First Nation Youth Job Readiness Program: Seabird Island Success Stories

See how First Nations youth from Seabird Island are benefitting from new opportunities obtainable through Canada's skills training programs that provide employment training and support to help youth find jobs.

See other Aboriginal success stories from across Canada.

Seabird Island Success Stories (Part 1)

Download: MP4 format (39.9 Mb)

Transcript: First Nation Youth Job Readiness Program: Seabird Island Success Stories (Part 1)

Narrator:

First Nation youth represent the fastest-growing segment of Canada's population. The Government of Canada is making important investments in skills training and job-readiness activities to help make sure First Nation youth have the same opportunities as all Canadians to find, keep and enjoy the benefits of a good job.

First Nation youth from across Canada are benefitting from new opportunities....including those from the Seabird Island Band.

What are they saying about the program? Let's find out.

Cherish, Seabird Island Band:

I didn't have anything pushing me to go to school right away. I was kind of just, "Well I'll keep working and be a typical 19 year-old – doing nothing." And it just pushed me into wanting to do things faster and get things over with. Because I want to move on with my life and have a future. Have a family one day, have kids get married—that sort of thing. And this kind of was like a stepping stone.

Diane Janzen – Director of Education, Seabird Island:

I don't believe in training just for training sake. I think there has to be an end-goal in mind. So whether someone is passionate about being a dental assistant, or they're passionate about being a welder, or they're passionate about being an early childhood educator, I think what it means is ensuring that First Nations youth have an opportunity after graduation

Maverick Fraser, Shxw'ow'hamel First Nations Indian Band:

The training course I took through Seabird Island College was the heavy equipment operator course.

Jake said that he was going to hire the top 4 graduates of the Heavy Equipment Operator course, and I ended up landing to be the number one, and only two people got hired out of the heavy equipment operator course. And ever since then, I've been operating a variety of equipment.

Carolyne Neufeld, Health Director

It's really cool to see that and to see the spark in their eye about wanting something, and really striving for it. Setting goals and, you know, being valued as a youth too. That they're not just someone here to give them a little bit of a job. We actually need them. We need our youth to be working.

Cherish, Seabird Island Band:

Currently I am a chair-side assistance at the dentist office here in Seabird, and basically I pass the dentist tools, I do sterilizing, help keep things clean—that sort of thing.

Working with all the girls in the dental office has been amazing. I mean, probably the best work colleagues I could have—I could ever imagine having. I love it.

Maverick Fraser, Shxw'ow'hamel First Nations Indian Band:

It changed my life completely from where I was before to where I am now. From where I am now, I think my life has a bright future.

Alexis Grace, Councillor for the Seabird Island Band:

I want to see strong, independent, powerful people – particularly young people that are changing families and lives and having an impact on everyone around them. Teaching adults how this change is possible.

Narrator:

Thanks to funding from Economic Action Plan 2013 First Nation youth – ages 18 to 24 – from across the country will be participating in programs such as those taking place in the Seabird Island Band in British Columbia.

These programs are being delivered through partnerships between Aboriginal organizations, Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Canada, and Employment and Social Development Canada.

Canada is providing job readiness support for First Nations youth so they can successfully participate in the Canadian economy. For more information on this and other programs and services, please visit Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development.

Seabird Island Success Stories (Part 2)

Watch Seabird Island Band's youth and community leaders describe the positive impacts of Canada's skills training program which provide employment training and support to help on-reserve youth ages 18 to 24 years old to find jobs.

Download: MP4 format (53.4 Mb)

Transcript: First Nation Youth Job Readiness Program: Seabird Island Success Stories (Part 2)

Narrator:

First Nation youth represent the fastest-growing segment of Canada's population. The Government of Canada is making important investments in skills training and job-readiness activities to help make sure First Nation youth have the same opportunities as all Canadians to find, keep and enjoy the benefits of a good job.

First Nation youth from across Canada are benefiting from new opportunities....including those from the Seabird Island Band.

What are they saying about the program? Let's find out.

Daniel, Seabird Island Band:

For 6 years, I didn't have a birth certificate. It was lost, believe it or not.

When I first came to the Employment and Social Development program, in a period of 3 months, I not only got my birth certificate, but I also got my SIN number, my BC ID, my updated Care Card, an updated status card, and my passport.

Alexis Grace, Employment and Social Development Program's Manager for Seabird Island Band:

Each individual has strengths and barriers they've overcome. And I think that's really what Seabird excels at: is being very proactive and very individual in our service delivery. Taking a client and a cultural focus in our implementation and understanding the individual and the life and the story behind that individual.

Carolyne Neufeld, Health Director

Now they're learning about work and for them it's a whole different world. So, we really see that, especially in income assistance families where it may be 2 generations that have been raised with income assistance as their way of living. And now we have youth who are actually teaching their parents about work.

Cherish, Seabird Island Band:

I had volunteered at the dentist office, in Grade 12, for a while.

I had taken quite a bit of interest in dentistry, so it kind of worked out to be a really awesome opportunity for me.

Jay Hope, Seabird Island Band:

Kids don't understand what skills they actually do have. They're more apt to focus on things that they don't have, and I think that's one of the challenges that we have with them. Is to start having them express those skills and to be able to challenge them to assert those skills and to be confident.

Cherish, Seabird Island Band:

Everyone was really sweet. And we sat down and got all the paperwork done right away, and like a week later I started working.

Alexis Grace, Employment and Social Development Program's Manager for Seabird Island Band:

So we're not changing one piece of that individual's life, we are changing a family, we're changing a story, and we're providing opportunity.

Daniel, Seabird Island Band:

I've been everywhere from Victoria to Saskatchewan in a period of 3-4 months and it's been a very good experience for me. I've been learning lots; I'm growing as an individual. I'm learning a lot of things that, hopefully, that will give me a decision in the end to decide on what I want to do.

Chief Clem Seymour, Seabird Island Band:

Creating a vision for our people. To understand that we're going to be here 25-50 years down the road, and making sure that what we have here today is going to be there tomorrow and the day after tomorrow.

Narrator:

Thanks to funding from Economic Action Plan 2013 First Nation youth – ages 18 to 24 – from across the country will be participating in programs such as those taking place in the Seabird Island Band in British Columbia.

These programs are being delivered through partnerships between Aboriginal organizations, Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Canada, and Employment and Social Development Canada.

Canada is providing job readiness support for First Nations youth so they can successfully participate in the Canadian economy. For more information on this and other programs and services, please visit Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development.

Cherish's Success Story

Meet Cherish of the Seabird Island Band. She wants to become a dental hygienist. See how Canada's skills training program is helping her to follow her dream and what she has to say about the program.

Download: MP4 format (27.3 Mb)

Transcript: First Nation Youth Job Readiness Program: Cherish's Success Story

Cherish, Seabird Island Band:

I want to be a hygienist here on Seabird. First off I'd like to do CDA and that's Certified Dental Assisting, and that's kind of like a stepping stone where I could branch into other forms of dentistry. I could go to pediatrics or I could go and do orthodontics or I could just be a dentist.

The Enhanced Service Delivery program will pay for schooling for me anywhere between 10-12 months, and they'll also give me a little bit of extra money to pay for car insurance, or a laptop, or anything else that I may need. Something that they consider a barrier that's kind of stopping me from going to school right now. And they helped me get over those barriers, and it's pretty great.

Currently I am a chair-side assistant at the dentist office here in Seabird, and basically I pass the dentist tools, I do sterilizing, help keep things clean—that sort of thing.

Working with all the girls in the dental office has been amazing. I mean, probably the best work colleagues I could have—I could ever imagine having. I love it.

Narrator:

Thanks to funding from Economic Action Plan 2013 First Nation youth – ages 18 to 24 – from across the country will be participating in programs such as those taking place in the Seabird Island Band in British Columbia.

These programs are being delivered through partnerships between Aboriginal organizations, Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Canada, and Employment and Social Development Canada.

Canada is providing job readiness support for First Nations youth so they can successfully participate in the Canadian economy. For more information on this and other programs and services, please visit www.aandc.gc.ca.

A First Nation Perspective

See why Seabird Island's Director of Education find Canada's approach to skills training more beneficial for Aboriginal youth.

Download: MP4 format (23.1 Mb)

Transcript: First Nation Youth Job Readiness Program: A First Nation Perspective

Diane Janzen – Director of Education, Seabird Island:

One of the things I've have noticed more and more in the last few years is that they're focusing more and more on Aboriginal young people and on the gaps in the system. And I think that's incredibly important. The other thing that I've noticed, and I'm just seeing more and more in some of the funding sources, is their support for wrap-around. Recognizing that it is not just training by itself, but it may mean employment readiness, it may mean basic upgrading, it may mean transportation, or food, or whatever it is that is a barrier to a young person getting training and employment. So I think that holistic approach is something I really support and have seen how that makes a difference for a young person who may have a number of barriers to overcome in order to be successful.

Narrator:

Thanks to funding from Economic Action Plan 2013 First Nation youth – ages 18 to 24 – from across the country will be participating in programs such as those taking place in the Seabird Island Band in British Columbia.

These programs are being delivered through partnerships between Aboriginal organizations, Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Canada, and Employment and Social Development Canada.

Canada is providing job readiness support for First Nations youth so they can successfully participate in the Canadian economy. For more information on this and other programs and services, please visit Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development.

Date modified: