 9,000

Total - 487,000 - 487,000

* This table does not include $1 million paid through INAC

Canadian Food Inspection Agency

In February 2001, as in previous years, a team of two inspectors and a veterinarian from the Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) travelled to Camp Mollet in order to supervise the slaughter of caribou in temporary facilities managed by Nunavik Arctic Foods. The Agency also certified the meat for sale in interprovincial and international markets. The hunting season, which had to be extended, was not as productive as in previous years. Fewer than 3,000 caribou were slaughtered as their migration route was far from the production facilities.

Return to Table of Contents





2001 - 2002 Annual Report

Summary of Federal Government Expenditures ($),1 1997-2002 

  1997-1998 1998-1999 1999-2000 2000-2001 2001-2002
Indian and Northern Affairs Canada 153,257,6612 142,549,4723 160,476,8084 181,009,000 193,632,594
Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation 36,899,544 37,605,100 37,620,700 42,673,518 44,364,765
Human Resources Development Canada 13,797,812 13,834,170 15,040,039 11,796,730 17,462,698
Health Canada 6,329,014 6,370,798 7,611,209 8,069,540 11,827,148
Transport Canada 4,115,661 3,314,833 6,921,8165 9,620,068 8,551,393
Solicitor General Canada 5,815,476 6,630,942 6,675,144 6,699,353 6,991,096
National Defence 840,000 2,438,0006 2,021,000 2,041,000 2,900,000
Canadian Heritage 1,774,719 1,834,424 1,834,424 1,836,345 1,857,962
Industry Canada 445,868 774,576 520,537 2,162,245 950,279
Fisheries and Oceans Canada 367,205 380,000 414,000 487,000 910,000
Environment Canada7 685,059 401,024 494,429 552,912 781,783
Natural Resources Canada Canadian Forest Service 458,600 676,073 655,100 543,450 596,920
Canada Economic Development 450,489 270,000 555,299 635,571 521,511
Justice Canada 92,785 202,903 529,265 508,456 269,700

Total 225,329,893 217,282,3156 241,369,7705 268,635,188 291,617,849

FEDERAL EXPENDITURES BETWEEN 1997 AND 2002: 1,244,235,015

1 Figures provided by each department
2 Including $1 million from Transport Canada and $1 million from Fisheries and Oceans Canada for the Northern Quebec Marine Infrastructure Program, $15,000 from Environment Canada for an environmental project and $655,000 to fund the Cree-Naskapi Commission. (For the 1993-1994, 1994-1995, 1995-1996 and 1996-1997 fiscal years, CNC received respectively, $655,000, $480,000, $655,000 and $480,000 for a total of $2,270,000. These expenditures are not included in the total amounts stated in this table; financial data prior to 1993 are available from INAC).
3 Excluding $2.5 million distributed through Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation to the Société d'habitation du Québec under a special initiative on housing for the Inuit of Nunavik and $23.6 million paid to the Government of Quebec as the first instalment of the federal contribution to funding the construction of the access road to Waskaganish.
4 Excluding the last instalment of $400,000 to the Government of Quebec for the federal contribution to funding the construction of the access road to Waskaganish.
5 Increase due to repairs to the Kuujjuaq and Schefferville airports. However, this total does not match the total shown in the 1999-2000 Annual Report because in the present Report the expenditures made by Transport Canada have been adjusted to exclude a $341,660 grant that was in fact disbursed in 2000-2001.
6 This total does not match the total shown in the 1998-1999 and 1999-2000 Annual Reports because in the present Report the expenditures made by National Defence have been adjusted to include $500,000 disbursed in 1998-1999 for restoration of the Mid-Canada Line sites.
7 Including the expenditures of the Canadian Environmental Assessment Agency.

Activities and Expenditures of Federal Departments and Agencies, 2001-2002

Indian and Northern Affairs Canada

During 2001-2002, total funding allocated by Indian and Northern Affairs Canada (INAC) to Cree, Inuit and Naskapi communities under the James Bay and Northern Quebec Agreement (JBNQA), the Northeastern Quebec Agreement (NEQA) and federal programs amounted to $193,632,594.

Population

As at June 30, 2001, 22,800 people were beneficiaries of the agreements, including 13,230 Cree in nine communities, 8,816 Inuit in 14 Northern municipalities and 754 Naskapi in a single community.

Education

The Department allocated $91,323,908 to education expenses in order to cover:

  CREE INUIT NASKAPI TOTAL
Education services $62,301,766 $16,787,238 $2,132,918 81,221,922
School infrastructure 5,909,415 2,428,197 40,534 8,378,146

Total $68,211,181 $19,215,435 $2,173,452 $89,600,068
Number of students** 3,437 2,928 264 6,629

* Figures for 2001-2002 school year include preschool to secondary students, and are supplied by the Quebec Ministère de l'Éducation.

  CREE INUIT NASKAPI TOTAL
Science and technology summer camps $43,628 $51,236 $1,621 $96,485
Co-operative Education 224,053 187,540 9,218 420,811
Summer Career Placements 278,148 154,336 11,033 443,517
Work Experience 210,764 131,800 - 342,564

Total $756,593 $524,912 $21,872 $1,303,377

Capital, Operations and Maintenance

During 2001-2002, $84,709,744 was allocated to capital, operations and maintenance and to infrastructure projects in Cree, Inuit, and Naskapi communities. The figure includes $21,086,096 in capital, $46,953,148 for operations and maintenance, and $16,670,500 for infrastructure projects. The breakdown by beneficiaries is as follows:

Electricity

During 2001-2002, INAC allocated $2,322,457 for electricity expenditures in Waskaganish.

Social Development

INAC provided $2,904,394 for social assistance services in Mistissini, Waswanipi and Kawawachikamach. In the remaining JBNQA communities, these services were provided by the Government of Quebec. The sums provided by Canada break down as follows:

Mistissini
Waswanipi
Kawawachikamach
$1,011,315
1,196,779
696,300

Total
$2,904,394

The federal government also participates in community social development by funding initiatives promoting health and better quality of life through the National Strategy for the Integration of Persons with Disabilities (NSIPD) and the Federal Initiative on Family Violence (IFV). The following amounts were provided during 2001-2002:

  CREE INUIT NASKAPI TOTAL
NSIPD $21,346 $25,744 $1,764 $48,854
IFV 140,938 169,200 11,635 321,773

Total $162,284 $194,944 $13,399 $370,627

Economic Development

INAC participates in Aboriginal economic development through the direct funding of Community Economic Development Organizations (CEDOs) and other sector-based organizations. These organizations support projects that promote economic development by providing technical and financial assistance. During 2001-2002, the Department provided the following amounts:

CREE INUIT NASKAPI TOTAL
$1,871,704 $870,441 $52,568 $2,794,713

Funding allocated to the Cree included $387,730 for the Cree Trappers' Association, $35,600 to the Cree Regional Authority to support Cree arts and crafts activities, and $200,000 for the Cree Outfitting and Tourism Association under a three-year agreement signed in 2001-2002. It also included $400,000, of which $200,000 was provided by Justice Canada, to the Cree Regional Authority for the Cree Trappers' Association to cover costs related to the application of the Firearms Act.

The Department also helped fund the following economic development projects: $142,500 to Mistissini for a food services project and $56,000 for a sporting goods project; $2,500 to Cree Regional Economic Enterprises Co. (Creeco) to organize an economic development fair in Chisasibi; $18,160 and $6,000 to the Avataq Cultural Institute for two projects that promote local products.

Through the Resource Access Negotiations (RAN) Program, INAC supports natural resources development by First Nations and Inuit by helping communities and their organizations set up business partnerships and stimulate investments in the natural resources sector.

During 2001-2002, the Department allocated $85,000 to the Wemindji community under the RAN to cover costs related to the negotiation of business partnerships with a mining company, and $82,110 to the Kawawachikamach community to conduct negotiations on hydroelectric exploitation of the Menehek dam.

Environment

During 2001-2002, the Cree Regional Authority received $34,326 from INAC to continue projects under the Environment Issues Inventory and Remediation Plan in Cree communities.

In addition, the Makivik Corporation was allocated $5,600 for a survey of abandoned mineral exploration sites in Nunavik. The Corporation also received $50,000 from the Department for an environmental study at Killiniq (Category I land located east of Ungava Bay) and on the Akpatok and Mansel islands.

Indian Registration

INAC and the Cree and Naskapi communities are responsible for Indian registration records. During 2001-2002, the Department provided $99,405 to the Cree and $4,123 to the Naskapi for their participation in maintaining the registry.

Cree-Naskapi Land Registry

During 2001-2002, the Department's Central Land Registrar continued coordinating registry services, in cooperation with its Cree and Naskapi partners. During 2001-2002, 61 parcel plans for interests in Cree lands were registered. In addition, aerial photos covering all Category 1A land in the Eastmain, Waskaganish, Wemindji, Chisasibi and communities were made during the year.

Chisasibi and Waskaganish received $195,000 and $242,600 for the creation of a land identification system.

Initiatives under Gathering Strength: Canada's Aboriginal Action Plan

During 2001-2002, INAC allocated the following funds to projects in the Cree, Inuit and Naskapi communities under the Gathering Strength plan:

Investing in Education Reform

Water and Sewer initiative

Income Security Reform

Environmental Management Capacity Building

Economic Development Opportunity Fund and Resource Acquisition Initiative

New Directions for Negotiations on Self-Government

Other Financial Assistance

During 2001-2002, the Cree Regional Authority received $405,000 from the Department to cover costs related to the negotiations surrounding the implementation of the JBNQA and $16,700 for the translation of Reflexions on the James Bay and Northern Québec Agreement, a book published on the occasion of the 25th anniversary of the signing of the Agreement.

The Makivik Corporation received $310,668 from INAC to cover costs related to implementation of the JBNQA and $197,374 for consulting costs.

The Naskapi Nation of Kawawachikamach received $52,242.

Nunavik Community Projects

INAC allocated $36,600 to the Makivik Corporation to support a pilot project designed to help young people in Kangiqsuallujuaq interested in mass communication technologies.

Cree-Naskapi Commission

INAC provided $725,745 to fund the activities of the Cree-Naskapi Commission, the mandate of which is to investigate and report every two years on disputes related to application of the Cree-Naskapi (of Quebec) Act.

INAC expenditures ($), 2001-2002

  CREE INUIT NASKAPI TOTAL
Education
Education services 62,301,766 16,787,238 2,132,918 81,221,922
School infrastructure 5,909,415 2,428,197 40,534 8,378,146
Cultural centres 194,376 226,087 - 420,463
Employment programs 756,593 524,912 21,872 1,303,377
 
  69,162,657 19,966,434 2,195,324 91,323,908
Capital expenditures 19,800,296 - 1,285,800 21,086,096
Operations and maintenance 43,559,226 - 3,393,922 46,953,148
Infrastructure-related projects 3,013,000 13,657,500 - 16,670,500
 
  66,372,522 13,657,500 4,679,722 84,709,744
Electricity - Waskaganish 2,322,457 - - 2,322,457
Social development
Social assistance 2,208,094 - 696,300 2,904,394
NSIPD-IFV programs 162,284 194,944 13,399 370,627
 
  2,370,378 194,944 709,699 3,275,021
Economic development 2,072,704 894,601 52,568 3,019,873
RAN 85,000 - 82,110 167,110
Environment 471,926 55,600 - 527,526
Indian registration 99,405 - 4,123 103,528
Initiatives under Gathering Strength  
Education reform 1,422,440 1,151,184 66,161 2,639,785
Water and sewer initiative 1,710,000 - - 3,842,254
Income security reform 5,063 - 169,412 174,475
Environmental management 30,000 20,205 17,650 67,855
Opportunity fund 425,000 761,697 - 1,186,697
New directions for negotiations - 493,161 - 493,161
 
  3,592,503 2,426,247 253,223 6,271,973
Inuit community services - 203 725 - 203,725
Other financial assistance 421,700 508,042 52,242 981,984
 
Subtotal 146,970,745 37,907,093 8,029,011 192,906,849
Cree-Naskapi Commission - - - 725,745

Total       193,632,594

Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation

The Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation (CMHC), in cooperation with INAC, is directly involved in the Cree and Naskapi communities through its non-profit housing program funded under section 95 of the National Housing Act.

The housing program for the Inuit is administered by the Quebec housing corporation, the Société d'habitation du Québec, under a federal-provincial cost-sharing agreement.

In 2001-2002, 51 new subsidized housing units were added to the Cree housing stock, while two new housing units were added to that of the Naskapi. In addition, the CMHC spent $5,000 to adapt two units to enhance the self-sufficiency of senior citizens in the Naskapi community.

As part of the Youth Employment Strategy, CMHC also provided a grant of financial assistance to enable 11 young Cree and one young Inuk to gain experience in the housing field in their communities.

The CMHC also helped the 10 Cree and Naskapi communities to organize a colloquium at which community leaders had an opportunity to share their experiences and find solutions to housing-related problems.

In addition, as part of its capability-enhancement activities, CMHC enabled Cree leaders to attend a workshop on inspection services. CMHC also contributed to the development of housing policies in three Cree communities in addition to contributing to the development of a regular preventive maintenance system for all Cree communities. Lastly, CMHC trained two new housing inspectors who work for the Cree Regional Authority.

In September 2000, Canada, Quebec, the Makivik Corporation, the Kativik Regional Government (KRG) and the Kativik Municipal Housing Bureau reached an agreement for $100 million over five years to implement a program to build approximately 350 subsidized housing units in Nunavik. The agreement is funded on a 50-50 basis by Canada ($5 million from CMHC and $5 million from INAC) and Quebec. In 2001-2002, CMHC contributed $5 million through INAC to the Makivik Corporation as the federal contribution to this agreement.

CMHC Expenditures ($), 2001-2002

  CREE INUIT NASKAPI TOTAL
Federal subsidies* 8,760,016 34,900,000 704,749 44,364,765
Number of subsidized units 1,770 1,811 118  

* The amount of $5 million paid through INAC is not included in this table.

Human Resources Development Canada

In 2001-2002, the Aboriginal Human Services Development Strategy (AHSDS) was in its third year. During this period, the signatories to the Aboriginal Human Services Development Agreements (AHSDA) were able to consolidate the implementation of programs designed to address their human resources development needs. HRDC thus continued to work towards the objective of strengthening the autonomy of Aboriginal communities by supporting their efforts to acquire development tools in order to enhance the employability of their workforce and its adjustment to the labour market. The agreements provide for increased accountability on the part of Aboriginal administrations, which is reflected in the inclusion of targets in terms of the number of people rejoining the workforce, returning to school or developing their employability, or in terms of unemployment insurance benefits and social assistance that is not paid. The results obtained show that the efficiency with which the resources allocated to them were managed in accordance with the expectations of HRDC.

Although the Inuit signed an agreement in 1992 with Employment and Immigration on the administration of programs and services, they have been participating in the AHSDS since 1999. A substantial portion of their funding comes from AHSDS funds, with additional amounts of $2.3 million for the administration of employment programs and services as well as for first line services for Employment Insurance and the Income Security Program. This agreement includes $7,687,119, of which more than $5 million comes from the AHSDS envelope.

Funding allocated to the Naskapi amounted to $432,624, which is their share of AHSDS funding for the Assembly of First Nations of Quebec and Labrador. These funds are administered by the local Naskapi First Nations Commission.

In the wake of the work of the sectoral table on human resources of the Cree-Canada round table, an implementation agreement was signed between HRDC and the Cree Regional Authority on October 1, 2001. This five-year agreement, which will expire on March 31, 2006, covers Canada's responsibilities in the area of human resources development set out in section 28 of the JBNQA as well as the regular HRDC programs for all Aboriginal peoples in Canada.

The agreement completes the transfer of the responsibility for providing the clientele living on Cree territory with the full range of employment and placement services, as well as the delivery of front-line Employment Insurance services and of the Income Security Program. This implementation includes the establishment of territorial training programs aimed at enabling the Cree to access jobs created in key economic development sectors on their territory, such as forestry, mining, hydroelectric projects, tourism and construction.

Lastly, in order to support appropriate, professional delivery of these programs and services, as stipulated in the JBNQA, the agreement provides for the establishment of a delivery structure, for which Canada is responsible, covering the entire Cree territory. The cost of this agreement for this year is $9,342,955.

HRDC Expenditures ($), 2001-2002

  CREE INUIT NASKAPI TOTAL
Labour market program
Treasury Board funds 2,981,115 2,593,173 212,257 5,786,545
Employment Insurance funds 1,450,793 2,593,173 117,066 2,853,530
Inuit and First Nations Child Care Initiative 1,170,321 1,229,070 88,359 2,487,750
Youth initiatives 390,726 279,205 14,492 684,873
Other Programs 1,000,000 - - 1,000,000
Other activities 2,350,000 2,300,000 - 4,650,000

Total 9,342,955 7,687,119 432,624 17,462,698

Health Canada

During 2001-2002, Health Canada's Quebec Region First Nations and Inuit Health Branch provided $11,827,148 for various health care programs in the Cree, Inuit and Naskapi communities.

Brighter Futures program

The First Nations and Inuit Health Branch (FNIHB) continued to support this program, which focusses on child development and parenting skills. The First Nations component is designed to help communities in the area of child development.

Aboriginal Diabetes Initiative

The Department's efforts focussed on the implementation and delivery of programs to reduce diabetes in Aboriginal communities.

Building Healthy Communities Program

The communities have established community mental health crisis management programs.

Canada Prenatal Nutrition program

Prevention and promotion activities have been implemented, specifically through the distribution of nutritional information and information on the services available, including activities involving the promotion of breast feeding and support available to mothers who are breast feeding.

Aboriginal Head Start on Reserves Initiative

The communities provide services for young children and families to support their spiritual, emotional, intellectual and physical growth. They also support and help parents, teachers and guardians in planning, establishing and evaluating projects, as well as maintaining links to other communities in order to enhance the effectiveness of the program.

Solvent Abuse program

In order to eliminate or reduce the problem of solvent abuse, the communities have established a "Role Model" program. A Web site project has also been established, and regular meetings and workshops are held on welfare issues to raise awareness of the harmful effects of solvent abuse.

First Nations and Inuit Home and Community Care Program

The FNIHB contributed financially to infrastructure construction for the implementation of the program as well as providing training for workers to deliver home and community health care services in 2002-2003.

National Aboriginal Alcohol and Drug Abuse Prevention program

The Region funded prevention activities to help communities to reduce the high levels of drug and alcohol consumption. The Region also provided First Nations and Inuit communities with culturally appropriate treatments. In addition, the Fetal Alcohol Syndrome and Effects of Alcohol on the Fetus program (FAS/EAF) was implemented in these communities. Close to 60 community workers received training in this initiative.

Tuberculosis Eradication Strategy

In order to eradicate tuberculosis in First Nations communities, funding was provided to raise awareness among parents and health care workers on the importance of prenatal HIV testing and vaccination of newborns with CGB.

Non-insured health services

Cree, Inuit and Naskapi residing in the territory covered by the agreements receive these services under the JBNQA and the NEQA while the FNIHB assumes all or part of the cost of these services only when the individuals are residing outside their own territory.

Health Canada Expenditures ($), 2001-2002

  CREE INUIT NASKAPI TOTAL
Brighter Futures 1,112,298 952,085 61,425 2,125,808
Aboriginal Diabetes Initiative 206,372 195,435 12,593 414,400
Building Healthy Communities 824,582 718,437 46,515 1,89,534
Canada Prenatal Nutrition program 320,523 253,240 16,656 590,419
Aboriginal Head Start on Reserves Initiative 554,164 - - 554,164
Solvent Abuse program 148,488 127,958 8,249 569,390
First Nations and Inuit Home and Community Care Program 1,244,945 1,195,994 162,112 2,603,051
First Nations and Inuit Home and Community Care Program* 909,730 727,600 - 1,637,330
National Aboriginal Alcohol and Drug Abuse program 689,884 721,417 50,410 1,461,771
Tuberculosis Elimination Strategy 9,100 - - 9,100
Non-Insured Health Benefits 491,784 62,751 2,401 556,936

Total 6,511,870 4,954,917 360,361 11,827,148

*Cost of infrastructure construction for program delivery

Transport Canada

Transport Canada maintained its support for Cree, Inuit and Naskapi communities, investing a total of $8,551,393 in its initiatives during 2001-2002.

Transport Canada contributed $900,000 to the Kativik Regional Government for the management and operation of Kuujjuaq Airport. Investments totalling $4,559,000 were also made by the Department in projects that include repairs to landing strip 07-25, totalling $3,995,000, the replacement of the landing lights at a cost of $481,000, while $83,000 was spent on developing the project to refurbish the multi-purpose building. The Department also implemented an environmental project at a cost of $720,000 to decontaminate the airport's fuel supply pipeline. A further $14,000 was allocated to miscellaneous operating expenses.

A grant of $80,000 was made under the Airport Facilities Assistance Program to repair the lighting system at Kuujjuarapik Airport, which belongs to the Government of Quebec.

The region's three Cree airports received a total of $575,393 under their three-year management contracts. The Eastmain Cree received $197,793, the Waskaganish Cree received $201,000 and the Wemindji Cree, $176,600. The facilities projects received a total of $1,105,000, distributed as follows: purchase of a light vehicle at Waskaganish ($25,000), the refurbishing of the marshalling areas ($535,000) and the purchase of vehicles at Eastmain ($148,000). Wemindji received $57,000 for refurbishing of marshalling areas and the purchase of a heavy vehicle ($340,000).

The airport lease with the Société aéroportuaire de Schefferville, a non-profit organization established jointly by the Cree and Naskapi communities, continued for a third consecutive year. An agreement was signed between Transport Canada and the Société on April 21, 1999. The parties also signed a lease for the nominal sum of $1 and an annual contribution, designed to wipe out the airport's deficit, was granted by Transport Canada. In 2001-2002, the Société received $195,000 for the management and operation of the airport. A further $403,000 was invested by Transport Canada in the purchase of heavy equipment.

During 2001-2002, Transport Canada, via INAC, paid $1 million to the Makivik Corporation. This amount forms part of an agreement signed between Transport Canada, INAC and Fisheries and Oceans Canada covering the payment over 10 years of an annual sum of $3 million for marine infrastructures in Northern Quebec.

Transport Canada Expenditures ($), 2001-2002

  CREE INUIT NASKAPI TOTAL
Airport management - 900,000 195,000 1,095,000
Operations and maintenance 575,393 14,000 - 589,393
Facilities 1,105,000 4,559,000 403,000 6,067,000
AFAP contribution - 80,000 - 80,000
Marine Infrastructures program - * - *
Environment 720,000 - - 720,000

Total 1,680,393 6,273,000 598,000 8,551,393

* The sum of $1 million paid through INAC is not included in this table.

Solicitor General of Canada

During 2001-2002, the Aboriginal Policing Directorate of the Department of the Solicitor General of Canada followed up on the implementation of three tripartite agreements on police services, one with the Cree Regional Authority, one with Kativik Regional Government and one with the Naskapi, each involving the Government of Quebec.

Since the difference of opinion with the Government of Quebec regarding the interpretation of the NEQA has still not been settled, the Solicitor General continued the temporary measures to enable the Department to participate in the funding of police services to the Naskapi.

During 2002-2003, the Correctional Service of Canada (CSC) pursued its strategy of developing and delivering programs specifically tailored to Aboriginal people.

CSC maintained its Aboriginal Liaison Officer services through Native Paralegal Services of Quebec for the Cree, Inuit and Naskapi. This organization is responsible for assisting and counselling Aboriginal offenders in federal penitentiaries to facilitate their safe return to the community. It also expanded its services to senior citizens in correctional facilities for Cree, Inuit and Naskapi and funded a range of correctional programs tailored to the needs of Aboriginal offenders, primarily in the areas of family violence and sex offences.

The Solicitor General of Canada also maintained its funding for accommodation, supervision and treatment in halfway houses during parole for Cree, Inuit and Naskapi.

Solicitor General Canada Expenditures ($), 2001-2002 

  CREE INUIT NASKAPI TOTAL
Aboriginal Policing Directorate
Tripartite agreements 3,136,736 3,592,602 208,200 6,937,338
Correctional Service
Native Paralegal Services of Quebec 12,511 18,787 - 31,278
Services to senior citizens 3,488 6,976 - 10,464
Adapted correctional programs* 2,325 4,651 - 6,976
Parole-related services 2,520 2,520 - 5,040

Subtotal 20,844 32,914 - 53,758
Total 3,157,580 3,625,516 208,200 6,991,096

*These amounts do not include costs directly related to incarceration.

National Defence

Land Force Quebec Area (LFQA) is responsible for activities related to delivering Canadian Rangers and Junior Canadian Rangers programs in its area of responsibility, the province of Quebec. During 2001-2002, the Department of National Defence (DND) allocated $2,900,000 for these two programs in Quebec.

The Canadian Rangers are volunteers between the ages of 18 and 65 who provide a military presence in remote and isolated areas of Canada and, if needed, provide support to the Canadian Forces during major exercises and in response to requests for assistance. Within its area of responsibility, LFQA has 22 Rangers patrols with a complement of 539 Canadian Rangers. On the territory covered by the agreements, LFQA has 15 Canadian Rangers patrols with 401 Aboriginal members: 356 Inuit, 30 Cree and 15 Naskapi.

The Department also offers a free activity program (Junior Rangers) for youth between the ages of 12 and 18. Within its area of responsibility, LFQA maintains 23 patrols comprising 402 Junior Canadian Rangers.

On the territory covered by the agreements, LFQA has 15 Junior Canadian Ranger patrols with 164 Inuit members. Camp Okpiapik 2001 offered advanced training for young people from all ethnic groups (non-Native, Inuit, Cree, Naskapi and Innu) who make up 2 CRPG. The activity took place in Kangirsuk on the shores of Ungava Bay from late June to mid-July 2001. More than 135 young people participated.

In 2001-2002, two new Canadian Rangers patrols were formed on the territory covered by the agreement, at Wemindji and Schefferville (including Schefferville, John Lake and Kawawachikamach).

Canadian Heritage

The Aboriginal Programs Directorate of the Department of Canadian Heritage supports a wide range of activities in Northern Quebec, particularly Aboriginal communication networks, friendship centres, protection of Aboriginal languages and cultures, support for Aboriginal organizations, and initiatives to improve the situation of Aboriginal women.

During 2001-2002, Canadian Heritage provided support amounting to $1,857,962 to Aboriginal communities in Northern Quebec as follows:

Canadian Heritage Expenses ($), 2001-2002
 
  CREE INUIT NASKAPI TOTAL
Northern Native Broadcast Access Program  
James Bay Cree Communications Society 292,200 - - 292,200
Taqramiut Nipingat Incorporated (TNI) - 907,317 - 907,317
Aboriginal Representative Organizations Program
Makivik CTorporation - 201,645 - 201,645
Native Friendship Centre Program  
Senneterre Native Friendship Centre Inc.* 122,000 - - 122,000
Val-d'Or Native Friendship Centre Inc.* 183,000 - - 183,000
Chibougamau Native Friendship Centre Inc. 152,000 - - 152,000

Total 749,000 1,108,962 0 1,857,962

* The services provided by these Native Friendship Centres are not restricted exclusively to the beneficiaries of the agreements.

Industry Canada

Through Industry Canada's Aboriginal Business Canada (ABC) program, ABC invested a total of $950,279 in 2001-2002 to support 21 business creation projects in Cree, Inuit and Naskapi territory.

ABC contributed to the development of 13 projects, with $532,239 from Cree communities, seven projects from Inuit communities with a value of $190,640 and one project in the amount of $227,400 from the Naskapi community.

Overall, ABC funds were invested in a variety of industrial sectors, although a substantial percentage was invested in the development of the region's Aboriginal economy. The projects included the establishment and expansion of Aboriginal businesses and the development of a range of business, marketing and training plans.

Industry Canada Expenditures ($), 2001-2002 

  CREE INUIT NASKAPI TOTAL
Aboriginal Business Canada 532,239 190,640 227,400 950,279

Fisheries and Oceans Canada

Fisheries and Oceans Canada (DFO) administers several research and development projects in Northern Quebec through its Laurentian Region.

Through the Laurentian Fisheries Management Branch, the Department participates in the hunting, fishing and trapping regime, as stipulated in section 24 of the JBNQA. Through the Science Branch, it participates, jointly with INAC, Environment Canada and the CEAA, in implementing the social and environmental protection regimes, as stipulated in sections 22 and 23 of the JBNQA.

DFO is also a co-signatory to an agreement with INAC and Transport Canada under which an annual payment of $3 million is made for a 10-year period for the construction of marine infrastructures in the 14 Inuit communities in Nunavik in order to increase the capacity and safety of navigation, with a view to the development of economic ties between the communities and outside regions.

In 2001-2002, DFO paid, through INAC, $1 million under the terms of this agreement to Makivik Corporation.

Aboriginal Fisheries Division - Fisheries Management

In 2001-2002, the Department continued its activities in the implementation of the Aboriginal Fisheries Strategy (AFS) and the three-year (2001-2003) Northern Quebec Beluga Management Plan, jointly with the 14 Nunavik municipal corporations, the Hunting, Fishing and Trapping Association of Nunavik, the Makivik Corporation, and the Kativik Regional Government.

During 2001-2002, two contribution agreements between DFO and the Makivik Corporation to fund the coordination of the logistics for the negotiation meetings on the new management plan with all the communities and associations involved in Nunavik. They also funded the expertise, tools and equipment required for analyzing the samples of belugas harvested during the season.

In addition, an agreement with the Kativik Regional Government allowed for the coordination of the work and the observation patrols of six Aboriginal fisheries wardens and to plan patrols by a DFOhired multidisciplinary officer in Inukjuak. This agreement also covers the hiring, on a seasonal basis, of community officers in each of the 14 communities in Nunavik. These provide DFO, among other customers, with statistical data on the beluga catch.

As in the past, in the course of aerial patrols carried each year in Nunavik, the Fisheries Management Branch representatives visited all the territories' communities to meet with their Inuit partners.

During 2001-2002, no specific activities were conducted on the Cree and Naskapi territories, but DFO maintained contacts with the Cree and Naskapi through the Joint Hunting, Fishing and Trapping Association.

Science Branch

The scientific activities conducted in 2001-2002 by the Regional Science Branch in the Canadian Arctic were a continuation of the work done in previous years. These research projects are often conducted in cooperation with the Central and Arctic Region of DFO and with Inuit universities and organizations, mainly the Makivik Corporation. A number of projects were carried out in the course of the year, including the following:

Oceans Directorate

In 2001-2002, the activities of the Regional Oceans and Environmental Branch in the Canadian North consisted of conducting surveys prior to the construction of marine infrastructures at Kuujjuaq and Ivujivik. These comprise the creation of a mooring area for boats formed by two rock breakwaters with launching ramp and service area. In the case of Kuujjuaq, no authorization was required in view of the low quality of the affected habitat. In the case of Ivujivik, no compensation was necessary because the project itself was self-compensating.

Efforts aimed at harmonizing the various processes (Canadian Environmental Assessment Act and JBNQA) are continuing, and a representative of the Regional Oceans and Environmental Branch has been appointed to Cofex-North.

CEAA compliance is mandatory for projects because of the federal funding, and DFO may also be the authority responsible by virtue of a permit for habitat modification issued under the Fisheries Act.

Fisheries and Oceans Canada, Laurentian Region Expenditures ($), 2001-2002

  CREE INUIT NASKAPI TOTAL
Northern Quebec Marine Infrastructure Agreement - * - *
Fisheries Management Branch
Agreement with Makivik Corporation - 126,000 - 126,000
Agreement with KRG - 550,000 - 550,000
Science Branch
Program expenditures - 225,000 - 225,000
Oceans Directorate
Program expenditures - 9,000 - 9,000

Total - 910,000 - 910,000

* This table does not include the amount of $1 million paid through INAC

Environment Canada

In 2001-2002, Environment Canada, through their representatives on the James Bay Advisory Committee on the Environment (JBACE), the Kativik Environmental Advisory Committee (KEAC) and the Hunting, Fishing and Trapping Coordinating Committee (HFTCC), continued to assist in the implementation of the environmental protection and social environment regimes, as well as the hunting, fishing and trapping regime. For 2001-2002, Environment Canada's expenditures relating to the implementation of the JBNQA totalled $46,410.

Northern Ecosystems Initiative

As part of the Northern Ecosystems Initiative, Environment Canada established a regional coordinating committee on which the main environmental participants in Northern Quebec were invited to sit. The steering committee thus comprised representatives of the Cree, Inuit, Naskapi and Innu Aboriginal organizations. The Centre d'études nordiques (Northern Studies Centre - CEN) and the Centre interuniversitaire d'études et de recherché autochtones (Interuniversity Centre for Aboriginal Studies and Research) at Laval University are also on the committee, as are Hydro-Québec, the Société de la faune et des parcs du Québec, Indian and Northern Affairs Canada and Environment Canada.

In 2001-2002, the regional coordinating committee worked on the preparation of an environmental action plan for Northern Quebec. Funds were allocated primarily to the implementation of projects carried out in cooperation with the Aboriginal organizations involved in the North. Four projects have been funded from this allocation over two years. Environment Canada provided the Kativik Regional Government with $50,000 for a study entitled Characterization and Priorization of Abandoned Mining Sites in Nunavik. An amount of $25,000 was allocated to the Makivik Corporation's Nunavik Research Centre for the "Evaluation of the effects of exposure to pollutants on the reproductive and endocrine systems of belugas." Funding was provided to the Centre hospitalier universitaire de Québec (CHUQ) (Quebec City University Medical Centre) for the "Identification, selection and monitoring of indicators of climate change in Nunavik and Labrador." A further $55,000 went to the Cree Regional Authority for the development of "Elements of a strategy aimed at promoting and facilitating access to environmental knowledge in Aboriginal communities of Northern Quebec."

Wildlife and Habitat Management

Under the Canada-United States Cooperation Agreement that forms part of the North American Wildfowl Management Plan, Environment Canada's Canadian Wildlife Service (CWS) prepared inventories of American black duck and Canada geese in 2001-2002. As in previous years, the study of the reproduction and band work on the Canada goose were completed as part of the joint Arctic goose plan to continue the assessment of the status of the species and the factors impacting on reproduction in this group of birds. The Canadian Wildlife Service allocated $100,000 for this work, plus a further $75,000 for inventories of migratory birds in the boreal forest in the territory covered by the agreements.

Environment Canada also allocated $24,000 to the Cree Regional Authority to conduct phase 1 of a project on the evaluation of Aboriginal harvesting entitled Towards a Protocol on Collecting, Sharing, Use and Distribution in Aboriginal Communities in Northern Quebec.

As part of the Endangered Species Habitat Stewardship Program (HSP), two contribution agreements were concluded with the Makivik Corporation for a total amount of $23,922 to enhance understanding of the problems associated with belugas in Hudson Bay and Ungava Bay. The Endangered Species Habitat Stewardship Program (HSP) is managed jointly by Environment Canada, Fisheries and Oceans Canada and Parks Canada. The Canadian Wildlife Service of Environment Canada is responsible for its administration.

Environmental Protection

As co-signatory to an agreement with the Department of National Defence, the Government of Quebec and the Kativik Regional Government, Environment Canada continued its efforts towards the restoration of polluted sites on the Mid-Canada Line and at Nitchequon Station. The Department allocated $30,000 to these projects.

Environment Canada has taken part in the inventory of abandoned mining exploration sites and the inventory of contaminated soil in Inuit territory. $33,700 dollars was allocated to this project.

Restoration work was begun at the abandoned sites at Cape Hopes Advance weather station and a radar station at Quaqtaq. Some $36,000 has been spent on these projects.

In 2001-2002, as part of the Shellfish Water Quality Protection Program, Environment Canada implemented the shellfish health monitoring program in Nunavik.

Meteorological Service of Canada

With the aim of identifying the sources and quantifying the origins of atmospheric pollutants in Arctic regions, an intensive measuring campaign was conducted in Nunavik under the coordination of the Meteorological Service of Canada. The cost of this initiative included $37,000, which came from the Northern Contaminants Program. A France-Quebec project also got under way at Kuujjuarapik in collaboration with the University of Grenoble (France). A halogen measurement project was conducted in Nunavik in cooperation with the University of Heidelberg, Germany.

In 2001-2002, Environment Canada arranged three training sessions for the Kativik Regional Government for observers/communicators in Northern Quebec.

Canadian Environmental Assessment Agency

Under sections 22 and 23 of the JBNQA, the Canadian Environmental Assessment Agency (CEAA) supports the federal administrator and provides advice and administrative support to the various committees established under the JBNQA.

Since 1999, Indian and Northern Affairs Canada, Fisheries and Oceans Canada and Transport Canada have been providing funding for the construction of marine infrastructures in a number of Inuit villages. For the implementation of these projects, the promoter, the Makivik Corporation, is obligated to meet the requirements of three environmental assessment processes: the two processes established by the JBNQA (federal and provincial) and the federal process under the Canadian Environmental Assessment Act (CEAA). An initial project was built at Kangiqsualujjuaq.

The Agency's Quebec regional office, with the active cooperation of the federal agencies concerned, the Federal Environmental and Social Impact Review Panel for the North (Cofex-North) and the Makivik Corporation developed a coordination mechanism for harmonizing the two federal environmental assessment processes (the JBNQA and the CEAA). Following a pilot project at Quaqtaq in 2000, this coordination process was implemented for the marine infrastructure projects at the northern villages of Umiujaq, Kangiqsujuaq and Kuujjuaq, the building of which was scheduled for summer 2001.

Despite this coordinated process, construction of the marine infrastructures at Umiujaq and Kangiqsujuaq was completed, even though the required authorizations under the JBNQA and the Fisheries Act had not yet been issued. During 2001-2002, the JBNQA and CEAA federal and provincial stakeholders urged the Makivik Corporation and the Kativik Regional Government to ensure that existing procedures are followed.

In summer 2001, the Federal Environmental and Social Impact Review Panel (Cofex-South) received a mandate from the local administrator at Nemaska to review the impact of the waste water collection and treatment project. Cofex-South held public hearings in the community and then issued its recommendations, despite major reservations about the justification for the project. This was also subjected to a prior assessment under the CEAA, for which the agency acted as the federal coordinator while Cofex-South carried out its mandate.

In the course of this year, the Agency's Quebec Regional Office developed an overall strategy to enhance the administration and implementation of the process mandated under sections 22 and 23 of the JBNQA. The recent agreements between Quebec and the Cree (the "Peace of the Braves") and with the Inuit (Sanarrutik) shows the importance of this initiative, since a number of major projects, including the Eastmain-Rupert hydro-electric complex, will be developed in the coming years. Changes were made as part of Cofex-North and the Evaluation Committee (COMEV). Specifically, an agency employee is now a member of COMEV. Furthermore, the marine infrastructure project at Ivujivik, which is under review this year, has been delegated to Cofex-North as a pilot project for prior review under section 17 of the CEAA.

The Agency met with representatives of the two advisory committees (JBEAC and KEAC) regarding the terms of reference and budgets of these committees.

Agency expenditures for the period April 1, 2001 to March 31, 2002 totalled $245,751. This amount includes the annual federal contribution of $173,500 for the maintenance and joint funding, with the Government of Quebec, of the secretariats of the James Bay Environmental Advisory Committee (JBEAC) and the Kativik Environmental Advisory Committee (KEAC). Also included in these contributions are the expenses of the federal members of COMEV and the costs associated with the activities of the federal review panels (Cofex-North and Cofex-South). The Agency maintained the executive secretariat of the two review committees.

Environment Canada and Canadian Environmental Assessment Agency Expenditures ($), 2001-2002

Environment Canada
Committees' expenditures 46,410
Northern Ecosystems Initiative 130,000
Wildlife and Habitat Management 222,922
Environmental Protection 99,700
Northern Contaminants Program 37,000
 
Subtotal 536,032
Canadian Environmental Assessment Agency 245,751

Total 781,783

Natural Resources Canada

The Department of Natural Resources Canada (NRCan) is active on the territory covered by the JBNQA and NEQA through the Canadian Forest Service and Geomatics Canada.

Canadian Forest Service

In 2001-2002, the Canadian Forest Service (CFS) continued to implement the First Nations Forestry Program (FNFP). The objective of this program is to improve the economic conditions of Aboriginal communities through sustainable forest development. In addition to the dimension of forest development on the reserves, the program offers components focussing on the economic development of Aboriginal forestry, that is, the development of Aboriginal businesses, cooperation between communities and partnerships with the forest industry.

In 2001-2002, contributions totalling close to $97,000 were distributed among the Cree and Mistissini communities to fund projects and activities covered by the FNFP.

The Mishtuk Corporation of Waswanipi received $56,300 to carry out work on a site covering almost 635 hectares. This work consisted of checkerboard clear-cutting and regeneration cutting, pre-commercial thinning, site preparation and reforestation for a total of 344,000 trees planted. Over 38 km of road construction and renovation were also completed.

In addition, the Waswanipi Cree model forest, the 11th model forest in Canada, which was in its fourth year of operation, received a $500,000 contribution from the Canadian Forest Service of Natural Resources Canada to continue its activities. The partners renewed their interest in the project in hopes of developing concrete approaches and solutions for Aboriginal forestry.

The Eenatuk Forestry Corporation of Mistissini received a contribution of almost $40,600 from the FNFP, which allowed it to carry out work on an area of almost 360 hectares, including checkerboard clear-cutting, site preparation work and the construction and improvement of 22 km of forest roads. In addition, a total of 200,000 trees were planted.

All the projects proposed by these communities under the FNFP were evaluated, where required, under the provisions of the Canadian Environmental Assessment Act by the Canadian Forest Service.

Canada Forest Service Expenditures ($), 2001-2002

  CREE INUIT NASKAPI TOTAL
First Nation Forestry Program 96,920 - - 96,920
Canada's Model Forest Network 500,000 - - 500,000

Total 596,920 - - 596,920

Geomatics Canada

Geomatics Canada, a branch of the Department of Natural Resources Canada, is active in the territory covered by the agreements through the Eastern Region Operation Centre, Legal Survey Division, specifically its Quebec Client Liaison Unit.

The Quebec Client Liaison Unit is the local representative of the Legal Survey Division. It is comprised of surveyors, geometricians, Canada land surveyors and technicians who provide professional opinions and advice on a regular basis regarding the management and land tenure system, the establishment of geographic land information systems (GIS) and on issues arising out of a variety of geomatics-related disciplines.

The Centre's activities with the Aboriginal communities in the region consist mainly of managing survey contracts, aerial photography, map verification, cartography and the production of colour mosaics. It also produced descriptions of the extent and location of property interests that must be registered on Cree and Naskapi lands.

In 2001-2002, the Bureau prepared 61 site plans for registering property interests on Cree land, while updating the plans representing the interests of each Cree and Naskapi community. It managed contracts for the conduct of aerial photography covering all category 1A lands in the communities of Eastmain, Waskaganish, Wemindji, Chisasibi and Whapmagoostui. For the latter, a new map is planned for next year.

The manual Preparation of Land Registry Plans for Cree Communities was produced to help local registrars submit their application to be used in the preparation of site plans for the registration of property interests. In the context of this guide, one day's training was given in Waswanipi. The concepts of positioning, land measurement and the preparation of sketches presented in the guide were explained. There are certainly plans to provide this training to other communities.

Canada Economic Development

The Economic Development Agency of Canada for Quebec Regions (CED) aims to promote the economic development of regions of Quebec where incomes and economic growth are low or where there is a shortage of opportunities for productive employment. It emphasizes long-term economic development, the creation of lasting employment and incomes and focuses its effort on small and medium sized enterprises as well as on fostering entrepreneurship.

The Cree and Inuit clienteles are served by the Northern Quebec Office, while the Naskapi community is served by the North Shore Office.

Through these two regional offices, CED promotes the development of business and the growth of competitiveness among SMEs through innovations and market development projects. Among other things, it supports the development of the local capacity to spur local economic development.

CED has contributed financially to the completion of a range of development projects in the Cree and Inuit communities under the Idea-SME, Regional Strategic Initiatives, Community Development and Youth Strategy programs.

The Idea-SME program provides services and funds activities in the following priority areas: innovation, research and development, design, market development and export, entrepreneurship and business climate development. The program provided support for, among other things, a feasibility study for the establishment of a business incubator in the Cree community, a marketing plan for the Cree Outfitting and Tourism Association, a feasibility study for the construction of an access road to the Otish Mountains, to permit the development of the natural resources and tourism potential, as well as a marketing study for Inuit herbal teas.

The Strategic Regional Initiatives Program (SRI) provides support for major initiatives with a potential structural impact on the regional economy in the following areas: development of the region's technological capacity, tourist development, support for the ability of the Quebec regions to attract and their international outreach, as well as their adjustment potential. Among other things, the program supported the purchase of ground equipment to support the deployment of a system of telecommunications for the Inuit of Nunavik and the development of a strategy aimed at providing telecommunications infrastructure to nine Cree communities.

Under the Community Futures Program, funding was provided to cover the operating budgets of two community development corporations in Northern Quebec, the Eeyou Economic Group (Cree CFDC) and the Nunavik Investment Corporation (Inuit CFDC). The Agency also established a mentoring program to enable the directors of these two CFDCs to benefit from the expertise of another CFDC in the Outaouais Region.

Under the CED-CFDC Youth Strategy, the Eeyou Economic Group also received contributions in 2001-2002. The aim of this program is to stem the migration of young people to the large urban centres. It contributes to helping young local entrepreneurs develop their business plans within their community by encouraging the creation, acquisition, expansion or modernization of a company by young people and by assisting their employability. The strategy also aims to reinforce the social, cultural and economic involvement of young people in their own community.

Canada Economic Development Expenditures ($), 2001-2002

  CREE INUIT NASKAPI TOTAL
Idea-SME 7,250 45,103 - 52,353
Strategic Regional Initiatives 111,892 51,766 - 163,658
Community Futures Program 255,000 - - 255,000
Youth Strategy 50,500 - - 50,500

Total 424,642 96,869 - 521,511

Justice Canada

The Department of Justice, through the Aboriginal Justice Directorate, in partnership with Aboriginal communities and the provinces, develops community-based programming that facilitates the transfer of responsibilities for the administration of justice to Aboriginal people and encourages a reduction in crime and incarceration rates. The following Cree, Inuit and Naskapi community justice programs were funded through the Aboriginal Justice Strategy:

The Cree Regional Authority

Implementing a justice program with the ultimate aim of coordinating and supporting the development, implementation and maintenance of community justice programs in Quebec's Cree communities.

The Whapmagoostui Council

The objective of the community justice committee is to find solutions to disputes within the community. This conflict resolution mechanism aims to enhance community participation in social control mechanisms. This program handles cases involving young offenders as well as adult offenders, and its activities aim to provide sentencing recommendations and mediation in the case of local disputes. The community may also become involved in the future in an alternative sentencing program.

The Council of the Mistissini Cree Nation

The Justice Committee provides a different approach to dealing with offences in the community. By referring cases to the Justice Committee from the social services, in the case of young offenders, and through continued participation, in the case of adults, it aims through the involvement of its members to provide support and alternatives to settle disputes as well as enhancing the future prospects for offenders and their victims.

The Justice Committee will encourage mediation and, if this proves impossible, will make recommendations as to how harmony can be re-established and the harm remedied. The Justice Committee will also work with the court in making sentencing recommendations and in providing follow-up through community work with young people.

The Council of the Kawawachikamach Naskapi Nation

The Naskapi Nation will continue to implement a community justice program through the Naskapi Healing Justice Committee. This committee works with the Court by making sentencing recommendations and providing advice and support to offenders and victims, using such alternative justice models as mediation, dejudicialization and sentencing circles.

The Makivik Corporation

The objectives of the project are to maintain continuity in the operations of the Justice Committees established earlier to enable the committees to discharge their mandate, which is to provide and engage in the promotion of mediation, alternative sentencing (dejudicialization) and sentencing recommendations. The objectives of the project also involve coordination with community correctional initiatives and could also include assistance with the reintegration of offenders into the community (dispute resolution circle).

Justice Canada Expenditures ($), 2001-2002

  CREE INUIT NASKAPI TOTAL
Aboriginal Justice Strategy - 69,021 13,755 82,776
Native Paralegal Assistance Program 98,363 69,512 19,049 86,924

Total 98,363 138,533 32,804 269,700

Canadian Food Inspection Agency

The Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) does not maintain any personnel in the region. It is involved through two of its programs: rabies control, under the Animal Health Act, and the inspection of caribou slaughtered in the commercial hunt, under the Meat Inspection Act.

Rabies control is an ongoing activity for which the CFIA provides the scientific support and analytical capability required for investigations and follow-up of cases where humans are bitten by animals. It has developed a response protocol with the local authorities, which results in the sending of samples to CFIA laboratories for diagnostic analysis.

In February 2002, at the request of the Makivik Corporation, the CFIA sent a team to the Mallette Lake camp in order to supervise the slaughter of caribou in the commercial hunt. CFIA certification of the meat is required for sale in inter-provincial and international markets. The cost of this activity is shared between the CFIA and the Makivik Corporation.

Return to Table of Contents





2002 - 2003 Annual Report

Summary of Federal Government Expenditures, 1998-2003

Summary of Federal Government Expenditures ($),1 1998-2003 

  1998-1999 1999-2000 2000-2001 2001-2002 2002-2003
Indian and Northern Affairs Canada 142,549,4722 160,476,8083 181,009,000 193,632,594 186,922,943
Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation 37,605,100 37,620,700 42,673,518 44,364,765 41,804,276
Human Resources Development Canada 13,834,170 15,040,039 11,796,730 17,462,698 17,814,683
Health Canada 6,370,798 7,611,209 8,069,540 11,827,148 12,235,769
Solicitor General Canada 6,630,942 6,675,144 6,699,353 6,991,096 8,156,973
Transport Canada 3,314,833 6,921,8164 9,620,068 8,551,393 6,525,725
National Defence 2,438,0005 2,021,000 2,041,000 2,900,000 3,160,000
Canada Economic Development 270,000 555,299 635,571 521,511 2,717,629
Canadian Heritage 1,834,424 1,834,424 1,836,345 1,857,962 1,828,962
Industry Canada 774,576 520,537 2,162,245 950,279 1,085,870
Fisheries and Oceans Canada 380,000 414,000 487,000 910,000 877,000
Environment Canada6 401,024 494,429 552,912 781,783 850,837
Justice Canada 202,903 529,265 508,456 269,700 459,533
Natural Resources Canada Canadian Forest Service 676,073 655,100 543,450 596,920 430,550

Total 217,282,3155 241,369,7704 268,635,188 291,617,849 284,870,750

FEDERAL EXPENDITURES BETWEEN 1998 AND 2003: 1,303,775, 872

1 Figures provided by each department
2 Excluding $2.5 million distributed through Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation to the Société d'habitation du Québec under a special initiative on housing for the Inuit of Nunavik and $23.6 million paid to the Government of Quebec as the first instalment of the federal contribution to funding the construction of the access road to Waskaganish.
3 Excluding the last payment of $400,000 to the Government of Quebec for the federal contribution to funding the construction of the access road to Waskaganish.
4 Increase due to repairs to the Kuujjuaq and Schefferville airports. However, this total does not match the total shown in the 1999-2000 Annual Report because in the present Report the expenditures made by Transport Canada have been adjusted to exclude a $341,660 grant that was in fact disbursed in 2000-2001.
5 This total does not match the total shown in the 1998-1999 and 1999-2000 Annual Reports because in the present Report the expenditures made by National Defence have been adjusted to include $500,000 disbursed in 1998-1999 for restoration of the Mid-Canada Line sites.
6 Including the expenditures of the Canadian Environmental Assessment Agency.

Activities and Expenditures of Federal Departments and Agencies, 2002-2003

Indian and Northern Affairs Canada

During 2002-2003, total funding allocated by Indian and Northern Affairs Canada (INAC) to Cree, Inuit and Naskapi communities under the James Bay and Northern Quebec Agreement (JBNQA), the Northeastern Quebec Agreement (NEQA) and federal programs amounted to $186,922,943.

Population

As at June 30, 2002, 23,451 people were beneficiaries of the agreements, including 13,556 Cree in nine communities, 9,119 Inuit in 14 Northern municipalities and 776 Naskapi in a single community.

Education

The Department allocated $89,481,362 for education expenditures, distributed as follows:

  CREE INUIT NASKAPI TOTAL
Education services 61,348,612 17,200,292 2,210,522 80,759,426
School infrastructure 5,752,385 992,627 240,758 6,915,770

Total 67,100,997 18,192,919 2,451,280 87,745,196
Number of students** 3,549 2,961 257 6,767

* Figures for 2002-2003 school year include preschool to secondary students, and are supplied by the Quebec Ministère de l'Éducation.

  CREE INUIT NASKAPI TOTAL
Science and technology summer camps $46,712 $54,657 $1,685 $103,054
Co-operative Education 243,833 206,984 9,951 460,768
Summer Career Placements 269,022 149,325 10,666 429,013
Work Experience 202,086 123,974 - 326,060

Total $761,653 $534,940 $22,302 $1,318,895

Capital, Operations and Maintenance

During 2002-2003, $81,651,837 was allocated to capital, operations and maintenance and to infrastructure projects in Cree, Inuit, and Naskapi communities. The figure includes $11,259,998 for capital expenditures in Cree and Naskapi communities, $49,101,088 for operations and maintenance, and $21,290,751 for infrastructure projects in Cree, Inuit and Naskapi communities. The breakdown by beneficiaries is as follows:

Electricity

INAC provided $2,606,384 during 2002-2003 for electricity expenses in Waskaganish.

Social Development

Mistissini, Waswanipi and Kawawachikamach receive social assistance services directly from the Department. In the remaining JBNQA communities, these services were provided by the Government of Quebec. The sums provided by Canada, including the National Child Benefit Reinvestment Initiative, break down as follows:

Mistissini
Waswanipi
Kawawachikamach
$1,005,105
1,078,399
613,002

Total
$2,696,506

The federal government also participates in community social development by funding initiatives promoting health and better quality of life through the National Strategy for the Integration of Persons with Disabilities (NSIPD) and the Federal Initiative on Family Violence (IFV). The following amounts were provided during 2002-2003:

  CREE INUIT NASKAPI TOTAL
NSIPD $21,346 $25,744 $1,764 $48,854
IFV 140,938 169,200 11,635 321,773

Total $162,284 $194,944 $13,399 $370,627

Economic Development

INAC participates in Aboriginal economic development through the direct funding of Community Economic Development Organizations (CEDOs) and other sector-based organizations. These organizations support projects that promote economic development by providing technical and financial assistance. During 2002-2003, the Department provided the following amounts:

CREE INUIT NASKAPI TOTAL
$1,503,829 $1,025,475 $51,841 $2,581,145

Funding allocated to the Cree included $389,901 for the Cree Trappers' Association and $205,347 for the Cree Regional Authority to support Cree arts and crafts activities.

The Department also allocated the following additional funding for other economic development projects: $10,000 to the Cree Outfitting and Tourism Association for the development of a Web site; $10,000 to the Cree Regional Authority to organize an economic development forum; $13,540 to the Kativik Regional Government (KRG) for the opening of a restaurant in Kangirsujuaq; $224,500 to the Makivik Corporation to carry out a number of projects in Inuit communities, including the purchase of equipment for the Nunavik Research Centre and improvements to some of its services, a healing project and the writing of a book on the lives of the Inuit on the eastern shore of Hudson's Bay.

Under the Resource Access Negotiations (RAN) Program, which supports natural resources development by First Nations and Inuit, Wemindji received $60,000 to cover the cost of negotiations with the Government of Quebec and mining companies in order to create business partnerships that will yield benefits for the community in terms of jobs, training and upgrading for prospectors. Mistissini also received $12,937 to fund its negotiations with Quebec on the development and joint management of a possible future park and the joint management of an existing wildlife preserve.

Environment

During 2002-2003, the Makivik Corporation received $32,000 for environmental rehabilitation of sites located near Puvirnituq and Kangiqsualujjuaq, and $8,000 to develop a 10-year plan for the rehabilitation of former mineral exploration sites. The Nunavik Health and Social Services Regional Board was allocated $77,710 under the Northern Contaminants Program. The purpose of the project is to eliminate or at least reduce the contaminants found in traditionally harvested foods and inform the individuals and communities that consume them or work in this industry.

Indian Registration

INAC and the Cree and Naskapi communities are responsible for Indian registration records. During 2002-2003, the Department provided $109,077 to the Cree and $4,235 to the Naskapi for their participation in maintaining the registry, for a total of $113,312.

Cree-Naskapi Land Registry

During 2002-2003, the Department's Central Land Registrar continued coordinating registry services, in cooperation with its Cree and Naskapi partners. Training on registering, defining and mapping ownership interests was also provided during the year to local Cree and Naskapi registrars.

 Gathering Strength: Canada's Aboriginal Action Plan

During 2002-2003, INAC allocated the following funds to projects in the Cree, Inuit and Naskapi communities under the Gathering Strength plan:

Investing in Education Reform

Water and Sewer initiative

A total of $1,710,000 was allocated to the following projects in Cree communities:

Income Security Reform

Professional Development
(formerly Development of professional governance capacities)

Governance, Administration and Accountability

Economic Development Opportunity, Resource Acquisition and Access to Land and Resources Funds

In addition, the following funds were allocated to the Kativik Regional Government for various projects: $100,000 for the purchase of mineral prospecting and extraction equipment with its partners, the Makivik Corporation and Nuvumiut Drilling, a company owned 50/50 by the Salluit and Kangiqsujuaq land corporations; $30,000 to start up and operate a restaurant in Salluit; $9,000 to purchase a truck for a transportation company; $1,178 to produce an Inuit clothing catalogue for a shop.

New Directions for Negotiations on Self-Government

During 2002-2003, INAC allocated $285,000 to the Makivik Corporation to cover the costs of research, communication and consulting activities related to the creation of a Nunavik assembly and government.

Other Financial Assistance

The Cree Regional Authority was allocated $440,000 by the Department to cover the costs related to negotiations surrounding implementation of the JBNQA and $16,372 to cover the cost of a feasibility study on setting up a Cree art and handicraft association.

The Makivik Corporation received $318,000 from INAC to cover costs related to implementation of the JBNQA. It received $195,312 to conduct negotiations on the Nunavik marine region and $40,000 for its participation in a negotiating session with the Cree in Kuujjuarapik in August 2002. The Corporation was also allocated $195,000 to take part in the Inuit Circumpolar Conference, held in Kuujjuaq in August 2002, and to conduct discussions with the Labrador Inuit Association to settle the issue of overlapping land claims.

Nunavik Community Projects

INAC allocated $36,600 to the Makivik Corporation to support a pilot project designed to help young people in Kangiqsuallujuaq interested in mass communication technologies.

Cree-Naskapi Commission

INAC provided $650,747 to the Cree-Naskapi Commission during 2002-2003 to fund its activities related to application of the Cree-Naskapi (of Quebec) Act.

INAC expenditures ($), 2002-2003

  CREE INUIT NASKAPI TOTAL
Education
Education services 61,348,612 17,200,292 2,210,522 80,759,426
School infrastructure 5,752,385 922,627 240,758 6,915,770
Cultural centres 194,376 292,895 - 487,271
Employment programs 761,653 534,940 22,302 1,318,895
 
  68,057,026 18,950,754 2,473,582 89,481,362
Capital expenditures 9,947,998 - 1,312,000 11,259,998
Operations and maintenance 45,612,713 - 3,488,375 49,101,088
Infrastructure-related projects 2,832,451 18,457,500 800 21,290,751
 
  58,393,162 18,457,500 4,801,175 81,651,837
Electricity - Waskaganish 2,606,384 - - 2,606,384
Social development
Social assistance 2,083,504 - 613,002 2,696,506
NSIPD-IFV programs 162,284 194,944 13,399 370,627
 
  2,245,788 194,944 626,401 3,067,133
Economic development 1,523,829 1,263,515 51,841 2,839,185
RAN 72,937 - - 72,937
Environment - 117,710 - 117,710
Indian registration 105,050 - 4,235 109,285
Initiatives under Gathering Strength  
Education reform 1,433,350 1,144,050 65,750 2,643,150
Water and sewer initiative 1,710,000 - - 1,710,000
Income security reform - - 52,283 52,283
Occupational skills - 75,000 20,000 95,000
Environmental capacity 15,000 18,550 - 33,550
Opportunity fund 125,920 140,178 - 266,098
Self-government - 285,000 - 285,000
 
  3,284,270 1,662,778 138,003 5,085,081
Other financial assistance 456,372 748,312 - 1,204,684
Inuit community projects - 36,600 - 36,600
 
Subtotal 136,747,473 41,432,113 8,095,267 186,272,198
Cree-Naskapi Commission - - - 650,745

Total       186,922,943

Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation

The Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation (CMHC), in cooperation with INAC, is directly involved in the Cree and Naskapi communities through its non-profit housing program funded under section 95 of the National Housing Act.

The housing program for the Inuit is administered by the Quebec housing corporation, the Société d'habitation du Québec, under a federal-provincial cost-sharing agreement

In 2002-2003, 60 new subsidized housing units were added to the Cree housing stock, while two new housing units were added to that of the Naskapi. 19 units were also renovated in the Cree communities as part of the housing refurbishment program.

Under the Youth Employment Strategy, CMHC also provided a grant of financial assistance to enable 9 young Cree and 5 young Inuit to gain experience in the housing field in their communities.

Training sessions were also arranged for individuals in charge of housing in the Cree and Naskapi communities, covering such subjects as air quality and the database for the review of the condition of the premises. Cree and Naskapi leaders also attended the annual Aboriginal inspection services workshop and the First Nations colloquium on housing.

In 2000, Canada, Quebec, the Makivik Corporation, the Kativik Regional Government and the Kativik Municipal Housing Bureau reached an agreement for $100 million over five years to implement a program to build approximately 350 subsidized housing units in Nunavik. The agreement is funded on a 50-50 basis by Canada (CMHC and INAC) and Quebec. In 2002-2003, CMHC contributed $5 million through INAC to the Makivik Corporation as the federal contribution paid under this agreement.

CMHC Expenditures ($), 2002-2003

  CREE INUIT NASKAPI TOTAL
Federal subsidies* 8,760,016 32,600,000 596,181 41,804,276
Number of subsidized units 1,830 1,873 120  

*The amount of $5 million paid through INAC is not included in this table.

Human Resources Development Canada

In this fourth year of the Aboriginal Human Resources Strategy, the Aboriginal organizations (AHSDS) in Quebec have reached cruising speed in administering the programs devolved to them. Youth and day care initiatives have been added to the labour market programs.

The Naskapi received their share of the AHSDS funding, which this year amounted to $308,303.

The Inuit received $2,300,000 for the administration of the agreement on programs and services signed in 1999 and $5,548,461 for human resources development under AHSDS.

During 2002-2003, implementation of the agreement reached in 2001 between HRDC and the Cree Regional Authority continued. The creation of the territorial program implementation committee provided for under the agreement resulted in a number of training programs in such key sectors as forestry, construction and tourism. The Cree Regional Authority also continued with the establishment of a structure for the delivery of programs and services covering the entire Cree territory. The Cree Regional Authority also developed a computerized file management system for clients involved in training activities, which allows data to be uploaded directly to HRDC systems for the purpose of reporting the results of CRA activities involving participants in the various programs arising out of the agreement. Funding under the agreement for this year totalled $9,569,560.

HRDC Expenditures ($), 2002-2003

  CREE INUIT NASKAPI TOTAL
Labour market program
Treasury Board funds 2,934,374 2,593,173 186,863 5,714,410
Employment Insurance funds 1,413,914 1,285,671 106,498 2,806,083
Inuit and First Nations Child Care Initiative 1,405,546 1,390,412 88,359 2,884,317
Youth initiatives 390,726 279,205 14,492 684,873
Territorial Programs 1,000,000 - - 1,000,000
Administration 2,425,000 2,300,000 - 4,725,000

Total 9,569,560 7,848,461 308,303 17,814,683

Health Canada

During 2002-2003, Health Canada's Quebec Region First Nations and Inuit Health Branch provided $12,226,169 for various health care programs in the Cree, Inuit and Naskapi communities.

Indian and Inuit Health Care Careers program

Funding was provided for career days in the health care field and to promote summer employment in the communities.

Brighter Futures program

The First Nations and Inuit Health Branch (FNIHB) continued to support this program, which focusses on child development and parenting skills, for example by providing training for parents through courses such as "Nobody's Perfect."

Aboriginal Diabetes Initiative

In 2002-2003, a program was implemented to reduce the prevalence of diabetes. A number of prevention and promotional activities were carried out, such as the production of a recipe book, winter welfare days, training, development of educational materials for community health representatives and nurses, health walks for women, food identification, training for health care workers, cooking classes and weight loss and weight maintenance support groups.

Building Healthy Communities Program

The communities have established community mental health crisis management programs. A number of activities were carried out, including workshops on the problem of attempted suicide, training for street workers and traditional healing activities.

Canada Prenatal Nutrition Program

Prevention and promotion activities have been implemented, specifically to improve the diet of women before delivery and during breast feeding. Other activities were designed to improve access to nutrition information and to the services available for Inuit and First Nations women.

Aboriginal Head Start on Reserves Initiative

The communities continued to provide services for young children and families designed to strengthen First Nations and Inuit languages and culture, while improving levels of preparation for starting school and enhancing family participation in the PAPA program.

Solvent Abuse program

In order to eliminate or reduce the problem of solvent abuse, the communities have been giving training to street workers. They organized cultural activities and developed promotional materials and resources to raise awareness of the harmful effects of solvent abuse.

First Nations and Inuit Home and Community Care Program

The FNIHB increased its financial contribution to continue training activities for workers involved as well as beginning the delivery of home and community health care services.

National Aboriginal Alcohol and Drug Abuse Prevention program

With a specific focus on the Fetal Alcohol Syndrome and Effects of Alcohol on the Fetus program (FAS/EAF), the Region funded training activities for those most involved in the communities. A response plan was subsequently developed, including telephone follow-up with the participants.

National Strategy to Reduce Tobacco Use

Training workshops were held on stopping smoking. Promotional materials and training were developed among the Cree and Inuit.

Non-insured health services

Cree, Inuit and Naskapi residing in the territory covered by the agreements receive these services under the Agreement, while the FNIHB assumes all or part of the cost of these services only when the individuals are residing outside their own territory.

Health Canada Expenditures ($), 2002-2003

  CREE INUIT NASKAPI TOTAL
Careers for Indians and Inuit in the Health Care Field 1,000 - 6,700 7,700
Brighter Futures 1,112,298 952,085 61,425 2,125,808
Aboriginal Diabetes Initiative 206,372 195,435 12,592 414,399
Building Healthy Communities 824,582 718,437 46,515 1,591,533
Canada Prenatal Nutrition program 426,580 253,240 18,322 698,142
Aboriginal Head Start on Reserves Initiative 1,029,753 - - 1,029,753
Solvent Abuse program 148,488 127,958 8,249 284,695
First Nations and Inuit Home and Community Care Program 1,791,720 1,777,784 96,427 3,665,931
National Aboriginal Alcohol and Drug Abuse program 689,884 721,417 50,410 1,461,771
National Strategy to Reduce Tobacco Use 65,135 59,087 - 124,222
Non-Insured Health Benefits 491,784 62,751 2,401 831,875

Total 6,866,794 5,053,935 305,485 12,235,769

Solicitor General of Canada

During 2002-2003, the Aboriginal Policing Directorate of the Department of the Solicitor General of Canada began negotiations for the renewal of the three tripartite agreements on police services, one with the Cree Regional Authority, one with Kativik Regional Government and one with the Naskapi, each involving the Government of Quebec. During 2002-2003, these negotiations resulted in adjustments to the budgets for the Cree, Inuit and Naskapi police services.

Since the difference of opinion with the Government of Quebec regarding the interpretation of the NEQA has still not been settled, the Solicitor General continued the temporary measures to enable the Department to participate in the funding of police services to the Naskapi.

During 2002-2003, the Correctional Service of Canada (CSC) pursued its strategy of developing and delivering programs specifically tailored to Aboriginal offenders. CSC maintained its Aboriginal Liaison Officer services through Native Paralegal Services of Quebec for the Cree, Inuit and Naskapi. This organization is responsible for assisting and counselling Aboriginal offenders in federal penitentiaries to facilitate their safe return to the community. It also continued to provide its services to Cree, Inuit and Naskapi seniors in correctional facilities and funded a range of correctional programs tailored to the needs of Aboriginal offenders, primarily in the areas of family violence and sex offences.

The Solicitor General of Canada also maintained its funding for accommodation, supervision and treatment in halfway houses during parole for Cree, Inuit and Naskapi.

Solicitor General of Canada Expenditures ($), 2002-2003 

  CREE INUIT NASKAPI TOTAL
Aboriginal Policing Directorate
Tripartite agreements 3,846,780 4,004,086 239,200 8,090,066
Correctional Service
Native Paralegal Services of Quebec 13,214 19,247 - 32,461
Services to senior citizens 4,651 9,776 - 14,427
Adapted correctional programs* 4,215 9,737 - 13,952
Parole-related services 2,035 4,032 - 6,067

Subtotal 24,115 42,792 - 66,907
Total 3,870,895 4,046,878 239,200 8,156,973

* The services provided by these Native Friendship Centres are not restricted exclusively to the beneficiaries under the agreements.

Transport Canada

Transport Canada maintained its support for Cree, Inuit and Naskapi communities, investing a total of $6,525,725 in its initiatives during 2002-2003.

Transport Canada contributed $1,100,000 to the Kativik Regional Government for the management and operation of Kuujjuaq Airport. Investments totalling $1,951,000 were also made by the Department in facilities projects, including completion of the refurbishing of the marshalling areas ($25,000), the start of work on smoothing out the levelled areas ($121,000), expansion of the multi-purpose building ($1,778,000) and purchase of a light vehicle ($27,000). The Department also spent $408,000 to decontaminate the airport's fuel supply pipeline. A further $191,000 was allocated to miscellaneous operating expenses.

A $715,500 contribution was made under the Airport Facilities Assistance Program to repair the lighting system at Kuujjuarapik Airport, which belongs to the Government of Quebec.

The region's three Cree airports received a total of $659,525 under their three-year management contracts. The Eastmain Cree received $219,335 dollars, the Waskaganish Cree received $219,190 and the Wemindji Cree, $221,000. The facilities projects received a total of $1,305,700, distributed as follows: re-gravelling of the marshalling areas ($48,000) and replacement of a heavy vehicle ($189,000) at Waskaganish, the refurbishing of the marshalling areas ($875,000) and the replacement of a heavy vehicle at Eastmain ($193,700).

The airport lease, with the Société aéroportuaire de Schefferville, a non-profit organization established jointly by the Cree and Naskapi communities, continued for a fourth consecutive year. An agreement was signed between Transport Canada and the Société on April 21, 1999. The parties also signed a lease for the nominal sum of $1 and an annual contribution, designed to wipe out the airport's deficit, was granted by Transport Canada. In 2002-2003, the Société received $195,000 for the management and operation of the airport.

During 2002-2003, Transport Canada, via INAC, paid $1 million to the Makivik Corporation. This amount forms part of an agreement signed between Transport Canada, INAC and Fisheries and Oceans Canada covering the payment over 10 years of an annual sum of $3 million for marine infrastructures in Northern Quebec.

Transport Canada Expenditures ($), 2002-2003

  CREE INUIT NASKAPI TOTAL
Airport management - 1,100,000 195,000 1,295,000
Operations and maintenance 659,525 191,000 - 850,525
Facilities 1,305,700 1,951,000 - 3,256,700
AFAP contribution - 715,500 - 715,500
Marine Infrastructures Program - * - *
Environment 408,000 - - 408,000

Total 1,965,225 4,365,500 195,000 6,525,725

* The sum of $1 million paid through INAC is not included in this table.

National Defence

Land Force Quebec Area (LFQA) is responsible for activities related to delivering Canadian Rangers and Junior Canadian Rangers programs in its area of responsibility, the province of Quebec. During 2002-2003, the Department of National Defence (DND) allocated $3,160,000 for these two programs in Quebec.

The Canadian Rangers are volunteers between the ages of 18 and 65 who provide a military presence in remote and isolated areas of Canada and, if needed, provide support to the Canadian Forces during major exercises and in response to requests for assistance. Within its area of responsibility, LFQA has 23 Rangers patrols with a complement of 669 Canadian Rangers, of whom 480 are Aboriginal members: 375 are Inuit, 90 are Cree and 15 are Naskapi.

The Department also offers a free activity program (Junior Rangers) for youth between the ages of 12 and 18. Within its area of responsibility, LFQA maintains 27 patrols comprising 668 Junior Canadian Rangers.

On the territory covered by the agreements, LFQA has 18 Junior Canadian Ranger patrols with the Inuit (402), Cree (90), Naskapi and Innu members who make up 2 CRPG. Camp Okpiapik 2002 offered advanced training for young people from all ethnic groups (non-Native, Inuit, Cree, Naskapi and Innu). The activity took place in Inukjuaq on the shores of Hudson Bay from late June to mid-July 2002. More than 150 young people participated.

In 2002-2003, one new Canadian Rangers patrol was formed on the territory covered by the agreements, in the community of Eastmain. For the Junior Canadian Rangers program, three new patrols were formed on the territory covered by the agreements, at Waskaganish, Eastmain and Kawawachikamach).

Canada Economic Development

The Economic Development Agency of Canada for Quebec Regions (CED) aims to promote the economic development of regions of Quebec where incomes and economic growth are low or where there is a shortage of opportunities for productive employment. It emphasizes long-term economic development, the creation of lasting employment and incomes and focuses its effort on small and medium sized enterprises as well as on fostering entrepreneurship.

The Cree and Inuit clienteles are served by the Northern Quebec Office, while the Naskapi community is served by the North Shore Office.

Through these two regional offices, CED promotes the development of business and the growth of competitiveness among SMEs through innovations and market development projects. Among other things, it supports the development of the local capacity to spur local economic development.

CED has contributed financially to the completion of a range of development projects in the Cree and Inuit communities under the Idea-SME, Regional Strategic Initiatives, Community Development and Youth Strategy programs.

The Idea-SME program provides services and funds activities in the following priority areas: innovation, research and development, design, market development and export, entrepreneurship and business climate development. The program provided support for, among other things, a feasibility study for the establishment of a business incubator in the Cree community, a marketing plan for the Cree Outfitting and Tourism Association, a feasibility study for the construction of an access road to the Otish Mountains, to permit the development of the natural resources and tourism potential, as well as a marketing study for Inuit herbal teas.

The Strategic Regional Initiatives Program (SRI) provides support for major initiatives with a potential structural impact on the regional economy in the following areas: development of the region's technological capacity, tourist development, support for the ability of the Quebec regions to attract and their international outreach, as well as their adjustment potential. Among other things, the program supported the purchase of ground equipment to support the deployment of a system of telecommunications for the Inuit of Nunavik and the development of a strategy aimed at providing telecommunications infrastructure to nine Cree communities.

Under the Community Futures Program, funding was provided to cover the operating budgets of two community development corporations in Northern Quebec, the Eeyou Economic Group (Cree CFDC) and the Nunavik Investment Corporation (Inuit CFDC). The Agency also established a mentoring program to enable the directors of these two CFDCs to benefit from the expertise of another CFDC in the Outaouais Region.

Under the CED-CFDC Youth Strategy, the Eeyou Economic Group also received contributions in 2001-2002. The aim of this program is to stem the migration of young people to the large urban centres. It contributes to helping young local entrepreneurs develop their business plans within their community by encouraging the creation, acquisition, expansion or modernization of a company by young people and by assisting their employability. The strategy also aims to reinforce the social, cultural and economic involvement of young people in their own community.

Canada Economic Development Expenditures ($), 2002-2003

  CREE INUIT NASKAPI TOTAL
Idea-SME 135,873 64,981 - 200 854
Strategic Regional Initiatives 61,900 1,813,125 - 1,897,025
Community Futures Program 255,000 318,750 - 573,750
Youth Strategy 46,000 - - 46,000

Total 498,773 2,218,856 - 2,717,629

Canadian Heritage

The Aboriginal Programs Directorate of the Department of Canadian Heritage supports a wide range of activities in Northern Quebec, particularly Aboriginal communication networks, friendship centres, protection of Aboriginal languages and cultures, support for Aboriginal organizations, and initiatives to improve the situation of Aboriginal women. During 2002-2003, Canadian Heritage provided support amounting to $1,857,962 to Aboriginal communities in Northern Quebec as follows:

Canadian Heritage Expenditures ($), 2002-2003

  CREE INUIT NASKAPI TOTAL
Northern Native Broadcast Access Program  
James Bay Cree Communications Society 292,200 - - 292,200
Taqramiut Nipingat Incorporated (TNI) - 907,317 - 907,317
Aboriginal Representative Organizations Program  
Makivik CTorporation - 201,645 - 201,645
Native Friendship Centre Program  
Senneterre Native Friendship Centre Inc.* 122,000 - - 114,000
Val-d'Or Native Friendship Centre Inc.* 183,000 - - 171,000
Chibougamau Native Friendship Centre Inc. 152,000 - - 143,000

Total 720,000 1,108,962 - 1,828,962

* The services provided by these Native Friendship Centres are not restricted exclusively to the beneficiaries of the agreements.

Industry Canada

Through Industry Canada's Aboriginal Business Canada (ABC) program, ABC invested a total of $1,085,870 in 2002-2003 to support 21 business creation projects in Cree, Inuit and Naskapi territory.

ABC contributed to the development of 13 projects, with $595,170 from Cree communities, six projects from Inuit communities with a value of $452,312 and two projects in the amount of $38,388 from the Naskapi community.

Overall, ABC funds were invested in a variety of industrial sectors, although a substantial percentage was invested in the development of the region's Aboriginal economy. The projects included the establishment and expansion of Aboriginal businesses and the development of a range of business, marketing and training plans.

Industry Canada Expenditures ($), 2002-2003

  CREE INUIT NASKAPI TOTAL
Aboriginal Business Canada 595,170 452,312 38,388 1,085,870

Fisheries and Oceans Canada

Fisheries and Oceans Canada (DFO) administers several research and development projects in Northern Quebec through its Laurentian Region.

Through the Laurentian Fisheries Management Branch, the Department participates in the hunting, fishing and trapping regime, as stipulated in section 24 of the JBNQA. Through the Science Branch, it participates, jointly with INAC, Environment Canada and the CEAA, in implementing the social and environmental protection regimes, as stipulated in sections 22 and 23 of the JBNQA.

DFO is also a co-signatory to an agreement with INAC and Transport Canada under which an annual payment of $3 million is made for a 10-year period for the construction of marine infrastructures in the 14 Inuit communities in Nunavik in order to increase the capacity and safety of navigation, with a view to the development of economic ties between the communities and outside regions. In 2002-2003, DFO paid, through INAC, $1 million under the terms of this agreement to Makivik Corporation.

Aboriginal Fisheries Division - Fisheries Management

In 2002-2003, the Department continued its activities in the implementation of the Aboriginal Fisheries Strategy (AFS). The follow-up to the three-year (2001-2003) Northern Quebec Beluga Management Plan required intensive consultations with the 14 Nunavik municipal corporations, the Hunting, Fishing and Trapping Association of Nunavik, the Makivik Corporation, and the Kativik Regional Government. In view of the availability of new scientific data on the status of the beluga population in Nunavik, DFO felt obliged to impose a total ban on hunting in the Ungava Bay and Eastern Hudson Bay areas and the revise the quota downwards. The only areas open to hunting were Hudson Strait and the two new areas of Long Island and James Bay.

During 2002-2003, a contribution agreement was signed between DFO and the Makivik Corporation to fund the coordination, translation and transportation of the delegates attending the consultation meetings on amendments to the 2002 management plan. This agreement also allowed a community hunt to take place in a non-traditional area.

The recurrent agreement with the Kativik Regional Government provided funding for the coordination of the work and the observation patrols of six Aboriginal fisheries wardens and to maintain the working relationship with a DFO-hired multidisciplinary officer in Inukjuak. This agreement also covers the hiring, on a seasonal basis, of community officers in each of the 14 communities in Nunavik. These provide DFO, among other customers, with statistical data on the beluga catch.

As in the past, in the course of aerial patrols carried out each year in Nunavik, the Fisheries Management Branch representatives visited all the territories' communities to meet with their Inuit partners.

During 2002-2003, no specific activities were conducted on the Cree and Naskapi territories under the JBNQA, but DFO maintained contacts with the Cree and Naskapi through the Joint Hunting, Fishing and Trapping Association.

Science Branch

The scientific activities conducted in 2002-2003 by the Regional Science Branch in the Canadian Arctic were a continuation of the work done in previous years. These research projects are often conducted in cooperation with the Central and Arctic Region of DFO, Inuit universities and organizations, mainly the Makivik Corporation. A number of projects were carried out in the course of the year, including the following:

Oceans Directorate

In 2002-2003, the activities of the Regional Oceans and Environmental Branch in Northern Quebec consisted of conducting surveys prior to the construction of marine infrastructures at Kangirsuk and Salluit. These comprise the creation of a mooring area for boats formed by two rock breakwaters with a launching ramp and service area. In both cases, it was necessary to sign compensation agreements for the resulting loss of habitat.

Efforts aimed at harmonizing the various processes (Canadian Environmental Assessment Act and JBNQA) are continuing. A representative of the Regional Oceans and Environmental Branch has been appointed to COFEX-North.

CEAA compliance is mandatory for projects because of the federal funding, and DFO may also be the authority responsible by virtue of a permit for habitat modification issued under the Fisheries Act.

A representative of the Regional Oceans and Environment Directorate was also appointed to and sits on the Kativik Advisory Committee on the Environment.

Fisheries and Oceans Canada, Laurentian Region Expenditures ($), 2002-2003

  CREE INUIT NASKAPI TOTAL
Northern Quebec Marine Infrastructure Agreements - * - *
Fisheries Management Branch
Agreement with Makivik Corporation - 126,000 - 126,000
Agreement with Kativik Regional Govt - 550,000 - 550,000
Science Branch
Program expenditures - 175,000 - 175,000
Oceans Directorate
Program expenditures - 26,000 - 26,000

Total - 877,000 - 877,000

* This table does not include the amount of $1 million paid through INAC.

Environment Canada

In 2002-2003, Environment Canada, through their representatives on the James Bay Advisory Committee on the Environment (JBACE), the Kativik Environmental Advisory Committee (KEAC) and the Hunting, Fishing and Trapping Coordinating Committee (HFTCC), continued to assist in the implementation of the environmental protection and social environment regimes, as well as the hunting, fishing and trapping regime. For 2002-2003, Environment Canada's expenditures related to the implementation of the JBNQA totalled $89,692. It should be noted that Environment Canada has begun chairing these three committees.

Northern Ecosystems Initiative

As part of the Northern Ecosystems Initiative, Environment Canada established a regional coordinating committee on which the main environmental participants in Northern Quebec were invited to sit. The steering committee thus comprised representatives of the Cree, Inuit, Naskapi and Innu Aboriginal organizations. The Centre d'études nordiques (Northern studies centre - CEN) and the Centre interuniversitaire d'études et de recherché autochtones (interuniversity centre for Aboriginal studies and research) at Laval University are also on the committee, as are Hydro-Québec, the Société de la faune et des parcs du Québec, Indian and Northern Affairs Canada and Environment Canada.

In 2002-2003, the regional coordinating committee approved an environmental action plan for Northern Quebec. Funding provided by the Northern Ecosystems Initiative was allocated primarily to the implementation of projects carried out in cooperation with the Aboriginal organizations involved in the North.

Funding continued for four projects begun in 2001-2002. Environment Canada provided the Kativik Regional Government with $50,000 for a study entitled Characterization and Priorization of Abandoned Mining Sites in Nunavik. An amount of $25,000 was allocated to the Makivik Corporation's Nunavik Research Centre for the Evaluation of the effects of exposure to pollutants on the reproductive and endocrine systems of belugas. A further $55,000 went to the Cree Regional Authority for the development of Elements of a Strategy Aimed at Promoting and Facilitating Access to Environmental Knowledge in Aboriginal Communities of Northern Quebec. Environment Canada also participated with the Centre hospitalier universitaire de Québec (CHUQ) (Quebec City University Medical Centre) in the project entitled Identification, Selection and Monitoring of Indicators of Climate Change in Nunavik and Labrador.

Environment Canada also provided the Cree Regional Authority with $40,000 for a project entitled Caribou Québec-Labrador: From Science to the Communities.

Wildlife and Habitat Management

Under the Canada-United States Cooperation Agreement that forms part of the North American Waterfowl Management Plan, Environment Canada's Canadian Wildlife Service (CWS) prepared inventories of American black duck and Canada geese in 2002-2003. As in previous years, the study of the reproduction and band work on the Canada geese were completed as part of the joint Arctic geese plan to continue the assessment of the status of the species and the factors impacting on reproduction in this group of birds. The Canadian Wildlife Service allocated $100,000 for this work, plus a further $70,000 for inventories of migratory birds in the boreal forest.

As part of the Endangered Species Habitat Stewardship Program (HSP), two contribution agreements were concluded with the Makivik Corporation for a total amount of $14,180 to a study of the acoustic environment in the estuaries in relation to the presence of belugas. The Kativik Regional Government organized a meeting between Inuit elders and scientists at Fisheries and Oceans Canada's Maurice Lamontagne Institute to promote dialogue on the status of the beluga populations. HSP contributed $86,150 to the project.

Environmental Protection

As co-signatory to an agreement with the Department of National Defence, the Government of Quebec and the Kativik Regional Government, Environment Canada completed its work on the restoration of polluted Mid-Canada Line sites and at Nitchequon Station. The Department allocated $30,000 to these projects.

In 2002-2003, Environment Canada continued work on the inventory of abandoned mining exploration sites and the inventory of contaminated soil. This year, the work was carried out in Cree, Naskapi and Inuit territory. Spending totalled $25,300.

Restoration work was completed at the abandoned sites at Cape Hopes Advance weather station and a radar station at Quaqtaq. $21,000 was invested in this work.

As part of the Shellfish Water Quality Protection Program, Environment Canada continued its sample monitoring program and organized a series of information briefings with local authorities.

Meteorological Service of Canada

With the aim of identifying the sources and quantifying the origins of atmospheric pollutants in Arctic regions, an intensive measuring campaign was conducted in Nunavik under the coordination of the Meteorological Service of Canada. Environment Canada allocated $35,000 to this initiative. A France-Quebec project also got under way at Kujjuarapik in collaboration with the University of Grenoble (France). Environment Canada arranged three training sessions for the Kativik Regional Government for observers/communicators in Northern Quebec.

Canadian Environmental Assessment Agency

Under sections 22 and 23 of the James Bay and Northern Quebec Agreement (JBNQA), the Canadian Environmental Assessment Agency (CEAA) supports the federal administrator and provides advice and administrative support to the various committees created as part of the JBNQA.

Since 1999, Indian and Northern Affairs Canada, Fisheries and Oceans Canada and Transport Canada have been providing funding to build marine infrastructures in several Inuit villages. To implement these projects, the promoter, the Makivik Corporation, must meet the requirements of three environmental assessment processes, that is, the two JBNQA processes (federal and provincial) and the federal process under the Canadian Environmental Assessment Act (CEAA).

The Agency's Quebec regional office, with the active collaboration of the federal officials concerned, the Federal Environmental and Social Impact Review Panel for the North (COFEX-North) and the Makivik Corporation, developed a coordination mechanism for the two federal processes (JBNQA and the CEAA). More specifically, since 2001, COFEX-North has been responsible for screening projects pursuant to section 17 of the CEAA.

In 2002, the Ivujivik marine infrastructure project was authorized as part of the CEAA and the JBNQA processes before the promoter started the work. Based on the success of the administrative arrangement used for the Ivujivik project, responsibility for the screening for marine infrastructure projects in Kangirsuk and Salluit was extended. These projects should be approved under the CEAA and the JBNQA before the work is scheduled to begin in spring 2003.

Further, as part of the Quebec and Inuit economic partnership, these projects will meet the needs of small craft (phase I) and supply vessels (phase II). It will therefore be possible to begin phase II in municipalities where phase I has been completed.

In summer 2002, the Wemindji local administrator asked the Federal Environmental and Social Impact Review Panel for the South (COFEX-South) to review the impacts of a waste incinerator installation project. COFEX-South issued its recommendations despite major reservations about this project, which was also subject to CEAA screening. The Agency acted as the federal coordinator while COFEX-South conducted its review.

Based on the experience over the past two years, the chair of COFEXSouth wrote a letter to the James Bay Advisory Committee on the Environment (JBACE) to report problems with the application of the section 22 environmental protection and social environment regimes (Category 1). As a result, a working group, which the chair of COFEXSouth was asked to join, will eventually be created by the JBACE to issue recommendations.

The Agency's Quebec regional office continued its efforts to coordinate the environmental assessment processes on the territory covered by the Agreement and to share information with the various federal members sitting on advisory committees created under sections 22 and 23.

The Agency's expenses for the period from April 1, 2002 to March 31, 2003 totalled $204,515. This included the annual federal contribution of $173,500 for the joint maintenance and funding with the Government of Quebec, the JBACE and the Kativik Environmental Advisory Committee (KEAC). These contributions also included the expenses of the federal members of COMEV and the costs of activities associated with federal review panels (COFEX-North and COFEXSouth). The Agency provided executive secretariat services for these review panels.

Environment Canada Expenditures ($), 2002-2003

Environment Canada
Committees' expenditures 89,692
Northern Ecosystems Initiative 170,000
Wildlife and Habitat Management 275,330
Environmental Protection 76,300
Northern Contaminants Program 35,000
 
Subtotal 646,322
Canadian Environmental Assessment Agency 204,515

Total 850,837

Justice Canada

The Department of Justice, through the Aboriginal Justice Directorate, in partnership with Aboriginal communities and the provinces, develops long-term community-based programming that facilitates the transfer of responsibilities for the administration of justice to Aboriginal people and encourages a reduction in crime and incarceration rates. The following Cree, Inuit and Naskapi community justice programs were funded through the Aboriginal Justice Strategy:

The Cree Regional Authority

Implementation of a justice program with the ultimate aim of coordinating and supporting the development, implementation and maintenance of community justice programs in Quebec's Cree communities.

The Whapmagoostui Council

The objective of the community justice committee is to find solutions to disputes within the community. This conflict resolution mechanism aims to enhance community participation in social control mechanisms. This program handles cases involving young offenders as well as adult offenders, and its activities aim to provide sentencing recommendations and mediation in the case of local disputes. The community may also become involved in the future in an alternative sentencing program.

The Council of the Mistissini Cree Nation

The Justice Committee provides a different approach to dealing with offences in the community. By referring cases to the Justice Committee from the social services, in the case of young offenders, and through continued participation, in the case of adults, it aims through the involvement of its members to provide support and alternatives to settle disputes as well as enhancing the future prospects for offenders and their victims.

The Justice Committee will encourage mediation and, if this proves impossible, will make recommendations as to how harmony can be re-established and the harm remedied. The Justice Committee will also work with the court in making sentencing recommendations and in providing follow-up through community work with young people.

The Council of the Kawawachikamach Naskapi Nation

The Naskapi Nation will continue to implement a community justice program through the Naskapi Healing Justice Committee. This committee works with the Court by making sentencing recommendations and providing advice and support to offenders and victims, using such alternative justice models as mediation, dejudicialization and sentencing circles.

The Makivik Corporation

The objectives of the project are to maintain continuity in the operations of the Justice Committees established earlier to enable the committees to discharge their mandate, which is to provide and engage in the promotion of mediation, alternative sentencing (dejudicialization) and sentencing recommendations. The objectives of the project also involve coordination with community correctional initiatives and could also include assistance with the reintegration of offenders into the community (dispute resolution circle).

Justice Canada Expenditures ($), 2002-2003

  CREE INUIT NASKAPI TOTAL
Aboriginal Justice Strategy 37,015 205,000 18,477 260,492
Native Paralegal Assistance Program 100,384 79,942 18,715 199,041

Total 137,399 284,942 37,194 459,533

Natural Resources Canada

The Department of Natural Resources Canada (NRCan) is active on the territory covered by the JBNQA and NEQA through the Canadian Forest Service and Geomatics Canada.

Canadian Forest Service

In 2002-2003, the Canadian Forest Service (CFS) continued to implement the First Nations Forestry Program (FNFP). The objective of this program is to improve the economic conditions of Aboriginal communities through sustainable forest development. In addition to the dimension of forest development on the reserves, the program offers components focussing on the economic development of Aboriginal forestry, that is, the development of Aboriginal businesses, cooperation between communities and partnerships with the forest industry. This program is funded jointly by INAC and NRCan.

In 2002-2003, contributions totalling more than $97,500 were distributed among the Cree communities of Waswanipi and Mistissini to fund projects and activities covered by the FNFP.

The Mishtuk Corporation of Waswanipi received $55,850 to carry out work on a site covering almost 820 hectares. This work consisted of checkerboard clear-cutting and regeneration cutting, pre-commercial thinning, site preparation, blowdown recovery and reforestation for a total of 155,000 trees planted. Two kilometres of road construction and renovation were also completed.

In addition, the Waswanipi Cree model forest, the 11th model forest in Canada, which was in its fifth year of operation, received a $333,000 contribution from the Canadian Forest Service of Natural Resources Canada to continue its activities. The partners renewed their interest in the project in hopes of developing concrete approaches and solutions for Aboriginal forestry.

The Eenatuk Forestry Corporation of Mistissini received a contribution of almost $41,700 from the FNFP, which allowed it to carry out work on an area of more than 642 hectares, including checkerboard clear-cutting, site preparation work and the construction and improvement of 16 km of forest roads. In addition, a total of 198,320 trees were planted.

All the projects proposed by these communities under the FNFP were evaluated, where required, under the provisions of the Canadian Environmental Assessment Act by the Canadian Forest Service.

Natural Resources of Canada
Canadian Forest Service Expenditures ($), 2002-2003


  CREE INUIT NASKAPI TOTAL
First Nation Forestry Program 97,550 - - 97,550
Canada's Model Forest Network 333,000 - - 333,000

Total 430,550 - - 430,550

Geomatics Canada

Geomatics Canada, a branch of the Department of Natural Resources Canada, is active in the territory covered by the agreements through the Eastern Region Operation Centre, Legal Survey Division, specifically its Quebec Client Liaison Unit.

The Quebec Client Liaison Unit is the local representative of the Legal Survey Division. It is comprised of surveyors, geometricians, Canada land surveyors and technicians who provide professional opinions and advice on a regular basis regarding the management and land tenure system, the establishment of geographic land information systems (GIS) and on issues arising out of a variety of geomatics related disciplines.

The Centre's activities with the Aboriginal communities in the region consist mainly of managing survey contracts, aerial photography, map verification, cartography and the production of colour mosaics. It also produced descriptions of the extent and location of property interests that must be registered on Cree and Naskapi lands.

In 2002-2003, the Quebec Client Liaison Unit prepared 21 site plans for registering property interests on Cree land, while updating the plans representing the interests of each Cree and Naskapi community. New registry plans were produced for the communities of Whapmagoostui and Kawawachikamach, together with ongoing support for the work of the central registrar.

For the Cartography Program, a new map sheet and a 1:3000 digital photomosaic were produced for the community of Whapmagoostui. These documents are based on the photographs taken in 2001-2002. New aerial photographs were taken: 1:8000 (for the village) and 1:15000 (for the 1AN lands) and map sheets and photomosaics were produced for the community of Kawawachikamach. A team from the Quebec Client Liaison Unit made on-site visits to both communities for photogrammetric monitoring and a summary inspection of the boundaries.

The Canadian Food Inspection Agency

The Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) does not maintain any personnel in the region. It is involved through two of its programs: rabies control, under the Animal Health Act, and the inspection of caribou slaughtered in the commercial hunt, under the Meat Inspection Act.

Rabies control is an ongoing activity for which the CFIA provides the scientific support and analytical capability required for investigations and follow-up of cases where humans are bitten by animals. It has developed a response protocol with the local authorities, which results in the sending of samples to CFIA laboratories for diagnostic analysis.

No requests for caribou inspection were received in 2002-2003.

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