Faro Mine Remediation Project: Environmental and socio-economic interests

Based on past consultations, a list of key environmental and socio-economic topics related to the Faro Mine Remediation Project has been developed to help focus the assessment on the key topics of interest as it relates to people, the environment and economy. These topics of interest will be used to develop the project proposal on the Faro Mine remediation plan that will be submitted to the Yukon Environmental and Socio-economic Assessment Board.

You may use this list as a reference when providing feedback to the Faro Mine Remediation Project Consultation or answering the questionnaire.

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Environmental interests and indicators

Surface water quality

Change in surface water quality in Rose Creek, Anvil Creek and Pelly River, including how water quality could be affected by:

  • contaminated groundwater
  • changes in water flow
  • discharge of treated water
  • blowing dust

Fish and fish habitat

(Sculpin, Arctic grayling, fish that are part of local fisheries):

  • destruction/creation of fish habitat in Rose Creek, Anvil Creek and  Pelly River by site activities
  • changes in the quality of fish habitat in the downstream  environment due to changes in water quality and flow
  • fish health
  • presence/absence of fish in habitat

Vegetation (plants)

(Species at risk, wetlands, wildlife habitat, riverbank ecosystems):

  • amount and type of vegetated  area to be cut or re-established
  • distribution of vegetated area (fragmentation level)
  • uptakes of contaminants into vegetation
  • presence of invasive species

Wildlife

(Species at risk, migratory birds, moose, caribou, sheep, grizzly bears):

  • increase or decrease of habitat availability and quality due to clearing, revegetation, and disturbance from noise,  traffic and human presence
  • habitat distribution and  connectivity (fragmentation level)
  • wildlife survival and reproduction, including wildlife health (contaminants in food chain) and other factors that could change wildlife abundance, for example collisions  with vehicles

Socio-economic interests and indicators

Local and traditional land use

  • traditional land use activities conducted by First Nations,  including the use and access to hunting cabins and harvesting areas
  • recreation and tourism, including fishing, hunting and hiking,  as well as access to those areas
  • commercial activities for example guided fishing, hunting or outfitting.
  • timber harvest
  • mineral exploration or extraction

Cultural and heritage resources

  • historical, cultural or sacred sites and heritage resources at the site
  • First Nations' culture and traditions

Economic opportunities

  • employment, contracting and income levels
  • education, training and skill development opportunities
  • investment in training and educational programs Business development
  • economic diversification

Community wellness

  • community demographics
  • social cooperation or cohesion
  • looking at the length of time residents stay in the community (an indicator of the number of connections made that help a community thrive)
  • family stability and structure
  • Community Well-being Index, a way of measuring social and economic  community well-being, comparing First Nation and non-First Nation communities, based on Canada census information
  • Indigenous language use, looking at whether changes in the workforce  during mine clean-up might impact the use of indigenous languages
  • crime rate
  • roads and traffic
  • housing (price and availability)
  • health and emergency services capacity
  • community infrastructure (sewage, electrical distribution capacity,  recreational services, child care, and support services)

Human health

  • how air quality, water quality, soil contamination and noise could affect the health of people who use the site
  • health of those who eat country food or drink water collected in the vicinity of the site (fish, game, berries and water)
  • worker health and safety
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