2014–15 Departmental Performance Report

QS: 6344-010-EE-A1
ISSN: 2368-5336
© Her Majesty the Queen in Right of Canada, represented by the Minister of Indigenous and Northern Affairs, 2015

Download PDF Version (1,045 Kb, 105 Pages)

Table of Contents

Minister's Message

The 2014–15 Departmental Performance Report for Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Canada and the Canadian Polar Commission (now Polar Knowledge Canada) outlines work achieved during 2014–2015 to make Canada a better place for Indigenous peoples and northern communities.

With any new Government comes new direction. For the Department, newly re-named Indigenous and Northern Affairs Canada, this translates to a positive, ambitious and hopeful vision with real changes. At the core of this new plan is a renewed relationship between Canada and Indigenous peoples — one based on reconciliation, recognition, rights, trust, respect, and a spirit of cooperation and partnership.

Reconciliation is not just an issue for Indigenous peoples; it is a Canadian issue, and I regard it as my most important task. Moving toward reconciliation means making progress on critical issues like education, housing, well-being and economic development. Our commitment to a renewed, nation-to-nation relationship will help meet these goals, create stronger communities and promote economic growth. Canada will also work alongside provinces and territories, and with First Nations, Métis and Inuit, to enact the recommendations of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission and continue the necessary process of truth telling and healing.

It is essential that we address the national tragedy of the disappearance and death of Indigenous women and girls. To this end, our Government will launch a national public inquiry into missing and murdered Indigenous women and girls in Canada. It will help this country take steps to address this urgent and serious issue.

A renewed Inuit-to-Crown relationship, and a commitment to serving as a true partner in addressing the challenges and opportunities in the North, is a sure path towards stronger communities and economic growth in that important region of Canada. We also look forward to working with Northerners to develop a comprehensive platform for the North to expand and update the Nutrition North Program, to ensure it is more transparent, effective, and accountable to Northerners and other Canadians.

It is a great honour to serve the people of Canada as Minister of Indigenous and Northern Affairs with a team that will deliver the kind of real change that all Canadians can be proud of.

The Honourable Carolyn Bennett, M.D., P.C., M.P.
Minister of Indigenous and Northern Affairs


Section I: Organizational Expenditure Overview

Organizational Profile

Minister: The Honourable Carolyn Bennett
The Honourable Bernard Valcourt (responsible Minister for 2014–2015)

Ministerial Portfolio: Department of Indian Affairs and Northern Development

Enabling Instrument: Department of Indian Affairs and Northern Development Act, R.S.C. 1985, c. I-6

Year of Incorporation: 1880

Other:
Special Operating Agency: Indian Oil and Gas Canada

Statutory and Other Agencies:

  • Indian Residential Schools Truth and Reconciliation Commission
  • Inuvialuit Arbitration Board
  • Registry of the Specific Claims Tribunal

Departmental Corporation: Canadian Polar Commission

Crown Corporation: Corporation for the Mitigation of Mackenzie Gas Project Impacts

Shared-Governance Corporations:

  • Aboriginal Healing Foundation
  • First Nations Financial Management Board
  • First Nations Tax Commission

Organizational Context

Raison d'être

Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Canada (AANDC) supports Aboriginal peoples (First Nations, Inuit and Métis) and Northerners in their efforts to:

  • Improve social well-being and economic prosperity;
  • Develop healthier, more sustainable communities; and
  • Participate more fully in Canada's political, social and economic development — to the benefit of all Canadians.

Responsibilities

The Department is responsible for two mandates, Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development, which together support Canada's Aboriginal and northern peoples in the pursuit of healthy and sustainable communities, and broader economic and social development objectives. Efforts are guided by the Department's mission statement:

Working together to make Canada a better place for Aboriginal and northern peoples and communities.

The mandate for Aboriginal Affairs is derived from a number of sources, including the following:

A broad suite of legislation designed to provide First Nations with jurisdictional powers outside the Indian Act further defines AANDC's mandate, including the following:

In addition, the Government of Canada has passed the First Nations Financial Transparency Act, designed to apply the same principles of transparency and accountability to First Nation governments that already exist for other governments in Canada.

The Department's mandate is also shaped by specific statutes enabling modern treaties and implementation of agreements. These include the following:

Moreover, policy and program practices, as well as judicial decisions shape the Department's mandate.

AANDC negotiates claims and self-government agreements on behalf of the Government of Canada. The Department is responsible for implementing its obligations under these agreements, as well as overseeing the implementation of obligations of other government departments flowing from these agreements. AANDC also provides support for services on reserves, such as education, housing, community infrastructure and social support to Status Indians on reserves; administers the land management component of the Indian Act; and executes other regulatory duties under the Indian Act.

The Minister acts as the Government of Canada's primary interlocutor for Métis, Non-Status Indians and urban Aboriginal peoples. The Department serves as a focal point for Inuit issues, and supports the inclusion of Inuit-specific concerns in federal program and policy development.

The Northern Development mandate derives from a number of sources, including the following:

Through its Northern Development mandate, AANDC is the lead federal department for two-fifths of Canada's landmass, with a direct role in the political and economic development of the territories, and significant responsibilities for science, land, and environmental management. In the North, the territorial governments generally provide the majority of social programs and services to all Northerners, including Aboriginal peoples.

The Canadian High Arctic Research Station Act, which received Royal Assent on December 16, 2014 and came into force on June 1, 2015, established Polar Knowledge Canada a new federal research organization. This new organization combines the mandate and functions of the Canadian Polar Commission and the Canadian High Arctic Research Station's Science and Technology Program led by Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Canada. The new organization is responsible for advancing Canada's knowledge of the Arctic and strengthening Canadian leadership in polar science and technologyFootnote 1.

Strategic Outcomes and Program Alignment Architecture

1 Strategic Outcome: The GovernmentSupport good governance, rights and interests of Aboriginal peoples

  • 1.1 Program: Governance and Institutions of Government
    • 1.1.1 Sub-Program: First Nation Governments
    • 1.1.2 Sub-Program: Aboriginal Governance Institutions and Organizations
  • 1.2 Program: Aboriginal Rights and Interests
    • 1.2.1 Sub-Program: Negotiations of Claims and Self-Government Agreements
    • 1.2.2 Sub-Program: Specific Claims
    • 1.2.3 Sub-Program: Consultation and Accommodation
    • 1.2.4 Sub-Program: Métis and Non-Status Indian Relations and Métis Rights Management
  • 1.3 Program: Management and Implementation of Agreements and Treaties

2 Strategic Outcome: The PeopleIndividual, family and community well-being for First Nations and Inuit

  • 2.1 Program: Education
    • 2.1.1 Sub-Program: Elementary and Secondary Education
    • 2.1.2 Sub-Program: Post-Secondary Education
  • 2.2 Program: Social Development
    • 2.2.1 Sub-Program: Income Assistance
    • 2.2.2 Sub-Program: National Child Benefit
    • 2.2.3 Sub-Program: Assisted Living
    • 2.2.4 Sub-Program: First Nations Child and Family Services
    • 2.2.5 Sub-Program: Family Violence Prevention
  • 2.3 Program: First Nations Individual Affairs
    • 2.3.1 Sub-Program: Registration and Membership
    • 2.3.2 Sub-Program: Estates
  • 2.4 Program: Residential Schools Resolution
    • 2.4.1 Sub-Program: Common Experience Payments
    • 2.4.2 Sub-Program: Independent Assessment Process
    • 2.4.3 Sub-Program: Reconciliation
    • 2.4.4 Sub-Program: Support to the Truth and Reconciliation Commission

3 Strategic Outcome: The Land and EconomyFull participation of First Nations, Métis, Non-Status Indians and Inuit individuals and communities in the economy

  • 3.1 Program: Aboriginal Entrepreneurship
    • 3.1.1 Sub-Program: Business Capital and Support Services
    • 3.1.2 Sub-Program: Business Opportunities
  • 3.2 Program: Community Development
    • 3.2.1 Sub-Program: Lands and Economic Development Services
    • 3.2.2 Sub-Program: Investment in Economic Opportunities
    • 3.2.3 Sub-Program: Administration of Reserve Land
    • 3.2.4 Sub-Program: Contaminated Sites (On Reserve)
  • 3.3 Program: Strategic Partnerships
  • 3.4 Program: Infrastructure and Capacity
    • 3.4.1 Sub-Program: Water and Wastewater
    • 3.4.2 Sub-Program: Education Facilities
    • 3.4.3 Sub-Program: Housing
    • 3.4.4 Sub-Program: Other Community Infrastructure and Activities
    • 3.4.5 Sub-Program: Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency
    • 3.4.6 Sub-Program: Emergency Management Assistance
  • 3.5 Program: Urban Aboriginal Participation

4 Strategic Outcome: The NorthSelf-reliance, prosperity and well-being for the people and communities of the North

  • 4.1 Program: Northern Governance and People
    • 4.1.1 Sub-Program: Political Development and Intergovernmental Relations
    • 4.1.2 Sub-Program: Nutrition North
    • 4.1.3 Sub-Program: Climate Change Adaptation
  • 4.2 Program: Northern Science and Technology
    • 4.2.1 Sub-Program: Northern Contaminants
    • 4.2.2 Sub-Program: Science Initiatives
  • 4.3 Program: Northern Land, Resources and Environmental Management
    • 4.3.1 Sub-Program: Petroleum and Minerals
    • 4.3.2 Sub-Program: Contaminated Sites
    • 4.3.3 Sub-Program: Land and Water Management

5.1 Program: Internal Services

Organizational Priorities

In its 2014–15 Report on Plans and Priorities, AANDC identified three ongoing priorities.

  1. Transforming for Improved Results
  2. Improving Partnerships and Relationships
  3. Managing Resources Effectively
Priority 1: Transforming for Improved Results — TypeFootnote 2: ongoing

Strengthening and Reforming Education
Aligned to The People Strategic Outcome

Summary of Progress

To strengthen and reform education, in 2014–2015 the Department accomplished the following:

  • Continued to look for opportunities to work with First Nations and First Nation partners to improve education outcomes for First Nation children and youth.
  • Funded 24 proposals under the First Nation Student Success Program and the Education Partnerships Program. These proposals support structural readiness through targeted funding for organizational capacity development in core areas such as: governance and leadership, parental/community involvement, planning/performance measurement and risk management, financial management, human resource management and organizational planning.
  • Invited existing program recipients under the First Nation Student Success Program and the Education Partnerships Program to submit updated 2015–2016 proposals/work plans for activities relating to school success planning, student learning assessments and performance measurement. The majority of submissions were assessed and approved in March 2015.

Empowering Citizens
Aligned to The People, The Government and The Land and Economy Strategic Outcomes

Summary of Progress

To support the empowerment of citizens, in 2014–2015 the Department accomplished the following:

  • Continued to support Enhanced Service Delivery — a new approach to social assistance — moving from passive to active measures. Enhanced Service Delivery improved employment readiness of community members through pre-employment supports and skills training and support services for those transitioning from Income Assistance to employment. Enhanced Service Delivery providers continued to build their capacity and expand the implementation of the Program in 2014–2015.
  • Continued to work with provinces and Yukon Territory to strengthen delivery of protection and prevention services to First Nations women and children.
  • Prepared the business case for an integrated, client-centric case management system to replace four current applications: the Indian Registration System; the Secure Certificate of Indian Status; the Treaty Payment System; and the Estate Reporting System. Once implemented, the new system will provide better controls and reporting capability, improve efficiency and facilitate electronic access to clients.
  • Developed and ratified a new form of trust agreement with one First Nation that includes a provision allowing it to administer the estates of minors who are band members. An additional arrangement is under development with this same First Nation to facilitate the option of the band administering the estates of their dependent adult members. Such alternatives are helping to advance the development of alternative approaches for carrying out the estates regime under the Indian Act.

Improving Economic Development and Job Creations
Aligned to The Land and Economy Strategic Outcome

Summary of Progress

To improve economic development and job creation, in 2014–2015 the Department accomplished the following:

  • Concluded consultations with Aboriginal organizations that will enable the National Aboriginal Capital Corporations Association to administer a suite of revised programs and mechanisms in support of the Aboriginal Financial Institutions network.
  • Facilitated transition of the administration of the revised programs and mechanisms to the National Aboriginal Capital Corporations Association to increase efficiency, effectiveness and Aboriginal control in access to capital by Aboriginal businesses.
  • Developed an Aboriginal procurement framework pilot to be assessed for effectiveness in 2015–2016.
  • Developed a land and environmental management modernization framework to address key policy and process gaps and to effectively implement fiduciary and statutory obligations on commercial leasing, designation and the environmental review process.
  • Advanced the implementation of the Federal Framework for Aboriginal Economic Development; continued the implementation of consolidated lands and economic development programming, including reducing administrative and reporting burdens; and strengthened coordination of Aboriginal economic development and land and environmental management programming, including economic infrastructure development. Additionally, Budget 2013 investments provided for expansion of the First Nations Land Management Regime by 28 new entrants.
  • Developed consultation drafts to modernize the regulation of oil and gas on reserve lands, in partnership with the Indian Resource Council of Canada and a Joint Technical Committee.
  • Addressed barriers to economic development on reserve, guided by broad policy goals on regulatory and institutional gaps. Key initiatives under the policy agenda included an Assembly of First Nation–AANDC Working Group on Natural Resources Development which submitted its final report in February 2015.
  • Developed a Structural Mitigation Funding Framework and Ranking Tool to better prioritize mitigation infrastructure projects and established a stream of funding to address non-structural mitigation and preparedness projects to roll out in 2015–2016 to support First Nations in protecting their communities against damages caused by natural disasters and emergency situations.
  • Partnered with the Métis National Council to develop and advance a Métis Economic Development Action Plan and held the Métis Economic Development Symposium III in March 2015. The Action Plan and the Symposium outlined economic development priorities for Métis and their businesses and discussed options for promoting Métis economic outcomes.

Sustaining the Momentum of the Northern Strategy
Aligned to The North Strategic Outcome

Summary of Progress

AANDC continued coordinating federal efforts on northern initiatives. The Department also advanced a number of key initiatives to support the development of sustainable northern communities, while simultaneously fostering a more conducive business environment.

In 2014–2015 the Department accomplished the following:

  • Completed the devolution of lands and resources management responsibilities to the Government of the Northwest Territories.
  • Advanced negotiations towards the completion of an agreement-in-principle for the devolution of lands and resources management responsibilities to the Government of Nunavut.
  • Continued to support isolated northern communities' access to perishable nutritious food by providing a retail subsidy under the Nutrition North Canada Program.
  • Started the construction of the Canadian High Arctic Research Station and launched the Science and Technology Program during summer 2014. Following Royal Assent of the Canadian High Arctic Research Station Act in December 2014, progress was made towards the establishment of the new Polar Knowledge Canada organization.
  • Worked towards the completion of the final legislative component of the Action Plan to improve Northern Regulatory Regimes.
  • Completed the implementation of the Beaufort Regional Environmental Assessment initiative in partnership with the Inuvialuit, industry, governments, regulators and academia.
  • Continued to address the high-risk elements at Giant Mine and Faro Mine, completed the construction of the Faro Mine's interim water treatment plant and the deconstruction of Giant Mine's roaster complex, and sustained progress on the management of over 115 sites in the Northern Contaminated Sites Program portfolio.
Priority 2: Improving Partnerships and Relationships — Type: ongoing

Advancing Reconciliation
Aligned to The People Strategic Outcome

Summary of Progress

To advance reconciliation, in 2014–2015 the Department accomplished the following:

  • The Indian Act Amendment and Replacement Act (previously known as Bill C-428) was passed. This legislation repealed sections 114 to 122 of the Indian Act, removing all sections that referenced residential schools allowing for the forcible removal of children from their homes to attend residential schools.
  • Continued implementation of components of the Indian Residential Schools Settlement Agreement (IRSSA), such as the Common Experience Payment and the Independent Assessment Process. Progress was also made preparing materials for distribution and engaging stakeholders to promote awareness of the Independent Assessment Process.
  • Supported resolution of claims under the Independent Assessment Process by implementing the Interpreter Strategy, approving 13 contribution agreements under the Group Independent Assessment Process Program, and starting a comprehensive final report on the achievements of the Independent Assessment Process objectives, anticipated for completion in 2016.
  • Developed a plan for completing the implementation of Personal Credits (part of the Common Experience Payment component of the IRSSA) in late summer 2015. As of March 31, 2015, 30,325 Personal Credits applications had been received, and over $4.4 million had been processed.
  • Implemented the Incomplete File Resolution process and Lost Claimant Protocol to improve claimant experience and bring about a final resolution to continuing claims through the Independent Assessment Process.
  • Prepared for the Department's participation in the closing events of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission (held May 31 to June 3, 2015), including the announcement of gestures of reconciliation.
  • Extended the timeline for disclosing documents held at Library and Archives Canada to the Truth and Reconciliation Commission to January 7, 2016, given the higher than expected volume of documents. It is estimated that between 700,000 and 1,000,000 documents will ultimately be disclosed to the Truth and Reconciliation Commission by the end of its mandate.

Facilitating Community Development and Capacity
Aligned to The Government and The Land and Economy Strategic Outcomes

Summary of Progress

To facilitate community development and capacity, in 2014–2015 the Department accomplished the following:

  • Implemented the First Nations Financial Transparency Act, and worked with other federal partners to develop collaborative approaches to supporting First Nations capacity development.
  • Continued the renewal of the Additions to Reserve Policy. Comments on a new draft policy were received from First Nations, municipal and provincial governments and other stakeholders, including 19 First Nations organizations.
  • Facilitated First Nations community development and capacity building in economic development and land and environmental management, through collaboration with Aboriginal institutional partners. Innovative pilot projects in land use planning and joint strategic economic development planning between First Nations and municipalities are building better relationships and laying the groundwork for successful economic development opportunities.
  • Invested $14.5 million in 18 initiatives across the country through the Strategic Partnership Initiative, including the Ring of Fire, Labrador Trough, and Northern Biomass initiatives.
  • Made targeted investments in the Circuit Rider Training Program and other water- and wastewater-related training activities designed to address high-risk factors, such as capacity, training, operation and maintenance. This resulted in the Program exceeding its two targets for operators certified to the level of the drinking water or wastewater system they operate.
  • Continued to work with First Nations to deliver the Capital Facilities and Maintenance Program and developed technical tools: the Priority Ranking Framework for Water and Wastewater Projects was updated; the Structural Mitigation Funding Framework and ranking tool were completed to prioritize structural mitigation projects; and the School Priority Ranking Framework was refined.
  • Explored alternative ways to finance and procure community infrastructure by collaborating with private sector financial institutions as well as First Nations financial experts to address barriers to First Nations' access to private capital. In addition, social finance partnerships developed over the last year, continued to provide insight into the closing of these gaps in high-need communities.
  • Launched, in collaboration with Health Canada, an engagement process with First Nations and other stakeholders to develop regulations under the Safe Drinking Water for First Nations Act.

Negotiating and Implementing Claims and Self-Government Agreements
Aligned to The Government Strategic Outcome

Summary of Progress

To negotiate and implement claims and self-government agreements, in 2014–2015 the Department accomplished the following:

  • Continued to address section 35 rights of the Constitution Act, 1982 through the negotiation of comprehensive land claims and self-government agreements and the effective implementation of modern treaties currently in effect. The benefits of comprehensive land claims agreements include greater legal certainty with respect to the use and ownership of lands and resources and the reduction of barriers that impede development.
  • Focused resources on negotiations tables with the greatest potential for success. Progress in negotiations represents greater clarity over use, management and ownership of lands and resources, and facilitation of economic self-sufficiency for Aboriginal groups and communities while promoting economic growth for all Canadians.
  • Led engagement with Aboriginal groups and key stakeholders to renew the Comprehensive Land Claims Policy. A final report summarizing recommendations was submitted to the former Minister for public release.
  • Continued to manage and oversee the implementation of 27 agreements, including 24 comprehensive land claims, from which 16 include self-government agreements, and 3 sectoral stand-alone self-government agreements.
  • Made considerable progress under the British Columbia treaty process:
    • the Tla'amin Final Agreement was signed on April 11, 2014 and Royal Assent of the Tla'amin Nation Final Agreement Act was received on June 19, 2014; and
    • the Te'mexw Treaty Association, comprising five bands, ratified its agreement-in-principle and signed the agreement with Canada and British Columbia on April 9, 2015.
  • Engaged with over 30 departments and agencies on the negotiation and implementation of modern treaties to promote awareness and oversight of federal obligations under the treaties.
  • Continued to resolve specific claims through negotiated settlement agreements. Fifteen settlement agreements were concluded and financial compensation in the amount of $35,972,152.64 was paid-out. Resolving specific claims fairly and expeditiously addresses the legal rights of, and provides justice to, First Nations. It also discharges outstanding legal obligations of the Crown, and provides certainty for all Canadians.

Increase Partnering to Ensure Programs Are More Responsive

Accomplishments are outlined separately on the departmental website.

Priority 3: Managing Resources Effectively — Type: ongoing

Leading Improvements to the Management of the Funding Cycle to Recipients

Implementing the Results of the Administrative Shared Services Review

Implementing Public Service Renewal and Supporting the Excellence Agenda via Blueprint 2020

Accomplishments for this priority are outlined on the departmental website.

Risk Analysis

Risk Risk Response Strategy Link to Program Alignment Architecture
Aboriginal Relationship Risk
There is a risk that AANDC will not build and sustain strong, productive and respectful relationships with Aboriginal people, communities, organizations and governments to contribute to the delivery of its mandate.
  • Continue engagement with Aboriginal communities and leaders to support program reform and better align with community needs. Ongoing program reforms aim to improve the quality, efficiency and/or communications about services delivered.
  • Continue to focus on high-level engagements with Aboriginal leaders in search of a common understanding of policy and program priorities.
  • Increase use of social-media and web-based tools to communicate the services and programs delivered by AANDC and strengthen linkages to Aboriginal persons.
  • Implement new approaches to treaties and active involvement in the negotiation and implementation of claims and self-government agreements.
  • Undertake pilot projects to explore best practices in First Nations education systems.
  • Support for activities such as comprehensive community planning and First Nation to First Nation learning through mentorship.
  • Pursue ongoing negotiations with First Nations and provinces to deliver Education and Social programs ensuring buy-in and integration of service delivery.
Aboriginal Relationship Risk is linked to and impacts all areas of the PAA.
Legal Risk
There is a risk that AANDC will not be able to effectively plan for, or respond to, legal risks that impact the activities of the Department.
  • Brought together resource allocation and priority setting using a risk-based management lens through the annual AANDC-Department of Justice Memorandum of Understanding for legal services.
  • Made advancements on the eDiscoveryFootnote 3 file working both intra and inter-departmentally. To complement the Directive — Discovery of Litigation Relevant Information, AANDC has standardized the litigation hold process to ensure departmental legal obligations are met.
  • Risk scales have been developed to facilitate sophisticated categorization, measurement and description of non-legal risk stemming from litigation to manage AANDC's litigation with a view to mitigating not only the legal risk but also the operation, business, financial and policy/program risks.
  • Refinements to AANDC's litigation case management system allow for advanced search capability and more efficient reporting against the departmental litigation case inventory.
  • Develop lessons learned based on experiences collecting modern documents, to inform procedures both for document retention and collection in the context of litigation. AANDC and the Department of Justice have developed a Best Practices Protocol for Streamlining the Document Production Process.
  • An eLearning script entitled "How to Frame a Legal Issue When Approaching the Department of Justice" has been developed as a training tool for AANDC employees.
Legal Risk is linked to and impacts all areas of the PAA.
Environmental Risk
There is a risk that AANDC will be unable to manage environmental issues and liabilities in a timely and cost-effective manner.
  • The resources allocated under the Federal Contaminated Sites Action Plan are being used to address high-risk contaminated sites through robust governance and oversight of site management, which allows the Department to efficiently identify and manage risks to human health, the environment, and the economy. In addition, a rigorous process is in place to account for the liability of contaminated sites on federal land.
  • Provide guidance on the safe handling of fuel, as well as the removal and/or replacement of non-compliant fuel tanks on reserve lands.
  • Develop and implement an Environmental Review Process, pursuant to the Canadian Environmental Assessment Act, 2012, that ensures economic and infrastructure developments on federal reserve lands avoid negative impacts on the environment.
  • Support community vulnerability assessments and adaptation planning to address the impacts of climate change. A departmental assessment has been completed that identifies specific programs vulnerable to the impacts of climate change.
  • Address Northerners' concerns about contaminants in traditional foods through ongoing monitoring and research and facilitating risk communications with northern health authorities, Aboriginal organizations and other stakeholders.
  • Facilitate the collection, analysis and dissemination of information regarding the ecosystemic and socio-economic environment in the Nunavut Settlement Area, enabling the Department to monitor environmental changes over time.
  • Consider sustainable development and environmental risks as part of AANDC's efforts to support the implementation of the Federal Sustainable Development Strategy. Environmental management is integral to the policies and procedures guiding the development of reserve land under the Indian Act. Additionally, AANDC provides funding to First Nations to strengthen environmental prevention capacity.
Environmental Risk is linked to and impacts all areas of the PAA.

AANDC faces many challenges and opportunities as it delivers its mandate and contributes to the achievement of the Government of Canada's priorities and commitments. AANDC funds or delivers programs and services to diverse groups of people and individuals who have varied and distinct needs and priorities. Those programs and services are delivered to communities large and small, urban and remote, all across the country. Most of AANDC's services are delivered through partnerships with Aboriginal communities, the provinces and territories, Aboriginal organizations and organizations in the North. The Department's responsibilities are largely shaped by unique demographic and geographic factors, as well as centuries of Canadian history that includes the signing and implementation of treaties and the consequences of court decisions.

The table highlights the three risks, which are driven by factors or uncertainties outside of the Department's control. Aboriginal Relationship Risk relates to the need to foster and maintain a broad spectrum of relationships with Aboriginal communities, persons and the organizations that represent them. To truly succeed in the long-term, the Department must continue to build open and trusting partnerships with Aboriginal people. Legal Risk recognizes that AANDC policies, programs and activities may result in litigation, therefore mitigating tools need to be in place. Environmental Risk refers to ongoing challenges of balancing economic development opportunities with environmental protection and remediation and implementing measures to address this risk. Risk response strategies to address risks internal to the Department, such as Information for Decision-Making Risk and Implementation Risk, have also been put in place.

A well-defined governance structure has been established within AANDC to implement and sustain effective risk-management practices throughout the Department, as set out in the AANDC Integrated Risk Management Framework, and embedded within the Department's governance structures.

Key to AANDC's risk management approach are the Corporate Risk Profile (CRP), program risk profiles, and region/sector risk assessments that serve as primary risk management tools at each level. At the Corporate level, the annual CRP update and Corporate Business Planning processes serve as the primary means of assessing and planning to respond to corporate risks. The results in the table outline a point in time assessment of the highest risks facing AANDC. This assessment feeds directly into the corporate business planning process of the Department.

Actual Expenditures

Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Canada
2014–2015 Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars) 2014–2015 Human Resources (FTEs)
Main Estimates Planned Spending Total Authorities Available for Use Actual Spending (Authorities Used) Difference (Actual Minus Planned) Planned Actual Difference (Actual Minus Planned)
8,053,975,405 8,053,975,405 8,730,597,310 7,691,653,138 (362,322,267) 4,703 4,648.7 (54.3)
Due to rounding, FTE figures may not add up to total shown.
Budgetary Performance Summary for Strategic Outcomes and Programs (dollars)
Strategic Outcomes, Programs and Internal Services 2014–2015 Main Estimates 2014–2015 Planned Spending 2015–2016 Planned Spending 2016–2017 Planned Spending 2014–2015 Total Authorities Available for Use 2014–2015 Actual Spending (Authorities Used) 2013–2014 Actual Spending (Authorities Used) 2012–2013 Actual Spending (Authorities Used)
Strategic Outcome: The Government
Governance and Institutions of Government 398,449,544 398,449,544 389,416,006 389,179,639 426,350,542 422,226,591 484,218,256 484,410,694
Aboriginal Rights and Interests1 826,318,323 826,318,323 868,880,226 845,138,033 850,123,995 173,531,547 485,123,423 674,086,734
Management and Implementation of Agreements and Treaties2 719,340,126 719,340,126 740,282,191 792,625,691 757,504,293 749,933,655 715,832,560 717,808,669
Subtotal 1,944,107,993 1,944,107,993 1,998,578,423 2,026,943,363 2,033,978,830 1,345,691,793 1,685,174,239 1,876,306,097
Strategic Outcome: The People
Education 1,798,304,555 1,798,304,555 1,779,502,873 1,810,138,112 1,789,854,739 1,788,854,310 1,775,804,549 1,734,756,058
Social Development 1,666,669,213 1,666,669,213 1,711,936,209 1,751,974,423 1,743,672,380 1,733,443,753 1,723,318,991 1,709,912,535
First Nations Individual Affairs3 25,228,617 25,228,617 25,732,113 25,723,607 29,053,812 28,426,563 33,836,437 37,059,921
Residential Schools Resolution 646,415,026 646,415,026 441,605,934 0 660,297,962 492,880,678 574,379,693 593,297,435
Subtotal 4,136,617,411 4,136,617,411 3,958,777,129 3,587,836,142 4,222,878,893 4,043,605,304 4,107,339,670 4,075,025,949
Strategic Outcome: The Land and Economy
Aboriginal Entrepreneurship 49,640,071 49,640,071 42,637,318 42,637,318 43,027,380 43,027,380 n/a n/a
Community Development 196,637,835 196,637,835 213,382,395 206,871,466 254,318,655 218,047,705 n/a n/a
Strategic Partnerships 24,738,453 24,738,453 39,586,727 39,586,727 33,930,706 33,668,724 n/a n/a
Infrastructure and Capacity4 1,160,687,268 1,160,687,268 1,252,453,270 1,119,493,600 1,313,930,953 1,266,710,553 1,038,948,588 1,073,406,412
Urban Aboriginal Participation 40,014,054 40,014,054 53,457,622 29,679,663 49,569,445 49,520,444 51,708,349 n/a
Aboriginal Economic Development5 n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a 224,607,972 238,105,460
Federal Administration of Reserve Land6 n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a 133,423,081 112,438,523
Subtotal 1,471,717,681 1,471,717,681 1,601,517,332 1,438,268,774 1,694,777,139 1,610,974,806 1,448,687,990 1,423,950,395
Strategic Outcome: The North
Northern Governance and People 130,218,356 130,218,356 150,430,663 132,180,760 150,273,247 146,407,862 170,331,482 136,472,218
Northern Science and Technology 7,320,522 7,320,522 48,961,314 63,036,220 46,683,870 40,827,871 13,504,948 12,862,568
Northern Land, Resources and Environmental Management 120,402,745 120,402,745 195,493,907 38,888,485 262,578,542 212,493,747 238,498,638 176,818,376
Subtotal 257,941,623 257,941,623 394,885,884 234,105,465 459,535,659 399,729,480 422,335,068 326,153,162
Strategic Outcome: Office of the Federal Interlocutor (Pursuant to the revised Program Alignment Architecture for 2013–2014, the Office of the Federal Interlocutor Strategic Outcome was reorganized/realigned in 2013–2014 and future years.)
Urban Aboriginal Strategy7 n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a 52,255,804
Métis and Non-Status Indian Organizational Capacity Development8 n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a 14,814,062
Métis Rights Management9 n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a 7,870,718
Subtotal n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a 74,940,584
Internal Services 243,590,697 243,590,697 233,659,100 226,027,679 319,426,789 291,651,755 375,954,708 318,766,155
Total 8,053,975,405 8,053,975,405 8,187,417,868 7,513,181,423 8,730,597,310 7,691,653,138 8,039,491,675 8,095,142,342
  1. Previously entitled Co-operative Relationships (renamed under the 2014–2015 PAA). The difference between Total Authorities and Actual Spending primarily reflects re-profiling of the Specific Claims settlement funds not required this fiscal year.
  2. Previously entitled Treaty Management (renamed under the 2014–2015 PAA).
  3. Previously entitled Managing Individual Affairs (renamed under the 2014–2015 PAA).
  4. Renamed Infrastructure and Capacity under the 2014–2015 PAA.
  5. The Aboriginal Economic Development Program was restructured under the new PAA for 2014–2015, with the funding realigned to the Aboriginal Entrepreneurship, Community Development and Strategic Partnerships programs.
  6. The Federal Administration of Reserve Land Program was restructured under the new PAA for 2014–2015, with the funding realigned to the Community Development and Infrastructure and Capacity programs.
  7. Funding for 2013–2014 and future years was realigned to the Urban Aboriginal Participation Program pursuant to the revised PAA for 2013–2014.
  8. Funding for 2013–2014 and future years was realigned to the Governance and Institutions of Government and Co-operative Relationships programs pursuant to the revised PAA for 2013–2014.
  9. Funding for 2013–2014 and future years was realigned to the Co-operative Relationships Program pursuant to the revised PAA for 2013–2014.

The $677 million increase between Planned Spending ($8,054 million) and Total Authorities Available for Use ($8,731 million) in 2014–2015 primarily reflects additional funding provided through Supplementary Estimates for: the assessment, management and remediation of federal contaminated sites; renewal of the First Nations Water and Wastewater Action Plan; comprehensive claims and self-government negotiations across Canada; a comprehensive and sustainable approach to on-reserve emergency management and for on-reserve response and recovery activities; Operation Return; and the Canadian High Arctic Research Station and the implementation of the associated Science and Technology Program.

The $1,039 million difference between Total Authorities Available for Use ($8,731 million) and Actual Spending ($7,692 million) in 2014–2015 primarily reflects the actual value of specific claims settled during the fiscal year, as well as the deferral under Residential School funding associated with the Independent Assessment Process settlement payments and delivery funding for continued implementation of the Indian Residential Schools Settlement Agreement. Funding for these initiatives that was not required in 2014–2015 has been re-profiled to future years when it will be available for the intended purpose.

Additional details by program and sub-program are provided in Section II.

Canadian Polar Commission

2014–2015 Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars) 2014–2015 Human Resources (FTEs)
Main Estimates Planned Spending Total Authorities Available for Use Actual Spending (Authorities Used) Difference (Actual Minus Planned) Planned Actual Difference (Actual Minus Planned)
2,576,360 2,576,360 2,588,377 2,355,267 (221,093) 9 13 4
Budgetary Performance Summary for Strategic Outcomes and Programs (dollars)
Strategic Outcomes, Programs and Internal Services 2014–2015 Main Estimates 2014–2015 Planned Spending 2015–2016 Planned Spending 2016–2017 Planned Spending 2014–2015 Total Authorities Available for Use 2014–2015 Actual Spending (Authorities Used) 2013–2014 Actual Spending (Authorities Used) 2012–2013 Actual Spending (Authorities Used)
Strategic Outcome: Increased Canadian Polar Knowledge
Research Facilitation and Communication 2,095,000 2,095,000 2,087,258 2,086,298 2,104,613 2,049,937 2,259,236 988,110
Internal Services 481,360 481,360 486,827 486,587 483,764 305,330 330,773 329,625
Total 2,576,360 2,576,360 2,574,085 2,572,885 2,588,377 2,355,267 2,590,009 1,317,735

Alignment of Spending with the Whole-of-Government Framework

Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Canada

Alignment of 2014–2015 Actual Spending with the Whole-of-Government Framework
Strategic Outcomes and Programs Spending Area Government of Canada Outcome 2014–2015 Actual Spending (dollars)
Strategic Outcome: The Government
Governance and Institutions of Government Social Affairs A diverse society that promotes linguistic duality and social inclusion 422,226,591
Aboriginal Rights and Interests Social Affairs 173,531,547
Management and Implementation of Agreements and Treaties Economic Affairs Strong economic growth 749,933,655
Strategic Outcome: The People
Education Social Affairs A diverse society that promotes linguistic duality and social inclusion 1,788,854,310
Social Development Social Affairs 1,733,443,753
First Nations Individual Affairs Social Affairs 28,426,563
Residential Schools Resolution Social Affairs 492,880,678
Strategic Outcome: The Land and Economy
Aboriginal Entrepreneurship Economic Affairs Strong economic growth 43,027,380
Community Development Economic Affairs 218,047,705
Strategic Partnerships Economic Affairs 33,668,724
Infrastructure and Capacity Economic Affairs 1,266,710,553
Urban Aboriginal Participation Economic Affairs Income security and employment for Canadians 49,520,444
Strategic Outcome: The North
Northern Governance and People Social Affairs Healthy Canadians 146,407,862
Northern Science and Technology Economic Affairs An innovative and knowledge-based economy 40,827,871
Northern Land, Resources and Environmental Management Economic Affairs A clean and healthy environment 212,493,747
Total Spending by Spending Area (dollars)
Spending Area Total Planned Spending (dollars) Total Actual Spending
Economic Affairs 2,318,781,074 2,614,230,079
Social Affairs 5,491,603,634 4,785,771,304
International Affairs n/a n/a
Government Affairs n/a n/a
Note: Excludes Internal Services.

Canadian Polar Commission

Alignment of 2014–2015 Actual Spending with the Whole-of-Government Framework
Strategic Outcome Program Spending Area Government of Canada Outcome 2014–2015 Actual Spending (dollars)
Increased Canadian Polar Knowledge Research Facilitation and Communication Economic Affairs A clean and healthy environment 2,049,937
Total Spending by Spending Area (dollars)
Spending Area Total Planned Spending (dollars) Total Actual Spending
Economic Affairs 2,095,000 2,049,937

Departmental Spending Trend

AANDC's Actual Spending for 2014–2015 was $7.7 billion, a net decrease of about $0.4 billion from $8.1 billion in 2012–2013. This net decrease of $0.4 billion is primarily a result of decreases for the following major items:

  • specific claims due to the value of settlements for the 2014–2015 fiscal year being lower than for the 2012–2013 fiscal year;
  • implementation of the Indian Residential Schools Settlement Agreement; and
  • implementation of the savings identified as part of Budget 2012.

These decreases over the period from 2012–2013 to 2014–2015 are partially offset by additional funding provided:

  • to meet the demand for ongoing First Nation and Inuit programs and services (2% allowance for inflation and population growth);
  • through Budget 2012 for the development of systems and supports to ensure readiness for First Nation education legislation and to support the construction and/or renovation of schools on reserve; and
  • for the assessment, management and remediation of federal contaminated sites.

Spending diminishes by about $0.7 billion over the period from 2014–2015 ($7.7 billion) to 2017–2018 ($7.0 billion) mainly because of decreases related to the sunset of targeted funding, namely:

  • sunset of targeted funding for implementation of the Indian Residential Schools Settlement Agreement;
  • sunset of targeted funding of investments provided in Budget 2012 and 2014 to improve First Nations education and water infrastructure; and
  • sunset of targeted funding for the assessment, management and remediation of federal contaminated sites.

Decisions on the renewal of these sunset initiatives will be taken in future budgets and reflected in future estimates.

These decreases over the period from 2014–2015 to 2017–2018 are partially offset by additional funding provided:

  • to meet the demand for ongoing First Nation and Inuit programs and services (2% allowance for inflation and population growth); and
  • for the negotiation, settlement and implementation of specific and comprehensive claims.
Spending Trend graphic
View text version of this image

The bar graph depicts the actual and planned spending trends broken down by sunset programs (anticipated), statutory and voted spending:

  • In 2012–2013, actual spending was $8,096 million. Of this amount: Sunset programs spending is not applicable, $182 million in statutory spending and $7,914 million in voted spending.
  • In 2013–2014, actual spending was $8,039 million. Of this amount: Sunset programs spending is not applicable, $186 million in statutory spending and $7,853 million in voted spending.
  • In 2014–2015, actual spending was $7,691 million. Of this amount: Sunset programs spending is not applicable, $191 million in statutory spending and $7,500 million in voted spending.
  • In 2015–2016, planned spending is $8,309 million. Of this amount: $122 million (anticipated) for sunset programs spending, $146 million in statutory spending and $8,041 million in voted spending.
  • In 2016–2017, planned spending is $8,097 million. Of this amount: $584 million (anticipated) for sunset programs spending, $162 million in statutory spending and $7,351 million in voted spending.
  • In 2017–2018, planned spending is $7,655 million. Of this amount: $656 million (anticipated) for sunset programs spending, $139 million in statutory spending and $6,860 million in voted spending.

Note: Additional funding for education infrastructure, Family Violence Prevention Program, First Nations Student Success Program and the Education Partnerships Program, Indspire (to provide post-secondary scholarships and bursaries for First Nations and Inuit students), Major Projects Management Initiative, and pro-active reconciliation and management of Métis Aboriginal rights and the management of Métis and Non-Status Indian litigation, which sunset in 2015–2016, has already been approved for 2015–2016 and future years, and will be included in future Estimates (i.e. Supplementary and Main Estimates). Decisions on the future of other sunset initiatives will be taken in future budgets and reflected in future Estimates.

Expenditures by Vote

For information on the Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Canada's organizational voted and statutory expenditures, consult the Public Accounts of Canada 2015, which is available on the Public Works and Government Services Canada website.


Section II: Analysis of Programs by Strategic Outcome

Strategic Outcome: The Government

Support good governance, rights and interests of Aboriginal peoples

Program 1.1: Governance and Institutions of Government

Description

The Governance and Institutions of Government Program contributes to The Government Strategic Outcome. This program provides support to First Nation governments, as well as Aboriginal governance institutions and organizations. The intent of this support is to facilitate capacity development in the Aboriginal public service; the elected leadership; and entities that administer aggregate services on behalf of or to First Nation governments and their communities. Transparent and accountable First Nation governments attract investment, create opportunities and effectively support their citizens. Transparent and accountable institutions and organizations strengthen the fabric of Aboriginal governments across Canada, assist Aboriginal communities and their governments in attracting investment and support Aboriginal participation in the Canadian economy. Ultimately, good governance practices are essential for active Aboriginal participation in Canadian society and the economy.

2014–2015 Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars) 2014–2015 Human Resources (FTEs)
Main Estimates Planned Spending Total Authorities Available for Use Actual Spending (Authorities Used) Difference (Actual Minus Planned) Planned Actual Difference (Actual Minus Planned)
398,449,544 398,449,544 426,350,542 422,226,591 23,777,047 435 429.3 (5.8)
The difference between Planned Spending and Actual Spending primarily reflects additional funding reallocated during the 2014–2015 fiscal year for Indian Government Support activities to meet demand for Aboriginal governance institutions and organization services. This additional funding was partially offset by funding which has been set aside in order to meet the statutory funding requirements under the Territorial Formula Financing as stipulated in the Northwest Territories Lands and Resources Devolution Agreement.
Performance Results
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Transparent and accountable First Nation governments and institutions Percentage of First Nations with their Audited Consolidated Financial Statements and Schedule of Remuneration and Expenses available to their community membersa 100% by September 30, 2015 98%
Percentage of First Nations free of defaultb 70% by March 31, 2015 74%
a The expression "available to their community members" is defined as publicly available on the Internet within 120 days of the end of the financial year.
b "Default" as defined by the Department's Default Prevention Management Policy.
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

In pursuit of its objective of transparent and accountable First Nation governments and institutions, in 2014–2015 the Department accomplished the following:

  • Engaged with First Nations and developed the First Nations Elections Regulations, in partnership with the Atlantic Policy Congress of First Nations Chiefs. The Department continued to promote the First Nations Elections Act as an electoral option that will increase governance stability and capacity in those First Nations that opt in, through information and discussion guides posted on the websites of the Department and of the Atlantic Policy Congress, and through in-person presentations at meetings of First Nations organizations. Two First Nations have since opted into the Act.
  • Continued to analyze the report of the Exploratory Process on Indian Registration, Band Membership and Citizenship.
  • Funded governance grants and contributions, along with direct training, capacity support to communities, and development and implementation of legislation, led to advancements in community governance capacity.
  • Continued to support and facilitate community development and governance capacity by: promoting a common integrated approach to community development through the application of the Community Development and Capacity Building Framework within the Department and leveraging joint work with other federal partners, including Health Canada and Public Safety; developing planning and analysis tools to better support community-based capacity investments; undertaking a comprehensive survey and analysis of departmental investments in community capacity in order to better align investments with community needs; ensuring governance institutions and organizations have the capacity to support First Nations; and developing program policy options to address barriers to First Nation governance capacity.
  • Continued to support Aboriginal institutions delivering programs on behalf of, or providing capacity development and technical support to, First Nation governments in areas such as taxation, financial management, and matrimonial real property.

Sub-Program 1.1.1: First Nation Governments

Description

This sub-program supports the core operations and capacity development of First Nation governments, including the professional development of their personnel. Support for community development and capacity building will be through collaborative, coordinated and targeted community-driven investments, leveraging partnerships wherever possible. Funds are provided through direct transfer payments toward the costs of core functions of government such as law-making, financial management and administration, and executive leadership. In addition, the program provides guidance and develops legislation supporting transparent and accountable governance. Typical activities include — but are not limited to — assistance in establishing governance and associated capacities, processes and mechanisms (such as by-law making authority, election processes).

2014–2015 Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars) 2014–2015 Human Resources (FTEs)
Planned Spending Actual Spending Difference (Actual Minus Planned) Planned Actual Difference (Actual Minus Planned)
383,693,559 377,083,774 (6,609,785) 432 426.1 (5.9)
The difference between Planned Spending and Actual Spending largely reflects internal reallocations from the First Nation Governments sub-program to the Aboriginal Governance Institutions and Organizations sub-program.
Performance Results
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Enhanced governance capacity of First Nation Governments Percentage of First Nations who have submitted a proposal/plan have received funding for the development or implementation of a Governance Capacity Plan 80% by March 31, 2015 80%
Percentage of First Nations scoring low risk on the Governance section of the General Assessmenta 70% by March 31, 2015 77%
a The General Assessment is a tool that supports the management of funding agreements. It was designed to provide a more recipient-focused, risk-based approach to transfer payment management.
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

In pursuit of its objective of enhancing governance capacity of First Nation governments, in 2014–2015 the Department accomplished the following:

  • Continued to implement the First Nations Financial Transparency Act by monitoring compliance with the legislation.
  • Supported legislative initiatives such as the implementation of the First Nations Elections Act, which required the development of the First Nations Elections Regulations; and the implementation of the Indian Act Amendment and Replacement Act, which removed some of the most objectionable elements of the Indian Act, including residential schools provisions, and provided First Nations greater authority over day-to-day governance matters by removing ministerial oversight in respect of making by-laws and requiring Band Councils to publish them.
  • Prioritized funding for the development and implementation of community capacity development plans. In 2014–2015, approximately $13.5 million supported governance capacity building initiatives. An additional $3 million in contribution funding was allocated for 150 First Nations under the Default Prevention and Management Policy to assist them in implementing capacity activities in their Management Action Plans. The Department also prioritized internal operating funds to support additional travel of key regional staff to these communities to facilitate community planning processes.
  • Provided ongoing support through the Band Support Funding grant and Band Employee Benefits contribution funding, targeted investments in capacity development projects, direct supports to communities through training and advice, and the development and implementation of legislation, which led to advancements in governance capacity development amongst First Nation communities.
  • Reinforced AANDC's goal of supporting an integrated approach to community development and capacity building, by working with Health Canada and other federal partners. The integrated approach included the collaboration between British Columbia Regional Office and Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation to support home maintenance skills training and tool-kits for First Nation communities who identified this need/ priority in their community plans, as well as the work happening within the Department to explore the potential to redirect funding targeted on capacity development.

Sub-Program 1.1.2: Aboriginal Governance Institutions and Organizations

Description

This sub-program supports aggregate program delivery as well as aggregate capacity development through Aboriginal governance institutions and organizations at the local, regional and national levels dedicated to developing and supporting Aboriginal governments in the exercise of their responsibilities. It also supports institutions providing technical support to First Nation governments in the areas of taxation and financial management to carry out their legislative mandate under the First Nations Fiscal Management Act. Funds are provided through transfer payments to organizations and institutions with demonstrated expertise in supporting First Nation governments enhance capacity for service delivery and professional development.

2014–2015 Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars) 2014–2015 Human Resources (FTEs)
Planned Spending Actual Spending Difference (Actual Minus Planned) Planned Actual Difference (Actual Minus Planned)
14,755,985 45,142,817 30,386,832 3 3.1 0.1
The difference between Planned Spending and Actual Spending primarily reflects the reallocation of resources, mainly from the Infrastructure and Capacity Program, to meet demand for Aboriginal governance institutions and organization services. In addition, the difference reflects internal re-allocations from the First Nation governments sub-program to the Aboriginal Governance Institutions and Organizations sub-program for Tribal Councils.
Performance Results
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Governance institutions and organizations have the capacity to support First Nations Percentage of governance institutions and organizations scoring low risk on the General Assessment 80% by March 31, 2015 87%a
a 87% of institutions and organizations that scored low-risk in their respective General Assessment include all three First Nations Fiscal Management Act institutions (the First Nations Tax Commission, the First Nations Financial Management Board and the First Nations Finance Authority).
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

In pursuit of its objective of governance institutions and organizations having the capacity to support First Nations, in 2014–2015 the Department accomplished the following:

  • Supported Aboriginal governments in the delivery of programs and services to their constituents; the Government of Canada continued to provide core operational funding to a number of national Aboriginal organizations: the First Nations Tax Commission, the First Nations Financial Management Board, the First Nations Finance Authority, and the Aboriginal Financial Officers Association of Canada. In 2014–2015, these organizations continued to promote capacity development in First Nations governments and Aboriginal groups and provide demonstrated technical expertise in the areas of financial management, taxation and public administration.
  • Helped the Government of Canada finalize the Emergency Protection Orders Regulations developed pursuant to the Family Homes on Reserves and Matrimonial Interests or Rights Act. The Government of Canada has also provided funding to a number of organizations to develop tools and training for front-line service providers such as superior court judges and legal experts.
  • Provided assistance, through the Centre of Excellence for Matrimonial Real Property that was established within the National Aboriginal Lands Managers Association, to First Nations in the development of their community-specific matrimonial real property laws and in the implementation of the provisional federal rules. Six First Nation communities have successfully enacted community-specific laws pursuant to the Family Homes on Reserves and Matrimonial Interests or Rights Act.
  • Collaborated with First Nations Fiscal Management Act institutions to advance proposed administrative legislative amendments to the First Nations Fiscal Management Act. In June 2014 the First Nations Finance Authority, issued inaugural bonds.
  • Shifted the core funding for Tribal Councils through the Tribal Council Funding Program, to a new funding approach with an overall reduced national budget.
  • The First Nations Fiscal Management Act institutions were funded to support various special projects and the institutions' activities related to the legislative amendments to First Nations Fiscal Management Act.

To support Tribal Councils in the delivery of programs and services to their member First Nations, the Department continued to provide core operational funding to Tribal Councils by contribution agreements. Tribal Councils are funded to provide direct support to First Nations with respect to governance capacity as well as support regarding the administration of other specified programs and services, depending on the needs of their members.

Program 1.2: Aboriginal Rights and Interests

Description

The Aboriginal Rights and Interests Program contributes to The Government Strategic Outcome. It seeks to strengthen collaboration between governments and Aboriginal groups through mutual respect, trust, understanding, shared responsibilities, accountability, dialogue and negotiation concerning the rights and interests of Aboriginal peoples. Partnerships will be established helping to contribute to the strengthening of the social, economic and cultural well-being of Aboriginal communities which conditions support more active participation in Canadian society. The program also addresses constitutional and historic obligations and public policy by: negotiating agreements which achieve clarity with respect to law-making authority and the ownership, use and control of lands and resources; addressing specific claims; developing multi-partner processes in areas identified by Aboriginal groups and the federal government; and supporting effective and meaningful consultation with Aboriginal groups and their representation in federal policy and program development.

2014–2015 Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars) 2014–2015 Human Resources (FTEs)
Main Estimates Planned Spending Total Authorities Available for Use Actual Spending (Authorities Used) Difference (Actual Minus Planned) Planned Actual Difference (Actual Minus Planned)
826,318,323 826,318,323 850,123,995 173,531,547 (652,786,776) 266 361.7 95.7
The difference between Planned Spending and Actual Spending primarily reflects re-profiling of the Specific Claims settlement funds in the amount of $664 million that are not required in the fiscal year. Specific claims settlement funding cannot be used for any other purpose than settling specific claims but can be re-profiled for future years when it will be available for the intended purpose. In addition the difference reflects incremental funding provided through Supplementary Estimates for comprehensive claims and self-government negotiations across Canada.
Performance Results
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Strengthened collaboration between governments and Aboriginal groups Number of policies and processes in place supporting strengthened collaboration between governments and with Aboriginal groups 12 by March 31, 2015 17
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

In pursuit of its objective of strengthening collaboration between governments and Aboriginal groups, in 2014–2015 the Department accomplished the following:

  • Continued to address section 35 rights of the Constitution Act, 1982 through the negotiation of comprehensive land claims and self-governments agreements. The benefit of comprehensive land claims agreements is greater legal certainty with respect to the use and ownership of lands and resources and the reduction of barriers that impede development. Negotiated agreements provide Aboriginal groups with opportunities to improve accountability and governance in key areas such as education, allowing meaningful changes in their communities improving their quality of life.
  • Began a quantitative and qualitative impact assessment of the socio-economic impacts and benefits of Aboriginal self-government to further assess the impacts of concluded agreements.
  • Put in place 17 policies and processes supporting strengthened collaboration between governments and Aboriginal groups, including for example, negotiation of land claims and self-government including special claims and other processes, a Five Year Review of the Specific Claims Tribunal Act, a Federal–Provincial–Territorial Working Group on Aboriginal Consultation, and an Aboriginal Representative Organization Project Funding Process.

Sub-Program 1.2.1: Negotiations of Claims and Self-Government Agreements

Description

Canada is committed to the negotiation of claims and self-government agreements as the best means for reconciling Aboriginal rights required under section 35 of the Constitution Act, 1982, with Crown sovereignty to the benefit of all Canadians. Canada is also committed to negotiating self-government agreements outside the Aboriginal rights context to address aspirations for greater Aboriginal autonomy and self-reliance and to promote good governance. With the participation of provincial and territorial governments, Canada negotiates claims and self-government agreements that provide Aboriginal groups with a solid foundation for self-determination and for the improvement of social, cultural and economic conditions within their communities.

2014–2015 Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars) 2014–2015 Human Resources (FTEs)
Planned Spending Actual Spending Difference (Actual Minus Planned) Planned Actual Difference (Actual Minus Planned)
42,931,413 73,862,591 30,931,178 139 225.8 86.8
The difference between Planned Spending and Actual Spending and related FTEs reflects the renewal of program authorities for the negotiation of comprehensive claims and self-government agreements, for which funding was provided through Supplementary Estimates.
Performance Results
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Certainty and clarity with respect to law-making authority and the ownership, use and control of land and resources Percentage of objectives reached as identified in the negotiations action plans 75% by March 31, 2015 Negotiations West: 86%
Negotiations Central: 88%
Negotiations East: 90%
For a combined total of 88%
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

In pursuit of its objective of having certainty and clarity with respect to law-making authority and the ownership, use and control of land and resources, in 2014–2015 the Department accomplished the following:

  • Continued to negotiate comprehensive land claim and self-government agreements with Aboriginal groups. Successfully ratified one self-government agreement; signed one self-government agreement; and initialed/signed four comprehensive land claim agreements-in-principle.
  • Advanced productive treaty and self-government negotiations by putting in place measures to increase efficiency, and by developing options for improving Canada's internal processes.
  • Appointed a Ministerial Special Representative to lead engagement with Aboriginal groups and key stakeholders on renewing the Comprehensive Land Claims Policy.
  • Continued to research and analyze policies and guidelines while seeking feedback from stakeholders on issues related to Canada's negotiation of Aboriginal self-government and comprehensive claims.
  • Continued to negotiate special claims and out-of-court settlements. Progress has been made in the advancement of these negotiations, which will support improved living conditions in the respective Aboriginal communities.
  • Progress reports were presented at a November 2014 Principals meeting by the Treaty Negotiations Process Revitalization technical working groups on funding, overlaps and shared territories, and the role of the British Columbia Treaty Commission, and the working groups received direction to continue their work.

Sub-Program 1.2.2: Specific Claims

Description

The Specific Claims sub-program is an alternative dispute resolution option through which First Nations may, on a voluntary basis, pursue the resolution of claims relating to the administration of land and other First Nation assets, and to the fulfilment of Indian treaties through negotiated settlement agreements. The government made the resolution of specific claims a priority when it announced the Specific Claims Action Plan in 2007, and reiterated its commitment to resolve claims in the 2010 Speech from the Throne. More recently, in the Federal Budget of 2013, funds were identified to continue to ensure that specific claims are addressed fairly and promptly. Key activities include the assessment of the historical and legal facts of the claim, the negotiation of a settlement agreement if it has been determined that there is an outstanding lawful obligation, and payment of monetary compensation to First Nations pursuant to the terms of a settlement agreement. Resolving specific claims fairly and expeditiously addresses the legal rights of, and provides justice to First Nations, discharges outstanding legal obligations of the Crown and provides certainty for all Canadians.

2014–2015 Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars) 2014–2015 Human Resources (FTEs)
Planned Spending Actual Spending Difference (Actual Minus Planned) Planned Actual Difference (Actual Minus Planned)
735,583,085 53,356,922 (682,226,163) 77 84.8 7.8
The difference between Planned Spending and Actual Spending primarily reflects re-profiling of funding for specific claims not required in the fiscal year; specific claims funding that was not required in 2014–2015 in the amount of $664 million will be re-profiled to future years when it would be available for the intended purpose. The funding was established to ensure a readily accessible source of funding available to settle specific claims in a timely manner. The value and number of negotiated specific claim settlements and Tribunal awards is difficult to project given there are many factors that are outside of the Department's control.
Performance Results
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Canada fulfils its long-standing obligations to First Nations arising out of treaties, and the administration of lands, band funds and other assets Percentage of claims under assessment addressed within legislated 3 years Claims in assessment: 100% by March 31, 2018 100% of claims were assessed.
Number of claims in negotiation addressed Claims in negotiations: continue to negotiate with 100% of claimants and make best efforts to negotiate settlements with First Nations within 3 years (by March 31, 2018) Canada continues to negotiate 100% of claims accepted for negotiation and to make best efforts to negotiate them within the 3-year operational framework.
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

In pursuit of its objective of Canada fulfilling its long-standing obligations to First Nations arising out of treaties, and the administration of lands, band funds and other assets, in 2014–2015 the Department accomplished the following:

  • Met all its specific claim targets. One hundred percent of claim submissions received were assessed against the Minimum Standard within six months. Resolving specific claims fairly and expeditiously addresses the legal rights of, and provides justice to First Nations, discharges outstanding legal obligations of the Crown and provides certainty for all Canadians.
  • Assessed 100% of claims for an outstanding lawful obligation within the three-year operational framework. As of March 31, 2015, 95 claims were in the assessment stage of the specific claims process.
  • Negotiated successfully 123 claims, for a total of approximately $2.2 billion in settlements paid to First Nations since the Justice At Last initiative was implemented in 2007.
  • Continued to participate in proceedings before the Specific Claims Tribunal in conjunction with Litigation Management and Resolution Branch and the Department of Justice. As of March 31, 2015, 65 claims had been referred to the Specific Claims Tribunal by First Nations.
  • Undertook a five-year review of the mandate and structure of the Specific Claims Tribunal, and of its efficiency and effectiveness of operation in accordance with the Specific Claims Tribunal Act. The Minister's Special Representative engaged with interested parties in the last half of 2014–2015.
  • Continued to implement the Justice At Last initiative. The recommendations of the Summative Evaluation of the Specific Claims Action Plan and the Audit of AANDC Support to the Specific Claims Process have been implemented through the Management Response and Action Plan, which have been completed.

Sub-Program 1.2.3: Consultation and Accommodation

Description

This sub-program provides technical, process and financial support to internal and external stakeholders to maintain collaboration with Aboriginal groups and their representatives. This support takes several forms, including assistance to federal departments/agencies in fulfilling the Crown's duty to consult; engagement with Aboriginal groups and representatives, provinces and territories, and industry with regard to that duty; contributions in the context of consultation protocols/arrangements; and contributions to a representative organization for engagement on developing policy and programs and advice on how to engage community members on the development of a community plan.

2014–2015 Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars) 2014–2015 Human Resources (FTEs)
Planned Spending Actual Spending Difference (Actual Minus Planned) Planned Actual Difference (Actual Minus Planned)
28,828,417 38,088,241 9,259,824 43 45.3 2.3
The difference between Planned Spending and Actual Spending primarily reflects additional funding reallocated internally from the Métis and Non-Status Indian Relations and Métis Rights Management sub-program, for Métis and Non-Status Indian Organizations basic organizational capacity funding.
Performance Results
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Assistance provided in fulfilling the Crown's legal duty to consult and, where appropriate, accommodate when Crown conduct may adversely affect Aboriginal or Treaty rights Number of instances where support is provided through a greater reliance on technology, processes and virtual and operational tools rather than direct advice 7,000 projects/initiatives/activities where advice given supported fulfillment of duty by March 31, 2015 15,504
Note: AANDC can't predict, from year to year, how much support departments will need as it depends on the number of natural resources projects/project reviews or of departmental initiatives that may trigger a duty to consult. The 'Target' takes into account the estimated number of instances where support is provided in a fiscal year.
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

In pursuit of its objective of providing assistance in fulfilling the Crown's legal duty to consult and, where appropriate, accommodate when Crown conduct may adversely affect Aboriginal or Treaty rights, in 2014–2015 the Department accomplished the following:

  • Exceeded the target set, by giving advice to over 15,504 projects/initiatives/activities that supported the fulfillment of the Crown's duty to consult, including:
    • developed and delivered the advanced training — interdepartmental and tailored (by department and by region) — to close to 500 officials to help strengthen their capacity to integrate the duty to consult and accommodate into their departmental activities;
    • continued protocol negotiations with six groups across Canada. Protocol evaluations continued in Quebec and Nova Scotia which will contribute to improvements in implementation and negotiation of future agreements. Continued collaboration with provinces towards improved consultation processes, including information sharing and joint training;
    • continued sharing of information, development of tools/best practices and support of policy development through federal–provincial/territorial dialogue, regional interdepartmental networks and interdepartmental and intradepartmental working groups, including discussions on the next edition of the federal guidelines on consultation;
    • provided direct support on major natural resource projects, focusing on six that included pipeline projects, oil sands mines, hydro developments and liquefied natural gas export terminals. Supported work to advance relationship building and promote Aboriginal participation in resource development; and
    • increased spending in contributions to Aboriginal groups to support the development of new protocols. Continued reliance on Regional Consultation Coordinators' presence in regional offices to minimize travel for regional events.
  • Provided funding to a number of Inuit Aboriginal Representative Organizations for projects that aligned with departmental priorities. The Department also worked with Makivik Corporation to understand the challenges to increasing market housing in Nunavik and with Inuit organizations and federal partners to ensure the Indigenous Communities exemption to the European Union's seal product ban is meaningful for Inuit communities.
  • Provided $21.2 million in funding through the Basic Organizational Capacity Program, to 46 Aboriginal Representative Organizations.
  • Provided project funding to willing First Nations organizations to assist in the development of, and engagement on, the First Nations Elections Regulations; and to national Aboriginal organizations to undertake a comprehensive review of the effects of the repeal of section 67 of the Canadian Human Rights Act in preparation for a report to Parliament as required by section 2 of An Act to amend the Canadian Human Rights Act.

Sub-Program 1.2.4: Métis and Non-Status Indian Relations and Métis Rights Management

Description

The Métis and Non-Status Indian Relations and Métis Rights Management sub-program aims to enhance the capacity, legitimacy, stability and democratic accountability of Métis and non-status Indian organizations to represent their members and have the capacity to build and expand partnerships with federal and provincial governments and the private sector. The sub-program also works with representative Aboriginal organizations that have substantial Métis membership to develop objectively verifiable membership systems for Métis members and harvesters in accordance with the 2003 Supreme Court Powley decision. In all, the objectives are to enhance the capacity of these organizations to find practical ways to improve the self-reliance and social and economic conditions of Métis and non-status Indians so that ultimately they can better realize their full potential within Canadian society.

2014–2015 Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars) 2014–2015 Human Resources (FTEs)
Planned Spending Actual Spending Difference (Actual Minus Planned) Planned Actual Difference (Actual Minus Planned)
18,975,408 8,223,793 (10,751,615) 7 5.8 (1.3)
The difference between Planned Spending and Actual Spending primarily reflects changes to the process for the allocation of proposal-based project funding for Aboriginal Representative Organizations resulting in a reduction in the amount of funding as these organizations adjust the focus of project proposals to address Government of Canada priority areas.
Performance Results
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Relationships between parties based on trust, respect and shared responsibilities to support strengthened social and economic participation Percentage of Métis and non-status Indian organizations in compliance with the relevant provincial or federal society laws and their bylaws 100% by March 31, 2015 92%
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

In pursuit of its objective of having relationships between parties based on trust, respect and shared responsibilities to support strengthened social and economic participation, in 2014–2015 the Department accomplished the following:

  • Engaged with Métis and Non-Status Indian (MNSI) Aboriginal Representative Organizations at meetings and general assemblies on funding to advance departmental priorities, sharing strategic policy views on key Métis and Non-Status Indian issues, future initiatives and federal/provincial links to Métis and Non-Status Indian Aboriginal Representative Organizations. Of note, senior officials from the Government of Canada and the Métis National Council attended four joint working sessions which led to the holding of the Third Métis Economic Development Summit in Winnipeg on March 17–19, 2015, at which occasion the Métis Economic Development Accord was signed.
  • Engaged with the Consultation and Accommodation Unit to develop relationships and processes to support the inclusion of MNSI within the broader federal consultation and accommodation practices.
  • Developed Métis membership standards in collaboration with Métis Aboriginal Representative Organizations and the Canadian Standards Association. These standards are intended to form the basis for a consistent approach to the registration of Métis people and issuance of harvester cards.
  • Implemented the recommendations, following the Evaluation of the Federal Interlocutor's Contribution Program and Powley Initiative completed September 2013, to improve the clarity of objectives and roles and responsibilities, develop a comprehensive Performance Measurement Strategy and examine the proportion of funding provided to internal operations.

Program 1.3: Management and Implementation of Agreements and Treaties

Description

The Management and Implementation of Agreements and Treaties Program contributes to The Government Strategic Outcome. It aims to create and maintain ongoing partnerships to support both historic and modern treaties to fulfill Canada's legal obligations while considering Aboriginal rights and interests. This program supports Aboriginal communities in articulating their interests, participating in economic activities, and managing and developing land and resources, where applicable. It also helps to demonstrate the importance of treaties and related partnerships between the Crown and Aboriginal people. This is achieved by honouring Canada's obligations as set out in final settlement agreements and improving collaboration between Canada and Aboriginal peoples and between Canada and Historic and Modern Treaty Aboriginal groups. Creating and maintaining partnerships that honour historic and modern treaties contributes to strengthened, healthy, self-reliant and sustainable Aboriginal communities while promoting delivery of programs and services vital to health and advancement of Aboriginal citizens and self-governing communities.

2014–2015 Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars) 2014–2015 Human Resources (FTEs)
Main Estimates Planned Spending Total Authorities Available for Use Actual Spending (Authorities Used) Difference (Actual Minus Planned) Planned Actual Difference (Actual Minus Planned)
719,340,126 719,340,126 757,504,293 749,933,655 30,593,529 75 80.1 5.1
The difference between Planned Spending and Actual Spending primarily reflects incremental funding provided through Supplementary Estimates and reallocated internally for the implementation of various comprehensive claims and self-government agreements. This incremental funding was partially offset by reduced funding requirements for the implementation of various comprehensive claims agreements. The deferred funding that was not required in 2014–2015 has been re-profiled to 2015–2016 when it will be available for the intended purpose ($5.0 million).
Performance Results
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Creation and maintenance of ongoing partnerships to support treaty structures Number of implementing structures in placea 28 by March 31, 2015 27
a An implementing structure includes any forum for treaty partner discussions such as, but not limited to, implementation committees, panels or working groups, regional caucus or federal steering committee.
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

In pursuit of its objective of creating and maintaining ongoing partnerships to support treaty structures, in 2014–2015 the Department accomplished the following:

  • Sustained intergovernmental relationships with modern treaty and self-government signatories through regular implementation committee meetings, joint work with treaty partners to further shared priorities, and the collaborative resolution of implementation issues as they arose.
  • Coordinated and administered ongoing financial arrangements and expenditure transfers to Aboriginal signatory groups and related organizations like co-management boards and committees.
  • Tabled 9 annual reports to Parliament on the activities of the signatories to comprehensive land claims and self-government agreements and continued to work with signatories on upcoming reports.
  • Provided ongoing training to federal departments on procurement obligations in comprehensive land claims agreements, and provided periodic updates on implementation issues to departments via an interdepartmental committee.
  • Responded to the 2013 Audit of the Implementation of Modern Treaty Obligations by a number of measures, including ongoing work with departments to implement the Treaty Obligation Monitoring System, and to strengthen accountability, oversight and awareness regarding Canada's obligations.
  • Collaborated with other federal departments, the Sioux Valley Dakota and the Province of Manitoba to prepare for the transition to self-government. AANDC continued to work with the Sioux Valley Dakota to negotiate various jurisdictions.
  • Made progress on the negotiation of implementation funding renewals for agreements in the Northwest Territories, Nunavut and the Nunatsiavut Agreement; completed the renewal of the Westbank Fiscal Financing Agreement and the Carcross/Tagish Financial Transfer Agreement, and extended two funding agreements with the Naskapi. Implementation plan renewal negotiations are ongoing for the Labrador Inuit Land Claims Agreement.
  • Finalized the Tla'amin Implementation Plan with Canada's treaty partners.
  • Substantially completed the In-Shuck-ch Implementation Plan, now awaiting finalization. Implementation plan negotiations for the K'omoks, Kitselas/Kitsumkalum and Wuikinuxv Agreements will commence when negotiations are further advanced.
  • Completed the implementation plan for the Union of Ontario Indians Education Sectoral Agreement, and furthered ongoing implementation plan negotiations with the Innu of Quebec, the Innu of Labrador and the Miawpukek First Nation.
  • Completed the Nunavik Housing Authority negotiations and made progress on the negotiation of other outstanding implementation issues under existing agreements.
  • Negotiated updates to the dispute resolution mechanisms in the Nunavut Land Claims Agreement.
  • Continued building on the Office of the Treaty Commissioner in Saskatchewan and the Treaty Relations Commission of Manitoba successes in the areas of public awareness, facilitation and research related to pre-1975 treaties. The Commissioners' mandates have both been extended to March 2016. In 2014–2015, both Treaty Commissions have developed ongoing partnerships with private sector and municipal organizations to enhance economic opportunities.

Strategic Outcome: The People

Individual, family and community well-being for First Nations and Inuit

Program 2.1: Education

Description

The Education program contributes to The People Strategic Outcome by supporting First Nation and Inuit students in achieving educational outcomes comparable to those of other Canadians. Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Canada (AANDC) has the principal role for elementary and secondary education for First Nation students ordinarily resident on reserve. The Education program also provides financial supports for post-secondary education to eligible First Nation and Inuit students. The overarching goal of AANDC's Education programming is to provide eligible First Nation and Inuit students with quality education, and ultimately, the opportunity to acquire the skills needed to enter the labour market and be full participants in a strong Canadian economy.

2014–2015 Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars) 2014–2015 Human Resources (FTEs)
Main Estimates Planned Spending Total Authorities Available for Use Actual Spending (Authorities Used) Difference (Actual Minus Planned) Planned Actual Difference (Actual Minus Planned)
1,798,304,555 1,798,304,555 1,789,854,739 1,788,854,310 (9,450,245) 270 271.9 1.9
The difference between Planned Spending and Actual Spending reflects internal reallocation including funding transferred to the Management and Implementation of Agreements and Treaties Program for the implementation of the Sioux Valley Dakota Nation Governance Agreement.
Performance Results
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
First Nations and Inuit students enabled through funding to achieve levels of education comparable to other Canadians Percentage of First Nation students ordinarily resident on reserve who graduated from high school Incremental increase year after year Using the previous system methodology, the graduation rate for grade 12 (secondary V in Quebec) was approximately 35% in 2010–2011 and 2011–2012. The revised rates using the new methodology are 44% for 2010–2011, 48.5% for 2011–2012 and 49.9% for 2012–2013.a
Number of First Nations and Inuit Post-Secondary Student Support Program (PSSSP) students who graduate with a post-secondary degree/diploma/certificate Data for this indicator began to be collected in 2012–2013 and another year is required in order to set baseline and targets (reporting against established baseline will begin in 2013–2014)b Data will be available in December 2015. Interim results: average of 3,700 students graduate yearly.
Percentage of First Nation and Inuit population with post-secondary degree/certificate Incremental increase over five years (reporting against established baseline will begin in 2013–2014) The most recent data from Statistic Canada's 2011 National Household Survey shows that 34.6% of the First Nation population, who self-identify as First Nation in the survey, has completed a post-secondary degree/certificate and 26.4% of the Inuit population has completed a post-secondary degree/certificate.
a The graduation rate calculated with the new methodology is higher than reported in previous years because of improvements to student data collection and calculation methodology. For example, it excludes students who left high school for reasons other than graduation (AANDC has refined data gathered on the reasons students leave high school).
b Another year of data review and validation is required in order to set baseline and targets.
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

In pursuit of its objective of First Nation and Inuit students achieving levels of education comparable to other Canadians, in 2014–2015 the Department accomplished the following:

  • The Department continued to look for opportunities to work with First Nations and First Nation partners to improve First Nation education outcomes.
  • Worked with willing and able First Nation partners to pursue targeted education reform by continuing to implement the Strong Schools, Successful Students Initiative, delivered through the First Nation Student Success Program and the Education Partnerships Program. This Initiative supported activities to improve the management capacity of First Nation schools, as well as initiatives to strengthen relationships with provincial school systems, early literacy programming, and other supports and services for First Nation students in grades K–12.
  • Advanced implementation of the Education Information System, a secure computer database that compiles information for AANDC's various education programs, enabling better tracking of results, such as First Nation graduation rates. The system is designed to modernize and replace the old paper-based processes for reporting, while reducing the reporting burden for First Nation schools. It will help AANDC and First Nations gain a better understanding of the performance of students and schools. The resulting information will allow AANDC and First Nations to address concerns faster and make enhancements, where necessary, to support improved education outcomes of students.

Sub-Program 2.1.1: Elementary and Secondary Education

Description

This sub-program supports First Nations, or designated organizations delivering First Nation education services, to provide eligible elementary and secondary on-reserve students with education services comparable to those of their provincial counterparts. Funds are allocated to pay salaries for on-reserve school teachers and other instructional services, reimburse tuition for on-reserve students who attend provincial schools, and provide student support services (e.g. transportation) and enhance education services (e.g. curriculum and language development, teacher recruitment and retention, community and parent engagement in education, and Information Communication Technology capacity). It also supports school access to resources for learners with identified high-cost special education needs. Investments are also made to support longer-term improvements in education outcomes by implementing school success plans, student learning assessments, and school performance measurement systems and by advancing existing tripartite education partnerships with First Nations, provinces and the Government of Canada. The goals are to increase students' achievement levels in reading, writing and mathematics; encourage students to remain in school (student retention); require schools to conduct student learning assessments; and put in place performance measurement systems that allow schools to assess, report on, and take steps to accelerate progress made by schools and students. In addition, the Elementary and Secondary Education sub-program also supports culturally appropriate education activities through cultural education centres, and provides supports for First Nation and Inuit youth to transition to post-secondary education and the workplace.

2014–2015 Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars) 2014–2015 Human Resources (FTEs)
Planned Spending Actual Spending Difference (Actual Minus Planned) Planned Actual Difference (Actual Minus Planned)
1,444,535,348 1,447,231,645 2,696,297 256 253.8 (2.2)
The difference between Planned Spending and Actual Spending reflects internal reallocation of funding between Education programs, including funding transferred for the implementation of the Sioux Valley Dakota Nation Governance Agreement.
Performance Results
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
First Nations students progress in their elementary and secondary education The percentage of students covered by the First Nation Student Success Program (FNSSP) on reserve who meet or exceed standard assessment for reading, writing and numeracy (and science where measured provincially) in the province of reference (at the testing interval adopted by that province, referenced by gender and province) Long term: Equivalent to provincial standards (reporting against established baseline will begin in 2013–2014) Below are the 2013–2014 results of First Nation students on-reserve who participated in provincial standardized testing (details are outlined in the text below):
Literacy, Atlantic — Male: 65% Female: 70%
Numeracy, Atlantic — Male: 16% Female: 54%
Literacy, Ontario — Male: 21% Female: 32%
Numeracy, Ontario — Male: 18% Female: 20%
Literacy, Manitoba — Male: 53% Female: 65%
Numeracy, Manitoba — Male: 59% Female: 50%
Literacy, Alberta — Male: 28% Female: 36%
Numeracy, Alberta — Male: 21% Female: 19%
Standardized testing results for 2014–2015 are expected in December 2015.
Note: All recipients of the First Nation Student Success Program must administer identical standardized tests to those utilized by the provincial ministry of Education to assess student outcomes. Though the long-term goal is to approach provincial equivalence, the short- and medium-term goals are to demonstrate incremental improvements in achievement as a result of new program investments. These data provide a baseline for future comparisons.
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

In pursuit of its objective of First Nations students progressing in their elementary and secondary education, in 2014–2015 the Department accomplished the following:

  • Continued to implement the Strong Schools, Successful Students Initiative through the First Nations Student Success Program and the Education Partnerships Program, to better support First Nation organizational capacity development in various core areas. This Initiative supported the development of governance and leadership in school, parental and community involvement, planning and performance measurement, risk management, financial management, human resources management, organizational planning and early literacy, and over the past year, it:
    • supported the establishment of a common vision for improving education;
    • solidified working relationships at the First Nation school and provincial school board level;
    • fostered processes of collaboration, monitoring and oversight for joint initiatives and dispute resolution;
    • improved collaboration for smoother student transitions between First Nation and provincial education systems; and
    • improved structural readiness to deliver education services to First Nation schools.
    Under the First Nation Student Success Program, recipients reported having used Early Literacy funding to purchase early literacy materials and provide programming, and to hire or engage early literacy resources, such as teachers.
  • Continued implementation of the Education Information System, which replaces the old paper-based processes for reporting, while streamlining data collection practices. Roll-out and refinements to the System, and its increased use by First Nations, have improved the timing and availability of key AANDC program data and tools, such as the Nominal Roll of eligible students, which is used as the basis for K–12 funding. The result is better alignment of AANDC and First Nations systems and program cycles and more reliable elementary and secondary data to support evidence-based policy and program decisions.

The achievements to date demonstrate that additional time and effort to update, verify and validate information is necessary and useful to ensure stable and reliable data. A key aspect of the time required relates to receiving and compiling data from recipients, aggregation at regional and national levels, and data review to ensure accuracy and reliability. Sufficient time must be allocated for each of these steps to ensure data and baselines are reliable to support decision making.

The data in the table above is published, as provided by First Nation recipients, only for students who were tested. Provincial assessments are administered at selected grade levels, unique to each province (e.g. grades 3, 6 and 9). Calculations combined all students in all grades who were tested and provincial percentages were tabulated using a consistent national methodology. To meaningfully measure improvement, a given cohort of students should be tracked across testing intervals. For national consistency and privacy concerns, percentages are generated using all students in all grades that were tested, subdivided by gender. While data may not be directly comparable to provincial rates at this time due to different tabulation methodologies by provinces, over time, progress will be tracked through long term trend analysis.

Sub-Program 2.1.2: Post-Secondary Education

Description

The objective of the Post-Secondary Education sub-program is to help increase access to and enable success in post-secondary education for eligible First Nation and Inuit students. The sub-program provides funding to Band Councils, Tribal Councils or regional First Nations education organizations to assist eligible students pay for tuition fees, books, travel, and living expenses (when applicable). It provides financial support to eligible First Nation and Inuit students for university and college entrance preparation programs offered in Canadian post-secondary institutions, to enable them to attain the academic level required for entrance to degree and diploma credit programs. Resources are also available to post-secondary education institutions for the research, design and development of college and university level courses for First Nation and Inuit students, as well as for research and development on First Nation and Inuit education. AANDC also funds Indspire, a national, registered, non-profit organization dedicated to raising funds for scholarships and program delivery that provide the necessary tools for Indigenous people, especially youth, to achieve their full potential.

2014–2015 Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars) 2014–2015 Human Resources (FTEs)
Planned Spending Actual Spending Difference (Actual Minus Planned) Planned Actual Difference (Actual Minus Planned)
353,769,207 341,622,665 (12,146,542) 14 18.1 4.1
The difference between Planned Spending and Actual Spending reflects internal reallocation between education programs to better align funding allocations at the sub-program level.
Performance Results
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Supported First Nations and Inuit students participate in post-secondary education Percentage of University and College Entrance Program (UCEP) participants who transition to a post-secondary program Target in development — data collection has commenced (reporting against established baseline will begin in December 2015) Education Program is still gathering data from regions/recipients and validating information. This is a necessary step before reliable data can be produced. The latest results are from 2011–2012, identifying 1,017 students in transition from UCEP to post-secondary education.a
First Nations and Inuit post-secondary students progress in their program of study Percentage of Post-Secondary Student Support Program (PSSSP) funded students who completed their academic year and were funded the next academic year
Percentage of First Nations and Inuit students, funded through PSSSP, who continue to be funded beyond the first year of their program of study
a Percentage of UCEP participants transitioning to a post-secondary education program is not available. Data for this indicator began to be collected in 2012–2013. Reporting against an established baseline will begin in December 2015.
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

In pursuit of its objective of supporting First Nation and Inuit students participating in post-secondary education, and First Nations and Inuit post-secondary students progressing in their program of study, in 2014–2015 the Department accomplished the following:

  • Engaged with Employment and Social Development Canada to explore and discuss mechanisms related to the Government of Canada's overall suite of post-secondary student support, including programs intended for First Nation and Inuit students. This included discussion of Statistics Canada data regarding levels of Aboriginal attainment, data related to the labour market, and examination of various program structures and delivery methods. This on-going work will contribute to, and inform, efforts to ensure that AANDC's post-secondary support programming is effective, accountable and coordinated with other federal student programs.
  • Remained committed to working with First Nation partners to ensure that First Nation and Inuit students have access to high quality post-secondary education. Through the Post-Secondary Education Program, the Department provided more than $335 million in funding to support post-secondary education for over 22,000 First Nation and Inuit students.
  • Fulfilled its commitment to amend and update the Indian Studies Support Program. The result was the development and implementation of the Post-Secondary Partnerships Program, which replaced the Indian Studies Support Program. This new Program offers First Nation and Inuit students courses designed and delivered to respond to their communities' needs, and prepares them to join the labour market.
  • Introduced new more user-friendly features that significantly reduced the reporting burden for recipients. However, progress in the production of data for the Post-Secondary Education Program through the Education Information System was delayed due to the completion, review and acceptance of reports.
  • Continued to fund Indspire. Over and above the $817,000 of annual funding provided to Indspire, in 2013 Indspire was provided with an additional $10 million over two years to fund post-secondary scholarships and bursaries for First Nation and Inuit students. In 2014–2015, $5 million of this additional funding was provided and was matched with equivalent funds from non-Government of Canada sources.

Program 2.2: Social Development

Description

The Social Development program contributes to The People Strategic Outcome by funding five social programs that assist First Nation individuals and communities to become more self-sufficient, protect individuals and families at risk of violence, provide prevention supports that allow individuals and families to better care for their children, and support greater participation in the labour market. The Program assists First Nation men, women and children to achieve greater independence and self-sufficiency in First Nation communities across Canada by providing funds to First Nations, First Nation organizations, provinces and others that provide individual and family services to on-reserve residents (and Yukon First Nation residents). These services help First Nation communities meet basic and special needs, support employability and an attachment to the workforce, and support the safety of individuals and families. Through these five social programs, First Nations are better able to advance their own development, leverage opportunities and actively contribute to the broader Canadian economy and society.

2014–2015 Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars) 2014–2015 Human Resources (FTEs)
Main Estimates Planned Spending Total Authorities Available for Use Actual Spending (Authorities Used) Difference (Actual Minus Planned) Planned Actual Difference (Actual Minus Planned)
1,666,669,213 1,666,669,213 1,743,672,380 1,733,443,753 66,774,540 147 144.1 (2.9)
The difference between Planned Spending and Actual Spending primarily reflects the reallocation of resources to meet increased demand for social development programs and services.
Performance Results
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
First Nations men, women and children are active participants in social development within their communities Percentage of communities using innovative community-driven approaches to program delivery Baseline + 10% over ten years (baseline to be established in 2013–2014a) by end of fiscal year 2023–2024 29% of First Nation communities are participating in Income Assistance Enhanced Service Delivery.
68% of First Nation children who live on reserve are benefitting from the Enhanced Prevention Focussed Approach model within the First Nations Child and Family Services Program.
a Baseline will be established when data becomes available.
Note: Social Development data should be utilized with caution as many reports have not been submitted yet, nor has all the data been fully validated.
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

In pursuit of its objective of First Nations men, women and children being active participants in social development within their communities, in 2014–2015 the Department accomplished the following:

  • Improved the on-reserve Income Assistance Program, through Enhanced Service Delivery and the First Nations Job Fund (administered by Employment and Social Development Canada) to help youth living on reserve access the skills and training they need to secure employment.
  • Completed the set-up of the First Nation Child and Family Services (FNCFS) Information Management System in June 2014. It was built to assist AANDC in collecting and aggregating information about FNCFS funding being used to support First Nations children in care on reserve. The Department will also use the FNCFS Information Management System data to assess and report on overall program performance.
  • Continued implementation of a new Enhanced Prevention Focused Approach to child and family services, in conjunction with willing provincial and First Nation partners. Early results under this new approach show improved tripartite relationships, increased kinship care, better awareness of the child welfare system in communities, promising prevention practices in some communities and increased community participation in prevention programs. To date, six tripartite frameworks under the Enhanced Prevention Focused Approach have been agreed to in Alberta, Saskatchewan, Nova Scotia, Quebec, Prince Edward Island, and Manitoba. Collectively, 68% of First Nations children and families on reserves across Canada now benefit from this enhanced prevention approach.
  • Continued to provide funding to First Nations to offer shelter and prevention services, develop partnerships aimed at reducing family violence and enhance the capacity of shelters.
  • Continued to provide Assisted Living support in over 500 First Nations, while working to improve the alignment of program components with comparable provincial programming, and also reassessing prospects for integrating federal on-reserve in home case supports under the Health Canada Home and Community Care Program.
  • Developed a Data Governance framework and an indicator tool kit, in support of the British Columbia First Nations Data Governance Initiative, an innovative, community-led approach to establishing a tripartite collaboration on governing, planning, measuring and reporting on investments in British Columbia First Nations' well-being. This Initiative aims to improve First Nations' capacity to implement technological solutions in managing data, a key part of good governance that is required to maintain healthy and self-sufficient communities.
  • Conducted compliance reviews based on a national framework and made progress in updating the National Social Programs Manual.

Sub-Program 2.2.1: Income Assistance

Description

The Income Assistance sub-program provides funding to First Nations, First Nation organizations and the province of Ontario (under the 1965 agreement) to assist eligible individuals and families living on reserve who are in financial need. This sub-program funds basic and special needs in alignment with the rates and eligibility criteria of reference provinces or territories. The sub-program also funds the delivery of pre-employment services designed to help clients transition to and remain in the workforce. The Income Assistance sub-program has four main components: basic needs, special needs, pre-employment supports and service delivery. The expected result of the Income Assistance sub-program is an improved quality of life through the reduction of poverty and hardship on reserve, as well as improved participation in, and attachment to the workforce.

2014–2015 Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars) 2014–2015 Human Resources (FTEs)
Planned Spending Actual Spending Difference (Actual Minus Planned) Planned Actual Difference (Actual Minus Planned)
853,802,865 909,984,251 56,181,386 84 70.1 (13.9)
The difference between Planned Spending and Actual Spending primarily reflects the reallocation of resources to meet increased demand for Income Assistance primarily due to an overall population increase on-reserve, the economic downturn in some regions, and rate increases.
The variance between Planned and Actual FTEs is primarily due to delays in staffing.
Performance Results
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Improved participation in, and attachment to, the workforce Percentage of Income Assistance beneficiaries, aged 16–64, that exit to employment or education 6% in 4 years (from baseline of 1%, 2011–2012) by end of fiscal year 2018–2019 3.6% (2013–2014)a
Percentage of Income Assistance beneficiaries, aged 16–64, who participate in Active Measures 19% in 4 years (from baseline of 5%, 2011–2012) by end of fiscal year 2018–2019 5.3% (2013–2014)a
Income Assistance Dependency Rateb 31.4% in 5 years (from baseline of 34.4%, 2010–2011) by end of fiscal year 2018–2019
Historical Results:
2007–2008 — 36.2%
2008–2009 — 36.5%
2009–2010 — 36.2%
2010–2011 — 34.4%
2011–2012 — 34.2%
2012–2013 — 34.5%
34.0% (2013–2014)a
a Data for 2014–2015 will be available in 2016.
b The dependency rate is calculated by dividing the number of Income Assistance clients and dependants by the total on reserve population, which is a combination of registered and non-registered populations. This is a common indicator used by provinces and territories. The rate indicates the breadth of the population on reserve who are having their basic needs met through welfare.
Note: Social Development data should be utilized with caution as many reports have not been submitted yet, nor has all the data been fully validated.
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

In pursuit of its objective to improve participation in, and attachment to, the workforce, in 2014–2015 the Department accomplished the following:

  • Worked collaboratively with Employment and Social Development Canada to align their respective programs supporting Income Assistance Reform. This collaborative effort with Employment and Social Development Canada targeting eligible youth living on reserve between 18 and 24 years old commenced in 2013–2014, and resulted in better support to Income Assistance clients as well as opportunities for individuals to access a range of services and programs aimed at advancing their participation in the labour market.
  • Analyzed the first year of data from Income Assistance Reform, revealing that Income Assistance Reform has been successful in improving labour market outcomes of youth living on reserve, as demonstrated by the more than 6,800 youth that have been case-managed since the Reform was launched, and the 2,000 youth that have transitioned off Income Assistance into either jobs or full-time school.
  • Delivered $18.9 million in funding to 28 First Nation service providers to continue activities that foster increased participation in the labour market. Additionally, the Department allocated $7.5 million to Ontario Works to expand the number of communities for which the province delivers the full suite of pre-employment Ontario Works programming, from 65 in 2013–2014 to 71 in 2014–2015. By the end of 2014–2015, excluding Ontario, 89 First Nations had formally moved to the Enhanced Service Delivery model. When combined with the 71 First Nations participating in the full Ontario Works, 160 of 540 First Nations (29%) were delivering a case-management approach to removing barriers to employment for Income Assistance recipients.
  • Ensured alignment with provincial programming by using a community-driven approach for activities, which were modeled on social assistance programs in their respective provinces.
  • Completed substantively all of the planned compliance reviews across Canada to ensure that the delivery of the on-reserve Income Assistance Program aligns with provincial eligibility requirements, provincial rates, and other program terms and conditions.

While the overall on-reserve population and number of Income Assistance beneficiaries have increased, the Income Assistance dependency rate has remained relatively unchanged at 34% over the past few years. A decrease of the dependency rate as a result of Income Assistance Reform is not expected in the initial years of implementation.

Sub-Program 2.2.2: National Child Benefit

Description

The National Child Benefit (NCB) is a federal/provincial/territorial partnership child poverty reduction initiative; the lead federal department is Employment and Social Development Canada. The NCB has two components: a financial benefits component (the federal Canada Child Tax Benefit and National Child Benefit Supplement, and provincial/territorial integrated child benefits) and a reinvestment component (the National Child Benefit Reinvestment [NCBR]). Under the financial benefits component, the Department provides funding to the Yukon Territorial Government for the cost of the Yukon Child Benefit paid to First Nation families. Under the reinvestment component, AANDC provides funding for community-based supports and services for children in low-income families. The five activity areas for the NCBR on reserve are child care, child nutrition, support for parents, home-to-work transition and cultural enrichment. The expected results of the NCB components are a reduction in the incidence, depth and effects of child poverty.

2014–2015 Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars) 2014–2015 Human Resources (FTEs)
Planned Spending Actual Spending Difference (Actual Minus Planned) Planned Actual Difference (Actual Minus Planned)
54,007,069 37,967,708 (16,039,361) 4 7.1 3.1
The difference between Planned Spending and Actual Spending primarily reflects funding that has been reallocated to other Social Development sub-programs to address regional core budget priorities.
The difference between Planned and Actual FTEs reflects in-year adjustments for human and financial resources across the Department's five social programs to more accurately reflect effort.
Performance Results
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Reduction in the incidence, depth and effects of child poverty Percentage of Income Assistance recipients with children on reserve that exit to employment 6% in 4 years (from baseline of 1%, 2011–2012) by end of fiscal year 2018–2019 Data will be available in 2016.
Food security (of families with children on reserve) Within 10% (+/-) of rate off-reserve by end of fiscal year 2023–2024 Data will be available in 2016.
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

In pursuit of its objective of reducing the incidence, depth, and effects of child poverty, in 2014–2015 the Department accomplished the following:

  • Continued to work in partnership with Employment and Social Development Canada, through the National Child Benefit (NCB) on reserve, to provide financial benefits to First Nation families in the Yukon and support First Nation communities and organizations across Canada to provide an array of programming alleviating the depth and effects of poverty for children in low-income families. The National Child Benefit Reinvestment (NCBR) provided enriching experiences for children, promoted healthy social development and inclusion in community life, supported the well-being of families and contributed to positive developmental outcomes for children.
  • Ensured the continuing alignment of NCBR funding with the level of support provided by provinces and territories to children off-reserve. During the reporting year, NCBR funding decreased in two jurisdictions: Saskatchewan, where funding was reduced from $22 million to $14.3 million in 2014–2015; and Ontario, where funding was reduced from $10.7 million to $6.0 million. These reductions were effected to address other significant funding pressures within social programs.
  • Continued to ensure that NCBR complemented Income Assistance active measures by reducing barriers to employment. Although 2014–2015 data is not yet available, in 2013–2014 the largest share (36%) of the proposal-based reinvestment funding was allocated to the Home-to-Work Transition activity area. Through this activity area, NCBR funded home-to-work transition projects, such as skills-based training and employment supports (e.g. uniforms, transportation, etc.), which helped parents become or remain employed. Funding also provided support to parents through funding for homework clubs in schools and other community-based programming for youth (12%) and childcare spaces that helped ensure children were safe while their parents attended training or work (7%).

Given that the NCB Program aims to help alleviate the incidence and depth of poverty, the Department began undertaking work with partners to help ensure data on food security (which measures whether households can afford to buy the food they need) required for exact comparison between on- and off-reserve families with children (aged 0–17 inclusive) will be available for future reporting cycles. Data on the rate of food security of families with children aged 0–17 on reserve was not available in 2014–2015.

Sub-Program 2.2.3: Assisted Living

Description

The Assisted Living sub-program is a residency-based program that provides funding to assist in providing non-medical, social support services so that seniors, adults with chronic illness, and children and adults with disabilities (mental and physical) can maintain functional independence and achieve greater self-reliance. Thereare three major components to the sub-program: in-home care, adult foster care and institutional care. The latter is for eligible individuals in need of personal, non-medical care on a 24-hour basis. The Assisted Living sub-program is available to all individuals residing on reserve, or ordinarily resident on reserve, who have been formally assessed by a health care professional (in a manner aligned with the relevant provincial or territorial legislation and standards) as requiring services and who do not have the means to obtain such services themselves. The expected result for the Assisted Living sub-program is that individuals maintain their independence for as long as possible while maximizing the quality of their daily experience at home and in the community.

2014–2015 Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars) 2014–2015 Human Resources (FTEs)
Planned Spending Actual Spending Difference (Actual Minus Planned) Planned Actual Difference (Actual Minus Planned)
86,860,890 100,902,336 14,041,446 14 18.4 4.4
The difference between Planned Spending and Actual Spending primarily reflects the reallocation of resources to meet increased demand for Assisted Living primarily due to an overall population increase on-reserve, combined with an increased number of persons requiring in-home social supports or institutional care, and rate increases.
The difference between Planned and Actual FTEs reflects in-year adjustments for human and financial resources across the Department's five social programs to more accurately reflect effort.
Performance Results
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
In-home, group-home and institutional care supports are accessible to low-income individuals, to help maintain their independence for as long as possible Percentage of clients whose assessed needs are met Baseline + 5% over 10 years (baseline to be established in 2013–2014a) by end of fiscal year 2023–2024 Baseline data has been gathered
Percentage of Disabilities Initiative projects that meet or exceed their objectives
a Baseline will be established when data becomes available.
Note: Social Development data should be utilized with caution as many reports have not been submitted yet, nor has all the data been fully validated.
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

In pursuit of its objective to make in-home, group-home and institutional care supports accessible to low-income individuals and to help maintain their independence for as long as possible, in 2014–2015 the Department accomplished the following:

  • Provided Assisted Living support in over 500 First Nations. To improve the alignment of Assisted Living Program components with provincial programming, the Department continued its development of an implementation plan to realign the Assisted Living Program with current income-tested benefits in provinces and the Yukon.
  • Continued to work with Health Canada to begin reassessing prospects for integrating federal on-reserve home care supports.
  • Funded 11 Disabilities Initiative projects across Canada. Project reports for 2014–2015 have not yet been received by the Department; however in 2013–2014, 100% of funding recipients submitted reports indicating projects met or exceeded their objectives.

Sub-Program 2.2.4: First Nations Child and Family Services

Description

The First Nations Child and Family Services (FNCFS) sub-program provides funding to assist in ensuring the safety and well-being of First Nation children ordinarily resident on reserve by supporting culturally appropriate prevention and protection services for First Nation children and families in accordance with provincial or territorial legislation and standards. The sub-program supports four activity areas/streams: developmental funding for new organizations, maintenance funding for costs associated to maintain a child in care, operations funding for staffing and administrative costs of an agency and prevention funding. In 2007, the FNCFS sub-program began shifting to an Enhanced Prevention Focused Approach (EPFA). This is consistent with provinces that have largely refocused their child and family services programs from protection to prevention services. The expected result for the FNCFS sub-program is to have a more secure and stable family environment for children ordinarily resident on reserve. The implementation of the EPFA is expected to improve services, family cohesion and life outcomes for First Nation children and families on reserve. AANDC also contributes to the funding of day care services for First Nation families in Ontario and Alberta.

2014–2015 Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars) 2014–2015 Human Resources (FTEs)
Planned Spending Actual Spending Difference (Actual Minus Planned) Planned Actual Difference (Actual Minus Planned)
640,266,382 652,444,992 12,178,610 36 37.6 1.6
The difference between Planned Spending and Actual Spending primarily reflects the increase in provincial and territorial rates to maintain the costs of children in care.
Performance Results
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
First Nation children ordinarily resident on reserve are more secure and benefit from more stable environments Percentage of permanent placements achieved, by type, out of the total number of children in care Baseline + 1% over 10 years (baseline to be established in 2014–2015a) by end of fiscal year 2023–2024
Historical results for ethno-cultural placement matching:
2008 — 8.5%
2009 — 10.1%
2010 — 10.6%
2011 — 11.9%
2012 — 16.1%
2013 — 31.0%
In 2013–2014, placements of children in care achieved, by types of care, were:
Foster Care — 75.8%
Group Home — 4.1%
Institutional — 2.9%
Kinship — 18.2%
Percentage of ethno-cultural placement matchingb
a Baseline will be established when data becomes available.
b Ethno-cultural placement matching is defined by the placement of Aboriginal children in homes where at least one of the caregivers is Aboriginal.
Note: Social Development data should be utilized with caution as many reports have not been submitted yet, nor has all the data been fully validated.
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

In pursuit of its objective to ensure that First Nation children ordinarily resident on reserve are more secure and benefit from more stable environments, in 2014–2015 the Department accomplished the following:

  • Continued to monitor the implementation of the Enhanced Prevention Focused Approach (EPFA). This transition to the EPFA supports agencies to implement programming that contributes to stabilizing the number of children requiring protection. Under this approach, agencies were able to invest in:
    • parenting and life-skills classes to reduce the risk of child apprehension;
    • cultural camps with a focus on family preservation, inclusive of elders, children and families;
    • establishment of Band Council resolutions (in some cases) to support removal of the parent from the home, rather than the children, to create a less disruptive approach for the children by maintaining their care in the family home;
    • family counseling sessions; and
    • youth drop-in centres.
  • Worked in partnership with First Nations, provinces and Yukon Territory to improve the First Nations Child and Family Services Program. For example, the Department funded over 100 delegated First Nations Child and Family Services, agencies, tribal councils, bands, and some provinces and Yukon Territory to support the delivery of culturally appropriate welfare services to First Nation children between 0 and 18 years of age. Key accomplishments included:
    • implementation of the First Nations Child and Family Services Accountability Plan, which contains increased clarity of roles and responsibilities, rigorous compliance reviews, information sharing, and early prevention;
    • commencement of collaborative accountability work in several jurisdictions; and
    • development by program of tools and templates, such as bilateral and tripartite accountability frameworks, national compliance tools, and business plans.

Sub-Program 2.2.5: Family Violence Prevention

Description

The Family Violence Prevention sub-program (FVPP) provides funding to assist First Nations in providing access to family violence shelter services and prevention activities to women, children and families ordinarily resident on reserve. There are two components to the sub-program: operational funding for shelters and proposal-based prevention projects such as education campaigns, training, workshops and counselling to raise awareness of family violence in First Nation communitiesFootnote 4. The FVPP also works to address issues related to Aboriginal women and girls. The expected result of the FVPP is the enhanced safety and security of First Nation women, children and families.

2014–2015 Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars) 2014–2015 Human Resources (FTEs)
Planned Spending Actual Spending Difference (Actual Minus Planned) Planned Actual Difference (Actual Minus Planned)
31,732,007 32,144,466 412,459 9 10.9 1.9
The difference between Planned and Actual FTEs reflects additional FTE efforts to support program authority renewal, as well as human resource planning and support functions.
Performance Results
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Women, children and families living on reserve are more safe and secure Number of communities, women and children accessing Family Violence Prevention Program (FVPP) prevention and protection supports and services Shelter Target: baseline (established in 2014–2015a) + 1% over 10 years for number of women and children accessing FVPP funded shelters by end of fiscal year 2023–2024 Shelters: 2,853 women and 2,336 children accessed shelter services (2013–2014)a
Prevention Target: baseline (established in 2014–2015a) + 1% over 10 years in the number of communities accessing prevention projects by end of fiscal year 2023–2024 Prevention: 303 recipients funded for prevention projects (2013–2014)a
a Baseline and actual results for 2014–2015 will be available in 2016.
Note: Social Development data should be utilized with caution as many reports have not been submitted yet, nor has all the data been fully validated.
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

In pursuit of its objective to make women, children and families living on reserve more safe and secure, in 2014–2015 the Department accomplished the following:

  • Worked actively to strengthen partnerships and improve coordination with key partners by participating in a National Roundtable on Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls with provinces, territories and national Aboriginal organizations, February 2–15, 2015. All parties committed to a framework for action and a national awareness campaign.
  • Continued on-site shelter visits to strengthen program management and improve family violence prevention service delivery. To date, 32 of the 41 AANDC shelters have been visited.
  • Revised and updated the Program's terms and conditions, and updated the Program's annual recipient reporting document to ensure consistency with other social program reports and to include gender-specific considerations.
  • Committed $158.7 million over five years as part of Canada's Action Plan to Address Family Violence and Violent Crimes Against Aboriginal Women and Girls, announced on September 15, 2014. As part of the Action Plan, $1.34 million was transferred from Canadian Heritage to the FVPP, increasing the annual budget to $31.74 million for 2015–2016.
  • Funded 303 violence prevention and awareness projects focused on intervention, culturally sensitive services (elder and traditional teachings), anger management and men's programming, and self-development projects (healthy parenting and financial skills).

Over 2,850 women and 2,330 children accessed family violence shelter services in 2013–2014. Data for 2014–2015 will be available in 2016. In 2014–2015, there were 601 shelters (including 41 AANDC-funded family violence shelters) for abused women operating across Canada: 74% (445) of these shelters served clients residing off reserve and 26% (156) served clients residing on reserve.

In 2011–2012, shelters saw over 62,500 admissions of women across Canada. AANDC-funded shelter usage has increased slightly since 2006. This demonstrates a continued need for funded shelters, as almost half of abused women in Canada do not report incidents to the police. This fact is particularly relevant to AANDC's Family Violence Prevention efforts, given that the violent crime rate on-reserve is eight times higher than the violent crime rate off-reserve, and due to the prevalent risk factors and root causes of family violence in First Nations communities.

Program 2.3: First Nations Individual Affairs

Description

The First Nations Individual Affairs Program contributes to ensuring federal stewardship of the legislative and administrative responsibilities of the federal government pertaining to registration, membership, status cards and estates. Results are achieved through direct client services and partnerships with First Nations to determine eligibility for registration under the Indian Act; issue proof of registration documents, such as the Secure Certificate of Indian Status (SCIS); and administer estates under the Indian Act. Through excellence in client-centric service delivery, the sound administration of individual affairs contributes to the well-being of First Nation individuals, families and communities.

2014–2015 Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars) 2014–2015 Human Resources (FTEs)
Main Estimates Planned Spending Total Authorities Available for Use Actual Spending (Authorities Used) Difference (Actual Minus Planned) Planned Actual Difference (Actual Minus Planned)
25,228,617 25,228,617 29,053,812 28,426,563 3,197,946 234 233.5 (0.5)
The difference between Planned Spending and Actual Spending primarily reflects additional resources provided through internal reallocations.
Performance Results
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Legislative, administrative and treaty obligations for which AANDC is responsible are fulfilled Delivery of services within established service standards related to registration, membership, and estates as per the Indian Act and other related Acts and regulations as demonstrated by the results in the sub-programs Deliver services as demonstrated in the sub-programs below Service delivered as demonstrated below for each sub-program.
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

In pursuit of its objective to fulfill legislative, administrative and treaty obligations for which AANDC is responsible, in 2014–2015 the Department accomplished the following:

  • Continued registration of individuals entitled to Indian status, including those applying pursuant to the Gender Equity in Indian Registration Act.
  • Continued modernization of the Indian registration process, including the integration of registration and Secure Certificate of Indian Status issuance.
  • Continued modernization of estates management to improve internal administrative processes.

Sub-Program 2.3.1: Registration and Membership

Description

The Indian Act mandates AANDC to maintain the Indian Register, determine entitlement to Indian registration and maintain departmentally controlled band lists. Through direct client services and partnerships with First Nations, the program seeks to register all those eligible pursuant to sections 5–7 of the Indian Act and also issue proof of registration documents, such as the Secure Certificate of Indian Status, which identify those eligible to receive key programs and services available to registered Indians. Indian Registration Administrators have specific authorities delegated to them through the Indian Registrar to work on behalf of AANDC to support registration and activities related to issuing status cards. A current and accurate Indian Register, as well as issuance of the Secure Certificate of Indian Status, are fundamental to the effective and accountable delivery of federal programs and services for eligible users.

2014–2015 Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars) 2014–2015 Human Resources (FTEs)
Planned Spending Actual Spending Difference (Actual Minus Planned) Planned Actual Difference (Actual Minus Planned)
21,577,938 24,304,583 2,726,645 191 198.4 7.4
The difference between Planned Spending and Actual Spending primarily reflects additional resources provided through internal reallocations.
Performance Results
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Applicants receive a decision on entitlement under the Indian Act and are notified of the decision within established service standards Percentage of registration applications for which a decision is rendered within the 6 month (entitlement) or 8 month (adoption) service standards 90% of applicants are sent an "Acknowledgement of Receipt" letter within 30 days of their application received in Office of the Indian Registrar (OIR) by March 31, 2015 96%
90% of registration applications are addressed within 6 months of being received in OIR (entitlement) or within 8 month service standard (adoption) by March 31, 2015 72%
New Secure Certificate of Indian Status (SCIS) is issued to eligible applicants within service standards Percentage of eligible applicants issued a SCIS issued within 16-week service standard 90% by March 31, 2015 94%
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

In pursuit of its objective of applicants receiving a decision on entitlement under the Indian Act and being notified of the decision within established service standards and new Secure Certificate of Indian Status being issued to eligible applicants within service standards, in 2014–2015 the Department accomplished the following:

  • Began integration of functions related to registration and Secure Certificates of Indian Status (SCIS) issuance into a seamless, client-centric service delivery model. This change will allow AANDC to deliver a simplified, integrated registration and card issuance experience to its new and existing clients in which they will deal with one point of contact, regardless of the service delivery option they choose. In 2014–2015 the Department received 45,935 applications for SCIS, and issued a total of 30,381 SCIS. As of March 31, 2015, 158,049 SCIS have been issued since the inception of the Program in 2009.
  • Explored the development of the Indian Registration and Estates Management System (IREMS) as an IT solution to consolidate four existing departmental systems and to modernize service delivery. In 2014–2015, the business case for IREMS was developed to address part of the Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat's IT-enabled gating process framework. In addition, a project Steering Committee was established to support sound project governance.
  • Registered 26,453 individuals, bringing the total Indian Register to 940,436 as of March 31, 2015. The number of applications, as well as the nature and complexity of research involved, impact the processing time. Generally speaking, applications for Indian Status take more time to process compared to other government applications, given the genealogical research required. AANDC processed 72% of applications received within the service standard.
  • Made significant efforts to improve the training available to staff on the complexities of the registration provisions of the Indian Act to increase its ability to reduce the existing inventory of applications within a reasonable timeframe. In addition to providing staff with enhanced training and tools to improve quality assurance, the Department continued to examine its processes to identify efficiencies that are expected to allow it to render decisions more expediently.
  • Continued implementing both the Agreement for the Recognition of the Qalipu Mi'kmaq Band, and the Supplemental Agreement between Canada and the Federation of Newfoundland Indians regarding the enrolment process for membership in the Qalipu Mi'kmaq First Nation. This process was assisted through the allocation of additional resources.
  • Bill C-25, the Qalipu Mi'kmaq First Nation Act, received royal assent on July 19, 2014, reaffirming a commitment that only eligible individuals are granted membership into the First Nation, thus protecting the integrity of the Qalipu Mi'kmaq First Nation.

Sub-Program 2.3.2: Estates

Description

The Estates Program is mandated to ensure that the federal government's responsibilities, pursuant to sections 42 to 52 of the Indian Act, are met by developing policy and procedures, providing advice and appointing administrators for the management and administration of Indian estates (decedents, minors and dependent adults).

2014–2015 Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars) 2014–2015 Human Resources (FTEs)
Planned Spending Actual Spending Difference (Actual Minus Planned) Planned Actual Difference (Actual Minus Planned)
3,650,679 4,121,980 471,301 43 35.1 (7.9)
The difference between Planned Spending and Actual Spending primarily reflects additional resources reallocated internally during the year. In certain regions, structural reorganization and staffing changes account for the difference in Planned and Actual human resources.
Performance Results
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Executors and administrators of wills and estates are appointed as required under the authority of Section 43(a) of the Indian Act Percentage of case files for which executors and administrators of wills and estates are appointed 100% by March 31, 2015 61% (1,086 of 1,781 files)
Percentage of non-departmental executors and administrators appointed under the authority of Section 43(a) of the Indian Act 90% by March 31, 2015 (with a 1% annual increase thereafter) 90% (977 of 1,086)
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

In pursuit of its objective of executors and administrators of wills and estates being appointed under the authority of section 43(a) of the Indian Act, in 2014–2015 the Department accomplished the following:

  • Undertook activities to enhance awareness of estates management among First Nation individuals and communities. These included funding and delivery of workshops on the estates management process as well as providing information on the importance of wills.
  • Developed an online tool for the implementation of the Family Homes on Reserve and Matrimonial Interests or Rights Act, which provides accessible information and guiding documentation for managing estates under the Act.
  • Opened 1,781 new decedent estates files, for which the Department appointed 1,086 (61%) administrators or executors. Of the 1,086 appointed administrators, 89 were departmental and 977 (90%) were non-departmental. While the number of decedent estates varies throughout a given year, as of March 31, 2015 there were 3,300 active decedent estates files. Since the goal is to empower First Nation members to administer the estates of deceased First Nation individuals who were ordinarily residents on a reserve before their death, a departmental employee will only be appointed if no eligible, non-departmental individual is willing or able to administer the estate.
  • Managed approximately 650 living estates files (for minors or dependent adults) on an ongoing basis, bringing the total number of estates (living and deceased) under management to 3,950, with some annual variation.

The current estates process provides a 120 day timeline for appointing an estate administrator. Although it is the Department's goal that every estate have an administrator within this timeline, a number of factors may affect this process. Some key factors that could impact this performance indicator include the Department being notified of a death close to the end of fiscal year, delays caused by court actions, delays in communications with clients and insufficient resources.

Program 2.4: Residential Schools Resolution

Description

The Residential Schools Resolution Program contributes to The People Strategic Outcome by supporting a fair and lasting resolution to the legacy of Indian Residential Schools and promoting reconciliation with former students, their families and communities, and all Canadians. AANDC implements the Indian Residential Schools Settlement Agreement (IRSSA) — a multi-party negotiated settlement monitored by the courts — by administering the Common Experience Payment and the Personal Credits strategy, resolving claims of abuse under the Independent Assessment Process and meeting the Government of Canada's obligations vis-à-vis the Truth and Reconciliation Commission. In addition to its legal obligations under the IRSSA, AANDC funds and monitors the Advocacy and Public Information Program and promotes reconciliation between the Government of Canada and Aboriginal peoples, as well as between Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal people, through specific reconciliation initiatives. A fair resolution of the legacy of Indian Residential Schools contributes to improved relationships between Aboriginal people and all Canadians and strengthens Aboriginal communities.

2014–2015 Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars) 2014–2015 Human Resources (FTEs)
Main Estimates Planned Spending Total Authorities Available for Use Actual Spending (Authorities Used) Difference (Actual Minus Planned) Planned Actual Difference (Actual Minus Planned)
646,415,026 646,415,026 660,297,962 492,880,678 (153,534,348) 631 520.6 (110.4)
The difference between Planned Spending and Actual Spending primarily reflects the deferral of Independent Assessment Process settlement payments and delivery funding for continued implementation of the Indian Residential Schools Settlement Agreement. This deferred funding, in the amount of $165.4 million, that was not required in 2014–2015 has been re-profiled to future years when it will be available for the intended purpose. The deferred funding is partially offset by incremental funding provided through Supplementary Estimates for the continued implementation of the Indian Residential Schools Settlement Agreement as well as for the provision of documents to the Indian Residential Schools Truth and Reconciliation Commission.
Performance Results
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
A fair resolution to the legacy of Indian Residential Schools is supported as set out in the IRSSA Delivery of services (Common Experience Payment and Independent Assessment Process) within established service standards related to resolution of the Settlement Agreement Deliver services as demonstrated in the sub-programs below Actuals as reflected below for each sub-program
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

In pursuit of its objective of supporting a fair resolution to the legacy of Indian residential schools as set out in the IRSSA, in 2014–2015 the Department accomplished the following:

  • 3,581 first-claimant hearings under the Independent Assessment Process were arranged by the Indian Residential Schools Adjudication Secretariat. Further, 5,140 claims were resolved through decision, negotiated settlement, withdrawal of claim, jurisdictional decision, or determination that the claim was ineligible. As of March 31, 2015, 6,432 Independent Assessment Process claims (17% of all applications received) remained in progress.
  • Continued work to conclude all aspects of the Common Experience Payment. It is anticipated that this component of the IRSSA will be completed by March 31, 2016, pending court direction and approval.
  • Implemented a communications approach to ensure that Common Experience Payment recipients, their family members, and educational entities and groups were aware of the extended deadlines for Personal Credits (part of the Common Experience Payment component of the IRSSA). This extended deadline was approved by an order of the Supreme Court of British Columbia on January 7, 2015. AANDC continued to administer Personal Credits in 2014–2015, and received over 30,000 funding applications by the end of the fiscal year.
  • Issued six Article 12 decisions in relation to requests to add new Indian residential schools to the Indian Residential Schools Settlement Agreement. All decisions were issued within the 60-day service standard and none resulted in the addition of a school to the IRSSA.
  • Continued to work with the Truth and Reconciliation Commission and central agencies on the planned wind-down and close-out of the Commission, which is now scheduled for December 31, 2015.

Sub-Program 2.4.1: Common Experience Payments

Description

As an element of the Indian Residential Schools Settlement Agreement (IRSSA), the Common Experience Payment (CEP) provides eligible former students with $10,000 for their first year or partial year of residence in a recognized Indian Residential School, and $3,000 for each additional year or partial year of residence. The IRSSA established a $1.9 billion trust for paying CEP. Once all CEPs have been made, if more than $40 million remains in the trust fund, Personal Credits for educational purposes will be distributed to each eligible CEP recipient who applies. Any funds remaining in the trust fund after all Personal Credits are paid will be distributed to two educational trusts to support Aboriginal education initiatives.

2014–2015 Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars) 2014–2015 Human Resources (FTEs)
Planned Spending Actual Spending Difference (Actual Minus Planned) Planned Actual Difference (Actual Minus Planned)
0 1,657,217 1,657,217 0 7.1 7.1
The difference between Planned Spending and Actual Spending primarily reflects additional resources reallocated internally to finalize and close all outstanding Common Experience Payments (CEP). Common Experience Payments sub-program was planned to be completed by 2013–2014 but continued due to delays relating to court challenges and court decisions.
Performance Results
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Eligible CEP applications are processed in accordance with the Settlement Agreement Percentage of applications under Canada's control processed within service standards (28 days for simple files and 150 days for reconsideration requests) 80% of simple files processed within 28 days service standard by March 31, 2015
100% of new reconsideration requests are processed within 150 day service standard (90 days for reconsideration files with 60 additional days for complex files) by March 31, 2015
Simple: no simple files were received.
Complex: 86% (6 of 7)
Reconsideration: 97% (29 of 30). This figure includes cases that were on hold pending additional information from the applicant.
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

In pursuit of its objective of processing eligible CEP applications in accordance with the Settlement Agreement, in 2014–2015 the Department accomplished the following:

  • Disbursed $1.622 billion (85.4%) by March 31, 2015 of the $1.9 billion Designated Amount Fund (money set aside to pay Common Experience Payments) to pay 79,286 former students out of an estimated 80,000 (99.0%) who resided at a recognized Indian residential school. Of this, $1.6 million was paid to 71 former students in the period 2014–2015. As part of the plan for the final close-out of the Designated Amount Fund in 2015–2016, a Request for Direction to finalize the Common Experience Payment is targeted for spring 2015.
  • Developed a plan for completing the implementation of Personal Credits in late summer 2015. As of March 31, 2015, 30,325 Personal Credits applications had been received, and over $4.4 million had been processed.
  • Developed a plan for approving the terms and conditions and transfer of any remaining balance in the Designated Amount Fund to the two identified educational trusts, starting on June 1, 2015. The goal is to complete the close-out of the Designated Amount Fund by March 31, 2016, pending court direction.
  • Conducted a lessons learned study of the Common Experience Payment, which highlighted among other issues, the large scale logistical challenges and the need for planning which sets out clear policies, procedures, and responsibilities, coupled with stronger coordination with departmental management officials and other federal department officials to ensure greater efficiencies. Through its wind-down phase, the Common Experience Program is still ongoing and is anticipated to be completed by March 31, 2016.

Sub-Program 2.4.2: Independent Assessment Process

Description

As an element of the Indian Residential Schools Settlement Agreement, the Independent Assessment Process (IAP) is a claimant-centred, non-adversarial, out-of-court process through which former students can settle their claims for abuse they suffered at Indian Residential Schools. The IAP compensates former students for sexual abuse, serious physical abuse and certain other wrongful acts.

Note: updates on the IAP are posted quarterly on the Department's website.

2014–2015 Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars) 2014–2015 Human Resources (FTEs)
Planned Spending Actual Spending Difference (Actual Minus Planned) Planned Actual Difference (Actual Minus Planned)
643,376,807 480,408,751 (162,968,056) 604 494.9 (109.1)
The difference between planned and actual financial and human resources reflects reduced operating expenditures in 2014–2015 for implementation of the Independent Assessment Process (IAP) under the Indian Residential Schools Settlement Agreement (IRSSA). This is mainly due to the deferral of awards to IAP claimants that could not be completed in the fiscal year, largely due to adjudicator decision delays as well as a lower number of negotiated settlements. The deferred funding, in the amount of $163.6 million, that was not required in 2014–2015 is to be re-profiled to future years when it will be available for the intended purpose. The difference between Planned and Actual FTEs is a result of challenges in maintaining a full staff complement. It is inherently difficult to attract and retain staff for time-limited initiatives.
Performance Results
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Canada's obligations for the Independent Assessment Process, as per the terms of the Settlement Agreement, are fulfilled Percentage of Negotiated Settlement fiscal-year target resolved 100% by March 31, 2015 508 claims were resolved via Negotiated Settlement Process (NSP) in 2014–2015, representing 72% of the original target (708).
Percent of payments processed within service standards (20 days after appeal period, 80% of the time) 80% by March 31, 2015 2,775 of 3,765 (74%) of payments were processed within 20 days.
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

In pursuit of its objective to fulfill Canada's obligation of the Independent Assessment Process, as per the terms of the Settlement Agreement, in 2014–2015 the Department accomplished the following:

  • Resolved 5,140 Independent Assessment Process claims through decision, negotiated settlement, withdrawal, jurisdictional decision, or ineligibility. Out of 4,500 first-claimant hearings originally forecast, 3,581 were held. Low volumes of hearing-ready claims and capacity among claimants and counsel to participate have impacted hearing numbers. Canada's representatives attended all scheduled hearings. Since 2006 the Independent Assessment Process has received 37,963 claims, of which 6,432 remain in progress.
  • Expanded the Accelerated Hearing Process to increase scheduling efficiency by reducing the impact of documentation requirements on hearing scheduling. This allows claims to proceed to hearing to capture claimant testimony in advance of document completion. Remaining documents are collected post-hearing.
  • Resolved 508 claims through the NSP, representing 102% of the revised target. Due to the complexity of remaining files and low numbers of hearing-ready claims, the 2014–2015 NSP target was reduced from 708 to 500.
  • Processed 2,775 of 3,765 (74%) of payments within the service standard of 20 days, which was below the target of 80%. Transition to the new financial system resulted in a backlog of payments, but was cleared by June 2014. An internal review, conducted to address payments outside of the service standard, also revealed processing gaps that were addressed immediately, enabling the service standard to be exceeded (89%) in quarters 3 and 4. Since 2007, $2.782 billion in settlement payments have been made.

Accomplishments made in pursuit of this objective by the Indian Residential Schools Adjudication Secretariat (IRSAS) include the following:

  • Focused on referring lost-contact, deceased, and "stalled" claims to the Lost Claimant Protocol and Incomplete File Resolution. This will enable resolution of these claims and promote efficient resource allocation.
  • Conducted 35 visits to law firms representing the largest caseloads in the process and firms appearing at risk of failing to meet given deadlines. Discussions included the Completion Strategy, IRSAS initiatives, reviews of firms' workloads, completion timelines, and difficulties encountered by counsel.

Sub-Program 2.4.3: Reconciliation

Description

This initiative provides ongoing support for the implementation of the Indian Residential Schools Settlement Agreement (IRSSA) and promotes reconciliation between Canada and former Indian Residential School students, their families and communities, as well as between Aboriginal people and other Canadians. Reconciliation supports the implementation of IRSSA by working with the churches that ran the schools to ensure that they fulfill their obligations under the IRSSA, supporting and reporting on the wind-down of the Aboriginal Healing Foundation, and working with Health Canada as it provides health supports under the IRSSA. The initiative promotes reconciliation by developing and offering concrete gestures of reconciliation which vary from year to year; taking advantage of opportunities that arise, such as Truth and Reconciliation Commission national events; educating the public about the history and legacy of Indian Residential Schools; and supporting the development of curriculum and educational tools to bring the history of Indian Residential Schools into the classroom.

2014–2015 Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars) 2014–2015 Human Resources (FTEs)
Planned Spending Actual Spending Difference (Actual Minus Planned) Planned Actual Difference (Actual Minus Planned)
2,717,844 2,261,657 (456,187) 24 16.2 (7.8)
The difference between planned and actual financial and human resources primarily reflects reduced resource requirements as activities are completed and wind-down of initiatives under the Indian Residential Schools Settlement Agreement as Canada's obligations are met. This reflects the staff reduction as a result of the completion of funded programs.
Performance Results
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Progress is made toward reconciliation between Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal Canadians through increased opportunities for awareness and understanding of the history and legacy of Indian residential schools Number of gestures of reconciliation offered Gestures offered at Truth and Reconciliation Commission closing event and as appropriate by March 31, 2015 The mandate of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission (TRC) was extended until June 30, 2015. As a result, the closing event will not occur until May 31–June 3, 2015.
Number of public education initiatives developed As appropriate by March 31, 2015 1 (see narrative below).
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

In pursuit of its objective to make progress toward reconciliation between Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal Canadians through increased opportunities for awareness and understanding of the history and legal of Indian residential schools, in 2014–2015 the Department accomplished the following:

  • Continued working with Health Canada to ensure that health supports are in place at all appropriate events, including Independent Assessment Process hearings.
  • Continued supporting the Aboriginal Healing Foundation until it closed in September 2014.
  • Planned for federal participation in the Truth and Reconciliation Commission's closing event, including travel support for survivors to attend TRC events and gestures of reconciliation.
  • Supported the Legacy of Hope Foundation exhibit on display at the Canadian Museum of History from June 5–29, 2014.
  • Focused on educating members of the Public Service through a Visiting Speakers Series on Reconciliation. The objective of this work was to improve the ability of the Public Service to lead Canada's ongoing efforts to promote reconciliation. There was only one public education event in 2014–2015, since there were no Truth and Reconciliation Commission national events during this fiscal year.
  • In addition, resources were focused on preparations for the Truth and Reconciliation Commission's closing event.

Sub-Program 2.4.4: Support to the Truth and Reconciliation Commission

Description

As per the Indian Residential Schools Settlement Agreement, the Government of Canada has obligations vis-à-vis the Truth and Reconciliation Commission (TRC) to disclose to the TRC all documents relevant to the TRC's mandate in an organized fashion, and to provide for the participation of high-level government officials at the TRC's seven national events. In addition to these obligations, AANDC provides the TRC with up to $1 million per year in in-kind services for five years.

2014–2015 Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars) 2014–2015 Human Resources (FTEs)
Planned Spending Actual Spending Difference (Actual Minus Planned) Planned Actual Difference (Actual Minus Planned)
320,375 8,553,053 8,232,678 3 2.4 (0.6)
The difference between Planned and Actual financial and human resources primarily reflects additional funding acquired under Supplementary Estimates B to fulfill Canada's document disclosure obligations to the Truth and Reconciliation Commission under the IRSSA.
Performance Results
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Remaining relevant documents are disclosed to the TRC in an organized manner as outlined in the IRSSA Percentage of boxesa potentially containing relevant material at Library and Archives Canada that are researched and disclosed to the TRC and/or the National Research Centreb 100% by autumn 2015 As of March 31, 2015, 53,000 files.
a Current estimate of the total number of boxes is approximately 70,000, though this is subject to change due to the nature of historical research.
b Subject to privacy and disposition issues being resolved by the TRC.
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

In pursuit of its objectives to disclose remaining relevant documents to the TRC in an organized manner as outlined in the IRSSA, and to provide for the participation of high-level government officials at the TRC's national events, in 2014–2015 the Department accomplished the following:

  • Ensured the participation of high-level officials at all of the national events held by the Truth and Reconciliation Commission. The former Minister of AANDC participated in all seven national events. In addition, a federal booth, at which information about the IRSSA, other government programs, and Canada's reconciliation efforts, was shared with participants.
  • Provided funding through the Advocacy and Public Information Program to support former students' participation at the national events as a gesture of reconciliation.
  • Awarded a contract to Bronson Consulting and its partners on July 7, 2014, to complete the work necessary to transfer documents from Library and Archives Canada to the Truth and Reconciliation Commission. Researchers identified greater numbers of relevant high-value documents than anticipated. It is anticipated that Canada will disclose its remaining documents at Library and Archives Canada to the Truth and Reconciliation Commission prior to the end of its operating period on December 31, 2015.

Canada's remaining obligation is to disclose its holdings at Library and Archives Canada. Initially, the federal government focused its document disclosure efforts on providing the Truth and Reconciliation Commission with all "active and semi-active documents" (those in the possession of individual departments). Twenty-four government departments were engaged in order to complete the work. On January 30, 2013, the Ontario Superior Court of Justice clarified that the federal government's obligation is to include all relevant federal documents housed at Library and Archives Canada.

Strategic Outcome: The Land and Economy

Full participation of First Nations, Métis, Non-Status Indians and Inuit individuals and communities in the economy

Program 3.1: Aboriginal Entrepreneurship

Description

Supporting Aboriginal entrepreneurship leads to greater participation in the economy and improved economic prosperity for Aboriginal Canadians. Guided by the Federal Framework for Aboriginal Economic Development and its vision of strengthening Aboriginal entrepreneurship, AANDC's Aboriginal Entrepreneurship program contributes to The Land and Economy Strategic Outcome. The sub-programs within this program work together to support the creation and growth of viable Aboriginal businesses by providing access to business capital, support services and business opportunities. In playing this key support role, this Program expects to influence longer-term Aboriginal business viability, leading to improved economic prosperity for Aboriginal Canadians.

2014–2015 Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars) 2014–2015 Human Resources (FTEs)
Main Estimates Planned Spending Total Authorities Available for Use Actual Spending (Authorities Used) Difference (Actual Minus Planned) Planned Actual Difference (Actual Minus Planned)
49,640,071 49,640,071 43,027,380 43,027,380 (6,612,691) 45 42.2 (2.9)
The difference between Planned Spending and Actual Spending primarily reflects reallocation from the Business Capital and Support Services sub-program to the Lands and Economic Development Services sub-program to support environment management capacity. These are new sub-programs, and resources were aligned accordingly.
Performance Results
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Creation and/or expansion of viable Aboriginal businesses Number of Aboriginal businesses created and expanded through the support of Aboriginal Financial Institutions (AFI) 1,000 by March 31, 2015 1,207 for Aboriginal Financial Institutions fiscal year 2012–2013a
Percentage of AFI-supported Aboriginal businesses actively repaying developmental loans 80% by March 31, 2015 94.76%a
a Performance data is reported by the National Aboriginal Capital Corporations Association (NACCA) and lags one fiscal year behind due to the labour intensive nature of collecting data and its dependence on timely submissions by the Aboriginal Financial Institutions. Depending on each Aboriginal Financial Institution, the fiscal year end can be on any date between April 1, 2013 and March 31, 2014 but is most likely to fall on March 31, 2014. The compiled data is reported by NACCA as part of the 2014 Aboriginal Financial Institution Portrait i.e. submitted to the NACCA to create the 2014 Aboriginal Financial Institution Portrait.
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

In pursuit of its objective of creating and/or expanding viable Aboriginal businesses, in 2014–2015 the Department accomplished the following:

  • Implemented a new program partnership with the National Aboriginal Capital Corporations Association on April 1, 2015, for the delivery of the Aboriginal Business Financing Program in 2015–2016 and 2016–2017 with a total value of $52.2 million.
  • Continued partnering with the National Aboriginal Capital Corporations Association to conduct the design of potential financing instruments and treasury structures to access private sector capital for Aboriginal Financial Institutions and complete a market assessment.
  • Established working relationships with the Province of Ontario, Business Development Bank of Canada, and Employment and Social Development Canada to ensure alignment of programming and evaluate other potential services that could also be delivered by Aboriginal Financial Institutions.
  • Assisted the Aboriginal Procurement and Business Promotion Directorate to select Aboriginal Financial Institutions to pilot procurement training for Aboriginal entrepreneurs.

Sub-Program 3.1.1: Business Capital and Support Services

Description

This sub-program contributes to the expected result of Aboriginal Entrepreneurship primarily through the provision of funding. Funding is provided to a national network of Aboriginal Financial Institutions (AFI), Aboriginal entrepreneurs and organizations as well as non-Aboriginal organizations to assist in the establishment and maintenance of capital for Aboriginal business development. Funding also supports ongoing capacity to deliver business development services. The expected results of this sub-program are a sustainable network of AFI delivering business development services, provision of both non-repayable and repayable financing to Aboriginal entrepreneurs and communities and support for the creation or expansion of small- and medium-sized businesses.

2014–2015 Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars) 2014–2015 Human Resources (FTEs)
Planned Spending Actual Spending Difference (Actual Minus Planned) Planned Actual Difference (Actual Minus Planned)
45,221,973 37,667,690 (7,554,283) 30 26.0 (4.0)
The difference between Planned Spending and Actual Spending primarily reflects the reallocation of funding to other departmental priorities including the Business Opportunities sub-program. The difference between Planned and Actual FTEs reflects a reallocation of resources in line with funding reduction and measures taken to adopt a third-party delivery model.
Performance Results
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
A sustainable network of Aboriginal Financial Institutions Percentage increase in the value of the AFI network's gross loan portfolio 1% by March 31, 2015 Decreased by 4.02% between Aboriginal Financial Institutions fiscal year 2012–2013 and 2013–2014a
a Performance data is reported by the National Aboriginal Capital Corporations Association (NACCA) and lags one fiscal year behind due to the labour intensive nature of collecting data and its dependence on timely submissions by the Aboriginal Financial Institutions. Depending on each Aboriginal Financial Institution, the fiscal year end can be on any date between April 1, 2013 and March 31, 2014 but is most likely to fall on March 31, 2014. The compiled data is reported by NACCA as part of the 2014 Aboriginal Financial Institution Portrait.
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

In pursuit of its objective of a sustainable network of Aboriginal Financial Institutions, in 2014–2015 the Department accomplished the following:

  • Implemented the Program Delivery Partnership Initiative to support a gradual transition towards new programming, which includes the Aboriginal Business Financing Program, the Aboriginal Developmental Loan Allocation, the Enhanced Access, the Interest Rate Buy-Down and the Aboriginal Capacity Development Program.
  • Implemented the Aboriginal Developmental Lending Assistance Program, in collaboration with the National Aboriginal Capital Corporations Association, to improve the financial sustainability of Aboriginal Financial Institutions and implemented the Aboriginal Capacity Development Program to improve governance and operational capacities.
  • Finalized an appropriate governance structure and program management design to allow the National Aboriginal Capital Corporations Association to assume program management responsibility associated with the Aboriginal Business Financing Program introduced on April 1, 2015.
  • Retained capital market consultants, in partnership with the National Aboriginal Capital Corporations Association, to conduct the design of potential financing instruments and treasury structures to access private sector capital for Aboriginal Financial Institutions and perform a market assessment based on design work.
  • Worked in close collaboration with the National Aboriginal Capital Corporation Association to build on its success implementing key elements of the Aboriginal Business Financing Program. This collaboration resulted in the Association submitting an operational plan to assume greater program management responsibility, while continuing delivery of the above suite of financial instruments during 2015–2017.

The Aboriginal Financial Institutions gross loan portfolio, which typically ranges from $25 million to $40 million, decreased by 4.02% between the fiscal years 2013–2014 and 2014–2015. This reduction is due to some loans being repaid prior to year-end (December 31) as well as some new lending being delayed due to weather conditions affecting the building of winter ice roads in remote northern communities.

Sub-Program 3.1.2: Business Opportunities

Description

This sub-program contributes to the expected result of Aboriginal Entrepreneurship by facilitating Aboriginal businesses to access to public- and private-sector business opportunities. Pursuant to the federal Procurement Strategy for Aboriginal Businesses (PSAB), this sub-program enhances Aboriginal business participation in the federal procurement process by promoting and influencing federal departmental contract opportunities set asides and facilitating the bidding process for qualified Aboriginal businesses. In addition, the sub-program supports the identification of other public- and private-sector business opportunities and facilitates Aboriginal access to these opportunities through a variety of partnership and participation based approaches. The expected result of this sub-program is that qualified Aboriginal businesses win federal and non-federal procurement contracts.

2014–2015 Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars) 2014–2015 Human Resources (FTEs)
Planned Spending Actual Spending Difference (Actual Minus Planned) Planned Actual Difference (Actual Minus Planned)
4,418,098 5,359,690 941,592 15 16.1 1.1
The difference between Planned Spending and Actual Spending primarily reflects the reallocation of funding from the Business Capital and Support Services sub-program.
Performance Results
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Aboriginal businesses win procurement contracts Percentage of total federal procurement spending awarded to Aboriginal businesses 2%a by March 31, 2015 For 2012–2013 approximately 3% (i.e. $443,927,665)b
Number of major initiativesc supported to enable Aboriginal businesses access to other public and private sector opportunities 5 by March 31, 2015 6
a 2% of contracts in fiscal 2014–2015.
b Data is reported by Public Works and Government Services Canada (PWGSC) and is behind two years due to data collection and validation processes. Data for 2013–2014 will become available in 2015–2016, and consequently, 2014–2015 data will become available from PWGSC in 2016–2017.
c Major initiatives represent major capital projects over $1 million in value.
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

In pursuit of its objective of Aboriginal businesses winning procurement contracts, in 2014–2015 the Department accomplished the following:

  • Exceeded its annual 2% target for Aboriginal procurement relative to the total federal procurement spending by approximately one percentage point in 2012, which translates into $443,927,665 in Aboriginal procurement, according to the latest performance data available from PWGSC.
  • Refined integrated procurement approach to encourage Aboriginal business participation in procurement and business opportunities.
  • Worked with other federal departments, Aboriginal organizations, and provincial and industry partners to assist Aboriginal businesses accessing public- and private-sector opportunities resulting in:
    • establishing of a Value Proposition Guide for the new Defence Procurement Strategy, which will enhance the participation of Aboriginal businesses, including partnership development, business and procurement strategies;
    • ensuring Aboriginal participation opportunities in the re-procurement of Health Canada's Health Information and Claims Processing Services contract valued at approximately $350 million;
    • identifying targeted measures to address challenges facing Aboriginal businesses interested in securing contracts through the National Shipbuilding Procurement Strategy;
    • working with the Department of National Defence to assess the Aurora project requirements to determine if Aboriginal business capacity exists for the inclusion of a Procurement Strategy for Aboriginal Business set-aside or an Aboriginal participation component; and
    • recommending to include Aboriginal participation opportunities through the inclusion of employment and subcontracting provisions in the building of schools in the Manitoba pilot project.
  • Continued to work with federal, Aboriginal, provincial/territorial and industry partners to maximize Aboriginal participation by supporting six major initiatives that enabled Aboriginal businesses to access other public- and private-sector opportunities, exceeding the target by one. These initiatives were the Defence Procurement Strategy, the Health Information and Claims Processing Services Renewal, the CP-140 Aurora long-range patrol aircraft project, the National Shipbuilding Procurement Strategy, Tourism, and School Infrastructure.
  • Provided funding to projects that influenced federal procurement research and opportunities. For example, 28 agreements ($2,927,411) were completed, focusing on key areas such as: Aboriginal tourism, Aboriginal women, business opportunities, major projects, and West Coast Energy Infrastructure.

Program 3.2: Community Development

Description

Supporting community development leads to greater participation in the economy and improved economic prosperity for Aboriginal Canadians. Guided by the Federal Framework for Aboriginal Economic Development and its vision of Enhancing the Value of Aboriginal Assets, AANDC's Community Development programming, through its sub-programs, contributes to The Land and Economy Strategic Outcome by supporting activities that establish conditions for economic development to take place. In playing this key support role, Community Development programming expects to influence greater self-reliance and participation in the mainstream economy and community well-being.

2014–2015 Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars) 2014–2015 Human Resources (FTEs)
Main Estimates Planned Spending Total Authorities Available for Use Actual Spending (Authorities Used) Difference (Actual Minus Planned) Planned Actual Difference (Actual Minus Planned)
196,637,835 196,637,835 254,318,655 218,047,705 21,409,870 404 401.0 (3.0)
The difference between Planned Spending and Actual Spending primarily reflects additional funding provided through Supplementary Estimates for the assessment, management and remediation of federal contaminated sites under the Federal Contaminated Sites Action Plan, and the expansion of the First Nations Land Management Regime. Additional funding was also provided through internal reallocations for the assessment, management and remediation of federal contaminated sites, partially offset by reduced funding requirements for Indian Oil and Gas Canada as well as the deferral of activities associated with the implementation of treaty land entitlement in Saskatchewan.
Performance Results
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Enhanced conditions for First Nation and Inuit communities to pursue greater independence/self-sufficiency and sustainable economic development are in place Percentage of band-generated revenues in relation to total revenuesa 13% by March 31, 2015 16% for 2013–2014b
First Nation land is available for economic development Number of active instruments/mechanisms enabling economic developmentc 15,000 on average by March 31, 2015 45,230
a Based on reporting from 60% of the communities.
b Data is collected from First Nations' year-end audits. Therefore, results will always be a year behind.
c Active instruments/mechanisms refers to land designations, leases and the registration of other land instruments.
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

In pursuit of its objective of ensuring that enhanced conditions for First Nation and Inuit communities to pursue greater independence/self-sufficiency and sustainable economic development are in place, and First Nation land is available for economic development, in 2014–2015 the Department accomplished the following:

  • Advanced the Federal Framework for Aboriginal Economic Development by implementing consolidated community development programming through the Lands and Economic Development Services Program, which streamlined First Nation, Métis and Inuit communities' access to programs and supported effective management of their lands and economic development.
  • Provided support through the Lands and Economic Development Services Program to First Nation and Inuit communities to assist with enhancing economic development and the land and environmental capacity of communities. Results show that band-generated revenues are increasing and that communities are utilizing their lands to enable economic development. Notwithstanding progress in this area, the need remains to continue supporting planning and capacity building to ensure communities and their lands are prepared to effectively respond to opportunities for economic development.

The result of 45,230 active instruments considerably exceeds the 2014–2015 target of 15,000 and may be attributed to instruments registered in prior years which have remained active, or have been amended, in order to guide current land tenure arrangements.

Sub-Program 3.2.1: Lands and Economic Development Services

Description

This sub-program contributes to the expected result of Community Development by providing critical support for communities to effectively build and manage a solid land base for economic development. Incentive-based funding will encourage and support those First Nations who wish to take on additional land-management responsibilities under the Indian Act. It also supports an effective transition toward greater autonomy through modern land-management tools such as the First Nation Land Management Act (FNLM) and the First Nations Oil and Gas and Moneys Management Act (FNOGMMA). Targeted funding is available to support training, capacity development, planning, and land and environmental management. The expected results of this program are the reduced risk of federal liabilities and enhanced conditions for First Nation and Inuit communities to pursue greater independence/ self-sufficiency and sustainable economic development.

2014–2015 Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars) 2014–2015 Human Resources (FTEs)
Planned Spending Actual Spending Difference (Actual Minus Planned) Planned Actual Difference (Actual Minus Planned)
69,038,104 127,574,381 58,536,277 250 262.5 12.5
The difference between Planned Spending and Actual Spending primarily reflects an internal transfer of funding from the Investment in Economic Opportunities sub-program, as well as additional funding provided through Supplementary Estimates and internal reallocations. The difference between Planned and Actual FTEs reflects a reallocation of resources towards other departmental priorities. At the time of establishing planned spending, funds were mis-categorized in the Investment in Economic Opportunities sub-program, and $50 million should have been recorded in the Lands and Economic Development Services sub-program.
Performance Results
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Enhanced Land and Environment management capacity for First Nation and Inuit communities Number of FNLM and Reserve Land and Environment Management Program (RLEMP) participants On average 10–15 new RLEMP and 20–30 FNLMa on a two-year cycle by March 31, 2015 18 new RLEMP First Nations this fiscal year.
28 First Nations commenced the developmental phase of FNLM.
9 First Nations ratified their respective land codes under FNLM during 2014–2015.
Percentage of active land transactions being managed by First Nations 50% of active transactions on average by March 31, 2015 75.1% of active land transactions are being managed by First Nations.
a 20 to 30 First Nations to commence the 2-year FNLM development process.
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

In pursuit of its objective of enhancing land and environment management capacity for First Nation and Inuit communities, in 2014–2015 the Department accomplished the following:

  • Continued working with institutional partners, municipalities and First Nation and Inuit communities through the integrated planning initiatives, which included the Community Economic Development Initiative and the Land Use Planning Pilot Project. The Community Economic Development Initiative is a three-year joint pilot initiative of the Federation of Canadian Municipalities and the Council for the Advancement of Native Development Officers, which is set to end in 2015–2016.
  • Completed Phase 1 of the Land Use Planning Pilot Project to further strengthen the integration of planning processes, including land and environmental management, economic development and capital planning. As a result of this planning process, some participating First Nations have begun to reach out to neighbouring municipalities to engage in joint planning processes.
  • Increased the number of land transactions managed by First Nations by 50%. This result is attributed to increased First Nations capacity in this area and the effectiveness of the Reserve Land and Environment Management Program training provided through the National Aboriginal Land Managers Association.
  • Met the targeted number of additional First Nation communities who have assumed management of their reserve land under the First Nation Land Management Act, as 9 communities ratified their land codes. This brings to 50 the total number of First Nations operating under their own land codes. As such, there are currently 110 First Nations either operating under their own land code or at various stages of the developmental process.
  • Renewed focus on working with key stakeholders to streamline program implementation, given that 40 First Nations are now in the developmental phase of the First Nations Land Management Regime. In partnership with Natural Resources Canada and the Land Advisory Board and Resources Centre, AANDC continues to integrate business processes to ensure that program milestones are achieved and issues preventing community progress are identified and resolved in a timely fashion. AANDC has also been working with stakeholders to identify additional First Nations who are interested and ready to join the Regime.
  • Continued to fund the First Nations Land Management Resource Centre to support capacity development and training. Workshops on environmental protection and enforcement issues for developmental and operational First Nations under the Regime have been provided and will continue to be provided into the future.
  • Reviewed a total of 515 projects for their environmental impacts. No projects were likely to cause significant environmental effects when mitigation measures were considered, thus no referrals were made to the Governor in Council. To advance work on environmental protection on reserve, the Department initiated the development of a solid waste management strategy and completed an initial inventory of solid waste management sites on reserve. The Department also participated in the inter-departmental Major Project Management Office Initiative through provision of expert advice and regulatory support.

Sub-Program 3.2.2: Investment in Economic Opportunities

Description

This sub-program contributes to the expected result of Community Development by providing critical support for communities to support greater Aboriginal participation in large and complex economic opportunities. Targeted investments provide funding for First Nation and Inuit communities for a range of activities to support communities' pursuit of economic opportunities (including the adoption of regulations for complex commercial and industrial development projects through the First Nation Commercial and Industrial Development Act (FNCIDA)). These activities are crucial to partnering with the private sector and other levels of government to effectively participate in and benefit from such economic opportunities. The expected result of this sub-program is that private sector partnerships and investments will occur within First Nation and Inuit communities.

2014–2015 Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars) 2014–2015 Human Resources (FTEs)
Planned Spending Actual Spending Difference (Actual Minus Planned) Planned Actual Difference (Actual Minus Planned)
95,649,067 38,187,026 (57,462,041) 11 10.2 (0.9)
The difference between Planned Spending and Actual Spending primarily reflects an internal transfer of funding to the Lands and Economic Development Services sub-program. At the time of establishing planned spending, funds were mis-categorized in the Investment in Economic Opportunities sub-program, and $50 million should have been recorded in the Lands and Economic Development Services sub-program.
Performance Results
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Private sector partnerships and investments occurring within First Nation and Inuit communities Projected leveraging investments within First Nation and Inuit communities. 1.0:0.5a by March 31, 2015 1:10
(The Program is leveraging approximately $10 for every dollar invested by the Department.)
Length of time needed to prepare the federal regulatory proposal allowing partnerships and investments (which includes the regulations as well as the tripartite agreement) 18 months on average by March 31, 2015 n/a
No project reached the stage where a federal proposal, including the analysis, tripartite agreement and draft regulations, was ready to present to senior management/Cabinet.
a For every dollar invested by AANDC, 50 cents will be leveraged from sources outside of the Department.
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

In pursuit of its objective of private sector partnerships and investments occurring within First Nation and Inuit communities, in 2014–2015 the Department accomplished the following:

  • Supported 224 projects in 180 communities totalling $35 million through the Community Opportunity Readiness Program. This investment leveraged over $350 million (10:1 ratio) from other funding sources, including the private sector, First Nations, provincial governments and other federal departments.
  • Updated Data Collection Instruments to reduce the reporting requirement of First Nations further to the consolidation of program authorities within the Lands and Economic Development sector.
  • Worked on developing two project regulations and associated tripartite agreements being developed under the First Nations Commercial and Industrial Development Act (FNCIDA). These initiatives represent complex ventures on reserve land not previously contemplated as viable in Canada. Ensuring the development of efficient regulatory regimes for these large-scale FNCIDA projects on Muskowekwan First Nation and Black Lake First Nation will provide precedents for future projects and increase the potential of attracting investment on reserve. Maintaining momentum is critical to ensuring investor certainty and successful negotiations among parties. While the current projects being developed under FNCIDA have not yet met the targeted forecasts, progress has been made on these agreements. Given the complexities associated with the development of regulations and accompanying tripartite agreements for these projects, additional collaboration with First Nations and provincial stakeholders has been required above what was initially anticipated.

Sub-Program 3.2.3: Administration of Reserve Land

Description

This sub-program contributes to the expected result of Community Development through four programs: the Registration of Rights and Interests in Reserve Land, which fulfills statutory requirements for the Department to maintain land registries; the Federal Management of Oil and Gas Interests in Reserve Land program, which provides management and regulation for oil and gas development on First Nation reserve lands through Indian Oil and Gas Canada (IOGC) and pursuant to the Indian Oil and Gas Act and Regulations; the Clarity of Reserve Boundaries, which clarifies title through historical research and provides proper demarcation of external reserve boundaries; the Additions to Reserve program, which involves adding land to existing reserves and creating new reserves for legal obligations, community expansion.

AANDC also administers band moneys (capital and revenue moneys) held within the Consolidated Revenue Fund (CRF) for the use and benefit of bands and their members. Band moneys are managed pursuant to sections 61 to 69 of the Indian Act.

The expected result of this sub-program is to reduce risk of federal liabilities and ensure that the foundational tools for community and economic development are in place.

2014–2015 Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars) 2014–2015 Human Resources (FTEs)
Planned Spending Actual Spending Difference (Actual Minus Planned) Planned Actual Difference (Actual Minus Planned)
26,330,097 19,862,911 (6,467,186) 131 116.3 (14.7)
The difference between Planned Spending and Actual Spending primarily reflects internal reallocations from Indian Oil and Gas Canada to Lands and Economic Development Services as well as the deferral of activities associated with the implementation of treaty land entitlement in Saskatchewan. Deferred funding has been re-profiled to 2015–2016 when it will be available for the intended purpose. The difference between Planned and Actual FTEs reflects a reallocation of resources, in line with funding reduction measures, to other departmental priorities.
Performance Results
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
First Nations benefit from the administration of reserve land Number of additions to Reserve Landa 36 by March 31, 2015 35 completed
Number of new leases, permits and other instrumentsb 10,000 by March 31, 2015 9,332 registered
Value of money collected by Indian Oil and Gas Canada on behalf of First Nations $120 million by March 31, 2015 $163.15 million
a An Addition to Reserve involves adding land to existing reserves and creating new reserves for legal obligations and community expansion. Targets refer to the number of additions to reserve approved by the Minister or Treasury Board.
b Refers to the number of new leases, permits and other land instruments registered into the Indian Land Registry System, which is a record information system that details interests registered against reserve lands, including transactions that affect a parcel of land, the nature of the transaction and the scope of interest.
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

In pursuit of its objective of First Nations benefitting from the administration of reserve land, in 2014–2015 Indian Oil and Gas Canada accomplished the following:

  • Worked with First Nations and industry to leverage opportunities for developing oil and gas resources, ensuring market-based returns for the benefit of the respective First Nations. Despite the dramatic fall in world oil prices mid-year, IOGC collected $163.15 million on behalf of First Nations including $1.66 million collected pursuant to clause 5.08 of the Saskatchewan Treaty Land Entitlement Agreement. This exceeded the $120 million target primarily due to industry's shift to double production of gas and their associated gas products, which had stronger market prices during the period.

Additionally in support of this objective, in 2014–2015 the Department accomplished the following:

  • Made progress on modernizing the regulation of oil and gas activities on reserve lands through work in partnership with the Indian Resource Council of Canada (which represents over 189 First Nations with oil and gas interests) and a Joint Technical Committee. As a result, significant accommodations have been made and a second consultation draft was developed.
  • Registered 9,332 lands documents, such as leases and permits which 75.1% (7,006) of them are administered by First Nations. Although this was below the target of 10,000, transactions are sensitive to year-over-year changes to market force demand and circumstances of First Nations who initiate permits and leases in response to and in support of economic development on reserve. The 2014–2015 result represents an increase of over 10% from the previous fiscal year with leases, sub-leases and permits accounting for 14% of the overall instrument activity.
  • Approved and implemented a new commercial lease template while ongoing locatee lease policy support was provided to regional officials and First Nations.
  • Approved 35 additions to reserves, by either the former Minister or by the Treasury Board in situations where ministerial authority to set apart land as reserve does not exist. The Department finalized another 35 additions to reserve submissions; however, they remained in the approval stages at the end of fiscal year 2014–2015. The National Additions to Reserve Tracking System has been upgraded to better support ongoing addition to reserve proposals.

The difference between Indian Oil and Gas Canada planned and actual spending primarily reflects internal reallocations to Lands and Economic Development Services, unanticipated departures, leave and staffing of vacant positions by internal staff. The financial variance was also impacted by a November 12, 2014 sprinkler system water break which flooded 47.5% of the office. This resulted in significant staff time and focus on resolving accommodation issues, impacting planned work and expenditures. A number of contracting processes which resulted in either no or non-compliant bids also impacted expenditures.

Sub-Program 3.2.4: Contaminated Sites (On Reserve)

Description

This sub-program contributes to the expected result of Community Development by supporting the assessment and remediation of contaminated sites on reserve lands and on any other lands under the Department's custodial responsibility. Pursuant to the Federal Contaminated Sites Action Plan (FCSAP), this sub-program supports the assessment and remediation of known contamination from National Classification System for Contaminated Sites (NCSCS) Class 1 and Class 2 sites for which a Crown liability has been established and documented. NCSCS Class 1 sites are contaminated sites where available information (assessment) indicates that action is required to address existing concerns for public health and safety. Class 2 sites are sites where available information (assessment) indicates that there is a high potential for adverse off-site impacts, although threat to human health and the environment (public health and safety) is generally not imminent and action is likely required. The expected results of this sub-program are three-fold: the risk to public health and safety is decreased, First Nation land is available for development and federal liabilities related to the existence of contaminated sites are reduced.

2014–2015 Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars) 2014–2015 Human Resources (FTEs)
Planned Spending Actual Spending Difference (Actual Minus Planned) Planned Actual Difference (Actual Minus Planned)
5,620,567 32,423,387 26,802,820 12 12.1 0.1
The difference between Planned Spending and Actual Spending primarily reflects additional funding provided through Supplementary Estimates (including a transfer of funding from the Department of National Defence) to address priority contaminated sites projects, as well as internal reallocations for the assessment, management and remediation of federal contaminated sites.
Performance Results
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Decreased risk to public health and safety Number of Class 1 sites (with existing concerns for public health and safety) where risk reduction is occurring 15 by March 31, 2015 79
First Nation land is available for development Number of contaminated sites completely remediated 5 by March 31, 2015 26
Federal liabilities related to the existence of contaminated sites are reduced Dollar reduction in total of the known federal financial liabilities in confirmed contaminated sites at the beginning of the fiscal year $8 million by March 31, 2015 $18.4 million
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

In pursuit of its objective of reducing federal liabilities related to the existence of contaminated sites, making First Nation land available for development, and decreasing risk to public health and safety, in 2014–2015 the Department accomplished the following:

  • Supported activities for 137 environmental site assessments.
  • Prioritized sites for remediation that have a higher risk to human health and safety. AANDC's inventory south of 60° includes over 230 Class 1 sites and an additional 1,100 sites requiring further assessment. As contaminated sites on reserve pose significant risks to human health and the ecological integrity of reserve lands, AANDC sought opportunities for additional investment to reduce these risks and help build conditions to support economic development on reserve lands. AANDC was able to access more Federal Contaminated Sites Action Plan funds than in previous years. AANDC targeted additional funds to projects with multiple sites to reduce mobilization costs, and these additional funds contributed to AANDC's ability to exceed all targets linked to contaminated sites during 2014–2015.
  • Invested in remedial activities on 127 high-priority sites (including both Class 1 sites and Class 2 sites). Twenty-six of the 127 high-priority contaminated sites were completely remediated, thereby reducing the total environmental liability of known contaminated sites on reserve by $18.4 million.

Experience over the last year highlights the importance of coordination, project planning and maintaining a list of investment-ready projects. AANDC uses a strong project management approach and is well positioned to redirect funding if needed and take advantage of available funding from other contaminated sites projects delayed due to poor weather, project tendering or equipment failure. The maintenance of a project list based on regional capacity, field season availability, and monthly updates to identify changing circumstances positioned AANDC to take advantage of surpluses from other Federal Contaminated Sites Action Plan custodial departments or other sources and advance remediation of high-risk sites.

Program 3.3: Strategic Partnerships

Description

The Strategic Partnerships Initiative (SPI) is an innovative, horizontal program intended to align federal efforts to support Aboriginal participation in complex economic opportunities, particularly large regional opportunities and major resource developments. Given the nature of these developments, multiple federal departments and agencies have an interest and role with respect to their planning and implementation. There are more than twenty federal departments and agencies delivering programs and services that support Aboriginal economic development. To access support, communities must therefore work with several federal partners each with differing programs, application requirements and approval processes, thereby inhibiting a coordinated, timely and strategic approach to Aboriginal community participation. Recognizing the need to support community participation at the early stages of these developments, the program provides a mechanism for federal partners to collectively identify emerging opportunities, target investment decisions and streamline program application and approval processes. In doing so, the initiative also helps to build closer partnerships with non-federal partners, including provincial and territorial governments, the private sector and Aboriginal communities. The Aboriginal Economic Development Strategic Partnerships Initiative contributes to The Land and Economy Strategic Outcome by aligning federal efforts, leveraging investments from other levels of government and the private sector, and addressing gaps in programming to ensure that Aboriginal Canadians can participate in and benefit from priority regional opportunities and major resource developments.

2014–2015 Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars) 2014–2015 Human Resources (FTEs)
Main Estimates Planned Spending Total Authorities Available for Use Actual Spending (Authorities Used) Difference (Actual Minus Planned) Planned Actual Difference (Actual Minus Planned)
24,738,453 24,738,453 33,930,706 33,668,724 8,930,271 65 79.7 14.7
The difference between Planned Spending and Actual Spending primarily reflects additional funding provided through Supplementary Estimates for the facilitation of Aboriginal participation in West Coast Energy Infrastructure. The difference between Planned and Actual FTEs reflects attributing additional staff to this Program.
Performance Results
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Investments are leveraged from other levels of government and the private sector Value of federal and non-federal funds leveraged under Strategic Partnership Initiative $10 million by March 31, 2015 $24,756,790
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

In pursuit of its objective of leveraging investments from other levels of government and the private sector, in 2014–2015 the Department accomplished the following:

  • Implemented a single-window funding approach under the Northern Biomass Initiative led by National Resources Canada (NRCan) in partnership with CanNor and AANDC. This initiative helped strengthen the development of a viable northern forestry industry based on the growing market for wood fuels.
  • Worked with the Treasury Board Secretariat, through legislative, regulatory, policy and program changes and strategic partnerships, to play a key role in helping the Government of Canada meet its commitments to Aboriginal peoples in breaking down barriers and addressing the growing demand for coordination and investment.
  • Played a key role in supporting community readiness activities such as early engagement, increasing administrative capacity, and providing information and resources so that communities are better prepared to engage with partners and participate fully in major development projects.
  • Supported the Working Group on Natural Resource Development, in partnership with the Assembly of First Nations. In February 2015, a final report was submitted to AANDC's former Minister and the National Chief of the Assembly of First Nations outlining steps to increase the successful and beneficial involvement of Aboriginal communities, businesses and citizens in major resource development in Canada and internationally.
  • Prepared environmental scans on emerging opportunities in New Brunswick as well as the forestry sector in Ontario.
  • Completed opportunity profiles on specific opportunities that could be considered for support using the governance structure in place for SPI. This included profiles on Voisey's Bay, Jansen Mine, Energy East, and the Arctic Energy Gateway. Further, a comprehensive action plan was developed in partnership with NRCan, Environment Canada, Department of Fisheries and Oceans, Employment and Social Development Canada and Western Economic Diversification to guide investments in West Coast Energy Infrastructure.
  • Invested in a series of initiatives across the country to unlock land and economic development opportunities leveraging investments of $24,756,790 from other levels of government, the private sector, and from Aboriginal stakeholders. Examples include the Forestry Major Opportunities Initiative in northern Ontario and British Columbia, Labrador Trough in Quebec, and West Coast Energy Infrastructure in British Columbia.
  • Partnered with the Métis National Council to develop a Métis Economic Development Action Plan and held the Métis Economic Development Symposium III in March 2015. The Action Plan and the Symposium identified economic development priorities for Métis and their businesses and discussed and assessed options for promoting Métis economic outcomes.

Program 3.4: Infrastructure and Capacity

Description

This program contributes to The Land and Economy Strategic Outcome by supporting First Nation communities in acquiring, constructing, owning, operating and maintaining a base infrastructure that protects their health and safety and enables their engagement in the economy. The Emergency Management Assistance sub-program supports the four pillars of emergency management on reserve: mitigation, preparedness, response and recovery. Other sub-programs provide funding and advice to support housing, capacity building and community infrastructure, including water and wastewater systems, education facilities, roads and bridges, electrification, and community buildings. Ultimately, this program enables First Nations to participate more fully in the Canadian economy by establishing a base of safe infrastructure that meets established standards, and housing and infrastructure that meets the needs of First Nations communities as well as supporting the four pillars of emergency management.

2014–2015 Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars) 2014–2015 Human Resources (FTEs)
Main Estimates Planned Spending Total Authorities Available for Use Actual Spending (Authorities Used) Difference (Actual Minus Planned) Planned Actual Difference (Actual Minus Planned)
1,160,687,268 1,160,687,268 1,313,930,953 1,266,710,553 106,023,285 212 251.4 39.4
The difference between Planned Spending and Actual Spending primarily reflects additional funding provided through Supplementary Estimates, partially offset by reallocations to address pressures in other programs, notably Social Development and Governance and Institutions of Government, as well as the deferral of funding provided for: Operation Return Home and certain high priority school construction projects through Budget 2012. This deferred funding that was not required in 2014–2015 has been re-profiled to 2015–2016 when it will be available for the intended purpose.
Performance Results
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
First Nation communities have a base of infrastructure that protects the health and safety and enables engagement in the economy Positive change in rating in the Community Well-Being Index (employment, income, education and housing sub-indices) Index rating greater than 57 (2006 baseline)a by March 31, 2016 59 (based upon Statistics Canada 2011 National Household Survey)
a Target baseline of 57 is the average 2006 Community Well-Being score for First Nations communities, based on the 2006 Census of Population. This number is given on a scale from zero to 100 and can be interpreted as a percentage.
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

In pursuit of its objective of First Nations communities having a base of infrastructure that protects health and safety and enables engagement in the economy, in 2014–2015 the Department accomplished the following:

  • Continued to support fire inspections of AANDC-funded assets through integration within the current Asset Condition Reporting System inspection regimeFootnote 5. First Nation communities will receive one comprehensive report indicating the General Condition Rating of AANDC-funded assets along with the fire safety inspection components.
  • Continued to work with First Nations to deliver the Capital Facilities and Maintenance Program. In 2014–2015, the development of Capital Facilities and Maintenance Program technical tools was completed: the Priority Ranking Framework for Water and Wastewater Projects was updated; the Structural Mitigation Funding Framework and Ranking Tool were completed to prioritize structural mitigation projects; the School Priority Ranking Framework was refined; and a prioritization methodology for a new departmental and asset-wide attribution of Financial Management Committee funds to the Capital Facilities and Maintenance Program was developed.
  • Implemented the Operation and Maintenance and Minor Capital reform pilot project in Ontario, which is now being rolled-out in other regions across the country. As a result, First Nations are now required to include formula-based (Operations and Maintenance and Minor Capital) requests in their community First Nation Infrastructure Investment Plan, which in turn supports their capacity in the area of on-reserve infrastructure management.
  • Provided new funds of $155 million over 10 years from the New Building Canada Fund as well as $139 million over five years from the Gas Tax Fund to the First Nations Infrastructure Fund. In 2014–2015, the First Nations Infrastructure Fund contributed approximately $38 million toward 131 projects in the following categories: planning and skills development; solid waste management; roads and bridges; energy systems; connectivity; and disaster mitigation.
  • Continued to explore public-private partnerships and bundled project procurement to maximize value-for-money and increase efficiency of program delivery to First Nations. AANDC will continue to expand on partnerships that have already been developed to integrate First Nations and mainstream finance processes, risk management and lending options targeted at increasing efficiency in procurement and financing of infrastructure.

Sub-Program 3.4.1: Water and Wastewater

Description

This sub-program supports the provision of funding for the planning, design, construction, acquisition, operation and maintenance of community infrastructure facilities, including: water supply, treatment and distribution systems and wastewater collection, treatment and disposal systems. It includes the provision of funding for coordination, training and capacity building for activities related to water and wastewater facilities, identification of on-reserve water and wastewater infrastructure needs, development of water and wastewater infrastructure capital plans, and the design and ongoing implementation of management practices for water and wastewater facilities maintenance. The goal is to support First Nations in meeting health and safety standards and providing their residents with similar levels of service as those in off-reserve communities. First Nations identify their priorities and needs and present project proposals to the Department. Funding is provided for projects based on a priority assessment.

2014–2015 Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars) 2014–2015 Human Resources (FTEs)
Planned Spending Actual Spending Difference (Actual Minus Planned) Planned Actual Difference (Actual Minus Planned)
171,889,288 328,860,147 156,970,859 25 93.0 68.0
The difference between Planned Spending and Actual Spending and related FTEs, primarily reflects additional funding provided through Supplementary Estimates for the First Nations Water and Wastewater Action Plan.
Performance Results
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
First Nation communities have a base of safe water and wastewater that meets established standards Percentage of First Nation drinking water systems that have LOW risk ratings. 50%a (2011 baseline: 27%) by March 31, 2015 57%
Percentage of First Nation wastewater systems that have LOW risk ratings 65% (2011 baseline: 35%) by March 31, 2015 48%
Percentage of First Nation drinking water systems with treated water that meets prescribed standards in the Guidelines for Canadian Drinking Water Quality 85% (2011 baseline: 46%) by March 31, 2015 74%
Percentage of First Nation wastewater systems producing treated water that meet effluent quality regulations and guidelines 70% of systems meet current standards (2011 baseline: 80% meeting the 1976 wastewater guidelines) by March 31, 2016 77%
a According to the National Assessment 2011 results, the baseline for the percentage of First Nation drinking water systems that had a low risk rating was set at 27%. It was assessed that the activities of the Capital Facilities Maintenance Program would have an incremental impact on the system risks enabling the Program to reach 50% of systems by 2015.
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

In pursuit of its objective of First Nations communities having a base of safe water and wastewater that meets established standards, in 2014–2015 the Department accomplished the following:

  • Worked on developing regulations under the Safe Drinking Water for First Nations Act to ensure access to safe, clean and reliable drinking water, the effective treatment of wastewater, and the protection of sources of water on First Nation lands three regions at a time. Detailed work began with First Nations and other stakeholders in the Atlantic, Yukon, and the Northwest Territories Regions. Since the publication of AANDC's Guide for On-Reserve Source Water Protection in 2013–2014, the number of communities that are implementing a plan has increased by ten percentage points.
  • Provided summaries of provincial and territorial acts and regulations related to drinking water and wastewater to First Nations to assist them in providing input to the regulatory development process.
  • Provided investments to help support communities in complying with Environment Canada's Wastewater Systems Effluent Regulations. Although the percentage of First Nations' water systems that met the Guidelines for Canadian Drinking Water Quality remained at 74%, the percentage of First Nations' wastewater systems producing treated water that met effluent quality regulations and guidelines increased from 63% in 2013–2014 to 77%, due, in part, to these investments. While the percentage of wastewater systems evaluated as low risk did not increase, the percentage of low risk ratings for drinking water systems increased from 44% to 57% between 2013–2014 and 2014–2015, exceeding the target by seven percentage points. First Nations can allocate AANDC investments to their various infrastructure priorities, which may result in reduced funding dedicated to water and wastewater. This may contribute to slower progress on or even regression of risk ratings.
  • Provided a strategic response to the National Assessment findings to improve and strengthen results for water and wastewater in First Nations communities by:
    • continuing to support First Nations in meeting the Guidelines for Canadian Drinking Water Quality through initiatives such as the Circuit Rider Training Program;
    • exceeding the two targets for the number of operators certified to the level of the water or wastewater system by six percentage points;
    • providing funding for projects based on a priority assessment;
    • prioritizing capital investments for the highest risk systems and to address factors that are the greatest contributors to risk such as capacity, training, operations and maintenance; and
    • implementing the new Circuit Rider Training Guidelines, which are now in use.
  • Supported the development of hubs of expertise, for example by funding First Nation organizations to explore the creation of public service utilities such as a Water Authority in Atlantic Canada.

Sub-Program 3.4.2: Education Facilities

Description

This sub-program supports the provision of funding for the planning, design, construction/acquisition, renovation, repair, replacement, operation and maintenance of band-operated elementary and secondary education facilities (including school buildings, teacheragesFootnote 6 and student residences) and any related facility services. This sub-program also supports the provision of funding for the acquisition, replacement, and repair of furniture, equipment and furnishing for schools, teacherages and student residences and for the identification of education facility needs and the development of education facility plans and the design and ongoing implementation of maintenance management practices. As well, this sub-program supports the provision of funding for agreements with provincial school boards for the planning, design, construction and acquisition of facilities, for the elementary and secondary education of First Nation children.

2014–2015 Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars) 2014–2015 Human Resources (FTEs)
Planned Spending Actual Spending Difference (Actual Minus Planned) Planned Actual Difference (Actual Minus Planned)
325,210,712 262,681,235 (62,529,477) 17 5.3 (11.7)
The difference between Planned Spending and Actual Spending is addressed at the program level under Infrastructure and Capacity.
Performance Results
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
First Nation communities have a base of education facilities that meet established standards Percentage of First Nation schools with a greater than "fair" condition rating (based on physical/structural conditions) as assessed through Asset Condition Report (ACRS) inspections 70% (2011 baseline) by March 31, 2015 63%
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

In pursuit of its objective of First Nation communities having a base of education facilities that meet established standards, in 2014–2015 the Department accomplished the following:

  • Funded 15 new school projects (partially or completely), including 11 new schools and 4 additions/renovations, as part of the $175 million over 3 years in funding for school infrastructure announced in 2012. Of these 15 projects, 3 are completed, 1 is substantially completed and the remaining projects are expected to be completed by March 2017. Moving forward, investments made in 2012 and 2014 for school infrastructure will positively impact the performance of the schools portfolio and affect the 2019 target.
  • Continued to examine various models for financing and construction to ensure value-for-money. This included the establishment of the Major Capital Infrastructure Project Delivery Directorate to oversee a pilot project for the bundling of school projects in northern Manitoba.

Data currently stored in the Integrated Capital Management System does not definitively identify which assets are schools and which are other types of education facilities assets. As such, the Program is unable to identify the exact number of schools or associate all schools to their asset numbers. Efforts will be undertaken during fiscal year 2015–2016 to address this situation; however, until this exercise is complete, the Program is unable to use trends to revise the target. The baseline and 2015 target were set in 2011 to be 70% when the issues of data integrity were unknown. The Department is undertaking efforts to remediate issues with the schools data.

Sub-Program 3.4.3: Housing

Description

This sub-program supports the provision of funding to First Nations to plan and manage their housing needs, including the design, construction and acquisition of new housing units as well as renovation of existing housing units. The goal of this sub-program is to work with First Nations to increase the supply of safe and affordable housing to achieve better housing outcomes for their residents.

2014–2015 Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars) 2014–2015 Human Resources (FTEs)
Planned Spending Actual Spending Difference (Actual Minus Planned) Planned Actual Difference (Actual Minus Planned)
138,450,869 128,607,509 (9,843,360) 14 14.1 0.1
The difference between Planned Spending and Actual Spending is addressed at the program level under Infrastructure and Capacity.
Performance Results
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Housing infrastructure meets the needs of First Nation communities Percentage of First Nation housing that is "adequate"a as assessed and reported annually by First Nations 72% (2011 baseline note that the baseline was established with self-reported data) by March 31, 2015 76%
a "Adequate" is defined in the Year-End Reporting Handbook for the Housing Data Collection Instrument (DCI) as dwellings that do not require major renovations and possess basic plumbing facilities, specifically, hot and cold running water, inside toilets, and installed baths or showers.
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

In pursuit of its objective of Housing infrastructure meeting the needs of First Nation communities, in 2014–2015 the Department accomplished the following:

  • 76% of First Nations housing was deemed "adequate" as assessed and reported annually by First Nations, exceeding the 2014–2015 target of 72%. The Government of Canada invests an average of $300 million in on-reserve housing each year through AANDC and Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation (CMHC), which work together with First Nations to help provide safe and affordable housing units on reserves across Canada. Over the past year, AANDC continued its collaboration with the Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation towards improving housing outcomes. In February 2015, AANDC and the CMHC developed information-sharing initiatives and collaborative working plans related to capacity development.
  • Supported the Nuu-Chah-Nulth Tribal Council initiative to set up a joint housing managers working group for its eight member bands through AANDC–British Columbia region's New Approach for Housing Support. This working group was established to network, share challenges and successes, build capacity, and develop core policies. The Nuu-Chah-Nulth Tribal Council Housing Working Group invited AANDC and the CMHC to a work session in March 2015 to share the progress made to date and objectives for 2015–2016.
  • Engaged in a unique partnership with the Montana First Nation to explore ways of creating sustainability in the First Nation's housing program. This led the First Nation to pursue renewable solar energy and reduce energy costs on their housing units, as well as to create a band-owned company, which trained band members to install solar panels and has catapulted them to becoming the largest hybrid solar-wind energy system on a First Nation in Western Canada.
  • Continued to foster partnerships between First Nations institutions and Employment and Social Development Canada on developing models for leveraging social finance with a view to increasing the range of options available to individuals for the secure and beneficial ownership of housing on reserve.

Sub-Program 3.4.4: Other Community Infrastructure and Activities

Description

This sub-program supports the provision of funding for the planning, design, construction, acquisition, operation and maintenance of community infrastructure assets and facilities. It also supports the provision of funding for coordination, training and capacity building for activities related to community infrastructure assets and facilities. The goal is to support First Nations in meeting health and safety standards and providing their residents with similar levels of service to those in off-reserve communities. Delivery of the program is devolved to First Nations. First Nations identify their priorities and needs and present project proposals to the Department. Funding is provided for projects based on a priority assessment.

2014–2015 Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars) 2014–2015 Human Resources (FTEs)
Planned Spending Actual Spending Difference (Actual Minus Planned) Planned Actual Difference (Actual Minus Planned)
483,478,980 435,067,987 (48,410,993) 128 111.9 (16.1)
The difference between Planned Spending and Actual Spending primarily reflects additional funding provided through Supplementary Estimates for the First Nation Infrastructure Fund (from the New Building Canada Fund) offset by reallocations to address pressures in other programs, notably Social Development and Governance and Institutions of Government. The difference between Planned and Actual FTEs is the result of an ongoing exercise to realign and redistribute human resources to better reflect the sub-program being supported.
Performance Results
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
First Nation communities have a base of safe infrastructure that meets established standards Percentage of First Nation communities with access to broadband connectivitya 70% (2011 baseline: 40%) by March 31, 2015 n/ab
Percentage of bridges with greater than "fair" condition rating Maintain 65% (2011 baseline) by March 31, 2015 51%
Percentage of roads with greater than "fair" condition rating Maintain 45% (2011 baseline) by March 31, 2015 42%
a Broadband connectivity is defined as First Nations with access to a minimum of 1.5 mbps to the households as per Industry Canada National Broadband Standards.
b This indicator is based on Industry Canada's National Broadband Standard, which changed from 1.5 mbps to 5 mbps in April 2014. The data source and tracking methodology for this indicator for 2014–2015, however, is based on 1.5 mbps and cannot be retroactively changed to 5 mbps. AANDC is currently working with Industry Canada to modify the data collection and methodology for this indicator to ensure it can be reported in 2015–2016 using the 5 mbps standard.
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

In pursuit of its objective of First Nations communities having a base of safe infrastructure that meets established standards, in 2014–2015 the Department accomplished the following:

  • Continued to support the national #BeFireSafe Awareness Education Campaign, in partnership with the Aboriginal Firefighters' Association of Canada, to raise awareness of the importance of fire prevention in First Nation communities. The campaign aims to reduce fire-related deaths, injuries and damages by sharing seasonal fire safety tips and information through regular radio features and social media messaging.
  • Developed a Structural Mitigation Funding Framework and Ranking Tool to better prioritize mitigation infrastructure projects. This will help deliver the $40 million over 5 years, starting in 2015–2016, announced in 2014 for disaster mitigation programming in First Nations communities.
  • Provided a subsidy of up to 90% of road and bridge operation and maintenance costs. First Nations have the flexibility to prioritize these funds to meet their needs, and competing priorities can divert funds away from maintenance of roads and bridges. Communities across Canada, on and off reserve, faced challenges in maintaining roads, compounded by the harsh effects of Canadian winters and freeze-thaw cycles that cause deterioration and increase maintenance costs. These factors contributed to the result of the 2014–2015 performance targets for roads and bridges not being met despite AANDC investments of $112,944,341 to First Nations in support of roads and bridges.

The current tools to track and tabulate Broadband Connectivity levels across First Nation communities in Canada need to be modified following Industry Canada's change in the Broadband Standard from 1.5 mbps to 5 mbps. AANDC will continue working with Industry Canada on assessing current methodology for tracking, collecting and tabulating this information to ensure a reliable picture of Broadband Connectivity levels in First Nation communities is captured.

Sub-Program 3.4.5: Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency

Description

The ecoENERGY for Aboriginal and Northern Communities Program supports Aboriginal and Northern communities, including off-grid communities, to reduce greenhouse gas emissions through the integration of proven renewable energy technologies such as residual heat recovery, biomass, geothermal, wind, solar and small hydro. The program provides funding for the design and construction of renewable energy projects integrated with community buildings and for the feasibility stages of larger renewable energy projects.

2014–2015 Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars) 2014–2015 Human Resources (FTEs)
Planned Spending Actual Spending Difference (Actual Minus Planned) Planned Actual Difference (Actual Minus Planned)
3,889,031 3,602,517 (286,514) 8 7.3 (0.7)
Performance Results
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Greenhouse gas emissions in Aboriginal and northern communities are reduced Projected Reductions in GHG Emissions resulting from all projects funded by the ecoENERGY for Aboriginal and Northern Communities Program (2011–2016) Projected 1.5 megatonnes by March 31, 2016 Projects funded from 2011–2012 to 2014–2015 are projected to reduce greenhouse gas emissions in excess of the projected program target of 1.5 megatonnes over the course of their lifespan.
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

In pursuit of its objective of reducing greenhouse gas emissions in Aboriginal and northern communities, in 2014–2015 the Department accomplished the following:

  • Supported Aboriginal and northern communities to reduce greenhouse gas emissions by providing funding for the development and implementation of community renewable energy projects through the ecoENERGY for Aboriginal and Northern Communities Program. In 2014–2015, the Program received 75 project funding applications. A total of 32 community projects were funded, including 19 off-grid projects, 10 of which were in the territories and 9 in the provinces.
  • Funded a total of 121 distinct energy projects since 2011, including 54 projects in off-grid and northern communities. These projects include pre-feasibility and feasibility studies of renewable energy projects and design, as well as the construction of renewable energy projects integrated with community buildings. If all the projects funded by the Program reach the construction and implementation phase, and become operational, they will reduce greenhouse gas emissions (over their 20-year project lifecycle) by well over the Program's overall reduction target of 1.5 megatonnes.

Similar to both 2012–2013 and 2013–2014, the Program moved its application intake period to earlier in the fiscal year again in 2014–2015. An ongoing challenge for communities has been the late flow of funds despite efficient proposal management processes. Moving its application intake period to earlier in the fiscal year has allowed the Program to make funding decisions earlier, and for communities to advance projects earlier, thus achieving better project and overall program results.

Sub-Program 3.4.6: Emergency Management Assistance

Description

The Emergency Management Assistance sub-program promotes the protection of the health and safety of on-reserve First Nations residents as well as their lands and critical infrastructure. The Emergency Management Assistance Program (EMAP) promotes the four pillars of emergency management: mitigation, preparedness, response and recovery. EMAP promotes efficiency by accessing existing resources and services of provincial/territorial and First Nation emergency management partners to address on-reserve emergencies. EMAP reimburses these partners for eligible expenses. EMAP also plays a coordinating role in integrating the emergency management efforts of the provinces, First Nations, other federal departments and emergency management organizations.

2014–2015 Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars) 2014–2015 Human Resources (FTEs)
Planned Spending Actual Spending Difference (Actual Minus Planned) Planned Actual Difference (Actual Minus Planned)
37,768,388 107,891,158 70,122,770 20 19.9 (0.1)
The difference between Planned Spending and Actual Spending primarily reflects additional funding provided through Supplementary Estimates.
Performance Results
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
First Nations respond to and recover from emergencies Percentage of eligiblea emergency response costs that are funded 100% by March 31, 2015b 100%
Percentage of eligiblea recovery projects that are fund
a Eligible costs are outlined in the Emergency Management Assistance Program's Terms and Conditions.
b The Emergency Assistance Management Program enters into agreements with emergency management providers (which can include First Nations) to deliver emergency management activities on-reserve. The program uses existing funding and, in exceptional years, seeks additional funding from Treasury Board to reimburse First Nations and other emergency management providers.
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

In pursuit of its objective of First Nations responding to and recovering from emergencies, in 2014–2015 the Department accomplished the following:

  • Worked with Public Safety to implement a comprehensive approach to emergency management on reserves. On April 1, 2014, the Program became the new single-window for funding eligible on-reserve emergency non-structural mitigation, preparedness, response, and recovery activities. In addition, the Emergency Management Assistance Program supported First Nations in emergency mitigation and preparedness activities.
  • Continued to build partnerships with federal, provincial, territorial, and third-party emergency management providers to support First Nations in emergency management. Negotiations of emergency management bilateral agreements to enhance emergency management were initiated with provinces and territories, and a historic 10-year agreement was signed between AANDC and the Province of Alberta on March 17, 2015.
  • Secured $29.33 million in stable new funding for the Emergency Management Assistance Program to reimburse on-reserve response and recovery costs. The variance in planned and actual financial and human resource expenditures minimally impacted the overall performance of the Program. The financial resources used to address on-reserve emergency management can greatly fluctuate from year to year depending on the number and severity of emergencies impacting First Nations. Due to an exceptional year in terms of the emergency management costs incurred on reserve, the Emergency Management Assistance Program's existing resources had to be supplemented with an additional $39.8 million from Treasury Board's Management Reserve to address urgent health and safety pressures.
  • Funded 100% of eligible funding requests ($51,475,054 in eligible response costs and $30,886,943 in recovery costs). In 2014–2015, the performance target of funding 100% of eligible First Nation emergency response and recovery activities was achieved.
  • Began responding to recommendations from the 2013–2014 Audit of the Emergency Management Assistance Program conducted by AANDC and by the Office of the Auditor General. The key recommendations from this audit were to develop a risk-based, all-hazards approach; clarify the Program authority and guidelines; strengthen internal controls over funds; and finalize a performance measurement strategy. In response to those recommendations, the Program is implementing its Department-approved performance measurement strategy; updating terms and conditions; revising the national plan; and implementing the comprehensive approach to emergency management.

Program 3.5: Urban Aboriginal Participation

Description

The Urban Aboriginal Participation Program contributes to The Land and Economy Strategic Outcome. The program supports the participation of urban Aboriginal individuals and communities in the economy. Through programs such as, the Urban Aboriginal Strategy; the Aboriginal Friendship Centres Program; the Cultural Connections for Aboriginal Youth; and Young Canada Works for Aboriginal Urban Youth, it provides a vehicle by which the federal government can work with other governments, the urban Aboriginal community and other stakeholders to reduce or remove barriers and enhance the life skills and knowledge of urban Aboriginal individuals and communities. These enhancements provide greater access to economic opportunities. The program allows the federal government to facilitate partnerships with all levels of government to align expenditures directed toward urban Aboriginal individuals and communities in key centres, achieving more substantive outcomes. The program will expand local labour market pools, allowing for increased economic development, and assist in moving urban Aboriginal communities toward increased self-reliance and a reduced dependency on government, thus helping to strengthen Canada's economy as a whole.

2014–2015 Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars) 2014–2015 Human Resources (FTEs)
Main Estimates Planned Spending Total Authorities Available for Use Actual Spending (Authorities Used) Difference (Actual Minus Planned) Planned Actual Difference (Actual Minus Planned)
40,014,054 40,014,054 49,569,445 49,520,444 9,506,390 15 18.2 3.2
The difference between Planned Spending and Actual Spending primarily reflects incremental funding provided through Supplementary Estimates for the Consolidated Urban Aboriginal Strategy.
Performance Results
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Urban Aboriginal people have the support to pursue social and economic opportunities Employment rate relative to the participation rate Increased employment rate relative to the participation rate by March 31, 2015 The participation rate for urban Aboriginal people decreased slightly from 64.7% in March 2014 to 64.4% in March 2015.
The employment rate for urban Aboriginal people decreased slightly from 57.3% in March 2014 to 56.4% in March 2015.a
a This is an aggregate from all population centres in the Labour Force Survey. Urban Aboriginal people refers to Aboriginal people living in "population centres," which are centres with more than 1,000 people per centre or more than 400 people per square kilometer.
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

In pursuit of its objective of Urban Aboriginal people having the support to pursue social and economic opportunities, in 2014–2015 the Department accomplished the following:

  • Provided the National Association of Friendship Centres with funding for delivery of Community Capacity Support and Urban Partnerships. This resulted in the National Association of Friendship Centres supporting 124 urban Aboriginal organizations across Canada with core-like funding under Community Capacity Support and funding for 174 initiatives under Urban Partnerships to increase urban Aboriginal people's economic participation. AANDC also delivered a portion of Urban Partnerships funding to communities and organizations to build and develop partnerships and support community and regional planning to foster the participation of Aboriginal peoples in the economy.
  • Consolidated four AANDC urban Aboriginal programs: the Aboriginal Friendship Centres Program, Cultural Connections for Aboriginal Youth, Young Canada Works for Aboriginal Urban Youth, and the Urban Aboriginal Strategy into two new programs — Community Capacity Support and Urban Partnerships —, and aligned them to provide increased participation in the economy.
    • Community Capacity Support provides funding to urban Aboriginal community organizations, establishing a strong and stable base from which to attract public and private contributions while assisting organizations to deliver programs and services that support the participation of urban Aboriginal people in the economy.
    • Urban Partnerships encourages partnerships, community planning, and making investments in projects that support the participation of urban Aboriginal people in the economy so that other community stakeholders feel confident investing their resources.

Strategic Outcome: The North

Self-reliance, prosperity and well-being for the people and communities of the North

Program 4.1: Northern Governance and People

Description

The Northern Governance and People Program supports The North Strategic Outcome. This program strengthens the North's communities and people by devolving to territorial governments responsibilities for lands and natural resources; by fostering effective intergovernmental relations with territorial governments and providing support to Territorial Commissioners; by subsidizing the costs of nutritious perishable foods and other essential items in isolated Northern communities; by providing grants for hospital and physician services in Nunavut and the Northwest Territories; by working with Northern communities to identify the risks and challenges posed by climate change and by advancing interests of Canadians and Northerners through circumpolar forums. Canadians and Northerners will benefit with territorial governments ultimately having more control over their own affairs.

2014–2015 Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars) 2014–2015 Human Resources (FTEs)
Main Estimates Planned Spending Total Authorities Available for Use Actual Spending (Authorities Used) Difference (Actual Minus Planned) Planned Actual Difference (Actual Minus Planned)
130,218,356 130,218,356 150,273,247 146,407,862 16,189,506 67 70.3 3.3
The difference between Planned Spending and Actual Spending primarily reflects additional funding provided through Supplementary Estimates, the Operating Budget Carry Forward and internal reallocations. This additional funding was partially offset by funding which has been set aside in order to meet the statutory funding requirements under the Territorial Formula Financing as stipulated in the Northwest Territories Lands and Resources Devolution Agreement.
Performance Results
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Northerners have greater control over their economic and political affairs Number of final devolution agreements fully implemented with territorial governments on land and resource management 2 by March 31, 2015 2 final devolution agreements are fully implemented (Northwest Territories and Yukon).
Community health and safety in the North is strengthened Estimated weight of Nutrition North Canada eligible food purchased per capita Increase annually by March 31, 2015 290 kg per capita of eligible foods were shipped to fully eligible communities. This represents a 3.5% increase over the weight of the same food shipped in 2013–2014.a
Number of new and revised codes and standards and guidelines for infrastructure in the North being adopted 2 out of 4 standardsb completed by March 31, 2015 All 4 of the northern infrastructure standards have been completed and are available as national standards for the Canadian public.
a The weight of food shipped is used as a proxy for the amount of food purchased.
b Target was modified to reflect the correct terminology. It now differs from the 2014–15 Report on Plans and Priorities.
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

In pursuit of its objective of Northerners having greater control over their economic and political affairs, in 2014–2015 the Department accomplished the following:

  • Concluded the second devolution agreement with the completion of implementation of the Northwest Territories Lands and Resources Devolution Agreement in April 2014.
  • Completed the implementation of Yukon devolution in 2003.
  • Advanced the Nunavut devolution negotiations towards an agreement-in-principle, or Phase 2 of the devolution process.

In pursuit of its objective of community health and safety in the North being strengthened, in 2014–2015 the Department accomplished the following:

  • Committed additional funding to help improve access to perishable, nutritious food in the communities it serves. In November 2014, the Government of Canada announced $11.3 million in 2014–2015 to increase the Program's food subsidy budget, along with a new 5% annual budget escalator.
  • Put in place active engagement between Nutrition North Canada and clients/stakeholders to encourage discussions on ways to enhance the design and delivery of the Program. The northern-based Nutrition North Canada Advisory Board provided an ongoing engagement vehicle for Northerners, stakeholders and experts so that the Program continues to respond to the needs of Northerners while meeting its objectives.
  • Through the Northern Infrastructure Standardization Initiative, supported pan-northern consultation, decision making and technical expert committees engaged in the development of infrastructure standards to consider impacts of thermosyphonsFootnote 7, community drainage, permafrost on existing foundations and snow loading on roofs. All four standards(CAN/CSA-S503-15, CAN/CSA-S500-14, CAN/CSA-S501-14 and CAN/CSA-S502-14) were completed in 2014–2015 and are available online.

Sub-Program 4.1.1: Political Development and Intergovernmental Relations

Description

This sub-program facilitates the growth of strong, effective and efficient government structures in the North. The devolution of responsibilities for land and resource management to territorial governments will strengthen northern governance. This sub-program also supports legislation and policy initiatives, the advancement of intergovernmental processes, and the appointment of Territorial Commissioners and general federal-territorial relationships. As well, it ensures that circumpolar co-operation activities reflect Canadians' interests and grants are provided to territorial governments for hospital and physician services.

2014–2015 Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars) 2014–2015 Human Resources (FTEs)
Planned Spending Actual Spending Difference (Actual Minus Planned) Planned Actual Difference (Actual Minus Planned)
68,403,194 74,110,490 5,707,296 51 51.6 0.6
The difference between Planned Spending and Actual Spending primarily reflects additional funding provided through Supplementary Estimates, the Operating Budget Carry Forward and internal reallocations to meet the Government of Canada's obligations under the Northwest Territories Lands and Resources Devolution Agreement.
Performance Results
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Devolution of land and resource management to the Government of Northwest Territories Completion of devolution phases in NWT against the 5 phases devolution process (protocol, AIP, final agreement, legislation and implementation) Final Report on Implementation by October 31, 2014 Completed and submitted final report in October 2014
Devolution of land and resource management to the Government of Nunavut Completion of devolution phases in Nunavut against the 5 phases devolution process (5-phases process: protocol, AIP, final agreement, legislation and implementation) Commence Phase 2 by March 31, 2015 Phase 2, agreement-in-principle negotiations started in October 2014
Canadian Priorities, as articulated in the Northern Strategy, are reflected in National Circumpolar cooperation activities Percentage of Canadian priorities actioned through activities under Arctic Council and Canada–Russia cooperation 100% by March 31, 2015 100% of Canadian Arctic Council Chairmanship priorities
Canada–Russia cooperation paused in fall 2014
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

In pursuit of its objective of devolving land and resource management to the Government of Northwest Territories, in 2014–2015 the Department accomplished the following:

  • Conducted negotiations regarding the transfer of provincial-like responsibility for land and resource management according to a five-phase process: protocol, agreement in principle, final agreement, legislation, and implementation. On April 1, 2014, the Northwest Territories Devolution Act took effect and successfully concluded the final phase of the devolution process. AANDC continued throughout the year to fulfill obligations post-devolution implementation.
  • Submitted the joint final report on the Northwest Territories devolution implementation process and results.

In pursuit of its objective of devolving land and resource management to the Government of Nunavut, in 2014–2015 the Department accomplished the following:

  • Supported the Chief Federal Negotiator in advancing negotiation of an agreement-in-principle on devolution in Nunavut.
  • Worked collaboratively with Employment and Social Development Canada, CanNor and Natural Resources Canada to strengthen resources management capacity in the context of devolution negotiations.

The experiences in completing the implementation of devolution in Yukon and the Northwest Territories are informing and guiding models for Nunavut. In particular, the Nunavut devolution initiative is largely mirroring the Northwest Territories devolution process and has adopted efficiencies in the negotiations process.

With respect to national Circumpolar Cooperation activities, in 2014–2015 the Department accomplished the following:

  • Facilitated the delivery of all Canadian Chairmanship priorities in collaboration with territorial governments, Aboriginal organizations, and domestic partners.
  • Provided substantive leadership and support to Arctic Council Working Groups and Task Forces and helped ensure that Northerners are at the forefront of the Council's agenda over the course of Canada's 2013–2015 Chairmanship of the Arctic Council.

Sub-Program 4.1.2: Nutrition North

Description

This sub-program provides increased access to perishable nutritious food in isolated northern communities through a retail subsidy. It is supported by an Advisory Board, which ensures that Northerners have a direct voice in the program. Eligible northern communities will benefit from improved access to healthy food.

2014–2015 Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars) 2014–2015 Human Resources (FTEs)
Planned Spending Actual Spending Difference (Actual Minus Planned) Planned Actual Difference (Actual Minus Planned)
57,148,044 67,651,714 10,503,670 9 11.2 2.2
The difference between Planned Spending and Actual Spending primarily reflects additional funding provided through Supplementary Estimates to increase support for the Nutrition North Canada Program.
The difference between Planned and Actual FTEs reflects the addition of 1 student (0.4 FTE) and 5 Board members (1.37 FTE).
Performance Results
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Subsidized food available in eligible communities Weight of eligible food shipped per capita Increase annually by March 31, 2015 316 kg per capitaa of eligible foods were shipped to fully eligible communities. This represents a 3.5% increase over the weight of the same food shipped in 2013–2014.
Nutrition North Canada food basket price trends Comparable to food price trends for the rest of Canada by March 31, 2015 For the period 2011–2015:
Nutrition North Canada food basket price for fully eligible communities — -5.0%
Canada Consumer Price Index basket for food — +9.9%
a Change in methodology using the population for full eligible communities only (Source: Census 2011 — Population: 76,066).
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

In pursuit of its objective of subsidizing food available in eligible communities, in 2014–2015 the Department accomplished the following:

  • Continued to promote transparency through posting reports, including compliance reports, the northern retail study, audit and compliance review findings and performance results, as well as posting information on the new and updated website.
  • Initiated by the Nutrition North Canada Advisory Board, a process to examining the possibility of displaying subsidy savings on point-of-sale receipts as a way to ensure greater retailer transparency. In March 2015, the former Minister tasked the Board with examining the issue further and providing recommendations.
  • Worked to address the recommendations of the 2014 Report of the Auditor General, including the addition of a new clause in funding agreements to ensure that the full subsidy is being passed on to consumers, and a detailed review of all isolated northern communities to assist in reviewing the community eligibility criteria. The Performance Measurement Strategy for Nutrition North Canada was updated in September 2014 and posted to the Government of Canada website in October 2014.
  • Held three face-to-face Nutrition North Canada Advisory Board meetings in addition to a number of teleconferences. The Department committed to engaging with Northerners, retailers and suppliers on ideas to keep improving this new and growing sub-program.
  • Completed the Northern Food Retail Study, which was posted on the Nutrition North Canada website in November 2014. In analysing the northern grocery retail system and the environment in which Nutrition North Canada operates, the study made several recommendations, including that Nutrition North Canada should communicate a more complete picture of the range of factors contributing to the high cost of groceries. Findings will inform program policies and engagement strategy.
  • Continued to focus on subsidizing nutritious perishable foods, with 25.5 million kilograms of nutritious food shipped by air to isolated northern communities in 2014–2015. Approximately 29% of the weight shipped consisted of perishable vegetables and fruits, 25% was milk and other dairy products, 17% was fresh and frozen meat, poultry and fish, and 12% was perishable grain product.

Between March 2011 and March 2015, the Revised Northern Food Basket for fully eligible communities decreased by 5.0%, or approximately $94.00 per month, whereas the Consumer Price Index for a basket of food in Canada increased by $12.60 over the same periodFootnote 8.

Sub-Program 4.1.3: Climate Change Adaptation

Description

This sub-program provides funding support to Aboriginal and northern communities, governments and organizations to assess vulnerabilities to climate change, develop adaptation plans and develop related information and tools. The sub-program builds capacity at the community level and develops partnerships with territorial governments to address broad northern issues. The assessment of climate change impacts and adaptation planning enhances community resilience and facilitates the integration of climate change considerations into decision making.

2014–2015 Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars) 2014–2015 Human Resources (FTEs)
Planned Spending Actual Spending Difference (Actual Minus Planned) Planned Actual Difference (Actual Minus Planned)
4,667,118 4,645,658 (21,460) 7 7.4 0.4
Performance Results
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Aboriginal and northern communities implement adaptation measures and decisions to protect community health and safety Number of communities implementing adaptation plans and measures 10 communities over 4 years by March 31, 2016 4 communities have successfully implemented adaptation measures.
The Climate Change Adaptation sub-program is running for five years (2011–2016), and this indicator will be measured for the full five years of the Program. Measurement was set to begin in year two (2012–2013) of the Program, but was delayed and has begun this year instead.
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

In pursuit of its objective of Aboriginal and northern communities implementing adaptation measures and decisions to protect community health and safety, in 2014–2015 the Department accomplished the following:

  • Funded a total of 37 community and territorial projects, exceeding plans to fund 20 projects each year by the Climate Adaptation and Resilience Program for Aboriginals and Northerners, referred to as the Climate Change Adaptation Program. The Program provides up to $500,000 per year to each territorial government to help communities manage climate change-related risks including territory specific and pan-arctic impacts. The territorial governments supported a total of 22 projects during 2014–2015. Projects funded supported vulnerability assessments, adaptation planning, tools and knowledge dissemination. While 22 projects were identified and led by territorial governments, the other 15 of the 37 directly supported a total of 51 Aboriginal and northern communities.
  • To date, four communities have reported that they have successfully implemented comprehensive adaptation measures that were identified through projects funded by the Climate Change Adaptation Program. A majority of multi-year projects are still ongoing and as they come into completion, it is anticipated that more adaptation measures will be implemented by communities.

In 2014–2015, the Program received 41 community project proposals and was able to fund 15 community projects. The number of community project proposals received was slightly lower than the previous year because the Program had further defined its project eligibility criteria to address the known gaps in climate change knowledge and to further align with departmental priorities. In order to focus on mature proposals and results, as well as to better manage stakeholder expectations, the 2015–2016 Call for Proposals clearly indicated that priority would be provided to multi-year projects that are currently receiving funds from the Program.

Program 4.2: Northern Science and Technology

Description

The Northern Science and Technology Program contributes to The North Strategic Outcome. It aims to support scientific research and technology in the North by providing researchers and scientists with increased access to programs and infrastructure to further research science and technology. The focus of this program is: researching and monitoring contaminants and their impacts on the ecosystem through the Northern Contaminants Program; supporting initiatives to create, manage and disseminate scientific data and results that help inform public policy making; and supporting work to establish the Canadian High Arctic Research Station (CHARS). Northerners and all Canadians will benefit from a knowledge base that supports health and sustainable development and the positioning of Canada as an international leader in Arctic science and technology.

2014–2015 Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars) 2014–2015 Human Resources (FTEs)
Main Estimates Planned Spending Total Authorities Available for Use Actual Spending (Authorities Used) Difference (Actual Minus Planned) Planned Actual Difference (Actual Minus Planned)
7,320,522 7,320,522 46,683,870 40,827,871 33,507,349 39 52.4 13.4
The difference between Planned Spending and Actual Spending primarily reflects additional funding provided through Supplementary Estimates and the Capital Budget Carry Forward for the Canadian High Arctic Research Station. This additional funding was partially offset by the deferral of activities associated with the Canadian High Arctic Research Station; this deferred funding that was not required in 2014–2015 has been carried forward to 2015–2016 when it will be available for the intended purpose.
The difference between Planned and Actual FTEs reflects the phasing in of the Polar Knowledge Canada's Science and Technology Program.
Performance Results
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Domestic and international policy on northern health and sustainable development is better informed by a scientific knowledge base Percentage of Northern Contaminants Program research, results and information that is accessible nationally and internationally 100% by March 31, 2017 100%
Canada is positioned as an international leader in Arctic science and technology Number of international Arctic Science and Technology partnerships between AANDC and international collaborators 2 to 4 partnership agreements by March 31, 2016 Complete 2 to 4 partnership agreements expected by March 31, 2017
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

In pursuit of its objective of domestic and international policy on northern health and sustainable development being better informed by a scientific knowledge base, in 2014–2015 the Department accomplished the following:

  • Contributed data and expertise to national initiatives as outlined in 4.2.1.
  • Released a summary for policy makers, which integrates the key findings that emerged from recently published comprehensive assessments of persistent organic pollutants and mercury in the North and their impacts on ecosystems and human health. While significant progress has been made towards the completion of the Canadian Arctic Contaminants Assessment Report III, Contaminants in Canada's North: Highlights Report, the need for further consultation to reflect regional differences and highlights has resulted in an extended timeline, with production and release re-scheduled to coincide with the 2015 Northern Contaminants Program Results Workshop.

The valuable history of archived results and information from the Northern Contaminants Program was not readily accessible to the broader public using modern information technology. Through an ongoing partnership with the Arctic Institute of North America at the University of Calgary, efforts got under way to make archived Northern Contaminants Program publications and related materials easily accessible through an online database. This approach took into consideration the Web Renewal Initiative and related efforts to remove outdated content from AANDC's website, while meeting the public's requests for access to older, but still valuable, information. This partnership will continue in 2015–2016, with further additions to the Arctic Institute of North America's publications database.

In pursuit of its objective of Canada is positioned as an international leader in Arctic science and technology, in 2014–2015 the Department accomplished the following:

  • Pursued the development of partnerships domestically and internationally. Opportunities to enhance bilateral cooperation between Canadian and international polar research institutions were explored and an international workshop (led by AANDC and the Canadian Polar Commission) provided the input required to begin developing a partnership and engagement strategy. A draft strategy has been developed that will provide the framework to begin the implementation of formal partnership agreements.

In 2014–2015, the level of international interest and the variety of potential partners highlighted the need for a coordinated strategy for managing bilateral and multilateral relationships, which was addressed by developing a partnership and engagement strategy based on the parameters identified at the international workshop. Once finalized, the partnership and engagement strategy will be used to develop and implement formal partnership agreements that align with the Polar Knowledge Canada's Science and Technology Plan for 2014 to 2019.

Sub-Program 4.2.1: Northern Contaminants

Description

This sub-program engages Northerners and scientists in researching and monitoring long-range contaminants in the Canadian Arctic. The data generated by the Northern Contaminants Program is used to assess ecosystem and human health, and the findings of these assessments inform policy, resulting in action to eliminate contaminants from long-range sources. This supports the safety and security of traditional country foods that are important to the health of Northerners and northern communities. The sub-program also contributes to scientific data to international agreements, such as the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) Minamata Convention on Mercury, helping to position Canada as an international leader in Arctic science. These international agreements will improve the health of Arctic people and wildlife over the long term.

2014–2015 Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars) 2014–2015 Human Resources (FTEs)
Planned Spending Actual Spending Difference (Actual Minus Planned) Planned Actual Difference (Actual Minus Planned)
4,889,400 4,828,602 (60,798) 10 10.3 0.3
Performance Results
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Contaminant related risk to ecosystem and human health is reduced Percentage decrease in concentrations of previously identified contaminants in northern wildlife 5 to 10% decrease in 3 indicator persistent organic pollutants concentrations over 1990 levels by March 31, 2015 Concentrations of legacy persistent organic pollutantsa have decreased by about 80% in arctic biota.b
1 to 3% decrease in mercury concentrations over 1990 levels by March 31, 2015 Currently there is no consistent trend in mercury concentrations in wildlife populations across the Arctic.c
Percentage decrease in concentrations of previously identified contaminants among northern populations 5 to 10% decrease in 3 indicator persistent organic pollutants concentrations over 1990 levels by March 31, 2015 Available data provides evidence that concentrations of legacy persistent organic pollutants have decreased in adult Inuit by 50 to 70% since the early 1990s.
1 to 3% decrease in mercury concentrations over 1990 levels by March 31, 2015 Available data provides evidence that mercury concentrations have decreased in adult Inuit by 25 to 50% since the early 1990s.
Northerners participate in contaminants research Number of Northerners engaged in Northern Contaminants Program activities 500 Northerners engaged by March 31, 2015 2,225
a Legacy persistent organic pollutants are the original 12 contaminants that were listed under the Stockholm Convention on Persistent Organic Pollutants when it entered into force in 2004.
b Biota refers to all living organisms of a particular region.
c Some wildlife populations being monitored exhibit no discernible trend (beluga, seal, land-locked char, caribou) while others show increases in mercury concentrations, such as a 50% increase in freshwater fish from Mackenzie Valley and a 30% increase in seabird eggs since 1990.
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

In pursuit of its objective of reducing contaminant related risk to ecosystem and human health, in 2014–2015 the Department accomplished the following:

  • Continued to make significant progress towards achieving the targets by ensuring that contaminant level monitoring in wildlife and people in the Canadian North was carried out efficiently, in partnership with stakeholders and by transferring knowledge to Northerners and policy makers.
  • Contributed data, information and expertise to Canadian and international assessments on contaminants and human health, as well as to the Arctic Council's Arctic Monitoring and Assessment Programme, the Stockholm Convention's Global Monitoring Plan and the Minamata Convention on Mercury.
  • Supported a pilot project for monitoring health and nutrition in partnership with the Government of the Northwest Territories, Health Canada, and researchers at the University of Waterloo, as it relates to consumption of traditional foods in the Deh Cho Region of Northwest Territories.

It is anticipated that newer persistent organic pollutants, like polybrominated diphenyl ethersFootnote 9, which have increased in wildlife since 1990, may be starting to decrease since being added to the Stockholm Convention in 2009. Similarly, as the Minamata Convention enters into force in approximately two to three years, mercury levels are anticipated to decrease, which in turn will lead to improved health of Arctic people and wildlife over the long term.

In pursuit of its objective of encouraging Northerners to participate in contaminants research, in 2014–2015 the Department accomplished the following:

  • In response to changes to the Northern Contaminants Program's strategic plans, and with the continued support of four Inuit Research Advisor positions across the North, the number of Northerners engaged through research and monitoring projects, workshops, consultations and other activities has increased to 2,225.

Sub-Program 4.2.2: Science Initiatives

Description

This sub-program works to position Canada as a leader in Arctic science through the establishment of the Canadian High Arctic Research Station. The Station will be a world-class, year-round, multidisciplinary facility on the cutting edge of Arctic issues that will anchor a strong research presence in Canada's Arctic to serve Canada and the world. It will advance Canada's knowledge of the Arctic to improve economic opportunities, environmental stewardship, and the quality of life of Northerners and all Canadians.

2014–2015 Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars) 2014–2015 Human Resources (FTEs)
Planned Spending Actual Spending Difference (Actual Minus Planned) Planned Actual Difference (Actual Minus Planned)
2,431,122 35,999,269 33,568,147 29 42.1 13.1
The difference between Planned Spending and Actual Spending primarily reflects additional funding provided through Supplementary Estimates and the Capital Budget Carry Forward for the construction of the Canadian High Arctic Research Station (CHARS).
Human resources variances are due to the phasing-in of the Polar Knowledge Canada's Science and Technology Program which began implementation in summer 2014.
Performance Results
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Researchers have access to world-class Arctic infrastructure in the Canadian North Launch of the Canadian High Arctic Research Station (including launch of the science and technology program and completion of facility construction) Completion of construction of the research station by July 1, 2017 Construction of the facility was officially launched in August 2014.
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

In pursuit of its objective of researchers having access to world-class Arctic infrastructure in the Canadian North, in 2014–2015 the Department accomplished the following:

  • Launched the construction of the Canadian High Arctic Research Station in August 2014, which is expected to be completed in 2017. Building material was brought on sealift in the fall 2014, which will allow the construction of the main research building (the largest and most complex of the buildings on the CHARS campus) to begin promptly in spring 2015.
  • Developed a draft strategy which will provide a framework to begin the implementation of formal partnership agreements.
  • Continued to integrate the development of the building design and the Science and Technology Program on an ongoing basis. The project is on schedule for the Canadian High Arctic Research Station to be operational by July 1, 2017.

In 2014–2015, challenges were experienced with the procurement of highly technical scientific equipment in line with requirements for procurement and contracting under the Nunavut Land Claim Agreement. Advice and expertise was sought from within AANDC and from other government departments with expertise in procurement of scientific equipment. Specific procurement expertise was identified as a gap and procurement capacity is being enhanced within AANDC to manage the acquisition of technical scientific equipment that meets the procurement and contracting requirements of the Nunavut Land Claim Agreement. Experience and expertise developed by AANDC will be used to increase capacity for this kind of specialized procurement within the newly established Polar Knowledge Canada.

Program 4.3: Northern Land, Resources and Environmental Management

Description

The Northern Land, Resources and Environmental Management Program supports The North Strategic Outcome. It focuses on the management, sustainable development and regulatory oversight of the land, water, natural resources and environment of the North, delivering on the Department's role as the Government of Canada's natural resource manager in Nunavut and the offshore, and its post-devolution responsibilities in the Northwest Territories and Yukon. This program involves: managing oil and gas resources development; supporting the sustainable management of active mineral exploration and development; supporting the sound management of contaminated sites and of Nunavut and the few remaining AANDC-managed land and water areas in the North; and ensuring the completion of territorial land-use planning including zones for conservation, development and other uses. Northerners and Canadians will benefit from economic opportunities and sustainable development.

2014–2015 Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars) 2014–2015 Human Resources (FTEs)
Main Estimates Planned Spending Total Authorities Available for Use Actual Spending (Authorities Used) Difference (Actual Minus Planned) Planned Actual Difference (Actual Minus Planned)
120,402,745 120,402,745 262,578,542 212,493,747 92,091,002 345 235.6 (109.4)
The difference between Planned Spending and Actual Spending primarily reflects additional funding provided through Supplementary Estimates (including a transfer of funding from the Department of National Defence) for the assessment, management and remediation of federal contaminated sites under the Federal Contaminated Sites Action Plan. This additional funding is partially offset by the deferral of activities associated with the Federal Contaminated Sites Action Plan (this deferred funding that was not required in 2014–2015 has been re-profiled to 2015–2016 when it will be available for the intended purpose) as well as funding which has been set aside in order to meet the statutory funding requirements under the Territorial Formula Financing as stipulated in the Northwest Territories Lands and Resources Devolution Agreement.
Performance Results
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Effective regulatory regimes are established in each of the three territories, which provide certainty to project proponents, Aboriginal organizations and Northerners Nunavut's ratings for three factors (1: administration, interpretation, enforcement of regulations; 2: environmental regulations; 3: regulatory duplication and inconsistencies) reported in the Fraser Institute Annual Survey of Mining Companies The percentage of industry encouraged to invest, or not deterred by, the three factors shall each increase by 10 percentage points by March 31, 2015 The Nunavut investment climate, as reported by the Fraser Institute, declined by 7 percentage points for Factor 1, by 19 percentage points for Factor 2 and by 13 percentage points for Factor 3 while overall investment attractiveness of the Nunavut regime increased from 68.9 to 70%.
Percentage of Nunavut projects and national interest or transboundary NWT projects approved within regulated time lines in process, including decisions on environmental assessments 100% by March 31, 2015 100% of projects were completed within regulated timelines.
Amendments to Mackenzie Valley Resource Management Act, Northwest Territories Waters Act, Territorial Lands Act, Yukon Environmental and Socio-economic Assessment Act ready for introduction to Parliament 100% by March 31, 2015 The Mackenzie Valley Resource Management Act, the Northwest Territories Waters Act, and the Territorial Lands Act received Royal Assent in March 2014.
The Yukon Environmental and Socio-economic Assessment Act was introduced in the Senate in June 2014 and in the House of Commons in October 2014.
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

In pursuit of its objective of establishing effective regulatory regimes in each of the three territories, to provide certainty to project proponents, Aboriginal organizations and Northerners, in 2014–2015 the Department accomplished the following:

  • Continued to work with the Government of the Northwest Territories on roles and responsibilities for environmental assessment following amendments to the Mackenzie Valley Resource Management Act. As the two governments work together through the environmental assessment decision-making processes, these roles and responsibilities will become clearer to government partners, boards, Aboriginal groups, as well as the public.
  • Introduced the Yukon and Nunavut Regulatory Improvement Act (Bill S-6) in the Senate in June 2014 and in the House of Commons in October 2014.
  • Replaced the Northwest Territories and Nunavut Mining Regulations by the Northwest Territories Mining Regulations and the Nunavut Mining Regulations on March 31, 2014. Effective April 1, 2014, the Northwest Territories Mining Regulations only apply to lands listed in Schedule 4 of the Northwest Territories Land and Resources Devolution Agreement. Further amendments to the Nunavut Mining Regulations aim to replace the physical staking of mineral claims on the ground with a system for the selection of mineral claims from online maps with pre-defined grids.
  • Continued to advance the implementation of amendments that were included in Bill C 15; the Mackenzie Valley Resource Management Act, the Territorial Lands Act, and Northwest Territories Waters Act.
  • Successfully issued project decisions within targeted timelines. In Nunavut, the project decisions for the Mary River Early Revenue Phase and Meliadine Gold projects, as well as the Giant Mine Remediation Project in the Northwest Territories, were completed within targeted timelines. Improvements to the Northern Regulatory Regime support the Government of Canada's commitments to timely decision making in northern environmental assessment regimes.
  • Continued to manage the lands and water resources in the North, as detailed under 4.3.3.
  • Supported private-sector investment in the northern petroleum sector to advance efficient and effective oil and gas management. Further results can be found under 4.3.1.

The three areas being reported on in the previous table (1. administration, interpretation, enforcement of regulations; 2. environmental regulations; and 3. regulatory duplication and inconsistencies) are factors that contribute to the overall attractiveness of a given regime. In this case, these three factors have not increased in a positive direction over the past year. At the same time, the respondents to the Fraser Institute's study have expressed an increase in the overall investment attractiveness of the regimes in all three territories (Nunavut from 68.9 to 70%, Northwest Territories from 69.7 to 76%, and Yukon from 77.9 to 80.1%), which would indicate that investor confidence in resource development in the North is improving.

Sub-Program 4.3.1: Petroleum and Minerals

Description

This sub-program manages the petroleum and mineral resource interests of Northerners, Aboriginal peoples and Canadians generally on federal lands in the Northwest Territories, Nunavut and the northern offshore. This is accomplished through the assessment of petroleum and mineral resources, collection of Crown royalties, participation in environmental assessment of projects, land-use planning, and promotion of Aboriginal participation in resource development. It regularly engages federal, territorial and Aboriginal organizations to consider socio-cultural and environmental sensitivities related to petroleum and mineral activities. This sub-program also manages rights issuance for new petroleum exploration rights, terms and conditions of exploration and production licences, and maintains a rights registry that is open to the public. Specific projects managed by this sub-program include the Beaufort Regional Environmental Assessment (BREA), the Department's federal lead responsibility for the Mackenzie Gas Project, and the Mineral and Energy Resource Assessments for establishing National Parks. Northerners and Canadians will benefit from economic opportunities offered by responsible and sustainable resource development on federal lands in the North.

2014–2015 Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars) 2014–2015 Human Resources (FTEs)
Planned Spending Actual Spending Difference (Actual Minus Planned) Planned Actual Difference (Actual Minus Planned)
18,171,318 12,756,689 (5,414,629) 63 26.9 (36.1)
The difference between Planned Spending and Actual Spending primarily reflects funding which has been set aside in order to meet the statutory funding requirements under the Territorial Formula Financing as stipulated in the Northwest Territories Lands and Resources Devolution Agreement. The difference between planned and actual financial and human resources primarily reflects the devolution of federal jurisdiction over Crown lands and resources as a result of the Northwest Territories Lands and Resources Devolution Agreement, as well as staffing changes to implement the Agreement.
Performance Results
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Petroleum and mineral resources on federal lands in NWT, Nunavut and northern offshore regions are managed for the benefit of Northerners and all Canadians Number of hectares under land disposition for oil and gas (based on a five-year moving average) as a reflection of the amount of work conducted in the region 3 million hectares by March 31, 2015 The 5-year rolling average as of December 31, 2014 for hectares under exploration licence is 3,698,125.
Percentage of total Canadian mineral exploration and deposit appraisal expenditures made in Nunavut 10% by March 31, 2015 7.5% by March 24, 2015.
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

In pursuit of its objective of managing petroleum and mineral resources on federal lands in Northwest Territories, Nunavut and northern offshore regions for the benefit of Northerners and all Canadians, in 2014–2015 the Department accomplished the following:

  • Transferred 127 oil and gas rights to the Government of the Northwest Territories on April 1, 2014 in support of devolution to the Government of the Northwest Territories. At the end of 2014, the five-year rolling average of hectares under licence for oil and gas exploration in the Canadian North was 3,698,125, thus achieving the target of 3 million hectares by March 31, 2015. AANDC engaged with industry on proposed administrative changes, and in 2015–2016 will communicate and promote areas open for nominations and associated programmatic changes to the call process.
  • Begun discussions between interested parties in order to move towards negotiations related to developing an approach for shared management of oil and gas resources in the Beaufort Sea. Discussions are still ongoing. Additionally, amendments were made to the Canada Oil and Gas Operations Act and the Canada Petroleum Resources Act.
  • Continued to contribute in developing plans for safe and sustainable Arctic offshore oil and gas exploration by leading key initiatives related to environmental protection and by contributing northern oil and gas expertise in working groups through its involvement in the Arctic Council.
  • Continued to advance environmental and social studies pertaining to oil and gas operations on frontier landsFootnote 10 by the Environmental Studies Research Fund. Northern studies investigated regional environmental conditions, as well as oil spill effects, preparedness and response.
  • Funded a total 23 research projects and 6 working group activities over 4 years through the Beaufort Regional Environmental Assessment (BREA) Initiative. Presented the results of these projects at the Final Results Workshop which took place in Inuvik, Northwest Territories in February 2015. Over 85 participants representing Inuvialuit communities and organizations, regulators, governments, industry, and academia attended the Forum to present and discuss the key results and findings from the four-year BREA initiative. The final results of all activities completed under the Initiative will be presented in a Final Synthesis Report.
  • Completed one annual report on a previous Benefits Plans submission, however the department did not receive any new Benefits Plans in 2014–2015.
  • Collected $63,762,082 in mining royalties. Following devolution of lands and resources to the Government of the Northwest Territories in 2014, the diamond Valuation and Royalty Assessment Program previously completed by AANDC is now under territorial responsibility.
  • The implementation of the map selection system has been delayed due the drafting process of the amendments to the Nunavut Mining Regulations not proceeding as planned. Progress was made on the IT system development side of the project. The spatial data model of map selection grid has been designed and is accessible through the new Geographic Information System viewer for Nunavut mineral tenure. However, the preliminary ground work with Public Works and Government Services regarding online credit card payments has been postponed due to planned technological changes of their system in 2015.
  • Continued to support the strengthening of the management of environmental securities by entering into negotiations with stakeholders and working to conclude a pilot Security Management Agreement for the Meliadine Project in Nunavut in order to avoid the issue of over-bondingFootnote 11 while ensuring that there is adequate security for reclamation.

Exploration activities in the Northwest Territories and Nunavut continue to be affected in 2014–2015 by the general slowdown in global exploration activity and low commodity prices resulting in 7.5% of the national total at the end of 2014.

Sub-Program 4.3.2: Contaminated Sites

Description

This sub-program ensures that contaminated sites are managed to ensure the protection of human health, safety and the environment for all Northerners by assessing and remediating contaminated sites and supporting the employment and training of Northerners, particularly Aboriginal peoples.

2014–2015 Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars) 2014–2015 Human Resources (FTEs)
Planned Spending Actual Spending Difference (Actual Minus Planned) Planned Actual Difference (Actual Minus Planned)
61,823,794 172,151,048 110,327,254 68 76.0 8.0
The difference between Planned Spending and Actual Spending primarily reflects additional funding provided through Supplementary Estimates (including a transfer of funding from the Department of National Defence) for the assessment, management and remediation of federal contaminated sites under the Federal Contaminated Sites Action Plan.
Performance Results
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Contaminated sites are managed to ensure the protection of human health and the safety of the environment while bringing economic benefit to the North Number of sites in Step 8 (implementation) through Step 10 (monitoring) of the Federal Contaminated Sites Action Plan 10-step process 40 by March 31, 2015 45
Percentage of Northerners and Aboriginal peoples employed within Contaminated Sites projects 60% by March 31, 2015 52%
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

In pursuit of its objective of managing contaminated sites to ensure the protection of human health and the safety of the environment while bringing economic benefit to the North, in 2014–2015 the Department accomplished the following:

  • Finalized assessments of contaminated sites in the Northwest Territories and Nunavut at three sites while preliminary assessments were undertaken at two sites.
  • Supported the management of 115 contaminated sites across the 3 territories. As of March 31, 2015, the Program's portfolio of contaminated sites counted 45 sites at or beyond Step 8 (implementation of the remediation strategy).
  • Engaged affected communities in its contaminated sites projects through public meetings, meetings with leaders and elders, site tours, etc. In 2014–2015, the Program held 48 consultation events attended by over 700 persons.
  • Promoted socio-economic opportunities for Northerners, the Northern Contaminated Sites Program using contracting tools that encourage the employment of Northerners and Aboriginal peoples within its contaminated sites projects. In 2014–2015, 52% of the workforce employed in the contaminated sites managed by the Program consisted of Northerners and Aboriginal peoples.
  • Advanced the work related to the Giant Mine Site Stabilization Plan, including the final deconstruction of the roaster complex, the contract award and initiation of work on underground stabilization, and made significant progress towards a final environmental agreement as required by the final Environmental Assessment decision.
  • Completed the construction and commissioning of a new Interim Water Treatment Plant for the Faro Mine Remediation Project. This state-of-the-art plant will be used to treat contaminated water over the next 10 to 15 years until the full closure plan is implemented.

Sub-Program 4.3.3: Land and Water Management

Description

This sub-program manages the land and water interests of Northerners, Aboriginal peoples and other Canadians in Nunavut and in lands managed by the Department in the Northwest Territories and Yukon. This is achieved through development, approval and implementation of sound land-use plans; environmental monitoring; administration of land rights; provision of inspection and investigation services for land-use permits and water licences; and management of their securities.

2014–2015 Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars) 2014–2015 Human Resources (FTEs)
Planned Spending Actual Spending Difference (Actual Minus Planned) Planned Actual Difference (Actual Minus Planned)
40,407,633 27,586,010 (12,821,623) 214 132.6 (81.4)
The difference between Planned Spending and Actual Spending primarily reflects funding which has been set aside in order to meet the statutory funding requirements under the Territorial Formula Financing as stipulated in the Northwest Territories Lands and Resources Devolution Agreement. The difference between planned and actual financial and human resources primarily reflects the devolution of federal jurisdiction over Crown lands and resources as a result of the Northwest Territories Lands and Resources Devolution Agreement, as well as staffing changes to implement the Agreement.
Performance Results
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Land and Water regimes in Nunavut and in lands managed by the Department in NWT and the Yukon are managed for the benefit of Northerners and all Canadians Percentage of land and water authorizations (risk based approach), under the responsibility of the Department, inspected NWT — 15%, Nunavut — 25% by March 31, 2015 NWT — 10%
Nunavut — 29.5%
Percentage of land authorizations and water licenses issued within legislation time limit 100% by March 31, 2015 80% of land authorizations and 100% of water licences issued within legislative time limits.
Percentage of settled lands zoned with a designated use 100% of settled lands (Draft Nunavut Land Use Plan and Revised Final Gwich'in Land Use Plan and any active NWT Land Use Plans such as Deh Cho) by March 31, 2015 38% of settled lands in Northwest Territories and 50% of settled lands in Nunavut have land use plans in place as of March 31, 2015.
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

In pursuit of its objective of managing the land and water regimes in Nunavut and in lands managed by the Department in the Northwest Territories and the Yukon for the benefit of Northerners and all Canadians, in 2014–2015 the Department accomplished the following:

  • Retained active land use planning responsibilities in the Gwich'in and Sahtu settlement areas and for the Deh Cho Region in the Northwest Territories following the Northwest Territories devolution and earlier settlement of land claim agreements.
  • Supported the ecosystemic and environmental monitoring in the North through the Nunavut General Monitoring Program. The Program supported the development of the Baker Lake Watershed Aquatic Monitoring Program, as well as the development of an interactive socio-economic mapping system using statistical data provided by the Government of Nunavut.
  • Issued 80% of land authorizations and 100% of water licences within legislated timelines. These authorizations contribute towards an efficient and effective resource management regime; however, the target for land authorizations was not met as a result of limited human resource capacity. Another determinant factor in the successful issuance of all land authorizations is the improvement resulting from the restructuring of the regulatory regime in Nunavut, which will be part of the implementation of the Nunavut Planning and Project Assessment Act. Lands authorizations will be considered only after land use conformity and environmental assessment approval decisions are given, rather than the current situation whereby these processes occur simultaneously. As such, the timing of authorizations will no longer be an issue since all of the information required to assess a land application will be immediately available.
  • Continued refinement of the Risk Management tool for the inspection of land and water authorizations is necessary to reflect the enforcement goals of the Department while simultaneously accounting for the changing operating environment. The ongoing implementation of the Risk Assessment model has allowed inspection plans to be refined to improve risk mitigation.
  • Exceeded the rate of inspections in Nunavut compared to the targets set at the beginning of the planning cycle as logistics permitted more sites to be inspected. However, in the Northwest Territories, the rate of inspections were less than targeted as the regional office was impacted by the transition to the post-devolution operating environment.
  • Contributed to the finalization of the Northwest Territories–Alberta Transboundary Waters Management Agreement. Also worked with its partners to the Master Agreement to ensure that AANDC's new role in a post-devolution environment is properly reflected.

Internal Services

Description

Internal Services are groups of related activities and resources that are administered to support the needs of programs and other corporate obligations of an organization. These groups are Management and Oversight Services, Communications Services, Legal Services, Human Resources Management Services, Financial Management Services, Information Management Services, Information Technology Services, Real Property Services, Materiel Services, Acquisition Services, and Travel and Other Administrative Services. Internal Services include only those activities and resources that apply across an organization and not those provided to a specific program.

2014–2015 Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars) 2014–2015 Human Resources (FTEs)
Main Estimates Planned Spending Total Authorities Available for Use Actual Spending (Authorities Used) Difference (Actual Minus Planned) Planned Actual Difference (Actual Minus Planned)
243,590,697 243,590,697 319,426,789 291,651,755 48,061,058 1,453 1,456.8 3.8
The difference between Planned Spending and Actual Spending primarily reflects funding provided through the Operating Budget Carry Forward and internal transfers to address funding pressures in: Information Technology; Legal Services (billings from the Department of Justice for work on AANDC litigation files); Management and Oversight; Financial Management; and Materiel Management. This incremental funding was partially offset by operating resources to be carried forward to 2015–2016, the deferral of funding for an out-of-court settlement (this deferred funding that was not required in 2014–2015 has been re-profiled to future years when it will be available for the intended purpose), as well as funding which has been set aside in order to meet the statutory funding requirements under the Territorial Formula Financing as stipulated in the Northwest Territories Lands and Resources Devolution Agreement.
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

With a focus on service improvement and transformation, in 2014–2015 AANDC continued to deliver the Public Service Excellence Agenda of high quality, client-centred, results-focused services, while ensuring the efficient and effective management of public funds.

Service Improvement and Transformation — To improve and transform internal services in 2014–2015, the Department:

  • Invested resources to maintain service standards associated with Shared Services Canada IT services. AANDC also developed a draft information Management Strategy that sets the future IM/IT direction of the Department for the next three to five years.
  • Developed and implemented a comprehensive national space optimization plan, in line with Public Works and Government Services Canada (PWGSC) Workplace 2.0 standards, which included the National Capital Region and regional strategic accommodation plans.
  • Continued the implementation of the Common Human Resources Business Processes by holding information sessions for business managers and human resources advisors to clarify and align roles and responsibilities.
  • Realigned the schedule for implementing the Government Standard Human Resources application PeopleSoft 9.1 with the agenda of PWGSC, which is responsible for providing connectivity and establishing a reliable testing environment for departments.
  • Implemented the PWGSC required updates to support pay modernization such as the upgrade of the PeopleTool (an interface between Phoenix and PeopleSoft). Implementation of the Phoenix system in support of pay modernization across the government is planned for February 2016.
  • Reviewed existing IM/IT policies and directives to document Enterprise Architecture and governance roles and responsibilities, and developed a high level Business Architecture based on the Program Alignment Architecture, therefore leveraging the work done for the Record Keeping Directive.
  • Reviewed existing IM/IT policy instruments and initiated the implementation of the Enterprise Architecture Strategy to enable improved management of information and technology.
  • Continued its efforts to transfer from AANDC's GroupWise email solution to the Government of Canada standardized Microsoft Outlook solution; provided analysis and support to Shared Services Canada to deliver on the Cost-Effective Telephone Services Initiative (which replaces desktop phones).
  • Generated efficiencies in procurement services by introducing automated tracking and approval of requirements from procurement to payment and reducing administrative burden on low risk transactions to allow greater oversight on complex transactions.
  • Seized opportunities to gain efficiencies where possible to optimize financial and human resources. Internal tools and processes were developed to increase the level of rigor associated with decision making for the allocation of public funds.

Advancing the Excellence Agenda — To advance a culture and environment of high performance in 2014–2015, the Department:

  • Conducted internal consultations with functional areas and key sectors on an Integrated Business Planning Approach and piloted a project to test how financial and non-financial information could be linked.
  • Produced over 30 studies, fact sheets and research summaries in collaboration with key partners including completion of the 2011 Community Well-Being Index, the barriers and enablers of school success, the Métis employment, the urban and northern Aboriginal landscapes and governance, and the role of housing in the well-being of Inuit children.
  • Responded to approximately 600 inquiries to support results-based reporting and evidence-based policy and program planning as the hub for authoritative demographic and socio-economic statistics on Aboriginal peoples and Northerners.
  • Through the implementation of the government-wide approach on performance management added a focus on talent management for non-executives, including discussions on succession planning and retirement planning.
  • Revised the Harassment Prevention and Resolution Strategy to address employee concerns expressed through the Public Service Employee Survey 2014 results.
  • Continued to lead the recruitment and development of Aboriginal employees within the Department and other departments. The third cohort of Aboriginal Leadership Development Initiative is in progress with 16 participants: 12 from AANDC, 2 from Treasury Board Secretariat and 2 from Correctional Service Canada.
  • Offered learning sessions on Aboriginal culture to all employees (including viewing documentaries, lunch and learn sessions).
  • Established a steering committee and working groups to develop recommendations on the four pillars of the Deputy Minister's Aboriginal Workforce Initiative: recruitment, retention, advancement, development and cultural awareness. Consultation on the draft recommendations took place at the National Conference of the departmental Committee for the Advancement of Native Employment.
  • Continued increasing employee engagement under the banner of Destination 2020 and awareness of Human Resources services through networking groups such as facilitated discussions.
  • Continued to ensure effective oversight of operations by conducting 17 audits and 18 evaluations. In June 2014, AANDC approved the departmental Policy on Performance Measurement, which codifies the principle of aligning and cascading performance measures from the corporate level (Departmental Performance Report and Report on Plans and Priorities) down to the operational level (business plans) so that the Department can monitor its performance and move in a coherent manner to achieve its goals for Aboriginal peoples and Northerners.

Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Canada is a participant in the 2013–2016 Federal Sustainable Development Strategy and contributes to Theme IV (Shrinking the Environmental Footprint — Beginning with the Government) targets through the Internal Services Program. The Department's achievements can be found in the Departmental Sustainable Development Strategy Supplementary Table.

Canadian Polar Commission

Strategic Outcome: Increased Canadian Polar Knowledge

Program: Research Facilitation and Communication

Description

This Strategic Outcome creates the conditions for Canada to acquire the wide range of information needed for effective policy and research program development in the polar regions and to maintain Canada's position as a leading polar nation. The Canadian Polar Commission is Canada's national institution for furthering polar knowledge and awareness. It maintains and builds knowledge networks; synthesizes polar knowledge to identify opportunities, issues and trends; and communicates polar knowledge.

2014–2015 Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars) 2014–2015 Human Resources (FTEs)
Main Estimates Planned Spending Total Authorities Available for Use Actual Spending (Authorities Used) Difference (Actual Minus Planned) Planned Actual Difference (Actual Minus Planned)
2,095,000 2,095,000 2,104,613 2,049,937 (45,063) 7.5 10.0 2.5
Performance Results
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
The Commission facilitates Canada fully embracing its place as a polar nation Polar knowledge networks are maintained and enhanced Relevant Canadian institutions are participating in polar research networks, and knowledge is being shared among participants and Canadians by March 31, 2015 The Canadian Polar Commission facilitates polar research networks by fostering collaboration with researchers, practitioners, decision makers from regional, territorial, federal governments, academia, non-governmental organizations, and the private sector.
The Canadian Polar Commission completed letters of agreement with polar research institutions in Italy, France, and Finland to facilitate collaboration and cooperation on polar knowledge creation.
The Commission led, partnered in, or sponsored polar knowledge-sharing events, conferences and outreach and maintained the Polar Knowledge (mobile) App, which helps to identify connections among people, programs and funding.
Canadian experts are participating in international polar research coordinating mechanisms and associated subcommittees and working groups, thus contributing to global polar knowledge creation and dissemination efforts by March 31, 2015 As Canada's adhering body to the Scientific Committee on Antarctic Research and the International Arctic Science Committee, the Canadian Polar Commission participated in and/or supported the participation of other Canadian experts in meetings of both organizations, and provided secretariat support to:
  • the Canadian Network of Northern Research Operators, to enhance the effectiveness of Canada's northern research infrastructure;
  • the Canadian Ad Hoc Working Group supporting the Sustaining Arctic Observing Networks initiative.
Synthesis and analysis of priority polar issues are developed and utilized Development and implementation of strategies addressing gaps and opportunities identified as a result of Canadian Polar Commission analytical work and products such as the State of Northern Knowledge in Canada Report (released in 2013–2014) by March 31, 2015 Implemented and executed an engagement strategy to assist in focusing future research to address gaps identified in the Canadian Polar Commission's State of Northern Knowledge in Canada Report. This strategy included meetings with senior managers and decision makers at the policy level and presentations at numerous regional, national, and international polar science conferences.
The report has been used to inform policy decisions, and has been highlighted to researchers as a source for research priorities identified by Northerners in calls for proposals and grant application manuals.
The State of Environmental Monitoring in Northern Canada Report and accompanying dataset, completed in March 2015, is a follow-up to the State of Northern Knowledge in Canada Report. It identifies locations of monitoring projects and the parameters being measured, to identify opportunities for collaboration, cooperation and potential areas of overlap in environmental monitoring.
Promotion of such work and products and their wide distribution by March 31, 2015
Communications channels to disseminate polar knowledge to Canadians are strengthened Canadian Polar Commission website and online knowledge base provide current and accessible content by March 31, 2015 The Canadian Polar Commission used a variety of modern tools and techniques to communicate with Canadians. These include the Canadian Polar Commission website and regular updates on social media via the Canadian Polar Commission Facebook page. The Polar Knowledge (mobile) App was also regularly updated.
The Canadian Polar Commission's Facebook page saw a marked increase in page subscriptions ("Likes"), from 165 in April 2014 to 701 in March 2015.
24 issues of the Polar Blog, a partnership with Canadian Geographic Magazine, were made available online and in the magazine.
The Commission also promoted polar knowledge through interviews and presentations at public meetings and events.
Development and utilization of modern communications strategies and tools to reach larger number of Canadians and maximize their awareness of polar issues by March 31, 2015
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

Meeting the challenges and opportunities of a changing North remains one of the Government's primary objectives. The Canadian Polar Commission met all targets in 2014–2015 with some significant achievements listed as follows:

  • The Canadian Polar Commission:
    • participated in Arctic Science Summit Week 2014 (International Arctic Science Committee, April 2014, Helsinki, Finland);
    • organized knowledge-sharing event, Canadian Science Writers Association (Toronto, June 2014);
    • participated in the Scientific Committee on Antarctic Research delegates meeting and conference and the meeting of the Council of Managers of National Antarctic Programs (Auckland and Christchurch, New Zealand, August–September 2014);
    • organized traditional knowledge conference (Yellowknife, September 2014) with the Tlicho First Nation and the Prince of Wales Northern Heritage Centre; and
    • organized an International Arctic S&T Collaboration and Engagement Workshop with Canadian High Arctic Research Station on current and future Arctic S&T priorities, and potential bilateral cooperation between Canadian and international polar research institutions (ArcticNet annual conference, Ottawa, December 2014).
  • Conducted a northern engagement campaign to promote the State of Northern Knowledge in Canada Report, April 2014 to January 2015, and presented the Report to senior federal government officials.
  • In cooperation with the Association of Polar Early Career Scientists, developed and published the State of Environmental Monitoring in Northern Canada Report and dataset.
  • In cooperation with Sustaining Arctic Observing Networks Canada, and the Association of Polar Early Career Scientists, produced the first four of a regular series of bulletins on northern environmental monitoring projects highlighting results and potential policy linkages.
  • Supported the Canadian Network of Northern Research Operators in its production of a business plan and pamphlet to increase awareness of its research facilities.
  • Participated in meetings of the International Arctic Science Committee and the Scientific Committee on Antarctic Research, and continued the relationship with the US Arctic Research Commission and Polar Research Board. Signed collaboration agreements with the National Research Council of Italy, the Centre national de la recherche scientifique (of France), and the Arctic Society of Finland.
  • Working with AANDC, led development of a new organization that will merge the mandates and functions of the Canadian Polar Commission with those of the AANDC's Canadian High Arctic Research Station program.

Internal Services

Description

Internal Services are groups of related activities and resources that are administered to support the needs of programs and other corporate obligations of an organization. These groups are Management and Oversight Services, Communications Services, Legal Services, Human Resources Management Services, Financial Management Services, Information Management Services, Information Technology Services, Real Property Services, Materiel Services, Acquisition Services, and Travel and Other Administrative Services. Internal Services include only those activities and resources that apply across an organization and not those provided to a specific program.

2014–2015 Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars) 2014–2015 Human Resources (FTEs)
Main Estimates Planned Spending Total Authorities Available for Use Actual Spending (Authorities Used) Difference (Actual Minus Planned) Planned Actual Difference (Actual Minus Planned)
481,360 481,360 483,764 305,330 (176,030) 1.5 3.0 1.5

Section III: Supplementary Information

Financial Statements Highlights

Condensed Statement of Operations (unaudited)

For the year ended March 31, 2015 (dollars)

Financial Information 2014–2015 Planned Results 2014–2015 Actual 2013–2014 Actual Difference
(2014–2015 Actual Minus 2014–2015 Planned)
Difference
(2014–2015 Actual Minus 2013–2014 Actual)
Total expenses 7,238,643,770 8,784,387,722 7,150,422,246 1,545,743,952 1,633,965,476
Total revenues 1,712,281 5,810,302 1,460,183 4,098,021 4,350,119
Net cost of operations before government funding and transfers 7,236,931,489 8,778,577,420 7,148,962,063 1,541,645,931 1,629,615,357

Expenses by Type

Total expenses were $8,784 million in 2014–2015, representing a 23% increase from previous year's expenses of $7,150 million. Transfer payments, the majority to Aboriginal people and Aboriginal organizations, amounted to $7,537 million or 86% of total expenses. Other significant expenses included salaries and employee future benefit totaling $479 million (5%) and court awards and other settlements totaling $385 million (4%).

Revenues by Type

Total revenues for 2014–2015 amounted to $5.8 million, representing a 287% increase over the previous year's total revenues of $1.5 million. Respendable revenues from the provision of financial and administrative services represent $3.1 million (53%). Respendable revenues from the proceeds from the sale of surplus Crown assets, included in miscellaneous revenue, account for most of the remaining $2.7 million (47%).

Significant changes

The change in total expenses can be attributed mainly to a significant increase in the provision for claims and litigation due to an increase in the number of claims and in the estimate of the settlement amounts.

The change in total revenues can be attributed mainly to an increase in respendable revenues from the prior year related to the proceeds from sale of surplus Crown assets and the provision of new services to other government departments such as Health Canada and the Public Health Agency of Canada.

Condensed Statement of Financial Position (unaudited)

As at March 31, 2015 (dollars)

Financial Information 2014–2015 2013–2014 Difference
(2014–2015 Minus 2013–2014)
Total net liabilities 15,611,305,310 14,458,492,218 1,152,813,092
Total net financial assets 1,707,414,429 1,656,102,350 51,312,079
Departmental net debt 13,903,890,881 12,802,390,868 1,101,500,013
Total non-financial assets 132,527,647 107,232,790 25,294,857
Departmental net financial position (13,771,363,234) (12,695,158,078) (1,076,205,156)

Liabilities by Type

Total net liabilities were $15,611 million at the end of 2014–2015, which is an increase of $1,153 million (8%) from the previous year's total net liabilities of $14,458 million. The provision for claims and litigation represents the largest portion of liabilities at $10,636 million (68%) of total liabilities. Other significant liabilities include environmental liabilities of $3,000 million (19%), trust accounts of $892 million (6%), accounts payable of $688 million (4%) and the liability for settled claims of $281 million (2%).

Net Financial Assets by Type

Total net financial assets were $1,707 million at the end of 2014–2015, which is an increase of $51 million (3%) from the previous year's total net financial assets of $1,656 million. The asset due from the Consolidated Revenue Fund accounted for $1,638 million (96%) of total financial assets and accounts receivable accounted for the remaining $69 million (4%).

Non-Financial Assets by Type

Total non-financial assets were $133 million which is an increase of $26 million (24%) from the previous year's total non-financial assets of $107 million. Tangible capital assets represent $93 million (70%) of total non-financial assets while land held for future claims settlements represents the remaining $40 million (30%).

Significant changes

The change in total liabilities can be attributed mainly to an increase in the provision for claims and litigation due to an increase in the number of claims and in the estimate of the settlement amounts. There was also an increase in environmental liabilities due to an increase in the forecasted care and maintenance cost of larger sites and changes to the Consumer Price Index.

The change in total net financial assets can be attributed mainly to an increase in the asset due from the Consolidated Revenue Fund as a result of a large increase in the provision for claims and litigation and in environmental liabilities.

The change in total non-financial assets can be attributed mainly to an increase in tangible capital assets primarily due to assets under construction related to the Canadian High Arctic Research Station as well as the capitalizing of development costs associated with information technology systems.

Financial Statements

Please refer to the Financial Statements on AANDC's website for more information.

Supplementary Information Tables

The supplementary information tables listed in the 2014–15 Departmental Performance Report are available on AANDC's website.

Tax Expenditures and Evaluations

The tax system can be used to achieve public policy objectives through the application of special measures, such as low tax rates, exemptions, deductions, deferrals and credits. The Department of Finance Canada publishes cost estimates and projections for these measures annually in the Tax Expenditures and Evaluations publication. The tax measures presented in the Tax Expenditures and Evaluations publication are the responsibility of the Minister of Finance.


Section IV: Organizational Contact Information

Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Canada

Les Terrasses de la Chaudière
10 Wellington Street, North Tower
Gatineau, Quebec
Mailing Address: Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0H4
E-mail: webmaster@aadnc-aandc.gc.ca

General and statistical inquiries and publication distribution
Telephone (toll-free): 1-800-567-9604
TTY (toll-free): 1-866-553-0554
E-mail: InfoPubs@aadnc-aandc.gc.ca

Departmental Library
Telephone: 819-997-0811
E-mail: Reference@aadnc-aandc.gc.ca

Media Inquiries — Communications
Telephone: 819-953-1160

Canadian Polar Commission

Constitution Square
360 Albert Street, Suite 1710
Ottawa, Ontario K1R 7X7
Telephone: 613-943-8605 or (toll-free) 1-888-POLAR01 (1-888-765-2701)
Website: Canadian Polar Commission

Appendix: Definitions

appropriation (crédit): Any authority of Parliament to pay money out of the Consolidated Revenue Fund.

budgetary expenditures (dépenses budgétaires): Includes operating and capital expenditures; transfer payments to other levels of government, organizations or individuals; and payments to Crown corporations.

Departmental Performance Report (rapport ministériel sur le rendement): Reports on an appropriated organization's actual accomplishments against the plans, priorities and expected results set out in the corresponding Report on Plans and Priorities. These reports are tabled in Parliament in the fall.

full-time equivalent (équivalent temps plein): Is a measure of the extent to which an employee represents a full person-year charge against a departmental budget. Full-time equivalents are calculated as a ratio of assigned hours of work to scheduled hours of work. Scheduled hours of work are set out in collective agreements.

Government of Canada outcomes (résultats du gouvernement du Canada): A set of 16 high level objectives defined for the government as a whole, grouped in four spending areas: economic affairs, social affairs, international affairs and government affairs.

Management, Resources and Results Structure (Structure de la gestion, des ressources et des résultats): A comprehensive framework that consists of an organization's inventory of programs, resources, results, performance indicators and governance information. Programs and results are depicted in their hierarchical relationship to each other and to the Strategic Outcome(s) to which they contribute. The Management, Resources and Results Structure is developed from the Program Alignment Architecture.

non-budgetary expenditures (dépenses non budgétaires): Includes net outlays and receipts related to loans, investments and advances, which change the composition of the financial assets of the Government of Canada.

performance (rendement): What an organization did with its resources to achieve its results, how well those results compare to what the organization intended to achieve and how well lessons learned have been identified.

performance indicator (indicateur de rendement): A qualitative or quantitative means of measuring an output or outcome, with the intention of gauging the performance of an organization, program, policy or initiative respecting expected results.

performance reporting (production de rapports sur le rendement): The process of communicating evidence-based performance information. Performance reporting supports decision making, accountability and transparency.

planned spending (dépenses prévues): For Reports on Plans and Priorities (RPPs) and Departmental Performance Reports (DPRs), planned spending refers to those amounts that receive Treasury Board approval by February 1. Therefore, planned spending may include amounts incremental to planned expenditures presented in the Main Estimates.

A department is expected to be aware of the authorities that it has sought and received. The determination of planned spending is a departmental responsibility, and departments must be able to defend the expenditure and accrual numbers presented in their RPPs and DPRs.

plan (plan): The articulation of strategic choices, which provides information on how an organization intends to achieve its priorities and associated results. Generally a plan will explain the logic behind the strategies chosen and tend to focus on actions that lead up to the expected result.

priorities (priorités): Plans or projects that an organization has chosen to focus and report on during the planning period. Priorities represent the things that are most important or what must be done first to support the achievement of the desired Strategic Outcome(s).

program (programme): A group of related resource inputs and activities that are managed to meet specific needs and to achieve intended results and that are treated as a budgetary unit.

Program Alignment Architecture (architecture d'alignement des programmes): A structured inventory of an organization's programs depicting the hierarchical relationship between programs and the Strategic Outcome(s) to which they contribute.

Report on Plans and Priorities (rapport sur les plans et les priorités): Provides information on the plans and expected performance of appropriated organizations over a three-year period. These reports are tabled in Parliament each spring.

result (résultat): An external consequence attributed, in part, to an organization, policy, program or initiative. Results are not within the control of a single organization, policy, program or initiative; instead they are within the area of the organization's influence.

statutory expenditures (dépenses législatives): Expenditures that Parliament has approved through legislation other than appropriation acts. The legislation sets out the purpose of the expenditures and the terms and conditions under which they may be made.

Strategic Outcome (résultat stratégique): A long-term and enduring benefit to Canadians that is linked to the organization's mandate, vision and core functions.

sunset program (programme temporisé): A time-limited program that does not have an ongoing funding and policy authority. When the program is set to expire, a decision must be made whether to continue the program. In the case of a renewal, the decision specifies the scope, funding level and duration.

target (cible): A measurable performance or success level that an organization, program or initiative plans to achieve within a specified time period. Targets can be either quantitative or qualitative.

voted expenditures (dépenses votées): Expenditures that Parliament approves annually through an appropriation act. The vote wording becomes the governing conditions under which these expenditures may be made.

whole-of-government framework (cadre pangouvernemental): Maps the financial contributions of federal organizations receiving appropriations by aligning their programs to a set of 16 government-wide, high-level outcome areas, grouped under four spending areas.

Date modified: