Indigenous and Northern Affairs Canada — 2016–17 Report on Plans and Priorities

QS-3659-000-EE-A1
ISSN: 2369-9663
© Her Majesty the Queen in Right of Canada, represented by the Minister of Indigenous and Northern Affairs, 2016

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Table of Contents

Minister's Message

I am pleased to present the 2016–17 Report on Plans and Priorities for Indigenous and Northern Affairs Canada (INAC), which describes what will be required to make real progress on issues most important to First Nations, Inuit, Métis and Northerners.

Moving forward with rights and reconciliation will be at the heart of the Department's actions. The 2016–2017 plans and priorities address how we will be working to renew the relationship between Canada and Indigenous peoples, building a relationship based on recognition, rights, respect, cooperation and partnership.

The recent launch of the National Inquiry into Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls is an important first step. The Department will also work with leaders of First Nations, Métis, Inuit, provinces and territories, parties to the Indian Residential Schools Settlement Agreement, and other key partners, to design an engagement strategy for developing a national reconciliation framework, informed by the Truth and Reconciliation Commission's Calls to Action. Implementing the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples will also guide our renewed efforts towards reconciliation.

Putting children and youth first will be central to our efforts, as focusing on education and training and child protection is essential to improving the well-being and quality of life of Indigenous children, youth and families.

Canada's success relies on strong communities. The investments we make will help support stronger Indigenous communities, through which Indigenous peoples and Northerners can participate more fully in Canada's political, social and economic development.

I am also committed to a new fiscal relationship with First Nations, including addressing sustainable, predictable funding. This will help First Nations address priorities such as making sure every child receives a quality education and providing equitable funding for child and family services on reserves.

Improving the quality of life for Métis individuals and communities is also a key departmental priority. Among our initiatives we will be renewing the dialogue on section 35 Métis rights, as well as identifying areas where investments will improve the quality of life for Métis people.

The North is ever-changing, which affects the cost of living. The initiatives presented in this report will facilitate access to affordable, nutritious food in the North, as well as sustainable access to the North's tremendous economic potential. At the same time, INAC will work with our partners on devolution, as well as climate change.

These are just some of the plans and priorities that the Department has for 2016–2017. I invite you to read this report to learn about the initiatives that INAC is pursuing to make Canada a better place for Indigenous and Northern peoples and communities.

Finally, the 2016–17 Report on Plans and Priorities provides information on how the Department will support the Government on achieving our agenda in the coming year and I am fully confident that INAC is prepared to successfully support me and work with our partners inside and outside government to deliver for Canadians. However, given our commitment to more effective reporting, this years report will be the final submission using the existing reporting framework.

The Prime Minister and the President of the Treasury Board are working to develop new, simplified and more effective reporting processes that will better allow Parliament and Canadians to monitor our Government's progress on delivering real change to Canadians. In the future, INAC's reports to Parliament will focus more transparently on how we are using our resources to fulfill our commitments and achieve results for Canadians.

These new reporting mechanisms will allow Canadians to more easily follow our Department's progress towards delivering on our priorities, which were outlined in the Prime Minister's mandate letter to me.

The Honourable Carolyn Bennett, M.D., P.C., M.P.
Minister of Indigenous and Northern Affairs


Section I: Organizational Expenditure Overview

Organizational Profile

Appropriate Minister: The Honourable Carolyn Bennett

Ministerial Portfolio: Department of Indian Affairs and Northern Development

Enabling Instrument: Department of Indian Affairs and Northern Development Act, R.S.C. 1985, c. I-6

Year of Incorporation: 1880

Other:

Special Operating Agency: Indian Oil and Gas Canada

Administrative Tribunals and Agencies:

  • Indian Residential Schools Truth and Reconciliation Commission
  • Polar Knowledge Canada

Adjudicative and Advisory bodies:

  • Specific Claims Tribunal Canada
  • National Aboriginal Economic Development Board

Organizational Context

Raison d'être

Indigenous and Northern Affairs Canada (INAC) supports Indigenous peoples (First Nations, Inuit and Métis) and Northerners in their efforts to:

  • Improve social well-being and economic prosperity;
  • Develop healthier, more sustainable communities; and
  • Participate more fully in Canada's political, social and economic development — to the benefit of all Canadians.

Responsibilities

The Department has a mandate to support Canada's Indigenous and northern peoples in the pursuit of healthy and sustainable communities, and broader economic and social development objectives. Efforts are guided by the Department's mission statement:

Working together to make Canada a better place for Indigenous and northern peoples and communities.

The mandate for Indigenous and Northern Affairs is derived from a number of sources, including the following: the Canadian Constitution; the Department of Indian Affairs and Northern Development Act; the Indian Act (as amended over the years); statutes dealing with environmental and resource management, such as the Nunavut Planning and Project Assessment Act (2013); and other statutes, such as the Northwest Territories Devolution Act (2014).

Along with responsibility for administering statutory and regulatory provisions of the Indian Act, INAC is also mandated to work with First Nations to implement legislation designed to provide them with jurisdictional powers outside of the Indian Act. The Department's mandate is further defined by specific statutes enabling modern treaties and self-government agreements and implementation of those agreements. For a list of all statutes, please consult INAC's website.

Policy and program practices, as well as judicial decisions, also shape the Department's mandate.

INAC negotiates comprehensive and specific claims, as well as self-government agreements and other related processes, on behalf of the Government of Canada. The Department is responsible for implementing its obligations under these agreements and processes, as well as overseeing the implementation of obligations of other government departments flowing from these agreements. INAC also provides support for services on reserves, such as education, housing, community infrastructure and social support to Status Indians on reserves; administers the land management component of the Indian Act; and executes other regulatory duties under the Indian Act.

The Minister acts as the Government of Canada's primary interlocutor for Métis, Non-Status Indians and urban Indigenous peoples. The Department further serves as a focal point for Inuit issues, and supports the inclusion of Inuit-specific concerns in federal program and policy development.

Through its Northern Affairs mandate, INAC is also the lead federal department for two-fifths of Canada's landmass, with a direct role in the political and economic development of the territories, and significant responsibilities for science, land, and environmental management. In the North, the territorial governments generally provide the majority of social programs and services to all Northerners, including Indigenous peoples.

The Canadian High Arctic Research Station Act, which received Royal Assent on December 16, 2014 and came into force on June 1, 2015, established Polar Knowledge Canada as a new federal research organization. This new organization combines the mandate and functions previously held by the Canadian Polar Commission and the Canadian High Arctic Research Station's Science and Technology Program, which was formerly led by INAC. The organization is responsible for advancing Canada's knowledge of the Arctic and strengthening Canadian leadership in polar science and technology. INAC will continue to report on the construction of the Canadian High Arctic Research Station as part of the Northern Science and Technology Program (4.2 of the Program Alignment Architecture), until the transfer of infrastructure to Polar Knowledge Canada in 2017–2018.

Strategic Outcomes and Program Alignment Architecture

1 Strategic Outcome: The GovernmentSupport good governance, rights and interests of Indigenous peoples

  • 1.1 Program: Governance and Institutions of Government
    • 1.1.1 Sub-Program: First Nation Governments
    • 1.1.2 Sub-Program: Indigenous Governance Institutions and Organizations
  • 1.2 Program: Rights and Interests of Indigenous Peoples
    • 1.2.1 Sub-Program: Negotiations of Claims and Self-Government Agreements
    • 1.2.2 Sub-Program: Specific Claims
    • 1.2.3 Sub-Program: Consultation and Accommodation
    • 1.2.4 Sub-Program: Métis Relations and Rights Management, and Non-Status Indian Relations
  • 1.3 Program: Management and Implementation of Agreements and Treaties

2 Strategic Outcome: The PeopleIndividual, family and community well-being for First Nations and Inuit

  • 2.1 Program: Education
    • 2.1.1 Sub-Program: Elementary and Secondary Education
    • 2.1.2 Sub-Program: Post-Secondary Education
  • 2.2 Program: Social Development
    • 2.2.1 Sub-Program: Income Assistance
    • 2.2.2 Sub-Program: National Child Benefit
    • 2.2.3 Sub-Program: Assisted Living
    • 2.2.4 Sub-Program: First Nations Child and Family Services
    • 2.2.5 Sub-Program: Family Violence Prevention
  • 2.3 Program: First Nations Individual Affairs
    • 2.3.1 Sub-Program: Registration and Membership
    • 2.3.2 Sub-Program: Estates
  • 2.4 Program: Residential Schools Resolution
    • 2.4.1 Sub-Program: Independent Assessment Process
    • 2.4.2 Sub-Program: Reconciliation

3 Strategic Outcome: The Land and EconomyFull participation of First Nations, Métis, Non-Status Indians and Inuit individuals and communities in the economy

  • 3.1 Program: Indigenous Entrepreneurship
    • 3.1.1 Sub-Program: Business Capital and Support Services
    • 3.1.2 Sub-Program: Business Opportunities
  • 3.2 Program: Community Economic Development
    • 3.2.1 Sub-Program: Lands and Economic Development Services
    • 3.2.2 Sub-Program: Investment in Economic Opportunities
    • 3.2.3 Sub-Program: Administration of Reserve Land
    • 3.2.4 Sub-Program: Contaminated Sites (On-Reserve)
  • 3.3 Program: Strategic Partnerships
  • 3.4 Program: Infrastructure and Capacity
    • 3.4.1 Sub-Program: Water and Wastewater
    • 3.4.2 Sub-Program: Education Facilities
    • 3.4.3 Sub-Program: Housing
    • 3.4.4 Sub-Program: Other Community Infrastructure and Activities
    • 3.4.5 Sub-Program: Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency
    • 3.4.6 Sub-Program: Emergency Management Assistance
  • 3.5 Program: Urban Indigenous Participation

4 Strategic Outcome: The NorthSelf-reliance, prosperity and well-being for the people and communities of the North

  • 4.1 Program: Northern Governance and People
    • 4.1.1 Sub-Program: Political Development and Intergovernmental Relations
    • 4.1.2 Sub-Program: Nutrition North
    • 4.1.3 Sub-Program: Climate Change Adaptation
  • 4.2 Program: Northern Science and Technology
    • 4.2.1 Sub-Program: Northern Contaminants
    • 4.2.2 Sub-Program: Science Initiatives
  • 4.3 Program: Northern Land, Resources and Environmental Management
    • 4.3.1 Sub-Program: Petroleum and Minerals
    • 4.3.2 Sub-Program: Contaminated Sites
    • 4.3.3 Sub-Program: Land and Water Management

5.1 Program: Internal Services

INAC's Program Alignment Architecture Crosswalk from 2015–2016 to 2016–2017

The following changes to the INAC 2016–2017 Program Alignment Architecture (PAA), from that of the 2015–2016 PAA, are minor.

The Government

The following have been retitled to reflect the change in the Department's applied name from Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Canada to Indigenous and Northern Affairs Canada:

  • The Government Strategic Outcome Statement, formerly, Support good governance, rights and interests of Aboriginal peoples, now becomes Support good governance, rights and interests of Indigenous peoples
  • 1.1.2: Aboriginal Governance Institutions and Organizations becomes Indigenous Governance Institutions and Organizations
  • 1.2: Aboriginal Rights and Interests becomes Rights and Interests of Indigenous Peoples

The People

The former 2.4.3: Support to the Truth and Reconciliation Commission sub-program has been removed, as the program has concluded.

The Land and Economy

The following have been retitled to reflect the change in the Department's applied name from Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Canada to Indigenous and Northern Affairs Canada:

  • 3.1: Aboriginal Entrepreneurship becomes Indigenous Entrepreneurship
  • 3.5: Urban Aboriginal Participation becomes Urban Indigenous Participation

Organizational Priorities

The relationship between the Government of Canada and Indigenous peoples is vitally important — not only to our shared economic interests, but also to our respective identities as nations. A renewed, nation-to-nation relationship with Indigenous peoples, based on recognition, rights, respect, cooperation and partnership is fundamental to how we move forward together.

As part of a renewed relationship, the Department, in close collaboration with other federal departments and agencies, will engage with Indigenous peoples to make progress on issues important to First Nations, the Métis and Inuit communities and those living in Canada's North.

In 2016–2017, INAC will focus on the following cross-cutting priorities:

  1. Moving Forward with Rights and Reconciliation
  2. Putting Children and Youth First
  3. Supporting Stronger Indigenous Communities
  4. Improving the Quality of Life for Métis Individuals and Communities
  5. Fostering a Strong, Inclusive and Vibrant North
Priority 1: Moving Forward with Rights and Reconciliation

Priority Type:Footnote 1 Ongoing

Description: Reconciliation is not just an issue for Indigenous peoples, it is a Canadian issue. It is about establishing and maintaining a mutually respectful relationship with Indigenous and non-Indigenous peoples through a renewed, nation-to-nation relationship that will help us to progress on critical issues, create stronger communities and promote economic growth. We can only move forward by supporting the work of reconciliation, and continuing the necessary process of truth telling and healing, alongside provinces, territories, and with First Nations, the Métis, and Inuit. Reconciliation is also about respecting the relationship between Indigenous people and the land, and respecting traditions and perspectives on environmental stewardship.

Key Supporting Initiatives
Planned Initiatives Start Date End Date Link to PAA
In collaboration with the Department of Justice Canada and Status of Women Canada, launch a national public inquiry into missing and murdered Indigenous women and girls in Canada, to seek recommendations on concrete actions to address and prevent violence against Indigenous women and girls Phase 1 — Pre-Inquiry Design Process: December 2015
Phase 2 — Inquiry: Spring/Summer 2016
Phase 1 — Pre-Inquiry Design Process: TBD
Phase 2 — Inquiry: TBD
2.2.5
Work with provinces and territories, First Nations, the Métis, Inuit, and other stakeholders to implement Calls to Action of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission, starting with the implementation of the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples Ongoing Ongoing All
Undertake, with advice from the Department of Justice, in full partnership and consultation with First Nations, Inuit and the Métis, a review of laws, policies and operational practices to ensure that the Crown is fully executing its consultation, accommodation and legal obligations under international and domestic law in relation to human rights, including rights of Indigenous peoples TBD TBD TBD
Support an annual meeting of the Prime Minister and First Nations, Métis and Inuit leaders December 2015 Ongoing All
Lead the continued implementation of the Indian Residential Schools Settlement Agreement to support fair and lasting resolution to the legacy of Indian Residential Schools September 17, 2007 March 31, 2020 2.4
Review and work collaboratively with Indigenous communities, provinces, territories, and other stakeholders towards a Federal Reconciliation Framework that is based upon well-governed, prosperous and healthy nations and effective nation-to-nation relationships, to promote recognition of rights, respect and mutual cooperation, and partnership for a renewed nation-to-nation relationship with First Nations, Inuit and the Métis Ongoing Ongoing 1.2
1.3
Work with provinces/territories, Indigenous communities and third-party stakeholders to facilitate the negotiation of modern treaties, self-government agreements, specific and special claims, incremental and non-treaty agreements, consultation protocols and other related processes, including a whole-of-government approach to implementation of treaties and self-government agreements, and the British Columbia treaty process Ongoing Ongoing 1.2
1.3
In partnership with Inuit stakeholders, support Inuit land claim organizations to undertake activities related to the Nanilavut Initiative in their respective regions November 2010 TBD 4.1.1
Note: TBD is referenced as new Planned Initiatives may still be pending approvals and/or funding, and as such, Start and End Dates may not be available yet.
Priority 2: Putting Children and Youth First

Priority Type: Previously Committed

Description: Over 647,000 Indigenous people (46%) are under the age of 25. It is in the interest of all Canadians to ensure that this generation benefits from a comprehensive framework of support for children, youth and their families. This starts with education. Today, approximately half of First Nation students living on reserves graduate from high school. Focusing on education, as well as addressing the social determinants of health — including poverty, nutrition and school infrastructure issues — are essential to improving the well-being and quality of life of Indigenous children, youth and families. Working with First Nations to improve social policies and programs is key to meeting this priority. Addressing the risks and vulnerabilities that act as socio-economic barriers to educational achievement and economic growth will help build safer, more resilient, and self-sufficient Indigenous communities and individuals.

Key Supporting Initiatives
Planned Initiatives Start Date End Date Link to PAA
Work with First Nation partners and provinces to identify and advance new investments and innovative approaches, including efforts to strengthen First Nation education systems on reserve to ensure that First Nation children on reserve receive a quality education TBD TBD 2.1.1
Invest additional funding in school infrastructure under the Capital Facilities and Maintenance Program for building and refurbishing First Nations Schools April 1, 2016 TBD 3.4.2
Work with Employment and Social Development Canada to launch consultations with provinces and territories and Indigenous peoples on a National Early Learning and Childcare Framework, as a first step towards affordable, high-quality, flexible and fully inclusive child care TBD TBD 2.1.1
Strengthen partnerships with provincial/territorial governments, other federal departments and non-government organizations to improve social and education outcomes for First Nation children, youth and families April 1, 2016 TBD 2.1
2.2
Explore opportunities to enhance First Nation Child and Family Services, leading to improved child welfare outcomes across Canada TBD TBD 2.2.4
Continue to modernize Indian registration and the Secure Certificate of Indian Status issuance processes and improve services across Canada Previously Ongoing March 2019 2.3.1
Work with Status of Women Canada and Infrastructure Canada to grow and maintain Canada's network of shelters and transition houses, to ensure that no one fleeing domestic violence is left without a place to turn TBD TBD 2.2.5
Note: TBD is referenced as new Planned Initiatives may still be pending approvals and/or funding, and as such, Start and End Dates may not be available yet.
Priority 3: Supporting Stronger Indigenous Communities

Priority Type: New

Description: Canada's success begins with its strong communities. Investing in communities is not just about creating good jobs and economic growth, it is also about building communities that Indigenous peoples and Northerners are proud to call home. With investment concentrated in land, economic development, housing, and water and wastewater, the Government of Canada will achieve all these goals. Moreover, the Government recognizes that investments in sustainable infrastructure contribute to make communities greener, safer and more resilient. Canadians must be able to trust that the government will engage in appropriate regulatory oversight, including credible environmental assessments, and that it will respect the rights of those most affected, such as Indigenous communities.

Key Supporting Initiatives
Planned Initiatives Start Date End Date Link to PAA
Lift the two-percent escalator on funding for First Nations programs and work to establish a new fiscal relationship that gives First Nations communities sufficient, predictable and sustained funding TBD TBD All
Work in collaboration with First Nations, Inuit and other stakeholders to improve housing outcomes as a part of ongoing efforts to improve essential infrastructure for Indigenous communities Housing initiatives to be determined in light of social infrastructure commitments made in Speech from the Throne Housing initiatives to be determined in light of social infrastructure commitments made in Speech from the Throne 3.4.3
3.4.4
4.1.1
Work with First Nations and other stakeholders on establishing sustainable water and wastewater servicing to make communities safer and more resilient, with particular attention to eliminating long-term drinking water advisories Sustainable local water and wastewater facilities: April 2016
Eliminating long-term drinking advisories: April 2016
Sustainable local water and wastewater facilities: March 2026
Eliminating long-term drinking advisories: March 2021
3.4.1
Contribute to environmental assessment legislation in consultation with Indigenous communities as a part of the ongoing enhancement of on-reserve lands and environmental management policies, processes and systems Environmental assessment legislation: TBD Environmental assessment legislation: TBD 3.2.1
3.2.3
3.2.4
Work with other federal government departments to implement the Government of Canada's commitments on green infrastructure TBD TBD 3.4.5
Explore opportunities and seek partnerships to modernize First Nations governance through the development of legislative and policy options TBD TBD 1.1
Facilitate Indigenous economic development by leveraging effective partnerships with Indigenous communities and other partners, thus advancing Indigenous business and community readiness for greater economic participation and enhancing the value of Indigenous assets as well as access to capital for public and commercial financing June 2009 Ongoing 1.1.2
3.1
3.2
3.3
Work with Employment and Social Development Canada and Innovation, Science and Economic Development to promote economic development and create jobs for Indigenous peoples TBD TBD TBD
Implement the modernized Indian Oil and Gas Act, regulations and systems to attract further investment on reserve lands May 2009 January 2017 3.2.3
Support First Nations' efforts in the development of community planning, including Comprehensive Community Planning TBD TBD 1.1.1
Note: TBD is referenced as new Planned Initiatives may still be pending approvals and/or funding, and as such, Start and End Dates may not be available yet.
Priority 4: Improving the Quality of Life for Métis Individuals and Communities

Priority Type: New

Description: Adopting a nation-to-nation approach to working with the Métis, based on cooperation, respect for rights and our international obligations, is essential to renewing the relationship while advancing reconciliation.

Key Supporting Initiatives
Planned Initiatives Start Date End Date Link to PAA
Work with Métis peoples, provincial and territorial governments, other Aboriginal organizations and interested parties to map out a process for dialogue on section 35 Métis rights December 2015 TBD 1.2.1
Make permanent funding available to provincial Métis communities for Métis identification and registration December 2015 December 2017 1.2.4
Review the existing federal programs and services available to the Métis, in partnership with Métis communities, to identify gaps and areas where strategic investments can be made to improve the Métis quality of life TBD TBD 1.2.4
Develop and implement a Métis Economic Development Strategy in partnership with Métis communities and existing Métis financial institutions Ongoing TBD 3.1.1
3.3
Note: TBD is referenced as new Planned Initiatives may still be pending approvals and/or funding, and as such, Start and End Dates may not be available yet.
Priority 5: Fostering a Strong, Inclusive and Vibrant North

Priority Type: New

Description: Canada's North is a vast and beautiful part of the world, home to a rich culture and tremendous economic potential. The North is also a region in transition; climate change is driving international interest and economic opportunity, leading to a rapid transformation of traditional northern lifestyles. The pace of change, combined with the remoteness of many northern communities, contributes to a high cost of living, food insecurity and other significant environmental and socio-economic challenges.

Key Supporting Initiatives
Planned Initiatives Start Date End Date Link to PAA
Enhance Northerners' food choices by supporting access to market foods in isolated northern communities through Nutrition North Canada (NNC), and by supporting informed decision making with respect to contaminants in traditionally harvested foods through the Northern Contaminants Program NNC: May 2010 (Update and expansion of NNC: TBD)
Northern Contaminants Program: 1991
NNC: Ongoing
Northern Contaminants Program: Ongoing
4.1.2
4.2.1
Work with other federal government departments to implement the Government of Canada's commitments on climate change TBD TBD 4.1.3
Advance work towards an agreement-in-principle on the devolution of responsibilities for land and resource management to the Government of Nunavut October 2014 March 2017 4.1.1
Continue the construction of the Canadian High Arctic Research Station, which will be a hub for science and technology in the North, and engage Northerners, territorial governments, academia, industry, other federal departments and agencies throughout the development and implementation of the Station August 2014 July 2017 4.2.2
Advance the sound management of natural resources and the environment and the remediation of contaminated sites in the North for the benefit of Northerners and Canadians Previously ongoing Ongoing 4.3.1
4.3.2
4.3.3
Support the effective functioning of northern regulatory regimes in order to enable development and protect the environment, while ensuring the consultation, engagement and participation of Indigenous groups in the process Previously ongoing Ongoing 4.3.1
4.3.3
Note: TBD is referenced as new Planned Initiatives may still be pending approvals and/or funding, and as such, Start and End Dates may not be available yet.

For more information on organizational priorities, see the Minister's mandate letter on the Prime Minister of Canada's website.

Risk Analysis

INAC faces many challenges and opportunities as it delivers its mandate and contributes to the achievement of the Government of Canada's priorities and commitments. INAC funds or delivers programs and services to diverse groups of people and individuals who have varied and distinct needs and priorities. Those programs and services are delivered to communities large and small, urban and remote, all across the country. Most INAC services are delivered through partnerships with Indigenous communities, the provinces and territories, Indigenous organizations and organizations in the North. The Department's responsibilities are largely shaped by unique demographic and geographic factors, as well as centuries of Canadian history replete with the signing and implementation of multiple treaties. The table below highlights the three external risks that are driven, in part, by factors outside of the Department's control.

Risk Analysis Table
Risk Risk Response Strategy Link to Program Alignment Architecture
Environmental Risk refers to the risk to the Department posed by human activities that impact the environment and the risk of environmental processes such as climate change.
  • Address contaminated sites that pose the greatest risk to human health and safety as well as the environment.
  • Maintain the governance structures and processes for contaminated sites in the North.
  • Continue to implement the site stabilization plan for the Giant Mine in the Northwest Territories to address urgent environmental risks.
  • Continue to address specific high risks at the Faro Mine site in the Yukon through a care and maintenance program, while moving forward with the development of the full remediation plan.
  • Monitor implementation of the Environmental Review Process and build on the "Community Land Use Planning On Reserve" project to integrate environmental matters in community economic development planning.
  • Implement a Structural Disaster Mitigation Framework to allow First Nation communities to undertake activities aimed at strengthening infrastructure against extreme weather events and other disasters.
  • Support reforms to strengthen environmental regulations and legislation (north and south of 60°) and update existing policies and programs.
Linked to and affects the following programs of the PAA:

Northern Land, Resources and Environmental Management

Northern Governance and People

Northern Science and Technology

Infrastructure and Capacity

Community Economic Development
Legal Risk recognizes that departmental policies, programs and activities may result in litigation.
  • Resolve litigation using the most appropriate resolution mechanisms.
  • Support improved forecasting of advisory and litigation services through the development of risk tools.
  • Ensure the Department is prepared for upcoming decisions through contingency planning which allows the Government of Canada to respond promptly and effectively to court decisions. Based on the Department of Justice's assessment, INAC is able to proactively develop strategies to address the possible outcomes of court decisions.
  • Raise litigation awareness through outreach meetings to highlight key litigation that may affect departmental programs/policies, and seek options that avoid litigation.
Linked to and affects the following programs of the PAA:

Rights and Interests of Indigenous Peoples

Management and Implementation of Agreements and Treaties

Education

Social Development
Indigenous Relationship Risk relates to fostering and maintaining the broad spectrum of relationships with Indigenous communities, persons and the organizations that represent them.
  • Hold regular meetings with Indigenous leaders to identify and advance key priorities of mutual concern, based on a relationship built on the mandate of the government.
  • Implement Calls to Action from the Truth and Reconciliation Commission.
  • Conduct a national inquiry on missing and murdered Indigenous women and girls.
  • Continue supporting the implementation of the Independent Assessment Process, a component of the Indian Residential Schools Settlement Agreement.
  • Improve critical programs (e.g.: Education, Child and Family Services, Infrastructure) that directly benefit communities and individuals.
  • Establish a fiscal relationship that provides sufficient, predictable and sustained funding for First Nation communities.
  • Enhance tools to address section 35 rights, work with Indigenous groups and provinces/territories to establish effective consultation processes within the context of the Federal Reconciliation Framework which will be developed.
  • Streamline departmental processes to increase flexibility and simplify reporting.
  • Implement improvements to service delivery to First Nation members.
  • Increase support to regional front-line officers to enhance relationship building with First Nations and Indigenous organizations.
Linked to and affects all areas of the PAA

Planned Expenditures

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars) Human Resources (FTEs)
2016–2017
Main Estimates
2016–2017
Planned Spending
2017–2018
Planned Spending
2018–2019
Planned Spending
2016–2017 2017–2018 2018–2019
7,505,552,140 7,505,552,140 7,889,133,574 8,045,681,329 3,877 3,823 3,807
Budgetary Planning Summary for Strategic Outcomes and Programs (dollars)
Strategic Outcomes, Programs and Internal Services 2013–2014 Expenditures 2014–2015 Expenditures 2015–2016 Forecast Spending 2016–2017 Main Estimates 2016–2017 Planned Spending 2017–2018 Planned Spending 2018–2019 Planned Spending
Strategic Outcome: The Government
Governance and Institutions of Government 484,218,256 422,226,591 423,986,874 397,170,892 397,170,892 397,432,638 396,076,381
Rights and Interests of Indigenous Peoples1 485,123,423 173,531,547 193,619,881 487,447,240 487,447,240 1,013,387,295 1,165,193,454
Management and Implementation of Agreements and Treaties2 715,832,560 749,933,655 1,045,612,617 806,628,418 806,628,418 789,189,679 781,887,016
Subtotal 1,685,174,239 1,345,691,793 1,663,219,372 1,691,246,550 1,691,246,550 2,200,009,612 2,343,156,851
Strategic Outcome: The People
Education 1,775,804,549 1,788,854,310 1,807,445,844 1,855,472,918 1,855,472,918 1,889,866,503 1,914,365,584
Social Development 1,723,318,991 1,733,443,753 1,788,334,279 1,764,360,798 1,764,360,798 1,772,628,163 1,825,483,482
First Nations Individual Affairs3 33,836,437 28,426,563 32,598,391 28,911,620 28,911,620 28,914,831 28,915,613
Residential Schools Resolution 574,379,693 492,880,678 391,443,547 165,991,965 165,991,965 41,311,703 0
Subtotal 4,107,339,670 4,043,605,304 4,019,822,061 3,814,737,301 3,814,737,301 3,732,721,200 3,768,764,679
Strategic Outcome: The Land and Economy
Indigenous Entrepreneurship4 n/a 43,027,380 40,698,706 42,636,070 42,636,070 42,636,070 42,636,070
Community Economic Development5 n/a 218,047,705 294,219,980 209,574,311 209,574,311 205,631,989 204,115,448
Strategic Partnerships n/a 33,668,724 41,194,440 39,583,926 39,583,926 30,333,926 30,333,926
Infrastructure and Capacity6 1,038,948,588 1,266,710,553 1,260,712,531 1,212,699,364 1,212,699,364 1,232,715,390 1,232,145,774
Urban Indigenous Participation7 51,708,349 49,520,444 52,705,983 29,645,997 29,645,997 29,645,997 29,645,997
Aboriginal Economic Development8 224,607,972 n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a
Federal Administration of Reserve Land9 133,423,081 n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a
Subtotal 1,448,687,990 1,610,974,806 1,689,531,640 1,534,139,668 1,534,139,668 1,540,963,372 1,538,877,215
Strategic Outcome: The North
Northern Governance and People 170,331,482 146,407,862 152,177,428 134,894,297 134,894,297 135,981,297 137,090,297
Northern Science and Technology 13,504,948 40,827,871 64,829,399 47,822,067 47,822,067 25,562,493 4,999,019
Northern Land, Resources and Environmental Management 238,498,638 212,493,747 195,186,771 58,614,753 58,614,753 31,967,498 32,634,798
Subtotal 422,335,068 399,729,480 412,193,598 241,331,117 241,331,117 193,511,288 174,724,114
Internal Services 375,954,708 291,651,755 288,209,854 224,097,504 224,097,504 221,928,102 220,158,470
Total 8,039,491,675 7,691,653,138 8,072,976,525 7,505,552,140 7,505,552,140 7,889,133,574 8,045,681,329
  1. Previously entitled Co-operative Relationships under the 2013–2014 PAA and renamed Aboriginal Rights and Interests under the 2014–2015 PAA (renamed under the 2016–2017 PAA)
  2. Previously entitled Treaty Management (renamed under the 2014–2015 PAA)
  3. Previously entitled Managing Individual Affairs (renamed under the 2014–2015 PAA)
  4. Previously entitled Aboriginal Entrepreneurship (renamed under the 2016–2017 PAA)
  5. Previously entitled Community Development (established under the 2014–2015 PAA)
  6. Previously entitled Community Infrastructure (renamed under the 2014–2015 PAA)
  7. Previously entitled Urban Aboriginal Participation (renamed under the 2016–2017 PAA)
  8. The Aboriginal Economic Development program was restructured under the new Program Alignment Architecture for 2014–2015, with the funding realigned to the Indigenous Entrepreneurship, Community Development and Strategic Partnerships programs.
  9. The Federal Administration of Reserve Land program was restructured under the new Program Alignment Architecture for 2014–2015, with the funding realigned to the Community Development, and Infrastructure and Capacity programs.

Overall, the year-over-year changes primarily reflect an increase in funding provided to meet the demand for ongoing First Nation and Inuit programs and services, as well as changes in targeted funding provided for major initiatives including: implementation of the Indian Residential Schools Settlement Agreement, the Federal Contaminated Sites Action Plan, investments to improve First Nations education and water and wastewater infrastructure, funding for the construction of the Canadian High Arctic Research Station and the implementation of the associated Science and Technology Program, obligations under the Northwest Territories Land and Resources Devolution Agreement, funding for on-reserve costs incurred by provincial/territorial or other emergency management organizations as required under the Emergency Management Assistance Program, improvements in the incentives in the on-reserve Income Assistance Program to encourage those who can work to access training so they are better equipped for employment, changes in the approved funding profile for the negotiation, settlement and implementation of specific and comprehensive claims, and out-of-court settlements. In addition, changes reflect government-wide efforts to identify efficiencies and streamline departmental operations, while protecting delivery of programs to First Nations. For additional explanation of the overall expenditure trend please refer to the Departmental Spending Trend subsection in Section I of this report; for additional discussion of variations in the planned spending by program please refer to Section II.

Alignment of Spending with the Whole-of-Government Framework

Alignment of 2016–2017 Planned Spending with the Whole-of-Government Framework
Strategic Outcome Program Spending Area Government of Canada Outcome 2016–2017 Planned Spending (dollars)
The Government Governance and Institutions of Government Social Affairs A diverse society that promotes linguistic duality and social inclusion 397,170,892
Rights and Interests of Indigenous Peoples Social Affairs 487,447,240
Management and Implementation of Agreements and Treaties Economic Affairs Strong economic growth 806,628,418
The People Education Social Affairs A diverse society that promotes linguistic duality and social inclusion 1,855,472,918
Social Development Social Affairs 1,764,360,798
First Nations Individual Affairs Social Affairs 28,911,620
Residential Schools Resolution Social Affairs 165,991,965
The Land and Economy Indigenous Entrepreneurship Economic Affairs Strong economic growth 42,636,070
Community Economic Development Economic Affairs 209,574,311
Strategic Partnerships Economic Affairs 39,583,926
Infrastructure and Capacity Economic Affairs 1,212,699,364
Urban Indigenous Participation Economic Affairs Income security and employment for Canadians 29,645,997
The North Northern Governance and People Social Affairs Healthy Canadians 134,894,297
Northern Science and Technology Economic Affairs An innovative and knowledge-based economy 47,822,067
Northern Land, Resources and Environmental Management Economic Affairs A clean and healthy environment 58,614,753
Total Spending by Spending Area
Spending Area Total Planned Spending (dollars)
Economic Affairs 2,447,204,906
Social Affairs 4,834,249,730
International Affairs
Government Affairs

Departmental Spending Trend

Spending Trend graphic

View text version of this image

The bar graph depicts the spending trends broken down by sunset programs (anticipated), statutory and voted spending:

In 2013–2014, the total is $8,039 million. Of this amount: Sunset programs spending is not applicable, $186 million in statutory spending and $7,853 million in voted spending.

In 2014–2015, the total is $7,692 million. Of this amount: Sunset programs spending is not applicable, $191 million in statutory spending and $7,500 million in voted spending.

In 2015–2016, the total is $8,073 million. Of this amount: Sunset programs spending is not applicable, $156 million in statutory spending and $7,971 million in voted spending.

In 2016–2017, the total is $7,939 million. Of this amount: $433 million (anticipated) for sunset programs spending, $153 million in statutory spending and $7,352 million in voted spending.

In 2017–2018, the total is $8,414 million. Of this amount: $525 million (anticipated) for sunset programs spending, $150 million in statutory spending and $7,739 million in voted spending.

In 2018–2019, the total is $8,501 million. Of this amount: $456 million (anticipated) for sunset programs spending, $141 million in statutory spending and $7,905 million in voted spending.

Note: Due to rounding, figures may not add to totals shown. Decisions on the future of sunset programs will be taken and reflected in future Estimates.

Over the period 2013–2014 to 2016–2017, total spending will decrease by about $0.1 billion (from $8.0 billion in 2013–2014 to $7.9 billion in 2016–2017). This net decrease of $0.1 billion is primarily the result of a decrease for the implementation of the Indian Residential Schools Settlement Agreement partially offset by additional funding provided to meet the demand for ongoing First Nation and Inuit programs and services (2 percent allowance for inflation and population growth).

Total spending over the period from 2016–2017 to 2018–2019 increases by about $0.6 billion (from $7.9 billion in 2016–2017 to $8.5 billion in 2018–2019). This net increase of $0.6 billion is primarily due to additional funding provided for accelerating the resolution of specific claims and to meet the demand for ongoing First Nation and Inuit programs and services (2 percent allowance for inflation and population growth). These increases are partially offset by the sunset of targeted funding, most notably for the implementation of the Indian Residential Schools Settlement Agreement.

Estimates by Vote

For information on Indigenous and Northern Affairs Canada's organizational appropriations, consult the 2016–17 Main Estimates.


Section II: Analysis of Programs by Strategic Outcome

Strategic Outcome: The Government

Support good governance, rights and interests of Indigenous peoples

Program 1.1: Governance and Institutions of Government

Description: This Program provides support to First Nation governments, as well as Indigenous governance institutions and organizations. The intent of this support is to facilitate capacity development in the Indigenous public service, the elected leadership, and entities that administer aggregate services on behalf of or to First Nation governments and their communities. Transparent and accountable First Nation governments attract investment, create opportunities, and effectively support their citizens. Transparent and accountable institutions and organizations strengthen the fabric of Indigenous governments across Canada, assist Indigenous communities and their governments in attracting investment, and support Indigenous participation in the Canadian economy. Ultimately, good governance practices are essential for active Indigenous participation in Canadian society and the economy.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars) Human Resources (FTEs)
2016–2017
Main Estimates
2016–2017
Planned Spending
2017–2018
Planned Spending
2018–2019
Planned Spending
2016–2017 2017–2018 2018–2019
397,170,892 397,170,892 397,432,638 396,076,381 419 419 416
Performance Measurement
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Date to Be Achieved
First Nation governments and institutions are supported in their efforts to be transparent to their communities and membership Percentage of First Nations having adopted reporting of financial statements to their members 75% by March 31, 2017
Planning Highlights

Through the Governance and Institutions of Government Program, INAC will continue to ensure First Nation governments and institutions are supported in their efforts to be transparent to their communities and membership by:

  • Undertaking a review of the First Nations Financial Transparency Act, in partnership with First Nations, to ensure the Crown respects its consultation and accommodation obligations, while supporting First Nation governments to be transparent and accountable to their members.
  • Building strategic partnerships, tools and initiatives to support investments in Indigenous community planning and capacity building to enhance competency development in the Indigenous public service.
  • Supporting program delivery and capacity development through Indigenous institutions and organizations to support the aggregation of services on behalf of or to First Nation governments and their communities.
  • Continuing to explore opportunities and seeking partnerships to modernize First Nations governance through the development of legislative and policy options.
  • Continuing to research and analyze the broader issues relating to Indian registration, Band membership and citizenship.
  • Undertaking a review of the Default Management and Prevention Policy suite, including Third Party Funding Agreement Management, through a multi-year approach, and engaging First Nations in defining the appropriate policy and tools to minimize financial risk, facilitate capacity and promote self-governance.

Sub-Program 1.1.1: First Nation Governments

Description: This sub-program supports the core operations and capacity development of First Nations governments, including the professional development of their personnel. Support for community development and capacity building is through collaborative, coordinated and targeted community-driven investments, leveraging partnership wherever possible. Funding is provided to support the costs of core government functions such as the holding of elections, law-making and enforcement, financial management, general administration, and executive leadership. In addition, the sub-program provides advice and support to First Nations on governance matters, and develops and implements legislation and policies that support the modernization of governance frameworks and transparent and accountable governance, while simultaneously overseeing the discharge of the Department's statutory and regulatory obligations in respect of governance processes under the Indian Act. Activities include — but are not limited to — assistance in establishing governance and associated capacities, processes and mechanisms, such as the development and implementation of community election systems, adoption of open and transparent governance practices, law-making and development of enforcement authorities.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars) Human Resources (FTEs)
2016–2017
Planned Spending
2017–2018
Planned Spending
2018–2019
Planned Spending
2016–2017 2017–2018 2018–2019
379,957,788 380,524,534 380,678,976 415 415 415
Performance Measurement
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Date to Be Achieved
Enhanced governance capacity of First Nation Governments Percentage of First Nations who have submitted a plan and have received funding for the development or implementation of a Governance Capacity Plana 80% by March 31, 2017
Percentage of First Nations scoring low risk on the Governance section of the General Assessment 70% by March 31, 2017
a INAC uses the United Nations Development Programme's definition of capacity development as the process through which individuals, organizations and societies obtain, strengthen and maintain the capabilities to set and achieve their own development objectives over time.
Planning Highlights

Through the First Nation Governments sub-program, INAC will align its actions with the expected result — enhanced governance capacity for First Nation Governments — by:

  • Supporting community-led planning and mentoring initiatives through targeted Professional and Institutional Development Program funding.
  • Supporting First Nations to prevent and address defaults through the Default Prevention and Management Policy Pilot Project initiative.
  • Continuing to discharge Canada's statutory and regulatory responsibilities relating to First Nations governance under the Indian Act and the First Nations Elections Act.
  • Supporting capacity building of First Nation governments through the provision of advice and training on governance-related matters, such as elections and enactment of by-laws.

Sub-Program 1.1.2: Indigenous Governance Institutions and Organizations

Description: This sub-program provides funding and supports aggregate program delivery and capacity through Indigenous governance institutions and organizations at the local, regional and national levels, including tribal councils and AFOA Canada (formerly Aboriginal Financial Officers Association of Canada). To provide support to First Nation governments wishing to develop capacity and systems in the areas of taxation and financial management, the First Nations Fiscal Management Act institutions receive administrative, policy and financial support to deliver on their legislative mandates under the Act. Funding, as well as tools, training and advice, are also provided to organizations and institutions to support First Nation government efforts to implement the Family Homes on Reserves and Matrimonial Interests or Rights Act.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars) Human Resources (FTEs)
2016–2017
Planned Spending
2017–2018
Planned Spending
2018–2019
Planned Spending
2016–2017 2017–2018 2018–2019
17,213,104 16,908,104 15,397,405 4 4 1
Performance Measurement
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Date to Be Achieved
Governance institutions and organizations have the capacity to support First Nations Percentage of tribal councils scoring low risk on the General Assessment 90% by March 31, 2017
Percentage of First Nations Fiscal Management Act institutions scoring low risk on the General Assessment 100% by March 31, 2017
Planning Highlights

Through the Indigenous Governance Institutions and Organizations sub-program, INAC will align its actions with the expected result — governance institutions and organizations have the capacity to support First Nations — by:

  • Supporting governance institutions delivering programs on behalf of, or providing capacity development and technical support to, First Nation governments in areas such as taxation and financial management.
  • Supporting amendment of the First Nations Fiscal Management Act and regulations in consultation with First Nations.
  • Enhancing the administration of justice in First Nation communities, including through effective administration of the Family Homes on Reserves and Matrimonial Interests or Rights Act.
  • Supporting Tribal councils and other Indigenous capacity development organizations in the implementation of member First Nation and Inuit governance capacity plans.

Program 1.2: Rights and Interests of Indigenous Peoples

Description: This Program seeks to strengthen collaboration between governments and Indigenous groups through mutual respect, trust, understanding, shared responsibilities, accountability, dialogue and negotiation concerning the rights and interests of Indigenous peoples. Partnerships will be established helping to contribute to the strengthening of the social, economic and cultural well-being of Indigenous communities to support conditions for more active participation in Canadian society. The Program also addresses reconciliation objectives, constitutional and historic obligations and public policy by: negotiating agreements that achieve clarity with respect to law-making authority and the ownership, use and control of lands and resources; addressing specific claims; dealing with special claims; developing multi-partner processes in areas identified by Indigenous groups and the federal government; and supporting effective and meaningful consultation and accommodation with Indigenous groups and their representation in federal policy and program development.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars) Human Resources (FTEs)
2016–2017
Main Estimates
2016–2017
Planned Spending
2017–2018
Planned Spending
2018–2019
Planned Spending
2016–2017 2017–2018 2018–2019
487,447,240 487,447,240 1,013,387,295 1,165,193,454 234 228 228
The year-over-year differences primarily reflects a reprofile of funding to future years for specific claims reflecting the anticipated settlement level, as well as the sunset (in 2016–2017) of funding and FTEs for the pro-active reconciliation and management of Métis rights and the management of Métis and Non-Status Indian litigation.
Performance Measurement
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Date to Be Achieved
Certainty and/or clarity of rights and interests of Indigenous peoples through strengthened collaboration between governments and Indigenous groups Number of departmental processes and programs in place that support the Crown and Indigenous groups in addressing rights and interests of Indigenous peoples, and other Crown obligations 594 by March 31, 2017
Planning Highlights

Through the Rights and Interests of Indigenous Peoples Program, INAC will continue to support certainty and/or clarity of rights and interests of Indigenous peoples through strengthened collaboration between governments and Indigenous groups by:

  • Developing a Federal Reconciliation Framework for addressing section 35 rights through engagement and dialogue with treaty partners.
  • Leveraging strong relationships with Métis and Non-Status Indian Aboriginal Representative Organizations that effectively represent their members to provide clarity about their interests.

Sub-Program 1.2.1: Negotiations of Claims and Self-Government Agreements

Description: This sub-program supports Canada's commitment to the negotiation of claims and self- government agreements as the best means for reconciling Aboriginal rights, as recognized and affirmed under section 35 of the Constitution Act, 1982, with the sovereignty of the Crown. It also supports Canada's commitment to negotiating self-government agreements to address aspirations for greater Indigenous autonomy and self-reliance and to promote good governance. With the participation of provincial and territorial governments, Canada negotiates claims and self-government agreements that provide Indigenous groups with a solid foundation for self-reliance and for the improvement of social, cultural and economic conditions within their communities.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars) Human Resources (FTEs)
2016–2017
Planned Spending
2017–2018
Planned Spending
2018–2019
Planned Spending
2016–2017 2017–2018 2018–2019
40,768,972 41,467,354 41,465,703 140 140 140
Performance Measurement
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Date to Be Achieved
Certainty and clarity with respect to law-making authority and the ownership, use and control of land and resources Percentage of objectives reached as identified in the negotiations action plans 80% by March 31, 2017
Planning Highlights

Through the Negotiations of Claims and Self-Government Agreements sub-program, INAC will align its actions with the expected result — Promote reconciliation while providing certainty and clarity with respect to law-making authority and the ownership, use and control of land and resources — by:

  • Enhancing tools to address section 35 rights, including the negotiation of land claims, self-government, special claims, and other related processes, including out-of-court settlements within the context of the Federal Reconciliation Framework which will be developed.
  • Increasing efficiencies and improving Canada's internal processes to expedite reaching land claims and self-government agreements.
  • Continuing to research, analyze and develop policies and guidelines, providing advice, and seeking feedback from stakeholders on issues related to Canada's negotiation of Indigenous self-government and comprehensive claims.
  • Addressing Canada's consultation and accommodation obligations with regard to overlapping claims.
  • Making measurable progress towards the conclusion of education jurisdiction and other sectoral agreements in self-government negotiations.
  • Working with the Province of British Columbia and the British Columbia First Nations Summit to improve and expedite modern treaty negotiations in the British Columbia treaty process.

Sub-Program 1.2.2: Specific Claims

Description: This sub-program provides support to address specific claims made by a First Nation against the federal government that relate to the administration of land and other First Nation assets, and to the fulfillment of Indian treaties. The Specific Claims sub-program is an alternative dispute resolution option in which First Nations may participate on a voluntary basis. Key activities include the assessment of the historical and legal facts of the claim; the negotiation of a settlement agreement if it has been determined that there is an outstanding lawful obligation; payment of monetary compensation to First Nations, pursuant to the terms of a settlement agreement or award of the Specific Claims Tribunal; and participation in proceedings before the Specific Claims Tribunal. The Government of Canada made the resolution of specific claims a priority when it announced the Specific Claims Action Plan in 2007, and reiterated its commitment to resolve claims in the 2010 Speech from the Throne. Following that, in the Federal Budget of 2013, funds were identified to continue to ensure that specific claims are addressed fairly and promptly. Resolving specific claims fairly and expeditiously addresses the legal rights of, and provides justice to First Nation claimants, discharges outstanding legal obligations of the Crown, and provides certainty for all Canadians.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars) Human Resources (FTEs)
2016–2017
Planned Spending
2017–2018
Planned Spending
2018–2019
Planned Spending
2016–2017 2017–2018 2018–2019
383,180,319 924,599,473 1,078,033,348 46 46 46
Performance Measurement
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Date to Be Achieved
Canada discharges outstanding legal obligations to First Nations fairly and promptly through negotiated settlement agreements or awards of the Specific Claims Tribunal Percentage of claims assessed within the legislated three-year time frame 100% of claims filed with the Minister are assessed within the legislated three-year time frame by March 31, 2017
Number of negotiated settlement agreements concluded 10 settlement agreements concluded by March 31, 2017
Percentage of awards of the Specific Claims Tribunal paid within 45 days of the award being made 100% of all awards of the Specific Claims Tribunal, unless otherwise agreed by the parties or directed by the Specific Claims Tribunal, are paid in full within 45 days of the award being made by March 31, 2017
Planning Highlights

Through the Specific Claims sub-program, INAC will align its action with the expected result — Canada discharges outstanding legal obligations to First Nations fairly and promptly through negotiated settlement agreements or awards of the Specific Claims Tribunal — by:

  • Reviewing claim submissions against the minimum standard, and where they meet the minimum standard, filing the claim with the Minister of Indigenous and Northern Affairs.
  • Assessing claims for outstanding lawful obligations, and where an obligation is found to exist, accepting claims for negotiation.
  • Settling claims that have been successfully negotiated by means of settlement agreements.
  • Paying compensation in accordance with settlement agreements or awards of the Specific Claims Tribunal.
  • Supporting the Department of Justice in proceedings of the Specific Claims Tribunal.

Sub-Program 1.2.3: Consultation and Accommodation

Description: This sub-program provides support to internal and external stakeholders to maintain collaboration with Indigenous groups and their representatives. It includes contributions to a representative organization for engagement on developing policy and programs, and advice on how to engage community members on the development of a community plan. In the context of the duty to consult, this support takes several forms, including: assistance to federal departments/agencies in fulfilling the Crown's duty to consult; engagement with Indigenous groups and representatives, provinces and territories, and industry with regard to that duty; and the negotiation and implementation of consultation protocols/agreements and related contributions (transfer payments).

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars) Human Resources (FTEs)
2016–2017
Planned Spending
2017–2018
Planned Spending
2018–2019
Planned Spending
2016–2017 2017–2018 2018–2019
43,520,569 42,133,174 40,507,109 42 42 42
Performance Measurement
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Date to Be Achieved
Assistance provided in fulfilling the Crown's legal duty to consult and, where appropriate, to accommodate when Crown conduct may adversely affect rights of Indigenous peoples Number of instances where support is provided to assist in fulfilling the Crown's duty to consult 15,000 instances where support was provided by March 31, 2017
Planning Highlights

Through the Consultation and Accommodation sub-program, INAC will align its actions with the expected result — assistance provided in fulfilling the Crown's legal duty to consult and, where appropriate, to accommodate, when Crown conduct may adversely affect rights of Indigenous peoples — by:

  • Supporting the enhancement of policy and operational guidance (guiding principles, guidelines, training).
  • Focusing the Crown's fulfillment of its consultation obligations and commitments on recognition, rights, respect, cooperation, and a renewed partnership by:
    • expanding the number of consultation protocols/arrangements with Indigenous groups and provinces/ territories and strengthening collaboration in consultation processes; and
    • contributing to the government's review of laws, policies and operational practices, to be undertaken in full partnership with First Nations, Inuit and the Métis, to ensure that the Crown is fully executing its consultation and accommodation obligations, in accordance with its constitutional and international human rights obligations, including rights of Indigenous peoples.
  • Making ongoing improvements to the functionality and content of the Aboriginal and Treaty Rights Information System, a web-based system that indicates the location of Indigenous communities and provides information pertaining to their potential or established rights of Indigenous peoples to help federal officials address their consultation obligations.

Sub-Program 1.2.4: Métis Relations and Rights Management, and Non-Status Indian Relations

Description: This sub-program aims to enhance the representativeness of Métis and Non-Status Indian organizations and their ability to build partnerships with federal and provincial governments and with the private sector. It also proactively supports the reconciliation of Métis rights.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars) Human Resources (FTEs)
2016–2017
Planned Spending
2017–2018
Planned Spending
2018–2019
Planned Spending
2016–2017 2017–2018 2018–2019
19,977,380 5,187,294 5,187,294 6 0 0
Performance Measurement
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Date to Be Achieved
Enhanced capacity of Métis and Non-Status Indian Aboriginal Representative Organizations to effectively represent their members Percentage of Métis and Non-Status Indian Aboriginal Representative Organizations scoring low risk on the Governance, Planning and Financial Management sections of the General Assessment 75% by March 31, 2017
Assertions of Métis rights effectively managed Percent of self-identified Métis in five western-most provinces (according to National Household Survey) that are in Métis registries 29%a by March 31, 2017
a Combining the expected decrease in overall rate of growth and potential increase in Métis Nation-Saskatchewan registrations, the sub-program currently projects that 29% of self-identified Métis in the five westernmost provinces will be registered in Métis registries in 2017.
Planning Highlights

Through the Métis Relations and Rights Management, and Non-Status Indian Relations sub-program, INAC will align its actions with the expected results — enhanced capacity of Métis and Non-Status Indian Aboriginal Representative Organizations to effectively represent their members, and assertions of Metis rights effectively managed — by:

  • Building and maintaining strong relationships and identifying and addressing areas of shared priorities to support enhanced capacity of Métis and Non-Status Indian Aboriginal Representative Organizations to effectively represent their members.
  • Supporting Métis Aboriginal Representative Organizations to maintain a reliable system for identifying members of potential Métis rights-bearing communities.

Program 1.3: Management and Implementation of Agreements and Treaties

Description: This Program aims to create and maintain ongoing partnerships to support fulfillment of Canada's legal obligations pursuant to both pre- and post-1975 treaties, while considering ongoing rights and interests of Indigenous peoples. This Program supports Indigenous communities in articulating their interests, participating in economic activities, and managing and developing land and resources, where applicable. It also helps to demonstrate the importance of treaties and related partnerships between the Crown and Indigenous peoples. This is achieved by honouring Canada's obligations as set out in final settlement agreements and treaties, and by improving collaboration between Canada and Indigenous peoples, and between Canada and pre- and post-1975 Treaty groups. Creating and maintaining relationships and partnerships that honour pre- and post-1975 treaties contributes to strengthened, healthy, self-reliant and sustainable Indigenous communities while promoting delivery of programs and services vital to the health and advancement of Indigenous peoples.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars) Human Resources (FTEs)
2016–2017
Main Estimates
2016–2017
Planned Spending
2017–2018
Planned Spending
2018–2019
Planned Spending
2016–2017 2017–2018 2018–2019
806,628,418 806,628,418 789,189,679 781,887,016 80 80 80
The year-over-year differences primarily reflect changes in the approved funding profiles for the implementation of various comprehensive claims and self-government agreements.
Performance Measurement
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Date to Be Achieved
Creation and maintenance of ongoing partnerships to support treaty structuresa Percentage of meetings (implementation committee or panel meetings) held with modern treaty partners, per the terms of the treaties, in order to maintain and support open and productive intergovernmental relationships and collaborate on implementation priorities 80%b by March 31, 2017
Percentage of completed initiatives supporting improved understanding of pre-1975 treaties: treaty awareness sessions; facilitated dialogue between private sector and First Nations; and, facilitated dialogue between treaty partners 80%c by March 31, 2017
a Examples of treaty structures include tri-partite implementation committees or panels where signatories collaborate on implementation.
b While the goal is always 100% completion of our legal obligations, this is not always possible. For example, a meeting may be canceled by another party to the treaty which results in an obligation not being met.
c Number of treaty related activities and initiatives committed to in the work plans vary according to the interests and capacity of the partners, and are reviewed on an annual basis.
Planning Highlights

Through the Management and Implementation of Agreements and Treaties Program, INAC will continue to support good governance and the rights and interests of Indigenous peoples by:

  • Creating and maintaining ongoing partnerships to support relationships and structures by, for example, leading federal government representation on implementation committees and collaborating with all signatories to fulfill Canada's obligations and make progress on mutual goals.
  • Continuing the coordination and administration of financial arrangements and implementation plans with respect to comprehensive land-claim agreements and self-government agreements through the administration of Fiscal Financing Agreements and transfer of expenditures to Indigenous peoples.
  • As part of the Whole-of-Government approach to improving the implementation of modern treaties, developing tools to support government departments/agencies in meeting Canada's legal obligations regarding Comprehensive Land Claims and Self-Government Agreements, including reporting on contracting and procurement and annual reports.
  • Working with government departments and agencies to assess and ensure the accuracy of the data to increase use of the Treaty Obligation Monitoring System, a tool used to monitor Canada’s obligations concerning comprehensive land claims and self-government agreements.
  • Facilitating reconciliation by strengthening and affirming the importance of the relationship stemming from pre-1975 treaties through dialogue, engagement and improved understanding.

Strategic Outcome: The People

Individual, family and community well-being for First Nations and Inuit

Program 2.1: Education

Description: This Program's overarching goal is to work in partnership with First Nations, provincial and territorial governments and other education stakeholders, to provide eligible First Nation and Inuit students with support in order to achieve educational outcomes that are comparable to those of other Canadians. The Education Program provides funding for culturally-appropriate elementary and secondary education for eligible First Nation students ordinarily resident on reserve, and financially supports post-secondary education for eligible First Nation and Inuit students.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars) Human Resources (FTEs)
2016–2017
Main Estimates
2016–2017
Planned Spending
2017–2018
Planned Spending
2018–2019
Planned Spending
2016–2017 2017–2018 2018–2019
1,855,472,918 1,855,472,918 1,889,866,503 1,914,365,584 279 279 279
The year-over-year differences primarily reflect ongoing increased demand for education programs, as well as the sunset in 2017–2018 of funding to Indspire to provide post-secondary scholarships and bursaries for First Nations and Inuit students.
Performance Measurement
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Date to Be Achieved
First Nation and Inuit students are enabled, through funding, to progress in their education Percentage of funded First Nation students ordinarily resident on reserve who graduate from high school Incremental increase year after year Ongoing
Number of funded First Nation and Inuit Post-Secondary Student Support Program students who graduate with a post- secondary degree/diploma/certificate Incremental increase year after year Reporting against 2012–2013 baseline data beginning in 2015–2016
Percentage of First Nation and Inuit population with post-secondary degree/certificate Incremental increase over five years relative to the 2011 National Household Surveya Ongoing
a Baseline, i.e. Registered Indians 20–54 years 39.0% (19.4% for 20–24 years, 43.3% for 25–54 years). Inuit 20–54 years 31.5% (15.1% for 20–24 years, 35.7% for 25–54 years).
Planning Highlights

Through the Education Program, INAC will continue to support individual, family and community well-being for First Nations and Inuit by:

  • Investing in First Nation elementary and secondary education to ensure that First Nation children on reserve receive quality education.
  • Investing in post-secondary education programs to help increase the number of Indigenous students accessing post-secondary education.
  • Working with partners in renewing the First Nations and Inuit Youth Employment Strategy, helping young people acquire essential employment skills and learn about various career options.
  • Working with partners seeking to strengthen education systems for First Nations on reserve, ultimately leading to improved education outcomes for First Nation students.

Sub-Program 2.1.1: Elementary and Secondary Education

Description: This sub-program supports First Nation decision making by providing funding to eligible on-reserve students with elementary and secondary education services that are comparable to those required in provincial schools. The sub-program provides funding to First Nations, or organizations designated by First Nations, to pay salaries for on-reserve school teachers and other instructional services, reimburse tuition for on-reserve students who attend provincial schools, provide student support services (e.g. transportation), and enhance education services (e.g. curriculum and language development, teacher recruitment and retention, community and parent engagement in education, and Information Communication Technology capacity). Funding also targets a series of specific initiatives that: support students with identified, high-cost special education needs; improve student achievement levels in reading, writing and mathematics; develop school success plans; implement school performance measurement systems to assess, report on, and accelerate student progress; and encourage students to remain in school and graduate. Additionally, this sub-program invests in tripartite partnerships — amongst First Nations, provincial governments and the Government of Canada — to help First Nation students who move between on-reserve and provincial schools to succeed. This sub-program also includes a number of initiatives that support culturally appropriate education activities, including cultural education centres. It also provides support to First Nation and Inuit youth in their efforts to transition from secondary school to either post-secondary education or the labour market.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars) Human Resources (FTEs)
2016–2017
Planned Spending
2017–2018
Planned Spending
2018–2019
Planned Spending
2016–2017 2017–2018 2018–2019
1,497,154,017 1,524,679,245 1,549,472,826 262 262 262
Performance Measurement
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Date to Be Achieved
First Nation students progress in their elementary and secondary education The percentage of tested students on reserve who meet or exceed standard assessmenta for literacy and numeracy in the province of reference (at the testing interval adopted by that province, referenced by gender and province) Incremental increase year after year Reporting against 2013–2014 baseline beginning in 2015–2016
a Standardized assessment attainment and increases in attainment rates over time are proxy indicators for likelihood of overall progression in studies.
Note: Reporting on data for this indicator is only required for First Nation Student Success Program recipients.
Planning Highlights

Through the Elementary and Secondary Education sub-program, INAC will align its action with the expected result — First Nation students progress in their elementary and secondary education — by:

  • Supporting the establishment of a new fiscal relationship with First Nations that provides sufficient, predictable and sustained funding for on-reserve education.
  • Working with First Nations and other partners to establish new and innovative models, such as First Nation Education Authorities, tripartite partnership agreements, and self-government agreements.
  • Strengthening First Nation education systems and capacity to improve education outcomes through the Strong Schools, Successful Students Initiative.
  • Investing in the First Nations and Inuit Skills Link Program, under the First Nations and Inuit Youth Employment Youth Strategy, to reach more young people.

Sub-Program 2.1.2: Post-Secondary Education

Description: This sub-program helps eligible First Nation and Inuit students access and succeed in post-secondary education. The sub-program provides funding to First Nations, tribal councils or regional First Nation and Inuit organizations to assist eligible students to pay for tuition fees, books, travel, and living expenses (when applicable). Financial support also targets a series of specific initiatives to: enable eligible First Nation and Inuit students to attain the academic level required for entrance to degree and diploma credit programs through entrance preparation programs offered by Canadian post-secondary institutions; and assist post-secondary education institutions to design and deliver university- and college-level courses that are tailored to the needs of First Nation and Inuit students. This sub-program also provides funding to Indspire — a national, registered non-profit organization — to provide post-secondary scholarships, including matching funds raised by Indspire from non-federal sources, and to deliver programs, such as career conferences, for secondary students in order to help First Nation and Inuit students pursue academic or career opportunities.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars) Human Resources (FTEs)
2016–2017
Planned Spending
2017–2018
Planned Spending
2018–2019
Planned Spending
2016–2017 2017–2018 2018–2019
358,318,901 365,187,258 364,892,758 17 17 17
Performance Measurement
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Date to Be Achieved
First Nation and Inuit post-secondary students who receive funding through the Post-Secondary Student Support Program progress in their program of study Percentage of Post-Secondary Student Support Program (PSSSP) funded students who completed their academic year and were funded the next academic yeara Incremental increase year after year Reporting against 2012–2013 baseline data beginning in 2015–2016
Percentage of First Nation and Inuit students, funded through PSSSP, who continue in the program beyond the first year of their program of studyb
a This indicator represents movement of all funded students from any academic year to the next.
b This indicator represents movement of funded students from the first to second years of study only. Also, a proxy indicator for retention of students at a critical point of their education.
Planning Highlights

Through the Post-Secondary Education sub-program, INAC will align its actions with the expected result — First Nation and Inuit post-secondary students who receive funding through the Post-Secondary Student Support Program progress in their program of study — by continuing to:

  • Invest in the Post-Secondary Student Support Program and the University and College Entrance Preparation Program to provide financial support to First Nation and eligible Inuit students to make post-secondary education more accessible and enhance their likelihood of success.
  • Engage and support post-secondary institutions in the identification and implementation of initiatives that respond to the education needs of Indigenous students.

Program 2.2: Social Development

Description: This Program provides funding to five social sub-programs: Income Assistance, National Child Benefit, Assisted Living, First Nations Child and Family Services, and Family Violence Prevention. Together, these sub-programs assist First Nation individuals and communities in becoming more self-sufficient, protect individuals and families at risk of violence, provide prevention supports that allow individuals and families to better care for their children, and support greater participation in the labour market. The Program assists First Nation men, women and children to achieve greater independence and self-sufficiency in First Nation communities across Canada by providing funding for First Nations, First Nation organizations, provinces and others that provide individual and family services to on-reserve residents (and Yukon First Nation residents). These services help First Nation communities meet basic and special needs, support employability and participation in the workforce, and support the safety of individuals and families. Through these five social sub-programs, First Nations are better able to advance their own development, leverage opportunities and actively contribute to the broader Canadian economy and society.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars) Human Resources (FTEs)
2016–2017
Main Estimates
2016–2017
Planned Spending
2017–2018
Planned Spending
2018–2019
Planned Spending
2016–2017 2017–2018 2018–2019
1,764,360,798 1,764,360,798 1,772,628,163 1,825,483,482 147 147 147
The year-over year differences primarily reflect ongoing increased demand for social development programs, as well as the sunset in 2016–2017 of funding for improvements in the incentives in the on-reserve Income Assistance Program to encourage those who can work to access training so they are better equipped for employment.
Performance Measurement
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Date to Be Achieved
Communities and organizations have the capacity to deliver the social development programs provided to meet the basic, special and self-sufficiency needs of First Nations men, women and children Percentage of communities and organizations using community-leda approaches to program delivery Increasing year over year by March 31, 2017
a Community led approaches are defined as approaches that give control of the priority development process directly to the communities as per program Terms and Conditions.
Planning Highlights

Through the Social Development Program, INAC will continue to support individual, family and community well-being for First Nations and Inuit by:

  • Funding First Nation communities to provide shelters, coordinate violence prevention efforts with other government departments and organizations, and promote greater prevention initiatives in accordance with the Action Plan to Address Family Violence and Violent Crimes Against Indigenous Women and Girls.
  • Supporting innovative, community-driven approaches for program delivery, including:
    • Pilot projects to reduce the reporting burden;
    • Initiatives to streamline services across departments to reduce duplication of programs and services;
    • Risk-based funding approaches to provide greater flexibility with program expenditures; and
    • Promotion of data-sharing agreements with key stakeholders.
  • Promoting greater accountability among provinces and First Nation organizations in their delivery of Child and Family Services through strengthened tripartite engagement and collaboration.

Sub-Program 2.2.1: Income Assistance

Description: This sub-program provides funding to First Nations, First Nation organizations and the province of Ontario (under the 1965 agreement) to assist eligible individuals and families living on reserve who are in financial need, through the provision of basic and special needs that are in alignment with the rates and eligibility criteria of reference for provinces or territories. The sub-program also provides funding for service delivery and pre-employment services designed to help clients transition to, and remain in, the workforce. INAC also contributes to the funding of day care services for First Nation families in Ontario and Alberta.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars) Human Resources (FTEs)
2016–2017
Planned Spending
2017–2018
Planned Spending
2018–2019
Planned Spending
2016–2017 2017–2018 2018–2019
912,105,316 907,485,700 946,784,247 73 73 73
Performance Measurement
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Date to Be Achieved
Eligible men and women in need use income assistance supports and services to help them meet their basic needsa and transition to the workforce Percentage of Income Assistance clients and dependants, aged 16–64, who exit to employment or education Increasing year over year
Historical Results:
2013–2014: 6.1%
by March 31, 2017
Percentage of Income Assistance clients and dependents, aged 16–64, who participate in Active Measuresb Increasing year over year
Historical Results:
2011–2012: 5%
2012–2013: 9%
2013–2014: 5%
by March 31, 2017
Income Assistance Dependency Rate Aligned to off-reserve dependency rate
Historical Results:
2007–2008: 36.2%
2008–2009: 36.5%
2009–2010: 36.2%
2010–2011: 34.4%
2011–2012: 34.2%
2012–2013: 33.6%
by March 31, 2017
a Basic needs are defined as supports provided to eligible clients and dependents in order to meet the basic needs for the following general categories of support: food; clothing; shelter costs including, rent, fuel/utilities, and other shelter-related costs; and other related costs.
b Active measures is an approach to the delivery of social assistance. It is opposed to "passive measures", which is limited to the provision of a benefit. "Active measures" approach relies on two key components: 1) active case-management, which is a collaborative, client driven process for the provision of support services through the effective and efficient use of resources. Case Management supports the client's achievement of safe, realistic and reasonable goals within a complex health, social, and fiscal environment; 2) client's access to services and programs aims reducing obstacles to employment and increasing employability through basic skills training, formal education, skills training, and career counseling.
Planning Highlights

Through the Income Assistance sub-program, INAC will align its action with the expected result — eligible men and women in need use income assistance supports and services to help them meet their basic needs and transition to the workforce — by:

  • Continuing to invest in Enhanced Service Delivery to help ensure that income assistance clients participate in job training through the First Nations Job Fund (funded by Employment and Social Development Canada) or other job training programs.
  • Working to ensure that the on-reserve Income Assistance program is delivered effectively.

Sub-Program 2.2.2: National Child Benefit

Description: This sub-program is a joint federal/provincial/territorial child poverty reduction initiative led by Employment and Social Development Canada. The sub-program has two components: a financial benefits component (the federal Canada Child Tax Benefit and National Child Benefit Supplement, and provincial/territorial integrated child benefits) and a reinvestment component (the National Child Benefit Reinvestment). Under the financial benefits component, the Department provides funding to the Yukon Territorial Government for the cost of the Yukon Child Benefit paid to First Nation families. Under the reinvestment component, INAC provides funding for community-based supports and services for children in low-income families for child care, child nutrition, support for parents, home-to-work transition and cultural enrichment.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars) Human Resources (FTEs)
2016–2017
Planned Spending
2017–2018
Planned Spending
2018–2019
Planned Spending
2016–2017 2017–2018 2018–2019
53,091,312 53,091,312 53,091,312 6 6 6
Performance Measurement
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Date to Be Achieved
In eligible regions, children in low income families have access to National Child Benefit/National Child Benefit Reinvestment benefits and supports Percentage of communities in which National Child Benefit Reinvestment projects are provided 100% by March 31, 2017
Planning Highlights

Through the National Child Benefit sub-program, INAC will align its action with the expected result — in eligible regions, low income families have access to National Child Benefit/National Child Benefit Reinvestment benefits and supports — by:

  • Ensuring that on-reserve funding in each region aligns with the level of support provided by provinces and territories for children in low-income families off reserve.
  • Working collaboratively with other federal departments (e.g.: Employment and Social Development Canada, Canada Revenue Agency), provinces and territories to ensure that benefits are available to eligible families.

Sub-Program 2.2.3: Assisted Living

Description: This sub-program provides funding for non-medical, social support services so that seniors, adults with chronic illness, and children and adults with disabilities (both mental and physical) can maintain functional independence. There are three major components to the sub-program: in-home care; adult foster care; and institutional care (institutional care is provided for eligible individuals in need of personal, non-medical care on a 24-hour basis). These services are available to individuals living on reserve or ordinarily resident on reserve who have been formally assessed by a health care professional (in a manner consistent with provincial or territorial legislation and standards), and identified as requiring services but without the means to obtain such services themselves.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars) Human Resources (FTEs)
2016–2017
Planned Spending
2017–2018
Planned Spending
2018–2019
Planned Spending
2016–2017 2017–2018 2018–2019
86,901,771 88,874,809 91,119,358 16 16 16
Performance Measurement
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Date to Be Achieved
In-home, group-home and institutional care supports are accessible to low-income individuals in need Percentage of clients whose assessed social support needs are met 100% by March 31, 2017
Planning Highlights

Through the Assisted Living sub-program, INAC will align its actions to meet the expected result — in-home and institutional care supports are accessible to low-income individuals in need — by:

  • Working with Health Canada and other partners to strengthen alignment of social and health programming on reserve to simplify and improve access for eligible individuals.
  • Continuing to assess opportunities to align institutional care funding provided in support of eligible individuals with funding rates provided in an institutionalized setting in their reference province or territory.

Sub-Program 2.2.4: First Nations Child and Family Services

Description: This sub-program provides funding for child and family services supporting the safety and well-being of First Nation children and families who are ordinarily resident on reserve. Culturally appropriate prevention and protection services are delivered by service providers in accordance with provincial or territorial legislation and standards. This sub-program supports: developmental funding for new organizations; maintenance funding for costs associated with maintaining a child in care; operations funding for staffing and administrative costs of an agency; and prevention funding. In 2007, following provincial lead, the First Nations Child and Family Services sub-program started introducing changes focussing on prevention. The goal of the prevention approach is to improve services, family cohesion and life outcomes for First Nation children and families on reserve.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars) Human Resources (FTEs)
2016–2017
Planned Spending
2017–2018
Planned Spending
2018–2019
Planned Spending
2016–2017 2017–2018 2018–2019
679,011,897 689,925,840 701,238,063 40 40 40
Performance Measurement
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Date to Be Achieved
First Nation children in need or at risk have access to and use protection and prevention supports and services Percentage of children not re-entering the child welfare system following a prior placement within the fiscal year (recurrence) Increasing year over year by March 31, 2017
Percentage of children in care who are placed with a family member (kinship care) Increasing year over year
Historical Results:
2008: 8.5%
2009: 10.1%
2010: 10.6%
2011: 11.9%
2012: 16.1%
2013: 18.23%
by March 31, 2017
Planning Highlights

Through the First Nations Child and Family Services sub-program, INAC will align its actions with the expected result — First Nation children in need or at risk have access to and use protection and prevention supports and services — by:

  • Continuing to implement and monitor culturally appropriate and prevention-based programming through improved program management tools, such as First Nation Agency business plan and final report templates, and effective program compliance activities.
  • Working in partnership with First Nations, provinces and Yukon Territory and other federal government departments (Health Canada, Public Health Agency of Canada, Employment and Social Development Canada, etc.) to improve the First Nations Child and Family Services Program, with a focus on strengthening the accountability of all partners for child welfare by clarifying roles and responsibilities, increasing information sharing, and implementing early intervention activities.
  • Working with Provinces and First Nations to improve the delivery of Child and Family Services through the strengthening of tripartite engagement and collaboration.

Sub-Program 2.2.5: Family Violence Prevention

Description: This sub-program provides funding for family violence protection and prevention services that are responsive to community needs for which there are two components. The first component supports women, children and families living on reserve with family violence shelter services by providing funding to core shelter operations. The second component is to support family violence prevention activities by providing funding to Indigenous communities and organizations. The Family Violence Prevention sub-program also works to address issues related to Indigenous women and girls.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars) Human Resources (FTEs)
2016–2017
Planned Spending
2017–2018
Planned Spending
2018–2019
Planned Spending
2016–2017 2017–2018 2018–2019
33,250,502 33,250,502 33,250,502 12 12 12
Performance Measurement
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Date to Be Achieved
Men, women or children in need or at risk have access to and use prevention and protection services Number of women and children accessing INAC-funded shelters N/Aa N/A
Percentage of projects directed to community priorities/needs 95% by March 31, 2017
a Please note that setting target for this indicator is not appropriate as it represents the ability to meet the needs of First Nations women and children for access to shelters.
Planning Highlights

Through the Family Violence Prevention sub-program, INAC will align its actions to meet the expected result — men, women or children in need or at risk have access to and use prevention and protection services — by:

  • Working with federal departments, organizations and provinces and territories to improve program coordination and enhance the capacity of shelters to offer services to those in need.
  • Improving program management through the introduction of tools and resources to facilitate the selection and implementation of family violence prevention projects and improve the planning and reporting of shelter activities.
  • Supporting the Inquiry into Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls to seek recommendations on concrete actions that governments, law enforcement, and others can take to solve these crimes and prevent future ones.

Program 2.3: First Nations Individual Affairs

Description: This Program contributes to ensuring federal stewardship of the legislative and administrative responsibilities of the federal government pertaining to registration, membership, status cards and estates. Results are achieved through direct client services and partnerships with First Nations to determine eligibility for registration under the Indian Act, issuing proof of registration documents such as the Secure Certificate of Indian Status, and administering estates under the Indian Act. Through client-centric service delivery, the sound administration of individual affairs contributes to the well-being of First Nation individuals, families and communities.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars) Human Resources (FTEs)
2016–2017
Main Estimates
2016–2017
Planned Spending
2017–2018
Planned Spending
2018–2019
Planned Spending
2016–2017 2017–2018 2018–2019
28,911,620 28,911,620 28,914,831 28,915,613 254 254 254
Performance Measurement
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Date to Be Achieved
Eligible, voluntary applicants are registered as Status Indians Percentage of complete registration applications for which a decision was rendered 80% by March 31, 2017
Registered Indians are enabled to demonstrate eligibility for programs, services and benefits to which they are entitled Percentage of Registered Indians with an active Secure Certificate of Indian Status 80% by March 31, 2020
Planning Highlights

Through the First Nations Individual Affairs Program, INAC will continue to support individual, family and community well-being for First Nations by:

  • Continuing to modernize the Indian registration process, including implementing the next phases of the integration of registration and Secure Certificate of Indian Status issuance, which began April 1, 2014.
  • Continuing information management and information technology modernization to support First Nation individual services of registration, Secure Certificate of Indian Status issuance, treaty payments and the management of estates.

Sub-Program 2.3.1: Registration and Membership

Description: This sub-program supports INAC, under the Indian Act, to maintain the Indian Register, determine entitlement to Indian registration, maintain departmentally controlled Band lists and provide advice on matters such as Band divisions and amalgamations. Through client services and partnerships with First Nations, the sub-program seeks to register eligible applicants pursuant to sections 5 to 7 of the Indian Act, and also issue proof of registration documents, such as the Secure Certificate of Indian Status, which identify those eligible to receive programs and services available to registered Indians. A current and accurate Indian Register and issuance of the Secure Certificate of Indian Status are fundamental to the effective and accountable delivery of federal programs and services for eligible users.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars) Human Resources (FTEs)
2016–2017
Planned Spending
2017–2018
Planned Spending
2018–2019
Planned Spending
2016–2017 2017–2018 2018–2019
24,878,196 24,881,407 24,882,189 214 214 214
Performance Measurement
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Date to Be Achieved
Applicants receive a decision on entitlement under the Indian Act within established service standards Percentage of registration applications for which a decision is rendered within service standards. (Current service standards being reviewed in 2015–2016) 80% by March 31, 2017
Eligible applicants receive Secure Certificate of Indian Status within service standards Percentage of eligible applicants issued a Secure Certificate of Indian Status within service standard. Current standard: 16 weeks from date that a completed application is received by the Department 90% by March 31, 2017
Planning Highlights

Through the Registration and Membership sub-program, INAC will align its actions with the expected results — applicants receive a decision on entitlement under the Indian Act within established service standards; and eligible applicants receive Secure Certificate of Indian Status within service standards — by:

  • Continuing efforts to ensure that applications for the Secure Certificate of Indian Status and new applications from individuals seeking to be registered as Status Indians under the Indian Act are processed within established service standards.
  • Increasing awareness among the general population of documentary requirements necessary to process a registration and/or Secure Certificate of Indian Status application so that requests can be addressed without unnecessary delay.
  • Continuing to determine applicants' eligibility for founding membership in accordance with the 2008 Agreement for the Recognition of the Qalipu Mi'kmaq Band between the Government of Canada and the Federation of Newfoundland Indians, as well as the 2013 Supplemental Agreement.
  • Developing the Department's response to recent court decisions, which impact upon the existing registration entitlement provisions of the Indian Act.

Sub-Program 2.3.2: Estates

Description: This sub-program ensures that the federal government's responsibilities (pursuant to sections 42 to 52 of the Indian Act) are met by developing policies and procedures, and providing guidance, information and support for the management and administration of Indian estates. The Indian Act provides the Minister of Indigenous and Northern Affairs Canada with exclusive jurisdiction over the administration of estates for First Nations individuals who were ordinarily resident on reserve at the time of their death (decedent estates), or for those declared by the appropriate provincial/territorial authority to be incapable of managing their financial affairs (living estates of dependent adults). The Indian Act also provides the Minister with discretionary jurisdiction to appoint guardians to administer the property of minors. INAC's role includes approving a will or declaring a will to be void in whole or in part and providing for the administration of both decedent and living estates through the appointment of executors, administrators or guardians. INAC may also act as the administrator or guardian of an estate when there is no one else eligible or willing to do so.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars) Human Resources (FTEs)
2016–2017
Planned Spending
2017–2018
Planned Spending
2018–2019
Planned Spending
2016–2017 2017–2018 2018–2019
4,033,424 4,033,424 4,033,424 40 40 40
Performance Measurement
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Date to Be Achieved
Canada fulfills its Indian Act obligations, in section 43 (a), to appoint executors and administrators of wills and estates within established service standards Percentage of estate files opened for which executors and administrators are appointed within 120 calendar days 90% by March 31, 2017
Planning Highlights

Through the Estates sub-program, INAC will align its actions with the expected result — Canada fulfills its Indian Act obligations in section 43 (a) to appoint executors and administrators of wills and estates within established service standards — by:

  • Enhancing awareness of estates management among First Nation individuals and communities.
  • Strengthening communications and tools to ensure First Nations are able to plan and administer estates.
  • Reviewing policies and processes of the Dependent Adult Estates and Decedent Estates programs to make changes, as required, to ensure the timely administration of estates.

Program 2.4: Residential Schools Resolution

Description: This Program supports a fair and lasting resolution to the legacy of Indian Residential Schools through implementation of the Indian Residential Schools Settlement Agreement (IRSSA) — a multi-party negotiated settlement monitored by the courts. The Program supports resolution of claims of abuse under the Independent Assessment Process (IAP) and promotes reconciliation with former students, their families and communities, and other Canadians. In addition to its legal obligations under IRSSA, INAC promotes reconciliation between the Government of Canada and Indigenous peoples, as well as between Indigenous and non-Indigenous peoples.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars) Human Resources (FTEs)
2016–2017
Main Estimates
2016–2017
Planned Spending
2017–2018
Planned Spending
2018–2019
Planned Spending
2016–2017 2017–2018 2018–2019
165,991,965 165,991,965 41,311,703 0 40 0 0
The year-over-year differences primarily reflect reduced requirements for the continued implementation of the Indian Residential Schools Settlement Agreement.
Performance Measurement
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Date to Be Achieved
Canada fulfills its obligations as outlined in the Indian Residential Schools Settlement Agreement The Courts deem that Canada has satisfactorily completed its obligations under the Indian Residential Schools Settlement Agreement Release from the Courts confirming that Canada has met its obligations under the Indian Residential Schools Settlement Agreement by March 31, 2020
Planning Highlights

Through the Residential Schools Resolution Program, INAC will continue to lead the implementation of the Indian Residential Schools Settlement Agreement by:

  • Continuing to participate in the remaining Independent Assessment Process claims in a timely manner, including attending hearings and processing payments for over 2,200 decisions on behalf of the Government of Canada.
  • Continuing to provide corporate and administrative services to support the Indian Residential Schools Adjudication Secretariat's mandate to deliver the Independent Assessment Process.
  • The Indian Residential Schools Adjudication Secretariat will continue to promote healing and reconciliation among former students, their families, and their communities by continuing to foster positive relationships with organizations through the Group Independent Assessment Process contribution program.

Sub-Program 2.4.1: Independent Assessment Process

Description: This sub-program supports one of the compensation elements established under the Indian Residential Schools Settlement Agreement — the Independent Assessment Process (IAP) — which is a non-adversarial, out-of-court process for claims of sexual abuse, serious physical abuse, and other wrongful acts causing serious psychological consequences to the claimant. The IAP aims to bring a fair and lasting resolution to harm caused by residential schools through a claimant-centered and neutral process. Updates on the IAP are posted quarterly on the Department's website.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars) Human Resources (FTEs)
2016–2017
Planned Spending
2017–2018
Planned Spending
2018–2019
Planned Spending
2016–2017 2017–2018 2018–2019
165,991,965 41,311,703 0 40 0 0
Performance Measurement
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Date to Be Achieved
Canada's obligations for the Independent Assessment Process, as per the terms of the Settlement Agreement, are fulfilled Percentage of payments processed within service standards (20 calendar days after appeal period, 85% of the time) 85% by March 31, 2017
Planning Highlights

Through the Independent Assessment Process sub-program, INAC will align its actions with the expected result — Canada's obligations for the Independent Assessment Process, as per the terms of the Settlement Agreement, are fulfilled — by continuing to:

  • Fulfill Canada's obligations to resolving Independent Assessment Process claims by case managing claims efficiently, attending all scheduled hearings, and conducting post-hearing activities.
  • Support the Indian Residential Schools Adjudication Secretariat in processing and resolving all Independent Assessment Process claims in a fair and consistent manner by:
    • Releasing decisions in a timely manner; and
    • Implementing the targeted initiatives to resolve specific claim types, such as the Incomplete File Resolution Process and Lost Contact Protocol.
  • Work with Health Canada to ensure that health supports, such as counseling services and a crisis line, are in place.

Sub-Program 2.4.2: Reconciliation

Description: This sub-program provides ongoing support for the implementation of the Indian Residential Schools Settlement Agreement (IRSSA) and promotes reconciliation between Canada and former Indian Residential School students, their families and communities, as well as between Indigenous peoples and other Canadians. Reconciliation supports the implementation of IRSSA by working with the churches that ran the schools to ensure they fulfill their obligations under IRSSA, and by working with Health Canada as it provides health supports under IRSSA. The sub-program promotes reconciliation with an emphasis on leading the implementation of a departmental reconciliation framework and the analysis of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission's final report.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars) Human Resources (FTEs)
2016–2017
Planned Spending
2017–2018
Planned Spending
2018–2019
Planned Spending
2016–2017 2017–2018 2018–2019
0 0 0 0 0 0
Performance Measurement
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Date to Be Achieved
N/A N/A N/A N/A
Planning Highlights

This sub-program included reconciliation activities directly related to the history and legacy of Indian residential schools in the context of the Indian Residential Schools Settlement Agreement. It included gestures of reconciliation and educational initiatives that were developed in conjunction with partner organizations and were tied to specific occasions, such as the Truth and Reconciliation Commission events.

In light of the conclusion of the mandate of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission in 2015–2016 and the conclusion of commemoration activities under the Indian Residential Schools Settlement Agreement, there are no additional activities to be reported under this sub-program. However, reconciliation and renewing the relationship between Canada and Indigenous peoples remains a key cross-cutting priority for the Department and the Government. Department initiatives to that effect will be addressed through the Department's priority: Moving Forward with Rights and Reconciliation.

Strategic Outcome: The Land and Economy

Full participation of First Nations, Métis, Non-Status Indians and Inuit individuals and communities in the economy

Program 3.1: Indigenous Entrepreneurship

Description: This Program supports and strengthens the long-term viability of Indigenous entrepreneurial business, greater participation in the economy, and improved economic prosperity for Indigenous peoples. This Program — guided by the Federal Framework for Aboriginal Economic Development — helps create and grow viable Indigenous businesses through increasing access to capital, capacity, networks, business development services and business opportunities.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars) Human Resources (FTEs)
2016–2017
Main Estimates
2016–2017
Planned Spending
2017–2018
Planned Spending
2018–2019
Planned Spending
2016–2017 2017–2018 2018–2019
42,636,070 42,636,070 42,636,070 42,636,070 35 35 35
Performance Measurement
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Date to Be Achieved
Viable Indigenous businesses are created and/or expanded Percentage increase of Indigenous businesses created and/or expanded through the support of Aboriginal Financial Institutions 2% average year-to-year increase over 5 years (from 2012 to 2016) by March 31, 2017 (data will be available in 2018–2019 fiscal year report)a
a Result is based on data received from Aboriginal Financial Institutions and reported in the fall of following fiscal year. As a result, there is a one-year lag on reposting results.
Planning Highlights

Through the Indigenous Entrepreneurship Program, INAC will support the full participation of First Nations, Métis, Non-Status Indians and Inuit individuals and communities in the economy by:

  • Supporting, through funding and capacity building, the Aboriginal Financial Institutions, a nationwide network of diverse Indigenous financial and business development organizations that provide developmental lending and other related financial services to enhance access to capital in a manner that is more reflective of business/community needs.

Sub-Program 3.1.1: Business Capital and Support Services

Description: This sub-program provides funding and support to a national network of Aboriginal Financial Institutions (AFI), Indigenous organizations and non-Indigenous organizations to enhance access to capital for Indigenous entrepreneurs. This sub-program also supports ongoing capacity to create and maintain a sustainable network of AFI to deliver business development services and provide non-repayable and repayable financing to Indigenous entrepreneurs and communities.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars) Human Resources (FTEs)
2016–2017
Planned Spending
2017–2018
Planned Spending
2018–2019
Planned Spending
2016–2017 2017–2018 2018–2019
39,371,145 39,371,145 39,371,145 18 18 18
Performance Measurement
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Date to Be Achieved
The network of Aboriginal Financial Institutions is sustained Percentage increase in the value of the Aboriginal Financial Institutions network's gross loan portfolioa 1% increase from 2015–2016 (Baseline 2013–2014: $310,849,445) by March 31, 2017 (The reporting on the data will be in 2018 due to current data collection regime)
Percentage of AFI-supported Indigenous businesses actively repaying developmental loans 80% by March 31, 2017
a Gross Loan Portfolio based on data received from Aboriginal Financial Institutions and reported in fall of following fiscal year. As a result, there is a one-year lag on reporting results. Gross Loan Portfolio for 2013–2014 was $310,849,445.
Planning Highlights

Through the Business Capital and Support Services sub-program, INAC will align its actions with the expected result — the network of Aboriginal Financial Institutions is sustained — by:

  • Providing support to the National Aboriginal Capital Corporations Association (NACCA) and the Aboriginal Financial Institutions for the successful delivery and transition of program delivery responsibilities to NACCA in adherence with funding agreements. This will be further enhanced by an improved performance reporting framework to facilitate management of the entire suite of programs, including the Aboriginal Business Financing Program, Aboriginal Developmental Loan Allocation (also known as NACCA: Aboriginal Developmental Lending Assistance), the Enhanced Access loan fund, the Interest Rate Buy-Down, and the Aboriginal Capacity Development Program.
  • Designing new financial instruments/practices that will foster and enhance greater capitalization to support the sustainability of the AFI network.
  • Developing innovative policy initiatives with Indigenous and non-Indigenous institutions and organizations that will create the conditions to enhance and diversify AFI business lines.

Sub-Program 3.1.2: Business Opportunities

Description: This sub-program facilitates access by Indigenous businesses to public- and private-sector business opportunities, including federal procurement contracts, using instruments like the Procurement Strategy for Aboriginal Businesses, various partnership and participation approaches; capacity and network building; and assistance in establishing business strategies.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars) Human Resources (FTEs)
2016–2017
Planned Spending
2017–2018
Planned Spending
2018–2019
Planned Spending
2016–2017 2017–2018 2018–2019
3,264,925 3,264,925 3,264,925 17 17 17
Performance Measurement
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Date to Be Achieved
Indigenous businesses win procurement contracts Percentage increase of federal procurement contracts value set aside for Indigenous businesses 5%a increase from 2012 result of $108 million by March 31, 2017 (The reporting on the data will be in 2019 due to current data collection regime)
a The data is collected by Public Services and Procurement Canada on an annual base with a two year lag in publication of results. The most current data available as of July 2015 is that of 2012 with $108 million federal set aside for Indigenous businesses.
Planning Highlights

Through the Business Opportunities sub-program, INAC will align its actions with the expected result — Indigenous businesses win procurement contracts — by:

  • Influencing the availability of federal procurement opportunities for Indigenous businesses through communications such as:
    • The Procurement Strategy for Aboriginal Business (PSAB) factsheet, interpretation bulletins, coordinator network and educational/instructional videos on the PSAB and the Aboriginal Business Directory (ABD);
    • Outreach and training (provide approximately 40 training sessions throughout the fiscal year to federal procurement officers, Indigenous and private sector businesses); and
    • Negotiations with federal departments (notably members of the Procurement Review Committee and the Senior Procurement Advisory Committee).
  • Modifying the ABD, in collaboration with Innovation, Science and Economic Development Canada, to simplify the registration process and increase the visibility of Indigenous businesses.Footnote 2
  • Implementing an economic impact analysis to track trends in Indigenous procurement and provide guidance to federal departments that have established Indigenous business set-aside targets.
  • Continuing to work with Shared Services Canada to assist in PSAB objective setting and reduce the impact of the consolidation of information technology and information management services on small and medium-sized Indigenous businesses.

Program 3.2: Community Economic Development

Description: This Program promotes conditions that will help improve community economic development and prosperity for Indigenous peoples. Guided by the Federal Framework for Aboriginal Economic Development — and its vision of "Enhancing the Value of Indigenous Assets" — this Program promotes greater self-reliance and participation in the mainstream economy and community well-being. This is achieved through supports to institutions and First Nations for land and environmental management and economic development.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars) Human Resources (FTEs)
2016–2017
Main Estimates
2016–2017
Planned Spending
2017–2018
Planned Spending
2018–2019
Planned Spending
2016–2017 2017–2018 2018–2019
209,574,311 209,574,311 205,631,989 204,115,448 439 439 439
The year-over-year differences primarily reflect changes in the approved funding for the First Nations Land Management Regime, and for the implementation of treaty land entitlement claims in Saskatchewan.
Performance Measurement
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Date to Be Achieved
First Nation and Inuit communities have the capacity to pursue economic development Percentage of Band-generated revenue in relation to total revenuea 13% (Five year average from 2008–2009 to 2012–2013 was 13.1%) by March 31, 2017
a Due to reporting timelines for community audits, data for this indicator is not available until midway through the fiscal year. Therefore, results will be based on data from the previous fiscal year.
Planning Highlights

Through the Community Economic Development Program, INAC will continue to support the full participation of First Nations, Métis, Non-Status Indians and Inuit individuals and communities in the economy by:

  • Making investments that facilitate business and community readiness for Indigenous peoples' participation in commercial and economic opportunities on reserve land.

Sub-Program 3.2.1: Lands and Economic Development Services

Description: This sub-program supports communities to effectively build and manage a land base for economic development. Incentive-based funding encourages and supports First Nations seeking to take on additional land-management responsibilities under the Indian Act. It also supports an effective transition toward greater autonomy through modern land-management tools such as the First Nation Land Management Act (FNLMA) and the First Nations Oil and Gas and Moneys Management Act (FNOGMMA). Targeted funding is available to support training, capacity development, planning, and land and environmental management.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars) Human Resources (FTEs)
2016–2017
Planned Spending
2017–2018
Planned Spending
2018–2019
Planned Spending
2016–2017 2017–2018 2018–2019
138,344,764 138,020,903 136,728,864 276 276 276
Performance Measurement
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Date to Be Achieved
First Nation and Inuit communities have capacity to manage land and environment and to pursue economic development Percentage of First Nations managing and administering their Land transactionsa 35% of 637 First Nations (2014–2015 baseline: 30% of 637 First Nations) by March 31, 2017
Percentage of First Nation and Inuit communities providing economic development public services to their members 70% of communities by March 31, 2017
a Land transactions include permits, leases, and other transactions under their responsibilities.
Planning Highlights

Through the Lands and Economic Development Services sub-program, INAC will align its actions with the expected result — First Nation and Inuit communities have capacity to manage land and environment and to pursue economic development — by:

  • Working with First Nation and Inuit communities, institutional partners and municipalities to build capacity and strengthen and integrate planning processes, including land use, strategic economic development, environmental management, and capital and emergency management plans.
  • Building First Nations' land management capacity, by supporting their participation in the Reserve Land and Environment Management program.
  • Enhancing First Nations control over oil and gas revenues and other moneys for First Nation governments, such as through the First Nations Fiscal Management Act and the First Nations Oil and Gas and Moneys Management Act.
  • Strengthening waste management on reserve through capacity building while also engaging broadly with First Nations, other government organizations and industry, and exploring potential partnerships between First Nations and municipalities to develop municipal-type service agreements and address other prevention, diversion and management issues.
  • Reporting annually to Parliament on all projects that have been assessed through the Environmental Review Process (Environmental Assessment in Canada).
  • Enhancing environmental capacity building through training, toolkits and guidance documents for First Nations and the development of departmental intranet and internet websites to disseminate information to First Nations and departmental staff.
  • Working with Inuit organizations and other partners to strengthen the Inuit art economy through support for the Inuit Art Foundation and the transfer of the Igloo Tag Program.

Sub-Program 3.2.2: Investment in Economic Opportunities

Description: This sub-program supports First Nations and Inuit communities seeking greater participation in large and complex economic opportunities. Targeted investments provide funding for First Nation and Inuit communities to better pursue economic opportunities. This sub-program also includes adoption of regulations for complex commercial and industrial development projects through the First Nation Commercial and Industrial Development Act which helps to establish increased certainty needed by investors. These activities are critical to successfully partner with the private and public sectors to effectively participate in — and benefit from — key economic opportunities.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars) Human Resources (FTEs)
2016–2017
Planned Spending
2017–2018
Planned Spending
2018–2019
Planned Spending
2016–2017 2017–2018 2018–2019
34,158,368 34,158,368 34,158,368 15 15 15
Performance Measurement
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Date to Be Achieved
First Nation and Inuit communities leverage investments from private sector and other sources Investments leveraged from sources outside of the Department for First Nation and Inuit communities 1:3 (for every dollar invested by INAC, three dollars will be leveraged from sources outside the Department) by March 31, 2017
Planning Highlights

Through the Investment in Economic Opportunities sub-program, INAC will align its actions with the expected result — First Nation and Inuit communities leverage investments from private sector and other sources — by:

  • Enhancing targeted investments in economic development projects, such as industrial parks and shopping complexes, which attract private sector business investments in Indigenous communities.
  • Using the optional First Nations Commercial and Industrial Development Act, assist First Nations seeking to develop major projects on reserve by creating federal regulations to protect the environment, as well as health and safety, in a similar manner to projects off reserve.

Sub-Program 3.2.3: Administration of Reserve Land

Description: This sub-program: creates, monitors and registers the rights and interests in reserve lands (including the Federal Management of Oil and Gas Interests in the Reserve Land Program, which manages and regulates oil and gas development on First Nation reserve lands through Indian Oil and Gas Canada); defines reserve boundaries; and administers land management policies and processes, including additions to reserve. This sub-program further administers band moneys (capital and revenue moneys) — pursuant to sections 61 to 69 of the Indian Act — held within the Consolidated Revenue Fund for the use and benefit of bands and their members.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars) Human Resources (FTEs)
2016–2017
Planned Spending
2017–2018
Planned Spending
2018–2019
Planned Spending
2016–2017 2017–2018 2018–2019
33,078,386 29,453,386 29,453,386 143 143 143
Performance Measurement
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Date to Be Achieved
First Nations benefit from the administration of reserve land. (Benefits include use of land for economic and community purposes) Percentage of active additions to reserve approveda 2.5% (approximately 35 additions to reserve per year) by March 31, 2017
Value of money collected by Indian Oil and Gas Canada on behalf of First Nationsb $45M to $70M by March 31, 2017
a An addition to reserve involves adding land to an existing reserve or creating new reserve for legal obligation and community expansion purposes for the socio-economic and cultural benefit of First Nations.
b Target is based on the current projected market demand and price. The money is collected on behalf of First Nations which is subsequently transferred to their capital and revenue accounts.
Planning Highlights

Through the Administration of Reserve Land sub-program, INAC will align its actions with the expected result — First Nations benefit from the administration of reserve land — by:

  • Collaborating with First Nations to enhance the growth of the Indigenous economy by supporting the development of First Nations oil and gas resources and ensuring market-based revenues for the benefit of the respective First Nations.
  • Encouraging greater investment on First Nation lands by implementing the Indian Oil and Gas Act and new Indian Oil and Gas Regulations.
  • Supporting the completion of additions to reserve, designations of reserve land and the creation of easements.
  • Improving the lands management manual, including updating operational land policies with a specific focus on leases, permits and the environment.
  • Enhancing Indian Land Registry System activities by implementing e-registration.
  • Continuing to strengthen policies in support of First Nations accessing, managing and controlling their capital and revenue moneys.

Sub-Program 3.2.4: Contaminated Sites (On-Reserve)

Description: This sub-program supports the assessment and remediation of contaminated sites on reserve lands and on other lands under the Department's custodial responsibility.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars) Human Resources (FTEs)
2016–2017
Planned Spending
2017–2018
Planned Spending
2018–2019
Planned Spending
2016–2017 2017–2018 2018–2019
3,992,793 3,999,332 3,774,830 5 5 5
Performance Measurement
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Date to Be Achieved
The risk to public health and safety related to contaminated sites is decreased Number of Class 1 sites (sites with imminent concerns for public health and safety) where remediation activities are occurring to reduce risk 80a by March 31, 2017
First Nation land is available for development Number of contaminated sites completely remediated 5a by March 31, 2017
Federal liabilities related to the existence of contaminated sites are reduced Dollar reduction in total of known federal financial liabilities in confirmed contaminated sites at the beginning of the fiscal year $8 million by March 31, 2017
a The target setting is dependent on the size of the sites, the complexity and duration of multi-year projects, and the timing and the level of budget resources.
Planning Highlights

Through the Contaminated Sites (On-Reserve) sub-program, INAC will align its actions with the expected results — the risk to public health and safety related to contaminated sites is decreased; First Nation land is available for development; and federal liabilities related to the existence of contaminated sites are reduced — by:

  • Assessing on-reserve suspected sites for possible contamination, ranking contaminated sites for remediation based upon risk to reserve community's health and the environment, and investing in the remediation of prioritized contaminated sites for the health and environmental benefits of reserve communities.
  • Integrating the management of contaminated sites and other activities in reserve communities, in consultation with the Indigenous communities and other partners, to realize cost and risk reduction and process efficiency.

Program 3.3: Strategic Partnerships

Description: This Program supports Indigenous community preparedness activities to engage with partners in economic opportunities, including the Strategic Partnerships Initiative (SPI) — an innovative, horizontal program intended to align federal efforts to support Indigenous participation in complex economic opportunities, particularly large regional opportunities and major resource developments. The Strategic Partnership Initiative provides a mechanism for federal partners to collectively identify emerging opportunities, target investment decisions and streamline program application and approval processes to support Indigenous communities at the early stages of large and complex economic opportunities. In doing so, closer partnerships with non-federal partners, including provincial and territorial governments, the private sector and Indigenous communities can be built. By addressing gaps in programming, this ensures that Indigenous peoples can participate in and benefit from priority regional opportunities and major resource developments.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars) Human Resources (FTEs)
2016–2017
Main Estimates
2016–2017
Planned Spending
2017–2018
Planned Spending
2018–2019
Planned Spending
2016–2017 2017–2018 2018–2019
39,583,926 39,583,926 30,333,926 30,333,926 68 68 68
The decrease in 2017–2018 reflects the approved funding profile for Indigenous participation in West Coast Energy Development.
Performance Measurement
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Date to Be Achieved
Regional economic opportunities and large resource development projects impacting Indigenous communities are pursued in partnership with public and private sectors Value of federal and non-federal investments leveraged under the community readiness phase of the Strategic Partnership Initiative 1:1.5 leveraging over three years (For every $1 Strategic Partnership Initiative investment an additional $1.50 is leveraged from other sources including private and other public sectors) by March 31, 2017
Planning Highlights

Through the Strategic Partnerships Program, INAC will continue to support the full participation of First Nations, Métis, Non-Status Indians and Inuit individuals and communities in the economy by:

  • Supporting Indigenous community economic readiness activities that enable communities to participate in complex economic development opportunities, such as: supporting early engagement and partnership development, increasing community administrative and financial capacity, supporting business planning and jobs matching, supporting skills development and training, and providing information and resources so communities are better prepared to engage with partners and stakeholders.
  • Developing emerging opportunity profiles, environmental scans and federal action plans on upcoming complex economic development opportunities, including initiatives related to clean energy.
  • Working with federal partners, for the benefit of Indigenous communities, using the flexibility provided by Strategic Partnerships Initiatives' umbrella terms and conditions, to establish a process allowing for a single-window approach to funding, and to simplify and reduce the application and reporting burden for program recipients.
  • Implementing the West Coast Energy Initiative in consultation with Indigenous communities.

Program 3.4: Infrastructure and Capacity

Description: This Program provides funding and advisory assistance to First Nation communities for the construction, acquisition, operation and maintenance of community infrastructure assets on reserves. These assets include drinking water systems, wastewater systems and community buildings. The Program also includes support for emergency management assistance, renewable energy projects and funding and advisory support for water and wastewater systems, education facilities, housing and other community infrastructure such as roads and bridges, electrification, and community buildings (these four sub-programs are collectively known as the Capital Facilities and Maintenance Program). Ultimately, this Program enables First Nations to participate more fully in the Canadian economy by establishing infrastructure that meets established standards, and the needs of First Nation communities.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars) Human Resources (FTEs)
2016–2017
Main Estimates
2016–2017
Planned Spending
2017–2018
Planned Spending
2018–2019
Planned Spending
2016–2017 2017–2018 2018–2019
1,212,699,364 1,212,699,364 1,232,715,390 1,232,145,774 189 189 189
The year-over-year differences primarily reflect ongoing increased demand for infrastructure programs as well as changes in the approved funding profile to support the repair and construction of on-reserve schools.
Performance Measurement
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Date to Be Achieved
First Nation communities have infrastructure that protects their health and safety Percentage of inspected INAC-funded infrastructure assets projected to remain operational for their life-cycles 70% for schools from the 2015 baseline of 59%
74% for water/wastewater from the 2015 baseline of 74%
63% for roads and bridges from the 2015 baseline of 63%
44% for other community infrastructure from the 2015 baseline of 44%
by March 31, 2019
Percentage of on-reserve INAC-funded First Nation drinking water systems with treated water that meets prescribed standards in the Guidelines for Canadian Drinking Water Quality 87%
2011 baseline: 46%
by March 31, 2019
Percentage of on-reserve INAC-funded First Nation wastewater systems producing treated wastewater that meets effluent quality regulations and guidelines 70%
2012 baseline: 68%
by March 31, 2019
Planning Highlights

Through the Infrastructure and Capacity Program, INAC will continue to support the full participation of First Nations, Métis, Non-Status Indians and Inuit individuals and communities in the economy by:

  • Working with First Nations to ensure value-for-money in the delivery of the Capital Facilities and Maintenance Program through strategic investment leading to improved infrastructure outcomes for Indigenous communities.
  • Pursuing new approaches for the management, financing and delivery of INAC-funded on-reserve assets while exploring opportunities for community partnerships and joint approaches to service delivery, regional hubs to support asset management, and the bundling of project procurements in order to maximize value for money and increase program efficiency.

Sub-Program 3.4.1: Water and Wastewater

Description: This sub-program provides funding to plan, design, construct, acquire, operate and maintain water and wastewater systems, including water supply, treatment and distribution, and wastewater collection, treatment and disposal. It also provides funding to: coordinate training and capacity building for activities related to water and wastewater facilities; identify on-reserve water and wastewater infrastructure needs; develop water and wastewater infrastructure capital plans; and design and implement management practices for water and wastewater facilities maintenance. The goal is to support First Nations in meeting health and safety standards and provide on-reserve residents with service levels comparable to those off reserve. First Nations identify priorities and needs and present project proposals to the Department. Funding is provided for projects based on a priority assessment.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars) Human Resources (FTEs)
2016–2017
Planned Spending
2017–2018
Planned Spending
2018–2019
Planned Spending
2016–2017 2017–2018 2018–2019
202,965,486 202,960,232 202,954,873 22 22 22
Performance Measurement
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Date to Be Achieved
First Nations drinking water and wastewater systems meet established standards Percentage of on-reserve INAC-funded First Nation drinking water systems that have low risk ratings 54%
2011 baseline: 27%
by March 31, 2019
Percentage of on-reserve INAC-funded First Nation wastewater systems that have low risk ratings 65%
2011 baseline: 35%
by March 31, 2019
Planning Highlights

Through the Water and Wastewater sub-program, INAC will align its actions with the expected result — First Nations drinking water and wastewater systems meet established standards — by working with First Nations in a renewed, respectful, and inclusive nation-to-nation process to advance progress on issues First Nations have prioritized, including bringing about real change and substantial improvement in the provision of safe, clean and reliable drinking water and sustainable management of wastewater on First Nation lands across Canada. Activities will include:

  • Enhancing capacity building and operator training by:
    • Supporting First Nations in establishing enhanced operator training and/or a centralized approach to service delivery (e.g.: hub-model service provider) for on-reserve water and wastewater system management.
    • Working in partnership with First Nations to increase accountability through enhanced, risk-based oversight of operation and maintenance funding, including maintenance management.

Sub-Program 3.4.2: Education Facilities

Description: This sub-program provides funding to: plan, design, construct/acquire, renovate, repair, replace, and operate and maintain band-operated elementary and secondary education facilities (including school buildings, teacherages and student residences) and any related facility services. Provincial school boards are also eligible for funding to plan, design, construct/acquire elementary and secondary education facilities for First Nation students. This sub-program also provides funding to: acquire, replace, and repair furniture, equipment and furnishing for schools, teacherages and student residences; identify education facility needs, and develop education facility plans; and design and implement maintenance management practices.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars) Human Resources (FTEs)
2016–2017
Planned Spending
2017–2018
Planned Spending
2018–2019
Planned Spending
2016–2017 2017–2018 2018–2019
306,428,973 306,419,688 281,410,217 18 18 18
Performance Measurement
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Date to Be Achieved
First Nation education facilities meet established standards Percentage of First Nation schools with a greater than "fair" condition rating 70%
2011 baseline: 70%
by March 31, 2019
Planning Highlights

Through the Education Facilities sub-program, INAC will align its actions with the expected result — First Nation education facilities meet established standards — by:

  • Working with First Nations to improve and increase school infrastructure, including making innovative and targeted investments through the Education Infrastructure Fund.
  • Innovating the delivery of school infrastructure through the provision of central project management aimed at developing standard tools and processes, and seeking efficiencies through initiatives such as the aggregation of core project functions.
  • Reforming the way education facilities projects are delivered so as to maximize the use of available funding while ensuring a level of service comparable to off-reserve school facilities.

Sub-Program 3.4.3: Housing

Description: This sub-program provides funding for First Nations to: plan and manage housing needs; design, construct and acquire new housing units; as well as renovate existing housing units. Working with First Nations, this sub-program seeks to increase the supply of safe and affordable housing to achieve better housing outcomes for on-reserve residents.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars) Human Resources (FTEs)
2016–2017
Planned Spending
2017–2018
Planned Spending
2018–2019
Planned Spending
2016–2017 2017–2018 2018–2019
161,532,424 161,532,424 161,532,424 20 20 20
Performance Measurement
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Date to Be Achieved
First Nations housing infrastructure needsa are supported Percentage of First Nation housing that is adequateb as assessed and reported annually by First Nations 75%
2011 baseline: 72%
by March 31, 2019
a Housing infrastructure needs are identified by First Nation communities.
b Adequate is defined in the Year-end Reporting Handbook for the Housing Data Collection Instrument as dwellings that do not require major renovations and possess basic plumbing facilities, hot and cold running water, inside toilets, and installed baths or showers.
Planning Highlights

Through the Housing sub-program, INAC will align its actions with the expected result — First Nations housing infrastructure needs are supported — by:

  • Collaborating with First Nations and other government partners to initiate projects and measures to maintain safe and suitable housing assets, facilitate better housing outcomes and improve access to financing.
  • Implementing capacity building programs on reserve to improve the ability of First Nations to manage and improve their housing stock. This could include: housing authorities pilot projects and maintenance and planning training pilot projects.

Sub-Program 3.4.4: Other Community Infrastructure and Activities

Description: This sub-program provides funding to plan, design, construct, acquire, operate and maintain community infrastructure assets and facilities, as well as coordinate training and undertake capacity-building activities in this area. The goal is to support First Nations in better meeting health and safety standards and provide on-reserve residents with similar levels of service to those off reserve. First Nations identify priorities and needs in their First Nation Infrastructure Investment Plans. Funding is provided for projects based on a priority assessment.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars) Human Resources (FTEs)
2016–2017
Planned Spending
2017–2018
Planned Spending
2018–2019
Planned Spending
2016–2017 2017–2018 2018–2019
474,606,604 494,637,169 519,082,383 108 108 108
Performance Measurement
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Date to Be Achieved
First Nations othera infrastructure meet established standards Percentage of bridges with greater than "fair" condition rating 60%
2012 baseline: 54%
by March 31, 2019
Percentage of roads with greater than "fair" condition rating 47%
2011 baseline: 45%
by March 31, 2019
a Other community infrastructure includes all community assets not represented in previous sub-program activities. This includes, but is not limited to band offices, community centres, fire protection assets and structural mitigation assets.
Planning Highlights

Through the Other Community Infrastructure and Activities sub-program, INAC will align its actions with the expected result — First Nations other infrastructure meet established standards — by:

  • Providing ongoing support to improve and increase public infrastructure on reserve, including the management and delivery of the First Nations Infrastructure Fund.

Additional planning highlights for other community activities include:

  • Working with First Nation communities and building partnerships with national fire experts to improve fire safety on reserve through fire prevention programming, capacity building initiatives, and investments in fire protection assets.
  • Supporting First Nations in protecting and building more disaster-resilient communities through the development and implementation of structural mitigation measures.Footnote 3

Sub-Program 3.4.5: Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency

Description: This sub-program implements the ecoENERGY for Aboriginal and Northern Communities Program, which supports Aboriginal and northern communities, including off-grid communities, to reduce greenhouse gas emissions through the integration of proven renewable energy technologies, such as residual heat recovery, biomass, geothermal, wind, solar and small hydro. The sub-program provides funding for the design and construction of renewable energy projects integrated with community buildings and for the feasibility stages of larger renewable energy projects.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars) Human Resources (FTEs)
2016–2017
Planned Spending
2017–2018
Planned Spending
2018–2019
Planned Spending
2016–2017 2017–2018 2018–2019
0 0 0 0 0 0
Performance Measurement
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Date to Be Achieved
Greenhouse gas emissions in Aboriginal and northern communities are reduced As the ecoENERGY program will sunset on March 31, 2016, there are no performance indicators or targets set for fiscal year 2016–2017
Planning Highlights

Through the Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency sub-program, INAC will align is actions with the expected result — greenhouse gas emissions in Aboriginal and northern communities are reduced — by:

  • As the ecoENERGY program will sunset on March 31, 2016, there are no planning highlights set for fiscal year 2016–2017.

Sub-Program 3.4.6: Emergency Management Assistance

Description: This sub-program provides funding to protect the health and safety of on-reserve First Nations residents as well as their lands and critical infrastructure. The sub-program promotes the four pillars of emergency management — mitigation, preparedness, response, and recovery — by providing funding and overseeing the reimbursement of eligible emergency management costs; providing timely and efficient situational awareness; and developing policy to support emergency management. It further promotes efficiency by accessing existing resources and services of provincial/territorial and First Nation emergency management partners to address on-reserve emergencies as required (with the mandate to reimburse partners for eligible expenses).

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars) Human Resources (FTEs)
2016–2017
Planned Spending
2017–2018
Planned Spending
2018–2019
Planned Spending
2016–2017 2017–2018 2018–2019
67,165,877 67,165,877 67,165,877 21 21 21
Performance Measurement
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Date to Be Achieved
First Nations are supported in their efforts to mitigate and prepare for emergencies Percentage of non-structural mitigation (i.e., flood mapping and risk assessment) and preparedness funding allocated towards on-reserve emergency resiliency and capacity building 100% of the $19.1 million allocated towards on-reserve emergency resiliency and capacity building by March 31, 2017
First Nations are supported in their response to and recovery from emergencies Transfer of funds equivalent to eligible costs identified (eligible costs can include but not limited to the evacuation of on-reserve First Nation communities, direct emergency response activities, and other cleaning and rebuilding expenses) 100% by March 31, 2017
Planning Highlights

Through the Emergency Management Assistance sub-program, INAC will align its actions with the expected results — First Nations are supported in their efforts to mitigate and prepare for emergencies; and First Nations are supported in their response to and recovery from emergencies — by:

  • Providing funding support for all four pillars of emergency management (mitigation, preparedness, response, and recovery).
  • Facilitating negotiations and the implementation of new or renewed agreements with provinces and territories, and supporting emergency preparedness activities.
  • Identifying opportunities to increase First Nation capacity through community-based planning, training and exercises to enhance emergency preparedness.
  • Developing program funding guidelines and policy to provide greater clarity regarding expense eligibility.

Program 3.5: Urban Indigenous Participation

Description: This Program supports participation of urban Indigenous individuals and communities in the economy. It is comprised of two streams: Community Capacity Support and Urban Partnerships. The Community Capacity Support stream provides funding to urban Indigenous community organizations to deliver programs and services that are designed to remove barriers and encourage innovative partnerships. The Urban Partnerships stream is comprised of a planning component and an implementation component. The planning component supports communities with multi-stakeholder engagement (private sector, municipalities, Indigenous groups) in the design and development of regional strategic plans and the identification of community priorities. These plans are then shared with the National Association of Friendship Centres which, in turn, implements the priorities through community projects.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars) Human Resources (FTEs)
2016–2017
Main Estimates
2016–2017
Planned Spending
2017–2018
Planned Spending
2018–2019
Planned Spending
2016–2017 2017–2018 2018–2019
29,645,997 29,645,997 29,645,997 29,645,997 13 13 13
Performance Measurement
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Date to Be Achieved
Urban Indigenous participation in the economy is enhanced through collaborative planning, knowledge management and research Percentage of funding allocated to the National Association of Friendship Centres that is invested in priorities identified in regional strategic plans 100% by March 31, 2017
Number of Indigenous individuals participating in community capacity support programs and services Increasing year over year Baselines to be established by March 31, 2016
Planning Highlights

Through the Urban Indigenous Participation Program, INAC will continue to support the full participation of First Nations, Métis, Non-Status Indians and Inuit individuals and communities in the economy by:

  • Providing funding to the National Association of Friendship Centres and other organizations for projects that increase the participation of urban Indigenous peoples in the economy.
  • Continuing to coordinate and facilitate partnerships and enhance collaboration with provincial and municipal governments, federal departments, urban Indigenous organizations, and other key stakeholders.
  • Continuing to implement the Urban Aboriginal Strategy through the development and refinement of appropriate tools to better identify the extent to which the regional strategic plans are used by the National Association of Friendship Centres to guide their decisions regarding the funding of projects designed to increase participation of urban Indigenous peoples in the economy.

Strategic Outcome: The North

Self-reliance, prosperity and well-being for the people and communities of the North

Program 4.1: Northern Governance and People

Description: This Program strengthens the North's communities and people by: devolving responsibilities for lands and natural resources to territorial governments; fostering effective intergovernmental relations with territorial and Inuit governments; collaborating with Inuit organizations and providing support to Territorial Commissioners; subsidizing the costs of nutritious perishable foods and other essential items in isolated northern communities; providing grants for hospital and physician services in Nunavut and the Northwest Territories; working with northern communities to identify the risks and challenges posed by climate change; and advancing Canadian and northern interests through circumpolar forums such as the international Arctic Council. Canadians and Northerners will benefit from territorial governments ultimately having more control over their own affairs.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars) Human Resources (FTEs)
2016–2017
Main Estimates
2016–2017
Planned Spending
2017–2018
Planned Spending
2018–2019
Planned Spending
2016–2017 2017–2018 2018–2019
134,894,297 134,894,297 135,981,297 137,090,297 62 62 62
The year-over-year differences primarily reflect additional funding for grants to territorial governments for the health care of Indians and Inuit.
Performance Measurement
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Date to Be Achieved
Northerners have greater control over their economic and political affairs Number of final devolution agreements fully implemented with territorial governments on land and resource management 3 by March 31, 2020
Affordability of perishable, nutritious food in eligible communities is strengthened Annual trend of the Revised Northern Food Basket At or below the annual trend (increase/decrease) for the Consumer Price Index basket for food by March 31, 2017
Community health and safety in the North is strengthened As the program will sunset on March 31, 2016, there are no performance indicators or targets set for fiscal year 2016–2017
Planning Highlights

Through the Northern Governance and People Program, INAC will continue to support self-reliance, prosperity and well-being for the people and communities of the North by:

  • Advancing discussions towards an agreement-in-principle for the devolution of land and resource management responsibilities to the Government of Nunavut.Footnote 4
  • Supporting access to perishable, nutritious food by providing a retail subsidy for eligible products under the Nutrition North Canada program.
  • Supporting the work of the Nutrition North Canada Advisory Board to ensure that the perspectives and interests of northern residents and communities are considered in managing the program.
  • As the Climate Change Adaptation program will sunset on March 31, 2016, there are no planning highlights set for fiscal year 2016–2017.

Sub-Program 4.1.1: Political Development and Intergovernmental Relations

Description: This sub-program facilitates the growth of strong, effective and efficient government structures in the North. The devolution of responsibilities for land and resource management to territorial governments will strengthen northern governance. This sub-program also supports legislation and policy initiatives, the advancement of intergovernmental processes, collaboration with Inuit organizations and governments, the appointment of Territorial Commissioners and general federal-territorial relationships. In addition, it ensures that circumpolar cooperation activities reflect Canadian interests and grants are provided to territorial governments for hospital and physician services.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars) Human Resources (FTEs)
2016–2017
Planned Spending
2017–2018
Planned Spending
2018–2019
Planned Spending
2016–2017 2017–2018 2018–2019
77,648,425 78,735,425 79,844,425 50 50 50
Performance Measurement
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Date to Be Achieved
Devolution of land and resource management to the Government of Nunavut Completion of devolution phases in Nunavut against the five-phase devolution process (five-phase process: protocol, agreement-in-principle, final agreement, legislation, and implementation) Complete Phase 2 by March 31, 2017
Canadian interests are advanced through international circumpolar cooperation activities Percentage of projects actioned under the Arctic Council and supported by INAC that reflect collaborative engagement from federal and territorial governments, and Canadian Indigenous stakeholders 100% by March 31, 2017
Planning Highlights

Through the Political Development and Intergovernmental Relations sub-program, INAC will align its actions with the expected results — devolution of land and resource management to the Government of Nunavut; and Canadian interests are advanced through international circumpolar cooperation activities — by:

  • Working with the Government of Nunavut, Nunavut Tunngavik Incorporated and the Chief Federal Negotiator to advance agreement-in-principle negotiations towards the devolution of land and resource management responsibilities in Nunavut.
  • Supporting Inuit land claim organizations, in partnership with Inuit stakeholders, to undertake activities related to the Nanilavut Initiative in their respective regions.
  • Working with Inuit organizations, other government departments and other external partners to support improved socio-economic outcomes for Inuit, focusing on housing and youth.
  • Continuing to build and maintain effective relationships with territorial governments, Indigenous governments and organizations and other domestic partners, and to facilitate their engagement in circumpolar affairs.
  • Advancing Canada's circumpolar interests through bilateral engagement with Arctic States and key stakeholders, and through leadership and active participation in Arctic Council working groups and task forces.

Sub-Program 4.1.2: Nutrition North

Description: This sub-program aims to improve access to perishable nutritious food for residents of isolated northern communities that lack year-round surface or marine transport. The sub-program provides a retail-based subsidy to registered retailers and suppliers to help reduce the cost of perishable nutritious food in the eligible communities. It is supported by an advisory board that gives Northerners a direct voice in the sub-program.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars) Human Resources (FTEs)
2016–2017
Planned Spending
2017–2018
Planned Spending
2018–2019
Planned Spending
2016–2017 2017–2018 2018–2019
57,151,800 57,151,800 57,151,800 11 11 11
Performance Measurement
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Date to Be Achieved
Residents in eligible communities have access to nutritious perishable food at a subsidized rate Percentage of compliance/audit reports demonstrating that subsidies have been fully passed on to consumers 100% by March 31, 2017
Percentage implementation of the new requirement for major northern retailers to show subsidy saving at the till receipt 100% by March 31, 2017
Annual percentage variation in the quantity of subsidized items shipped by air 3 to 5% by March 31, 2017
Planning Highlights

Through the Nutrition North sub-program, INAC will align its actions with the expected result — residents in eligible communities have access to nutritious perishable food at a subsidized rate — by:

  • Continuing to increase transparency and strengthen accountability of the Nutrition North Canada program by:
    • Ensuring that the perspectives and interests of northern residents are considered through the Nutrition North Canada Advisory Board public meetings; and
    • Posting compliance reviews, shipping reports and the Revised Northern Food Basket price reports on the website.
  • Ensuring that the full subsidy is being passed on to consumers through compliance reviews and the implementation of at-the-till receipts.Footnote 5
  • Ensuring that the operational structures of the Nutrition North Canada program are well supported by advancing the implementation of tools and systems to monitor and report on trends in isolated communities.

Sub-Program 4.1.3: Climate Change Adaptation

Description: This sub-program provides funding support to Aboriginal and northern communities, governments and organizations to assess vulnerabilities to climate change, develop adaptation plans, and develop related information and tools. The sub-program builds capacity at the community level and develops partnerships with territorial governments to address broad northern issues. The assessment of climate change impacts and adaptation planning enhances community resilience and facilitates the integration of climate change considerations into decision making.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars) Human Resources (FTEs)
2016–2017
Planned Spending
2017–2018
Planned Spending
2018–2019
Planned Spending
2016–2017 2017–2018 2018–2019
94,072 94,072 94,072 1 1 1
Performance Measurement
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Date to Be Achieved
Aboriginal and northern communities implement adaptation measures and decisions to protect community health and safety As the Climate Change Adaptation program will sunset on March 31, 2016, there are no performance indicators and targets set for fiscal year 2016–2017
Planning Highlights

Through the Climate Change Adaptation sub-program, INAC will align its actions with the expected result — Aboriginal and northern communities implement adaptation measures and decisions to protect community health and safety — by:

  • As the Climate Change Adaptation program will sunset on March 31, 2016, there are no planning highlights set for fiscal year 2016–2017.

Program 4.2: Northern Science and Technology

Description: This Program supports scientific research and technology in the North through programs and infrastructure to ensure domestic and international policy on key northern issues is better informed by a scientific knowledge base. The focus of this Program is to: research and monitor contaminants and their impacts on the ecosystem and human health through the Northern Contaminants Program; assess, manage and communicate scientific data and results, and contribute expertise to help inform public policy making and international controls on certain contaminants; and support the construction of the Canadian High Arctic Research Station. Northerners and all Canadians will benefit from a knowledge base that supports health and sustainable development and the positioning of Canada as an international leader in Arctic science and technology.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars) Human Resources (FTEs)
2016–2017
Main Estimates
2016–2017
Planned Spending
2017–2018
Planned Spending
2018–2019
Planned Spending
2016–2017 2017–2018 2018–2019
47,822,067 47,822,067 25,562,493 4,999,019 37 40 28
The year-over-year differences primarily reflect changes in the approved funding profile and associated FTEs for the construction of the Canadian High Arctic Research Station, including the transfer to Polar Knowledge Canada of certain funding for the Canadian High Arctic Research Station and the implementation of the associated Science and Technology Program.
Performance Measurement
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Date to Be Achieved
Domestic and international policy on northern health and sustainable development is better informed by a scientific knowledge base Percentage of Northern Contaminants Program datasets used in regional, national and international policy-relevant assessments and obligations under international conventions 80% by March 31, 2017
Canada is positioned as an international leader in Arctic science and technology Launch of the Canadian High Arctic Research Station Research station is operational by July 1, 2017
Planning Highlights

Through the Northern Science and Technology Program, INAC will continue to support self-reliance, prosperity and well-being for the people and communities of the North by:

  • Contributing data and expertise to national initiatives, such as the federal Chemicals Management Plan and northern health advisories, as well as international initiatives, such as the Arctic Council's Arctic Monitoring and Assessment Programme, the Stockholm Convention on Persistent Organic Pollutants, and the United Nations Environment Programme's Minamata Convention on Mercury.
  • Finalizing and implementing a new data management policy for the open and timely access to Northern Contaminants Program data to facilitate data usage in national and international assessments.
  • Supporting the construction of the Canadian High Arctic Research Station.

Sub-Program 4.2.1: Northern Contaminants

Description: This sub-program engages Northerners and scientists in researching and monitoring long-range contaminants in the Canadian Arctic. The data generated by this sub-program is used to assess ecosystem and human health, and the findings of these assessments inform policy, resulting in action to eliminate contaminants from long-range sources. This supports the safety and security of traditional country foods that are important to the health of Northerners and northern communities. The sub-program also contributes scientific data to contaminants-related international agreements and assessments, helping to position Canada as an international leader in Arctic science. These international agreements will improve the health of Arctic people and wildlife over the long term.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars) Human Resources (FTEs)
2016–2017
Planned Spending
2017–2018
Planned Spending
2018–2019
Planned Spending
2016–2017 2017–2018 2018–2019
4,037,428 4,037,428 4,037,428 11 11 11
Performance Measurement
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Date to Be Achieved
Contaminants-related risk to ecosystem and human health is reduced Percentage decrease in concentrations of previously identified contaminants in human and wildlife populations in the North 5 to 10% decrease in three indicator persistent organic pollutants concentrations over 1990 levels by March 31, 2017
1 to 3% decrease in Mercury concentrations over 2013 levels by March 31, 2020
Contaminants-related research results are widely available for domestic and international policy use Percentage of current Northern Contaminants Program research, results and information that is accessible nationally and internationally 100% by March 31, 2017
Northerners participate in contaminants research Percentage of Northern Contaminants Program-funded projects in which Northerners are identified as project leaders and/or team members 100% of 2013–2014 baseline year by March 31, 2017
Planning Highlights

Through the Northern Contaminants sub-program, INAC will align its actions with expected results — contaminants-related risk to ecosystem and human health is reduced, contaminants-related research results are widely available for domestic and international use; and Northerners participate in contaminants research — by:

  • Supporting the monitoring of contaminant levels in wildlife and people in the Canadian North, including implementing regional human biomonitoring studies in partnership with Health Canada and territorial/regional health authorities, among others.
  • Developing northern science capacity, for example through community-based initiatives, transferring knowledge on contaminants, human health and safety of traditional foods to Northerners through initiatives such as workshops, and releasing publications related to recent major assessments and supporting health advisories, as needed.

Sub-Program 4.2.2: Science Initiatives

Description: This sub-program works to position Canada as a leader in Arctic science and technology through the establishment of the Canadian High Arctic Research Station. The Station will be a world-class, year-round, multidisciplinary facility on the cutting edge of Arctic issues that will anchor a strong research presence in Canada's Arctic to serve Canada and the world. It will advance Canada's knowledge of the Arctic in order to improve economic opportunities, environmental stewardship and the quality of life of Northerners and all Canadians.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars) Human Resources (FTEs)
2016–2017
Planned Spending
2017–2018
Planned Spending
2018–2019
Planned Spending
2016–2017 2017–2018 2018–2019
43,784,639 21,525,065 961,591 26 29 17
Performance Measurement
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Date to Be Achieved
Researchers have access to world-class Arctic infrastructure in the Canadian Northa Infrastructure is available for Polar Knowledge Canada and associated researchers Access to Canadian High Arctic Research Station infrastructure (interim office, triplex units, field and maintenance building, main research building) by July 1, 2017
a Commissioning will be completed by March 2018. A commissioning period is standard for any construction project to ensure that all systems (heating, ventilation, air conditioning, electrical, water, etc.) are in full working order before the facility is officially handed off to the owner. It is also anticipated that the facility will be transferred to Polar Knowledge Canada by March 2018.
Planning Highlights

Through the Science Initiatives sub-program, INAC will align its actions with the expected result — researchers have access to world-class Arctic infrastructure in the Canadian North — by:

  • Continuing the construction of the Canadian High Arctic Research Station and completing housing units.
  • Working collaboratively with Polar Knowledge Canada to ensure alignment between infrastructure and science and technology program needs.

Program 4.3: Northern Land, Resources and Environmental Management

Description: This Program focuses on the management, sustainable development and regulatory oversight of the land, water, natural resources, and environment of the North, delivering on the Department's role as the Government of Canada's natural resource manager in Nunavut and the northern offshore and its post-devolution responsibilities in the Northwest Territories and Yukon. This Program involves: managing oil and gas resources development; supporting the sustainable management of active mineral exploration and development; supporting the sound management of contaminated sites and the few remaining INAC-managed land and water areas in the North; and ensuring the completion of territorial land-use planning including zones for conservation, development and other uses. Northerners and Canadians will benefit from economic opportunities and sustainable development.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars) Human Resources (FTEs)
2016–2017
Main Estimates
2016–2017
Planned Spending
2017–2018
Planned Spending
2018–2019
Planned Spending
2016–2017 2017–2018 2018–2019
58,614,753 58,614,753 31,967,498 32,634,798 147 136 136
The year-over-year differences primarily reflect the sunset of funding and associated FTEs (in 2016–2017) for the assessment, management and remediation of federal contaminated sites, and the Diamond Valuation and Royalty Assessment Program.
Performance Measurement
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Date to Be Achieved
Canada's responsibilities to support effective regulatory regimes in the territories are carried out in a manner that provides certainty for Indigenous people, Northerners, and project proponents Nunavut's, Northwest Territories', and Yukon's ratings on the Policy Perception Index as reported in the Fraser Institute Annual Survey of Mining Companies The rating on the policy perception index will be as good or better than the previous year's by March 31, 2017
Percentage of Nunavut and NWT projects for which the Minister is a decision maker approved within regulated timelinesa 100% by March 31, 2017
Environmental stewardship of contaminated sites is responsible and sustainable Percentage of contaminated sites projects' risks rated as "very high" or "high" with mitigation strategies in place 100% by March 31, 2017
a Mackenzie Valley Resource Management Act, and Nunavut Planning and Projects Assessment Act.
Planning Highlights

Through the Northern Land, Resource and Environmental Management sub-program, INAC will align its actions with the expected results — Canada's responsibilities to support effective regulatory regimes in the territories are carried out in a manner that provides certainty for Indigenous people, Northerners, and project proponents; and environmental stewardship of contaminated sites is responsible and sustainable — by:

  • Advancing changes to northern regulatory regimes in order to promote the North's resource economy and protect the environment. These changes are intended to ensure certainty, predictability and timeliness. More specifically, the Department will:
    • Introduce the necessary legislative change and develop regulations to improve northern regulatory regimes in Yukon, the Northwest Territories and Nunavut and restore confidence in the environmental assessment system;
    • Developing resource management partnership frameworks with territorial and Indigenous groups to facilitate sound resource management plans and decisions.
  • Fostering conditions for the development of the North's natural resources in a sustainable manner by supporting efficient and effective environmental assessment regimes.
  • Contributing to a safer, healthier and more sustainable environment for First Nations, Inuit, and Northerners through the management of federal contaminated sites in the North.
  • Managing the lands and water resources in the North in a timely, efficient and effective manner through the application of a consistent, modern, and relevant regulatory regime.

Sub-Program 4.3.1: Petroleum and Minerals

Description: This sub-program manages the petroleum and mineral resource interests of Northerners, Indigenous peoples and Canadians generally on federal lands in the Northwest Territories, Nunavut and the northern offshore. This sub-program: manages the rights to Crown petroleum and mineral resources; collects Crown royalties; participates in project assessments and land-use planning; and promotes Indigenous participation in resource development. It regularly engages federal, territorial and Indigenous organizations to consider socio-cultural and environmental sensitivities related to petroleum and mineral activities.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars) Human Resources (FTEs)
2016–2017
Planned Spending
2017–2018
Planned Spending
2018–2019
Planned Spending
2016–2017 2017–2018 2018–2019
5,883,966 406,679 719,679 25 17 17
Performance Measurement
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Date to Be Achieved
Petroleum and mineral resources on federal lands in NWT, Nunavut and northern offshore regions are managed for the benefit of Northerners and all Canadians Percentage of Canadian Frontier Landsa under licence managed by INAC 30% by March 31, 2017
Percentage of total Canadian mineral exploration and deposit appraisal expenditures made in Nunavut 7% by March 31, 2017
a Lands under federal jurisdiction in northern areas, offshore Newfoundland and Labrador, offshore Nova Scotia, and other areas, such as the Gulf of St. Lawrence and Hudson Bay.
Planning Highlights

Through the Petroleum and Minerals sub-program, INAC will align its actions with the expected result — petroleum and mineral resources of federal lands in NWT, Nunavut, and northern offshore regions are managed for the benefit of Northerners and all Canadians — by:

  • Managing Crown lands for oil and gas exploration and development through administration of lands and allocation of rights.
  • Advancing regional research and partnerships in support of oil and gas decision making in Canada's Arctic.
  • Collecting Crown revenues and royalties from petroleum and mining companies and performing royalty audits and assessment.
  • Developing an online map selection system for mineral claims in Nunavut.
  • Conducting a comprehensive review of the departmental policy framework for environmental protection and reclamation for mines under federal jurisdiction.

Sub-Program 4.3.2: Contaminated Sites

Description: This sub-program ensures that contaminated sites are managed to ensure the protection of human health, safety and the environment for all Northerners by assessing and remediating contaminated sites and supporting the employment and training of Northerners, particularly Indigenous people.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars) Human Resources (FTEs)
2016–2017
Planned Spending
2017–2018
Planned Spending
2018–2019
Planned Spending
2016–2017 2017–2018 2018–2019
28,055,668 6,885,700 6,810,000 5 2 2
Performance Measurement
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Date to Be Achieved
Contaminated sites are managed to ensure the protection of human health and the safety of the environment while bringing economic benefit to the North Percentage of high priority sitesa in Step 8 (implementation) through Step 10 (monitoring) of the Approach to Federal Contaminated Sites 45% by March 31, 2017
Percentage of people employed within Contaminated Sites projects that are Northerners and/or Indigenous people 60% by March 31, 2017
a High priority sites: Sites classified as Class 1 sites as per the National Classification System for Contaminated Sites.
Planning Highlights

Through the Contaminated Sites sub-program, INAC will align its action with the expected result — contaminated sites are managed to ensure the protection of human health and the safety of the environment while bringing economic benefit to the North — by:

  • Conducting remediation activities across the three northern territories on a priority basis.
  • Continuing risk mitigation at Giant Mine, including ongoing site care and maintenance, addressing urgent site risks by stabilizing the underground and addressing deteriorating infrastructure, as well as continuing to incorporate the measures from the Environmental Assessment into the project plan. Regular project updates are provided through a monthly newsletter, available to the public through the Department's website.
  • Working with the Government of Yukon to manage the long-term environmental and human health and safety risks at the Faro Mine, including undertaking ongoing care and maintenance, and addressing urgent site risks through the implementation of adaptive management activities.

Sub-Program 4.3.3: Land and Water Management

Description: This sub-program manages the land and water interests of Northerners, Indigenous peoples, and other Canadians in Nunavut and in lands managed by the Department in the Northwest Territories and Yukon. This is achieved through: the development, approval and implementation of sound land use plans; environmental monitoring; administration of land rights; provision of inspection and investigation services for land use permits and water licences; and management of their securities.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars) Human Resources (FTEs)
2016–2017
Planned Spending
2017–2018
Planned Spending
2018–2019
Planned Spending
2016–2017 2017–2018 2018–2019
24,675,119 24,675,119 25,105,119 117 117 117
Performance Measurement
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Date to Be Achieved
Land and Water regimes in Nunavut and in lands managed by the department in NWT and the Yukon are managed for the benefit of Northerners and all Canadians Percentage of land and water authorizations (risk based approach), under the responsibility of the Department, inspected NWT = 15%, Nunavut = 25% by March 31, 2017
Percentage of requests for land authorizations, and water licences submitted for Ministerial decision, responded to within legislated time limit 100% by March 31, 2017
Percentage of land use planning initiatives submitted for Ministerial decision responded to as per Northwest Territories and Nunavut legislationa 100% by March 31, 2017
a Mackenzie Valley Resource Management Act, Nunavut Planning and Projects Assessment Act, and Deh Cho First Nations Interim Measures Agreement.
Planning Highlights

Through the Land and Water Management sub-program, INAC will align its actions with the expected result — land and water regimes in Nunavut and in lands managed by the Department in NWT and the Yukon are managed for the benefit of Northerners and all Canadians — by:

  • Ensuring that land authorizations and water licences, including the management of applicable liability securities, are issued within the legislated timelines.
  • Conducting inspections to ensure compliance with mitigation measures in land and water authorizations to minimize liability to the Crown.
  • Supporting improved certainty and informed decision making by contributing to the completion of regional land use plans in Nunavut and the Northwest Territories.
  • Advancing the state of knowledge on the ecosystemic and socio-economic environment of Nunavut through research funded under the Nunavut General Monitoring Plan.

Internal Services

Description: Internal Services are groups of related activities and resources that are administered to support the needs of programs and other corporate obligations of an organization. Internal services include only those activities and resources that apply across an organization, and not those provided to a specific program. The groups of activities are Management and Oversight Services; Communications Services; Legal Services; Human Resources Management Services; Financial Management Services; Information Management Services; Information Technology Services; Real Property Services; Materiel Services; and Acquisition Services.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars) Human Resources (FTEs)
2016–2017
Main Estimates
2016–2017
Planned Spending
2017–2018
Planned Spending
2018–2019
Planned Spending
2016–2017 2017–2018 2018–2019
224,097,504 224,097,504 221,928,102 220,158,470 1,434 1,434 1,433
The year-over-year differences primarily reflect changes in the approved funding and associated FTEs for: construction of the Canadian High Arctic Research Station and the implementation of the associated Science and Technology Program; out-of-court settlements; and, the Diamond Valuation and Royalty Assessment Program (sunset in 2016–2017).
Planning Highlights

Internal Services contribute to the effective and efficient delivery of the Department's programs and services, and support the Government's commitment to ensuring an open government, evidence-based policy-making and diversity in government, as well as the implementation of transformative initiatives.

In support of open government, INAC will:

  • Move forward on the approved Open Government Implementation Plan. Specifically, INAC will develop a change management plan and a data and information release plan, and will publish data/information as identified in year one of the release plan.
  • Migrate updated web content to Canada.ca, under the Treasury Board Secretariat-driven Web Renewal initiative.

In support of evidence-based policy-making, INAC will:

  • Continue, in close collaboration with partners, including the First Nation Information Governance Centre's Data Centre, Statistics Canada, and other government departments, to advance the production of, and access to, relevant socio-economic and demographic evidence and performance metrics to support decision making on issues important to Indigenous communities and Northerners.
  • Conduct audits, evaluations, management practices audits, risk assessments (including General Assessment), forensic audits and control self-assessments, and other special studies of INAC programs and initiatives.
  • Support long-term policy coordination and collaboration between government programs to enable Indigenous governance and decision making.

In support of diversity in government, INAC will:

  • Implement Phase II of the Deputy Minister Aboriginal Workforce Initiative to advance the recruitment of Indigenous individuals, strengthen Indigenous employees' career experience in the Department, and expand the awareness of Indigenous peoples' cultures.
  • Make special efforts to maintain and increase the representation and internal promotion of Aboriginal peoples, members of visible minorities and persons with disabilities.

In support of service improvement and transformation, INAC will:

  • Modernize the procurement business processes, as part of a multi-year plan, in order to enhance client service and process control.
  • Implement a grants and contributions risk-based compliance and assurance framework that integrates and standardizes departmental grant and contribution oversight activities (i.e., multi-year plan).
  • Strengthen the financial management capacity and maximize efficiencies within the Department to ensure optimal use of resources through the establishment of a cost centre of expertise and a corporate accounts receivable function.
  • Continue to support the Government of Canada's consolidation and standardization agenda with its work on web renewal, adoption of the federal enterprise document and records management systems (GCDOCS), application readiness for data-centre migration, and implementation of the human resource system managed by the federal government.
  • Continue to adopt and enhance information management and information technology solutions to advance the collection, management, reporting, and safeguarding of business information within the Department and with its partners.
  • Review INAC's staffing policies, tools and monitoring practices to align them with the new staffing framework from the Public Service Commission.
  • Strengthen the Department's talent management, performance management and innovative learning environment.
  • Finalize and implement a departmental workplace well-being strategy.

Section III: Supplementary Information

Future-Oriented Condensed Statement of Operations

The Future-Oriented Condensed Statement of Operations provides a general overview of Indigenous and Northern Affairs Canada's operations. The forecasted financial information on expenses and revenues is prepared on an accrual accounting basis to strengthen accountability and to improve transparency and financial management.

Because the Future-Oriented Condensed Statement of Operations is prepared on an accrual accounting basis, and the forecast and planned spending amounts presented in other sections of the Report on Plans and Priorities are prepared on an expenditure basis, amounts may differ.

A more detailed Future-Oriented Statement of Operations and associated notes, including a reconciliation of the net cost of operations to the requested authorities, are available on INAC's website.

Future-Oriented Condensed Statement of Operations
For the Year Ended March 31, 2016 (dollars)
Financial Information 2015–2016 Forecast Results 2016–2017 Planned Results Difference (2016–2017 Planned Results minus 2015–2016 Forecast Results)
Total expenses 8,637,114,793 6,760,046,375 −1,877,068,418
Total revenues 3,467,576 2,224,999 −1,242,577
Net cost of operations before government funding and transfers 8,633,647,216 6,757,821,376 −1,875,825,840
Expenses

Total expenses for 2016–2017 are planned at $6,760.05 million, representing a $1,877.07 million decrease from the previous year's forecasted total expenses of $8,637.11 million. Expenses by Strategic Outcome are as follows:

  • The People $3,634.1M (53.8%);
  • The Government $1,251.6M (18.5%);
  • The Land and Economy $1,498.9M (22.2%); and
  • The North $116.0M (1.7%).

The remainder of the total expenses include Internal Services in the amount of $253.0M (3.7%) and expenses incurred on behalf of the Government of Canada in the amount of $6.4M (0.1%).

Revenues

Total revenues for 2016–2017 are planned at $2.2 million, representing a $1.2 million decrease over the previous year's total revenues of $3.5 million. Respendable revenues from the provision of financial and administrative services represent $0.7 million (31.9%) of total revenues. Respendable revenues from the disposal of tangible capital assets, presented as miscellaneous revenue in the statement of operations, account for the remaining $1.5 million (68.1%).

Significant variances

Variances between the planned results for 2016–2017 and the 2015–2016 forecast results are largely attributable to the timing of key elements in the fiscal cycle. Planned results for 2016–2017 are based on the Main Estimates, which are the first step in the fiscal cycle. Additional significant funding and initiatives that were not approved in time to be included in the Main Estimates have not been included in the 2016–2017 planned results. This funding will be provided through Supplementary Estimates and it should be noted that over the past five years significant funding has been accessed through this process.

As well, another factor contributing to the variance between the planned results for 2016–2017 and the 2015–2016 estimated results is the forecasted change in the environmental liabilities and in the provision for claims and litigation. The forecasted change in the adjustment to the environmental liabilities and to the allowance for claims and litigation can be attributed to the projected remediation costs and the resolution of claims and litigation.

Supplementary Information Tables

The supplementary information tables listed in the 2016–17 Report on Plans and Priorities are available on INAC's website.

Tax Expenditures and Evaluations

The tax system can be used to achieve public policy objectives through the application of special measures such as low tax rates, exemptions, deductions, deferrals and credits. The Department of Finance Canada publishes cost estimates and projections for these measures each year in the Tax Expenditures and Evaluations publication. The tax measures presented in that publication are the responsibility of the Minister of Finance.


Section IV: Organizational Contact Information

Indigenous and Northern Affairs Canada

Les Terrasses de la Chaudière
10 Wellington Street, North Tower
Gatineau, Quebec
Mailing Address: Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0H4
Email: webmaster@aadnc-aandc.gc.ca

General and statistical inquiries and publication distribution
Telephone (toll-free): 1-800-567-9604
TTY (toll-free): 1-866-553-0554
Email: InfoPubs@aadnc-aandc.gc.ca

Departmental Library
Telephone: 819-997-0811
Email: Reference@aadnc-aandc.gc.ca

Media Inquiries — Communications
Telephone: 819-953-1160

Appendix: Definitions

Appropriation: Any authority of Parliament to pay money out of the Consolidated Revenue Fund.

budgetary expenditures: Operating and capital expenditures; transfer payments to other levels of government, organizations or individuals; and payments to Crown corporations.

Departmental Performance Report: Reports on an appropriated organization's actual accomplishments against the plans, priorities and expected results set out in the corresponding Reports on Plans and Priorities. These reports are tabled in Parliament in the fall.

full-time equivalent: A measure of the extent to which an employee represents a full person-year charge against a departmental budget. Full-time equivalents are calculated as a ratio of assigned hours of work to scheduled hours of work. Scheduled hours of work are set out in collective agreements.

Government of Canada outcomes: A set of 16 high-level objectives defined for the government as a whole, grouped in four spending areas: economic affairs, social affairs, international affairs and government affairs.

Management, Resources and Results Structure: A comprehensive framework that consists of an organization's inventory of programs, resources, results, performance indicators and governance information. Programs and results are depicted in their hierarchical relationship to each other and to the Strategic Outcome(s) to which they contribute. The Management, Resources and Results Structure is developed from the Program Alignment Architecture.

non-budgetary expenditures: Net outlays and receipts related to loans, investments and advances, which change the composition of the financial assets of the Government of Canada.

performance: What an organization did with its resources to achieve its results, how well those results compare to what the organization intended to achieve, and how well lessons learned have been identified.

performance indicator: A qualitative or quantitative means of measuring an output or outcome, with the intention of gauging the performance of an organization, program, policy or initiative respecting expected results.

performance reporting: The process of communicating evidence-based performance information. Performance reporting supports decision making, accountability and transparency.

planned spending: For Reports on Plans and Priorities (RPPs) and Departmental Performance Reports (DPRs), planned spending refers to those amounts that receive Treasury Board approval by February 1. Therefore, planned spending may include amounts incremental to planned expenditures presented in the Main Estimates.

A department is expected to be aware of the authorities that it has sought and received. The determination of planned spending is a departmental responsibility, and departments must be able to defend the expenditure and accrual numbers presented in their RPPs and DPRs.

plans: The articulation of strategic choices, which provides information on how an organization intends to achieve its priorities and associated results. Generally a plan will explain the logic behind the strategies chosen and tend to focus on actions that lead up to the expected result.

priorities: Plans or projects that an organization has chosen to focus and report on during the planning period. Priorities represent the things that are most important or what must be done first to support the achievement of the desired Strategic Outcome(s).

program: A group of related resource inputs and activities that are managed to meet specific needs and to achieve intended results and that are treated as a budgetary unit.

Program Alignment Architecture: A structured inventory of an organization's programs depicting the hierarchical relationship between programs and the Strategic Outcome(s) to which they contribute.

Report on Plans and Priorities: Provides information on the plans and expected performance of appropriated organizations over a three-year period. These reports are tabled in Parliament each spring.

results: An external consequence attributed, in part, to an organization, policy, program or initiative. Results are not within the control of a single organization, policy, program or initiative; instead they are within the area of the organization's influence.

statutory expenditures: Expenditures that Parliament has approved through legislation other than appropriation acts. The legislation sets out the purpose of the expenditures and the terms and conditions under which they may be made.

Strategic Outcome: A long-term and enduring benefit to Canadians that is linked to the organization's mandate, vision and core functions.

sunset program: A time-limited program that does not have an ongoing funding and policy authority. When the program is set to expire, a decision must be made whether to continue the program. In the case of a renewal, the decision specifies the scope, funding level and duration.

target: A measurable performance or success level that an organization, program or initiative plans to achieve within a specified time period. Targets can be either quantitative or qualitative.

voted expenditures: Expenditures that Parliament approves annually through an Appropriation Act. The Vote wording becomes the governing conditions under which these expenditures may be made.

whole-of-government framework: Maps the financial contributions of federal organizations receiving appropriations by aligning their Programs to a set of 16 government-wide, high-level outcome areas, grouped under four spending areas.

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