Income Assistance: Tofino Success Stories

Notice

This website will change as a result of the dissolution of Indigenous and Northern Affairs Canada, and the creation of Indigenous Services Canada and the eventual creation of Crown-Indigenous Relations and Northern Affairs Canada. During this transformation, you may also wish to consult the updated Indigenous and Northern Affairs home page.

Watch how youth affiliated with the Nuu-chah-nulth Tribal Council are describing their experiences from participating and succeeding in Canada's skills training programs that provide employment training and support to help them find jobs.

See other Aboriginal success stories from across Canada.

Download: MP4 format

Transcript: Income Assistance: Tofino Success Stories

Narrator:

First Nation youth represent the fastest-growing segment of Canada's population. The Government of Canada is making important investments in skills training and job-readiness activities to help make sure First Nation youth have the same opportunities as all Canadians to find, keep and enjoy the benefits of a good job.

First Nation youth from across Canada are benefitting from new opportunities....including those from Nuu-chah-nulth Tribal Council in British Columbia.

What are they saying about the program? Let's find out.

Bert, Tla-o-qui-aht First Nation:

Just certain things I could learn in these programs that would help me get a job.

Like last week, I took a life skills course and that kind of helped a few things that I had problems with. Like, I probably wouldn't be able to do this right now. I hate talking, like, to people, interviews, and stuff.

Keanna, Hupacasath First Nation:

Most of it is what I did to get stuff on my resume. So, I got my first aid, got my Food Safe, my Serving It Right [Serving alcohol course], some sales certificates.

For the sales certificates that I got - there is about 6 of them - I know more about retail. So, if I want to hand my resume out for retail, I know exactly what to do.

Evan Hauser, Central Region Case Manager:

I don't know if it's specifically what I say, I feel like it's just the constant I am always there , you know, I don't let it slide, you know, they don't succeed in something I don't give up. I just come back the next day, or I come back the next week and I'm still there.

John, Tla-o-qui-aht First Nation:

Currently right now, I am working on getting my high school equivalency.

This program has been really great for that, I feel more uplifted and intrigued to go out there and do things.

I'm hoping to work with our children in our community and but my first goal is to finish school.

Crystal, Tla-o-qui-aht First Nation:

I'm hoping to work with our children in our community and but my first goal is to finish school.

Ashley, Ehattesaht First Nation:

I think it's working, like, for instance, the driver's license that worked. SVOP, a lot of people use that for fishing because a lot of people do sports fishing in our community. So, that helps with that and the radio operating ticket.

Keanna, Hupacasath First Nation:

I'm not used to doing things by myself. So, I don't like being by myself but with these programs you're not by yourself but you're with other people so you can make friends that way too.

Samantha, Ditidaht First Nation:

I could tell them how much they've helped me and what I am doing now because of them and I also graduated too.

Evan Hauser , Central Region Case Manager:

For the most part, I think we are seeing results. I personally like to think that the real results I'm going to see is actually in the kids of the clients I'm working with.

Donald, Tla-o-qui-aht First Nation:

It is a great course and I would take it again if I ever need to.

Narrator:

Thanks to funding from Economic Action Plan 2013 First Nation youth – ages 18 to 24 – from across the country will be participating in programs such as those taking place in Nuu-chah-nulth Tribal Council affiliated communities in British Columbia.

These programs are being delivered through partnerships between Aboriginal organizations, Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Canada, and Employment and Social Development Canada.

Canada is providing job readiness support for First Nations youth so they can successfully participate in the Canadian economy. For more information on this and other programs and services, please visit www.aandc.gc.ca.

Donald's Success Story

Meet Donald of Tla-o-qui-aht First Nation who has successfully completed Canada's skills training program. The skills training program aims at getting participating First Nation youth aged 18-24 years old ready and prepared to join the workforce. Hear Donald describe the benefits of the skills training program through his experiences with being in the program.

Download: MP4 format

Transcript: Donald's Success Story

This text represents the long description or the answer to a FAQ.

Donald, Tla-o-qui-aht First Nation:

We started off with first aid. The first week was first aid, and wilderness. Then, the second and third weeks were kayaking and lifesaving. After lifesaving, we went through boating, and then ROC which is Radio Operators Course.

I got a certificate for completing the course and I also got all the certificates for all the training that I did, for life saving, the boating, the kayaking.

It's only a seasonal job for the kayaking, but it will help me in the long run.

It makes me happy and it's a lot different because I'm working with tourists now. It helps me in the long run because I'm looking forward to doing it next year, but I want more training and skills.

It is worth it if they are interested in that kind of stuff. You know - you got to be interested, you got to commit to it.

You are not going to just walk into it and think its okay. It is a hard thing to do, 4 weeks in the wilderness is.

The best thing is the job that I'm working right now. I get to meet lots of people from all over the world and then I get to show them our territory on our paddles.

Narrator:

Thanks to funding from Economic Action Plan 2013 First Nation youth – ages 18 to 24 – from across the country will be participating in programs such as those taking place in Nuu-chah-nulth Tribal Council affiliated communities in British Columbia.

These programs are being delivered through partnerships between Aboriginal organizations, Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Canada, and Employment and Social Development Canada.

Canada is providing job readiness support for First Nations youth so they can successfully participate in the Canadian economy. For more information on this and other programs and services, please visit www.aandc.gc.ca.

A First Nation Community Leader's Perspective

According to Nuu-chah-nulth's affiliated Community Service Manager Georgina Sutherland of Ditidaht First Nation, the funds from the Enhanced Service Delivery program have made getting higher education easier and more reachable for First Nations youth. The Enhanced Service Delivery program supports First Nations by identifying employment needs and assisting in overcoming employment barriers. The objective is connecting youth with jobs. Watch Georgina Sutherland of Ditidaht First Nation further describe the many benefits of the Enhanced Service Delivery program for her community.

Download: MP4 format

Transcript: A First Nation Community Leader's Perspective

Georgina Sutherland, Ditidaht First Nation - Community Service Manager:

I strongly believe that educating our people to wanting more for themselves. It's more about them wanting more for themselves. I want more for them, but I want them to want more for themselves. So, having that little bit of a push from the Enhanced Service Delivery program and the job fund has actually created that space for them to get educated in the levels that they want to be and they want to do it. So, it's not making them feel like they are forced or they have to be. So, it's more about giving them what they want in an area they want to be in.

I think that the greatest successes are having people completing the programs more than having them go halfway through and then dropping out saying I don't want to do this anymore. I think it's of more about having a program that they want to do. So, they actually seen the success level and feeling really proud in grounding themselves in something that they like to do.

One of the things that I find with the youth is that they are generating more role models. They are being more outgoing where they are inspiring other people, like we had a lot of 40 and over adults coming into the program because they see the success in the youth and they want to share in that as well and get themselves involve.

So it's really nice that it is just like the domino effect where you see one person sharing success, but then, all of their friends want to come too. So, I think that's one of the greatest things is like they don't need to be on social assistance in our community.

So, now we have people who are leaving our community to go out for diplomas, and bachelors, and stuff like that which is really neat to see that.

Narrator:

Thanks to funding from Economic Action Plan 2013 First Nation youth – ages 18 to 24 – from across the country will be participating in programs such as those taking place in Nuu-chah-nulth Tribal Council affiliated communities in British Columbia.

These programs are being delivered through partnerships between Aboriginal organizations, Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Canada, and Employment and Social Development Canada.

Canada is providing job readiness support for First Nations youth so they can successfully participate in the Canadian economy. For more information on this and other programs and services, please visit www.aandc.gc.ca.

Date modified: