First Nation Youth Job Readiness Program: Meadow Lake Success Stories

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Youth affiliated with the Meadow Lake Tribal Council are participating and succeeding in the skills training programs that provide employment training and support to help them find jobs.

See other Aboriginal success stories from across Canada.

Download: MP4 format (49.4 Mb)

Transcript: First Nation Youth Job Readiness Program: Meadow Lake Success Stories

Narrator:

First Nation youth represent the fastest-growing segment of Canada's population. The Government of Canada is making important investments in skills training and job-readiness activities to help make sure First Nation youth have the same opportunities as all Canadians to find, keep, and enjoy the benefits of a good job.

First Nation youth from across Canada are benefitting from new opportunities....including those affiliated with Meadow Lake Tribal Council.

What are they saying about the program? Let's find out.

Derrick, Waterhen Lake First Nation:

During the time not being with my case worker, I was at home. I wasn't doing much. I was just waiting for welfare. As the time went by, I was always waiting for welfare. And now that I got into this program, I feel like I want to do something with my life.

Mitch, Flying Dust First Nation:

The program assisted me by giving me the references and resources that I needed, and the support as well, and telling me where I needed to go to get to a certain point that I need to be at. It gave me those resources. It gave me an extra person to go over my resume, cover letters, for example, and the support that I need to gain my license.

Chelsea, Waterhen Lake First Nation:

I chose an educational assistant because I want to help other students. I know a lot of students struggle in school, and most of the time they don't get that one-on-one. And I think that being an education assistant could benefit a lot of the younger students to helping them understand their work.

Mitch, Flying Dust First Nation:

I have already referred people to the program.  I've let them know who to contact, and how to do about it, and that the resources were available to a lot of aboriginal people.

Derrick, Waterhen Lake First:

I think that I would say to somebody that is not sure on whether they should get into the program or not—I would tell them that there is really no stress. That they can go and they could feel comfortable because they're going to treat you good, they're going to help you. That's why they're there, and that's their job—they want to help you. They want you to succeed as a First Nation person. They want to see us get up on our two feet and do things for ourselves, rather than rely on others.

Vanessa, Waterhen Lake First Nation:

All I can say to everybody that has helped me out. I have the deepest gratitude for your support and help, and I thank you.

Narrator:

Thanks to funding from Economic Action Plan 2013 First Nation youth – ages 18 to 24 – from across the country will be participating in programs such as those taking place in Meadow Lake Tribal Council affiliated communities in Saskatchewan.

These programs are being delivered through partnerships between Aboriginal organizations, Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Canada and Employment and Social Development Canada.

Canada is providing job readiness support for First Nations youth so they can successfully participate in the Canadian economy. For more information on this and other programs and services, please visit www.aandc.gc.ca.

Vanessa

Meet Vanessa of the Waterhen Lake First Nation. She is currently in the process of completing Canada's skills training program aimed at getting participating First Nation youth aged 18-24 years old ready and prepared to join the workforce. See what she has to say about the program.

Download: MP4 format (32.8 Mb)

Transcript: Vanessa

Vanessa, Waterhen Lake First Nation:

She made me see that I didn't want to spend the rest of my life on SA by pointing out the other people that have gone through it. She asked me, "How do you think everyone around you that you see who are on SA right now feel? Do you think they are going anywhere?" And I looked, and I saw that they weren't happy. They weren't really going anywhere, and I said "no". Then she said "Well, in order to not go through that, you have to stand up and move forward. Not look back". And honestly, if it weren't for these people, I wouldn't be standing here today. I wouldn't be graduated. I wouldn't be going forward with my schooling. So these people are truly a blessing.

I would strongly recommend my case manager to anybody who are currently struggling to get out of (Social Assistance) this trap. And, if anything, just look around and see for yourself— SA is not the way to go. You will see that nobody is happy unless they know what they want in life. Move forward with your schooling and don't worry about what anybody says or thinks about what you're going to do with your future. It's your life, your choice.

Narrator:

Thanks to funding from Economic Action Plan 2013 First Nation youth – ages 18 to 24 – from across the country will be participating in programs such as those taking place in Meadow Lake Tribal Council affiliated communities in Saskatchewan.

These programs are being delivered through partnerships between Aboriginal organizations, Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Canada and Employment and Social Development Canada.

Canada is providing job readiness support for First Nations youth so they can successfully participate in the Canadian economy. For more information on this and other programs and services, please visit www.aandc.gc.ca.

Chelsea

Meet Chelsea of the Waterhen Lake First Nation. She is currently in the process of completing Canada's skills training program aimed at getting participating First Nation youth aged 18-24 years old ready and prepared to join the workforce. See what she has to say about the program.

Download: MP4 format (22.7 Mb)

Transcript: Chelsea

Chelsea, Waterhen Lake First Nation:

Working with my case manager was very enjoyable. She was very supportive. She helped me with transportation, she helped me get all the references, and she helped me get funding, which was through MLTC.

I chose an educational assistant because I want to help other students. I know a lot of students struggle in school, and most of the time they don't get that one-on-one. And I think that being an education assistant could benefit a lot of the younger students to helping them understand their work.

I would recommend a case manager to people that are in similar situations because a lot of people do feel stuck, and they don't know where to look for help, and I think a case manager could really help people.

Narrator:

Thanks to funding from Economic Action Plan 2013 First Nation youth – ages 18 to 24 – from across the country will be participating in programs such as those taking place in Meadow Lake Tribal Council affiliated communities in Saskatchewan.

These programs are being delivered through partnerships between Aboriginal organizations, Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Canada and Employment and Social Development Canada.

Canada is providing job readiness support for First Nations youth so they can successfully participate in the Canadian economy. For more information on this and other programs and services, please visit www.aandc.gc.ca.

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