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Date: 2014
QS-6344-000-EE-A1
ISSN: 2368-5336
© Her Majesty the Queen in right of Canada, represented by the Minister of Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development, 2014

PDF Version PDF Version of Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Canada and Canadian Polar Commission — 2013–14 Departmental Performance Report  (4,576 Kb, 131 Pages)

Table of Contents

 

Foreword

Departmental Performance Reports are part of the Estimates family of documents. Estimates documents support appropriation acts, which specify the amounts and broad purposes for which funds can be spent by the government. The Estimates document family has three parts.

Part I (Government Expenditure Plan) provides an overview of federal spending.

Part II (Main Estimates) lists the financial resources required by individual departments, agencies and Crown corporations for the upcoming fiscal year.

Part III (Departmental Expenditure Plans) consists of two documents. Reports on Plans and Priorities (RPPs) are expenditure plans for each appropriated department and agency (excluding Crown corporations). They describe departmental priorities, strategic outcomes, programs, expected results and associated resource requirements, covering a three-year period beginning with the year indicated in the title of the report. Departmental Performance Reports (DPRs) are individual department and agency accounts of actual performance, for the most recently completed fiscal year, against the plans, priorities and expected results set out in their respective RPPs. DPRs inform parliamentarians and Canadians of the results achieved by government organizations for Canadians.

Additionally, Supplementary Estimates documents present information on spending requirements that were either not sufficiently developed in time for inclusion in the Main Estimates or were subsequently refined to account for developments in particular programs and services.

The financial information in DPRs is drawn directly from authorities presented in the Main Estimates and the planned spending information in RPPs. The financial information in DPRs is also consistent with information in the Public Accounts of Canada. The Public Accounts of Canada include the Government of Canada Consolidated Statement of Financial Position, the Consolidated Statement of Operations and Accumulated Deficit, the Consolidated Statement of Change in Net Debt, and the Consolidated Statement of Cash Flow, as well as details of financial operations segregated by ministerial portfolio for a given fiscal year. For the DPR, two types of financial information are drawn from the Public Accounts of Canada: authorities available for use by an appropriated organization for the fiscal year, and authorities used for that same fiscal year. The latter corresponds to actual spending as presented in the DPR.

The Treasury Board Policy on Management, Resources and Results Structures further strengthens the alignment of the performance information presented in DPRs, other Estimates documents and the Public Accounts of Canada. The policy establishes the Program Alignment Architecture of appropriated organizations as the structure against which financial and non-financial performance information is provided for Estimates and parliamentary reporting. The same reporting structure applies irrespective of whether the organization is reporting in the Main Estimates, the RPP, the DPR or the Public Accounts of Canada.

A number of changes have been made to DPRs for 2013–14 to better support decisions on appropriations. Where applicable, DPRs now provide financial, human resources and performance information in Section II at the lowest level of the organization's Program Alignment Architecture.

In addition, the DPR's format and terminology have been revised to provide greater clarity, consistency and a strengthened emphasis on Estimates and Public Accounts information. As well, departmental reporting on the Federal Sustainable Development Strategy has been consolidated into a new supplementary information table posted on departmental websites. This new table brings together all of the components of the Departmental Sustainable Development Strategy formerly presented in DPRs and on departmental websites, including reporting on the Greening of Government Operations and Strategic Environmental Assessments. Section III of the report provides a link to the new table on the organization's website. Finally, definitions of terminology are now provided in an appendix.


Minister's Message

On behalf of Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Canada (AANDC) and the Canadian Polar Commission, I am pleased to present the 2013–14 Departmental Performance Report.

Creating jobs, growth and economic prosperity for Aboriginal peoples and Northerners remains a priority for our Government. This report demonstrates the concrete steps taken by our Government in the past year to achieve this goal.

In 2013–2014, we began implementing the First Nations Financial Transparency Act, providing First Nation members with transparency and accountability from their elected officials and helping deliver more effective, accountable governments, which will in turn contribute to stronger, more self-sufficient and prosperous communities.

We secured the passage of key legislation such as the Safe Drinking Water for First Nations Act which aims to provide First Nations communities with drinking water and wastewater standards comparable to those off reserve and the Family Homes on Reserves and Matrimonial Interests or Rights Act which ensures that individuals living on reserve have access to the same matrimonial rights as all Canadians, including access to emergency protection orders.

The Sioux Valley Dakota Nation Governance Act received Royal Assent in March 2014. This is a landmark agreement that represents the first self-government agreement in the prairies. Also in March 2014, Kawacatoose First Nation in Saskatchewan became the first community to opt into the Moneys Management component of the First Nations Oil and Gas and Moneys Management Act and take full control over the management of its land and resource moneys.

In the North, work is well underway in planning the Canadian High Arctic Research Station; progress has been made on nearly 100 sites under the Northern Contaminated sites program; and elements of the Northwest Territories Devolution Act have come into force, providing Northerners with greater control over their lands and resources and improving regulatory processes in the North.

The Northern Jobs and Growth Act, which received Royal Assent in May 2013, is an important step in the Government of Canada's plan to create jobs, growth, and long-term prosperity in Canada's three Territories.

Building on the achievements presented in this report, the Government of Canada will continue to develop and strengthen its partnerships. By working together, we will secure a bright, healthy and prosperous future for Aboriginal peoples and Northerners, today and for generations to come.

The Honourable Bernard Valcourt, PC, QC, MP
Minister of Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development


Section I: Organizational Expenditure Overview

Organizational Profile

Minister: The Honourable Bernard Valcourt

Ministerial Portfolio: Department of Indian Affairs and Northern Development

Year of Incorporation: 1880

Enabling Instrument: Department of Indian Affairs and Northern Development Act, R.S.C. 1985, c. I-6

Other:

Special Operating Agency: Indian Oil and Gas Canada

Statutory and Other Agencies:

Departmental Corporation: Canadian Polar Commission

Crown Corporation: Corporation for the Mitigation of Mackenzie Gas Project Impacts

Shared-Governance Corporations:

Organizational Context

Raison d'être

Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Canada (AANDC) supports Aboriginal peoples (First Nations, Inuit and Métis) and Northerners in their efforts to:

Responsibilities

The Department is responsible for two mandates, Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development, which together support Canada's Aboriginal and northern peoples in the pursuit of healthy and sustainable communities and broader economic and social development objectives. Efforts are guided by the mission statement:

Working together to make Canada a better place for Aboriginal and northern people and communities

The mandate for Aboriginal Affairs is derived from a number of sources including the following:

A broad suite of legislation designed to provide First Nations with jurisdictional powers outside the Indian Act further defines AANDC's mandate, including the following:

The Department's mandate is also shaped by specific statutes enabling modern treaties. These include the following:

Moreover, a significant part of the mandate is derived from policy decisions and program practices that have been developed over the years. It is framed by judicial decisions, many of which carry policy implications for the Department. Finally, the mandate is carried out through funding arrangements or formal agreements with First Nations and/or provincial or territorial governments.

AANDC negotiates comprehensive and specific claims as well as self-government agreements on behalf of the Government of Canada. The Department is responsible for implementing its obligations under these agreements, as well as overseeing the implementation of obligations of other government departments flowing from these agreements. AANDC also provides support for services on reserves such as education, housing, community infrastructure and social support to Status Indians on reserves; administers the land management component of the Indian Act; and executes other regulatory duties under the Indian Act.

The Minister acts as the Government of Canada's primary interlocutor for Métis, Non-Status Indians and urban Aboriginal people. The Department serves as a focal point for Inuit issues, which supports the inclusion of Inuit-specific concerns in federal program and policy development.

The Northern Development mandate derives from a number of sources including the following:

Through its Northern Development mandate, AANDC is the lead federal department for two-fifths of Canada's landmass, with a direct role in the political and economic development of the territories and significant responsibilities for resource, land and environmental management. In the North, the territorial governments generally provide the majority of social programs and services to all Northerners, including Aboriginal people.

The Canadian Polar Commission, a separate agency, supports polar research through its mandate to develop, promote and disseminate knowledge of the polar regions. It carries out this mandate by co-operating with organizations, institutions and associations, in Canada and elsewhere, to undertake, support and publish studies, recognize achievements and promote polar research and its application in Canada. It also reports on polar issues and the state of polar knowledge and initiates and supports conferences, seminars and meetings.

Strategic Outcomes and Program Alignment Architecture

1 Strategic Outcome: The Government

2 Strategic Outcome: The People

3 Strategic Outcome: The Land and Economy

4 Strategic Outcome: The North

Internal Services

Organizational Priorities

In its 2013–14 Report on Plans and Priorities, AANDC identified eleven priority areas that fall under three themes:

Transforming for Improved Results

Improving Partnerships and Relationships

Managing Resources Effectively

Priority: Strengthening and Reforming Education Type:
Ongoing
Strategic Outcome: The People
The Department continued to work with willing partners to advance First Nation education reform:
  • In July 2013, AANDC circulated a Blueprint for Legislation to all First Nations and stakeholders. Input from First Nations was incorporated in a draft legislative proposal entitled "Working Together for First Nation Students: A Proposal for a Bill on First Nations Education" that was shared in October 2013 with First Nation Chiefs and Council, First Nation organizations, provincial governments and other stakeholders for feedback to inform legislation drafting.
  • In December 2013, Minister Valcourt responded to the National Chief of the Assembly of First Nations' November 2013 open letter and committed to work further with First Nations leadership to resolve outstanding issues in the proposed approach. During the December 11, 2013 Special Chiefs Assembly, a resolution was passed unanimously by the Chiefs-in-Assembly, directing the National Chief and Executive to focus on five priority areas (i.e. First Nations control, funding, First Nations languages and cultures, oversight, and an ongoing process of meaningful engagement) and pursue a statutory guarantee of funding and immediate investments.
  • On February 7, 2014 the Prime Minister and the National Chief of the Assembly of First Nations announced an historic agreement between the Government of Canada and the Assembly of First Nations to reform First Nations elementary and secondary education through the proposed First Nations Control of First Nations Education Act, which would incorporate the five priority areas identified by the Chiefs-in-Assembly.
  • These key initiatives were built on significant groundwork. Since December 2012, the Department has consulted First Nations and stakeholders across the country on the development of proposed legislation to support First Nations elementary and secondary education reform. By using a multi-faceted consultation approach, approximately 440 individuals participated in the Canada-wide face-to-face consultation sessions, along with hundreds of participants in video and/or teleconferencing sessions. The Department received and analysed over 500 completed responses to the online survey and 80 email submissions as well as letters from First Nations and other stakeholders.
  • Following the resignation of the National Chief and resolutions adopted by the Chiefs in Assembly in May 2014, the Bill has been placed on hold.

Additionally in 2013–2014, the Department:

  • Funded 50 proposals under the First Nation Student Success Program and the Education Partnership Program to support supported structural readiness through targeted funding for organizational capacity development in core areas such as: governance and leadership, parental/community involvement, planning/performance measurement and risk management, financial management, human resource management and organizational planning.
  • As a member of the National Committee in Inuit Education, provided relevant knowledge and expertise as the Committee seeks to advance the Inuit Education Strategy and improve education outcomes for Inuit students.
  • Continued to implement innovative and cost-efficient practices to construct new schools and renovate existing schools in an effective and timely manner with the best value for money. The on-going roll-out of Canada's Economic Action Plan 2012 targeted investments for school infrastructure. As of March 31, 2014, 1 school was completed, 4 were under construction, 5 were in design phase, 2 were in the tendering process and the Manitoba school bundle business case was developed for further consideration.
  • Implemented existing tripartite education agreements (First Nations, Province and AANDC) and drew up a new Memorandum of Understanding with the Nishnawbe Aski Nation and the Province of Ontario. There are now nine tripartite education agreements in place to strengthen collaboration on First Nations education. Partners coordinate and advance joint initiatives that ensure linkages are made with provincial systems to facilitate transferability between the First Nation and provincial systems, and support the capacity development of First Nation organizations to deliver First Nation education services.
Priority: Empowering Citizens Type:
Ongoing
Strategic Outcomes: The People, The Government, The Land and Economy
Progress during 2013–2014 includes advancing legislation such as the First Nations Elections Act and the First Nations Financial Transparency Act:
  • In 2013–2014, the Department began implementing a new approach to social assistance in moving from passive to active measures.* In the past year, 742 18–24 year olds participated in the program.
  • The First Nations Elections Act was re-introduced as Bill C-9 in October 2013, and the Department continued to support the bill as it moved through the parliamentary process. Bill C-9, developed in partnership with First Nations organizations, presents a solid alternative election system that will build the foundations for open, stable and accountable First Nations governments. At the same time, the partnership with the Atlantic Policy Congress of First Nations Chiefs was renewed to establish a joint work plan for the regulatory development and engagement required for the implementation of the First Nations Elections Act.
  • Efforts were focused on implementing the First Nations Financial Transparency Act, ensuring that the necessary systems and work processes were in place so that AANDC could meet its statutory obligation to post on its website the audited consolidated financial statements and the remuneration for Chief and Council of First Nations. This increased transparency of First Nations governments enables First Nations members to access financial information about their communities and it informs potential investors who are contemplating economic development opportunities in First Nations.
  • The review and analysis of the Exploratory Process on Indian Registration, Band Membership and Citizenship findings was completed. Given the volume of information submitted by First Nations and Métis participants, developing the options for potential reform will continue.
  • Opt-in legislation that would allow interested communities to hold fee simple title on reserve lands was explored with the First Nations Tax Commission and 12 proponent First Nations. The technical requirements for such a proposal were developed with the First Nation Tax Commission.
  • Work continued with First Nation, provincial and territorial partners to improve delivery of First Nations Child and Family Services. Early results under the Enhanced Prevention Focused Approach show improved tripartite relationships, increased kinship care, heightened community awareness of the child welfare system, promising prevention practices in some communities and increased community participation in prevention programming.

* Active Measures are activities that help income assistance clients increase their employability and find jobs. These activities are aimed at increasing their job prospects and supporting them as they move into the workforce, including: basic life-skills, literacy training, and career counselling.

Priority: Improving Economic Development and Job Creation Type:
Ongoing
Strategic Outcome: The Land and Economy
AANDC remains focused on Aboriginal economic development in order to create jobs, economic growth and long-term prosperity and to continue our role in the federal administration of reserve land, while making responsible spending choices. Our policy direction is embedded in the Federal Framework for Aboriginal Economic Development. Over this period AANDC:
  • Helped build capacity, reduce barriers and forge partnerships that will increase economic opportunities for First Nations, Métis and Inuit across Canada through advisory bodies such as the National Aboriginal Economic Development Board and external service delivery organizations such as Aboriginal Financial Institutions and land management organizations.
  • Invested in the Support and Training Fund administered by National Aboriginal Capital Corporation Association, which offers valuable training for Aboriginal Financial Institution (AFI) staff by focusing educational support on the effective and consistent delivery of developmental lending and business support services across the AFI network.
  • Supported Aboriginal community-member training to participate in employment opportunities, in partnership with the Department of Employment and Social Development Canada and the Mi'kmaw Economic Benefits Office of Nova Scotia and the Nova Scotia Aboriginal Employment Partnership Program.
  • Organized the third Aboriginal Entrepreneurs Conference and Trade Show in November 2013. Hosted by the Canadian Council for Aboriginal Business, this event offered an exclusive learning and business networking milieu for Aboriginal entrepreneurs and industry leaders.
  • Initiated a pilot project with four Aboriginal Financial Institutions to promote the Procurement Strategy for Aboriginal Business and the Aboriginal Business Directory to their clients through outreach, training, communications and directory registration. This will enhance Aboriginal business viability and repayment of AFI loans, contributing to the health of the AFI loan portfolio.
  • Moved forward with implementing the Federal Framework for Aboriginal Economic Development and finalized program consolidation and activity renewal. This includes the consolidation of program authorities, and development and approval of associated performance measurement strategies and management control frameworks. This will result in reduced administrative and reporting burdens and enhanced coordination of Aboriginal Economic Development and Land management programming, including economic infrastructure development.
  • Revised the Locatee Lease policy to streamline the process and support commercial and other transactions for individuals with a Certificate of Possession.
  • Developed a number of revisions to the Additions to Reserve policy in partnership with the Assembly of First Nations, to improve the clarity and transparency of the policy for First Nations and other stakeholders. A web-based public engagement process on the new policy was used to reach out and responded to comments from First Nations, provincial and municipal governments and the general public. Revisions to the policy are still in development.
  • Responded to changes to the Canadian Environmental Assessment Act announced in 2012 by developing and publicly launching a new Environmental Review Process so that projects not subject to a federal environment assessment process will be reviewed and not cause adverse environmental effects on reserve.
  • Started modernizing the Indian Oil and Gas Regulations, 1995 with regulatory drafters and clients. Ongoing discussions and consultations on the draft are being held with oil and gas First Nations to ensure effective administration of oil and gas on reserve lands.
  • Partnered with the Public Policy Forum on the Global Perspectives in Indigenous Economic Development roundtable in March 2014 to identify best practices and potential strategies for increasing Aboriginal participation in major resource projects.
  • Led the Aboriginal participation in the National Shipbuilding Procurement Strategy in both the Atlantic and Western regions in partnership with federal, provincial, Aboriginal and industry representatives. In addition, the Department successfully encouraged Seaspan Marine Corporation and Irving Shipbuilding Inc. to increase Aboriginal business and labour force participation.
Priority: Sustaining the Momentum of the Northern Strategy Type:
Ongoing
Strategic Outcome: The North
AANDC continued to lead the Northern Strategy throughout 2013–2014, by coordinating federal efforts on northern initiatives. A number of key initiatives to support the development of sustainable Northern communities while simultaneously fostering a more conducive business environment were advanced.

AANDC activity for each pillar of the Northern Strategy:

Exercising our Arctic Sovereignty

  • Advanced Canada's priorities under the Arctic Council Chairmanship with the effective engagement of Canadian Indigenous Permanent Participants and international partners.

Promoting social and economic development

  • Advanced changes to Northern Regulatory Regimes with Bill C-47; gaining Royal Assent for the Nunavut Planning and Project Assessment Act; and the regulatory improvement aspects of Bill C-15, which includes amendments to the Mackenzie Valley Resource Management Act, NWT Waters Act and the Territorial Lands Act, the Nunavut Mining Regulations and Northwest Territories Mining Regulations coming into force.
  • Advanced the pre-construction of the Canadian High Arctic Research Station and hired a Chief Scientist to lead the Station's Science and Technology Program.
  • Supported isolated northern communities access to healthy food by providing a retail subsidy under the Nutrition North Canada program.

Protecting our environmental heritage

  • Pursued environmental and socio-economic research as well as stakeholder engagement through the Beaufort Regional Environmental Assessment to influence oil and gas regulatory decisions and future projects in the Beaufort Sea.
  • Acted to address the high-risk elements at Giant Mine and Faro Mine; advanced the Faro Mine long-term remediation plan; made progress on the Giant Mine Environmental Assessment that is nearing completion; and continued managing close to 100 sites in the Northern Contaminated Sites Program portfolio.

Improving and devolving governance

  • Completed the devolution of responsibilities for land and resource management to the Northwest Territories with Bill C-15, Royal Assent of the Northwest Territories Devolution Act making devolution effective as of April 1, 2014.
  • Advanced discussions in Nunavut for the second phase of the devolution process.
Priority: Implementing Reconciliation Type:
Ongoing
Strategic Outcome: The People
AANDC continued to meet its obligations under the Indian Residential Schools Settlement Agreement, which includes financial compensation, a Truth and Reconciliation Commission, commemorative activities and measures to support healing and education. With the continued implementation of the Settlement Agreement AANDC has:
  • Processed remaining applications for compensation under the Common Experience Payment and Independent Assessment Process within established service standards.
  • Launched the disbursement of Personal Credits pursuant to the Settlement Agreement.
  • Began to negotiate the terms and conditions for the disbursal of any remaining funds in the Designated Amount Fund to Aboriginal educational foundations as per the Settlement Agreement.
  • Participated in three national events of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission.
  • Completed the disclosure of active, semi-active and legacy documents to the Commission, as well as preparing a plan to research and disclose relevant documents held at Library and Archives Canada.

In addition to implementing the Settlement Agreement, reconciliation with Aboriginal people has been promoted by:

  • Developing a departmental framework for reconciliation to align policy and program development and delivery with the government's goal of reconciliation.
  • Offering gestures of reconciliation such as supporting former student participation in Truth and Reconciliation Commission national events.
Priority: Facilitating Community Development and Capacity Type:
Ongoing
Strategic Outcome: The Land and Economy
The Department continued to facilitate community development and capacity. Over the period of 2013–2014, AANDC:
  • Enhanced community development and capacity through its funding support for the provision and management of on-reserve housing through the First Nation Building Officers Association. First Nations were also supported directly with, for example, implementation of a Housing Authority in Metepenagiag and housing policy and capacity development in Shubenacadie First Nation and Tobique First Nation. Finally, approximately $143 million was provided for on-reserve housing needs, which were used at the First Nations' discretion.
  • Continued developing a public-private water and wastewater partnership in Atlantic Canada and a public-private school partnership in Manitoba. A two-school bundleFootnote 1 was identified for Northern Ontario.
  • Prioritized investments in First Nations' water and wastewater systems to address high-risk factors such as capacity, training, operations and maintenance. Water system low-risk ratings increased from 38% to 44% and wastewater systems from 43% to 52%, effectively reducing water system and wastewater system risks. The percentage of First Nation systems that had operators certified to drinking water system level increased from 60% in 2012–2013 to 68% in 2013–2014 while those certified to the wastewater system level decreased from 61% to 58%. The percentage of First Nations' water systems that meet the Guidelines for Canadian Drinking Water Quality standards increased from 69% to 74% between 2012–2013 and 2013–2014. The Safe Drinking Water for First Nations Act came into force on November 1, 2013, allowing planning for development of federal regulations to begin.
  • Strengthened First Nations emergency management capacity (mitigation, preparedness, response and recovery).
  • Supported a common integrated approach to community development by adopting Health Canada's Community Development Framework and reinforcing efficiency on mutual projects with Health Canada and other federal partners. These partnerships strengthened our approach of integrating programming and engagement with targeted communities for capacity building. With a focus on communities with a capacity development plan, AANDC will continue to pursue a collaborative community-focused approach with Health Canada and other partners for investing in capacity where there are communities in common.
Priority: Increasing Partnering to Ensure Programs Are More Responsive Type:
Ongoing
Strategic Outcomes: The Land and Economy, The North
The Department continued to increase partnering to ensure programs are more responsive. Over the period of 2013–2014, AANDC:
  • Worked with its Co-Management Board, the Indian Resource Council (which represents 189 First Nations with oil and gas interests) and a Joint Technical Committee to develop policy approaches for modernizing regulations.
  • Strengthened relations with provincial and territorial emergency management partners through bilateral agreements to improve the provision of emergency management services on reserve and to make sure funding mechanisms are both effective and efficient.
  • In concert with Health Canada, developed plans for federal regulations development under the Safe Drinking Water for First Nations Act, which came into force on November 1, 2013. A consultation and engagement strategy was developed and contact with provincial and territorial governments initiated.
  • Strengthened partnerships with northern Aboriginal organizations and territorial/northern governments and built capacity to effectively communicate benefits and risks of consuming traditional country foods.
  • Provided, through the National Aboriginal Capital Corporations Association, leadership in managing various consultation processes for researching and developing new program initiatives for the AFI network. These efforts have included technical advisory groups, external advisory groups, general managers' meetings and annual general meetings with representatives from a variety of government, non-government, private sector and AFI stakeholders.
Priority: Negotiating and Implementing Claims and Self-Government Agreements Type:
Ongoing
Strategic Outcome: The Government
The Department continued to negotiate and implement claims and self-government agreements. Over the period of 2013–2014, AANDC:
  • Facilitated progress in comprehensive land claims and self-government negotiations by implementing the results-based approach to Canada's participation in treaty and self-government negotiations, identifying alternative methods (other than treaties) to address section 35 of the Constitution Act, 1982 on Aboriginal rights and working internally to reduce the time it takes to mandate negotiators and approve completed agreements.
  • Discussed and negotiated Memoranda of Understanding and consultation protocols with provinces and discussed protocols with First Nation and Métis groups across the country to harmonize consultation processes and strengthen relationships.
  • Used various federal policies to address comprehensive claims; provided clarity over use, management and ownership of lands and resources; facilitated economic self-sufficiency for Aboriginal groups and communities while promoting economic growth for all Canadians; and focused resources on tables with the greatest potential for success.
  • Co-chaired the Senior Oversight Committee with the Assembly of First Nations, and created a mandate to update and reform Canada's Comprehensive Claims Policy. The Committee put forth recommendations at the end of its mandate, which included principles of recognition and reconciliation.
Priority: Improving the Management of Funding Relationships by Maximizing the Use of the Policy on Transfer Payments Type:
Ongoing
Strategic Outcomes: The Government, The People, The Land and Economy, The North, Internal Services
The Department continued to improve the management of funding relationships by maximizing the use of the Policy on Transfer Payments.Footnote 2 Over the period of 2013–2014, AANDC:
  • Made significant progress in harmonizing the way federal departments do business and successfully integrated a common financial management system with Health Canada. We are also hosting the Public Health Agency of Canada on AANDC's grants and contributions management system and working to host Health Canada by the end of 2014–2015. AANDC met the Government of Canada's open data requirements by fully integrating the Department's central document management system and the government's financial accounting system.
  • Continued to make progress in improving transfer-payment management by offering new optional funding agreements, refreshing policy instruments, introducing a consistent approach for case management and strengthening compliance and monitoring functions.
  • Standardized and streamlined various transfer payment terms and conditions to align to the adjusted Program Alignment Architecture, thereby increasing flexibility, reducing recipients' reporting burden and enhancing the management/administration of transfer payments. Transfer payment terms and conditions were consolidated by combining 39 of its current compliment of 69 authorities into 14, with the balance being assessed for further consolidation.
  • In response to one of the areas of the Red Tape Reduction Plan, AANDC applied measurable service standards and made national funding agreements and corresponding reporting guides available online for recipients.
  • Continued to improve web-based services by consolidating the Year-End Reporting Handbook and the Recipient Reporting Guide into a single Reporting Guide.
  • Presented to the Assistant Deputy Minister Coordinating Committee on the Arctic the lessons learned from the Pangnirtung and key factors for replication; continued the work of the Interdepartmental Partnership Board and Working Group to ensure continuation and simplified delivery Youth programs.
Priority: Implementing the Results of the Administrative Shared Services Review Type:
Ongoing
Strategic Outcomes: The Government, The People, The Land and Economy, The North, Internal Services
The Department continued to implement the results of the administrative shared services review. Over the period of 2013–2014, AANDC:
  • Participated in the Government of Canada mandated Information Management/Information Technology transformation by supporting the transition to Shared Services Canada.
  • Implemented efficiencies within the Department by actively participating in the governance of the E-mail Transformation Initiative and collaborating on the planning for data centre and network consolidation.
  • Conducted an extensive internal review of IT expenditures as per requirements by Central Agencies and provided recommendations on the distribution of savings. Implementation of these savings within the organization improved the manner in which AANDC conducts its business, increased accountability and reduced duplication and spending.
Priority: Implementing Public Service Renewal and Support the Excellence Agenda Type:
Ongoing
Strategic Outcomes: The Government, The People, The Land and Economy, The North, Internal Services
The Department continued to implement public service renewal and support the excellence agenda. Over the period of 2013–2014, AANDC:
  • Adjusted its 2014–2015 Program Alignment Architecture to simplify and clarify the program structure to more meaningfully depict programs in relation to their expected results for Aboriginal people, Northerners and Canadians. The intended impact of the new Program Alignment Architecture is to better assess program results and establish a trend line of progress over time.
  • Strengthened the integration of three key planning areas: Investment Plan, IM/IT Plan and Procurement Plan. This integration aligned the components more effectively and helped make the IM/IT and procurement processes more efficient while supporting an improved and more transparent process for planning and managing departmental operating resources.
  • Through consultation at all levels on topics such as talent management, career development and employee workplace well-being, the Department actively engaged its employees in developing its Blueprint 2020 Vision and embarked on the implementation of key activities with employees' involvement. Nine key focus areas were identified, such as student recruitment of Aboriginal Peoples, accessing new technology platforms and social media, the enhancement of mandatory training for managers and recruitment/career development programs for Aboriginal employees. Through a Dragons' Den approach, ten specific ideas are being reviewed and many will be adopted, including the creation of a single system for the management of federal employees' security files and the introduction of electronic signatures.
  • Implemented new multi-year Employment Equity and Official Languages Plans. A national Resourcing Strategy was adopted and integrated into human resources planning activities. The Strategy includes the use of collective staffing approaches and inventories or pools and fosters partnerships to leverage results.
  • Made significant progress in providing enhanced service to AANDC recipients and First Nations by making funding allocations available earlier in the year by aligning with the Department's annual funding cycle. Improvements to the annual funding cycle provided recipients and First Nations with funding continuity and predictability and contributed to more strategic financial planning of departmental Grants and Contributions.

Risk Analysis

In order to align with Government of Canada priorities and commitments, AANDC delivers a number of wide-ranging and complex programs and services to effectively serve our diverse stakeholders and clients. Analysis of current business conditions (demographic, geographic, historical, etc.) helps the Department identify potential risks and implement appropriate mitigation.

In order to mitigate these risks and meet departmental objectives, AANDC employs a range of risk management practices. Identifying, assessing and mitigating corporate risks are a shared responsibility of managers at all levels, including Assistant Deputy Ministers and Deputy Ministers. The Corporate Risk Profile (CRP) and Corporate Business Planning processes served as the primary means of assessing and planning at the corporate level to respond to corporate risks. Once completed, the CRP informed the Department's business planning cycle and was a key input in the Department's priority-setting exercise. The activities put forward in the Department's plans not only addressed the operational needs of individual programs, but also contributed to the overall management of AANDC's corporate risks. The chart that follows outlines the Department's key risks.

Risk Risk Response Strategy Link to Program Alignment Architecture
Aboriginal Relationship Risk
  • Implementing Reconciliation — this includes a range of key activities, from the implementation of the Indian Residential Schools Settlement Agreement and the offering of gestures of reconciliation, to the Department's ongoing efforts to work with Aboriginal communities on issues of concern to them
  • Ongoing improvements to some AANDC programs (e.g., Education, Income Assistance, Water and Wastewater)
  • Ongoing engagements focused on strategic, policy and operational issues
  • Streamlined Program authorities and related performance indicators to simplify and reduce administrative burden
Aboriginal Relationship Risk is linked to and impacts all areas of the PAA
Legal Risk
  • Issue/case prioritization process developed to address the most significant issues
  • Implementation of Canada's Action Plan on Aboriginal Consultation to improve federal coordination so that the Crown can meet its consultation obligations
Legal Risk is linked to and impacts all areas of the PAA
Environmental Risk
  • Support for northern environmental monitoring programs, cumulative impact monitoring program and Nunavut General Monitoring Plan
  • Support of reforms to environmental regulations (North and South of 60)
  • Establishment of new governance structure and processes for large contaminated sites
  • Implementation of new regulations under Canadian Environmental Assessment Act, 2012, Fisheries Act and Species at Risk Act
  • Assessing potential for contingent liabilities with Indian Oil and Gas Canada (i.e. for disclosure in financial reports)
  • Implementation of a site stabilization plan for Giant Mine to address urgent environmental risks
  • Provide opportunities for better management of lands and regulatory enforcement on reserves through the First Nations Land Management Regime and the First Nations Commercial and Industrial Development Act
  • Pilot project for "Community Land use Planning" to focus attention on infrastructure and environmental matters
  • Informing and optimizing infrastructure and energy investments through the Climate Change Adaptation and ecoEnergy for Aboriginal and Northern communities programs
Environmental Risk is linked to and impacts all areas of the PAA

For Aboriginal Relationship Risk, high-level engagements with Aboriginal leadership and consultation processes with Aboriginal communities have resulted in an increased common understanding of policy and program priorities as well as program delivery that is better aligned to community needs (i.e. economic development projects).

Legal Risk has been addressed through attempts to resolve Departmental litigation using the most appropriate resolution mechanisms (including out-of-court settlements). The Department has begun implementation of cost containment measures to ensure quality legal advice is obtained in a timely fashion while avoiding duplication. As well, legal obligations have been monitored to increase compliance and reduce litigation risks. AANDC's Litigation Management System provides a comprehensive repository of litigation cases, which allows for real-time reporting and facilitates trend analysis.

AANDC has implemented a number of strategies in order to mitigate Environmental Risk. An Environmental Management Approach was developed to update the process of environmental reviews to ensure that economic and infrastructure developments on Federal Reserve lands do not impact the environment negatively. Prioritization frameworks for contaminated sites ensure issues that pose the greatest risk are addressed early and with appropriate interventions. AANDC's continued participation in the Federal Contaminated Sites Action Plan (FCSAP) and governance structure has resulted in frequent additional transfers of FCSAP resources from other departments to priority on-reserve contaminated sites for assessment or remediation.

In addition to these risks, the Department continues to implement strategies related to external and government partners in order to reach its objectives. Increased cooperation with other government departments, agencies and provinces provides AANDC with more opportunities for proactive relationship building. Underpinning all risks is the Department's ability to implement its programming and manage its resources. Reviews of financial and human resources activities have allowed the Department to align resources to priorities and better address Implementation Risk. As a result of this ongoing work, Resource Alignment Risk has been minimized.

Actual Expenditures

Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Canada

2013–2014 Budgetary Financial Resources (Dollars)

Main Estimates Planned Spending Total Authorities
Available for Use
Actual Spending
(Authorities used)
Difference
(Actual minus planned)
7,904,970,562 7,904,970,562 8,778,368,322 8,039,491,675 134,521,113

2013–2014 Human Resources (FTEs)

Planned Actual Difference
(Actual minus planned)
The Department is continuing to ensure that its human resources are used effectively and are aligned and reported accurately as per the Program Alignment Architecture (PAA). Variances between planned and actual FTEs identified in a number of programs relate primarily to internal re-allocation of resources in response to evolving departmental priorities. The difference between planned and actual FTEs was attributable, in part, to the implementation of the Regional Accounting Operations Hubs which brought about efficiencies. Additionally, the Department encountered some challenges in recruiting to support programs like the Independent Assessment Process, due to the program's temporary nature, combined with the fact that this program requires personnel with a very specialized skill set.
4,996.9 4,745.7 (251.2)

Budgetary Performance Summary for Strategic Outcomes and Programs (Dollars)

Strategic Outcomes, Programs and Internal Services 2013–2014 Main Estimates 2013–2014 Planned Spending 2014–2015 Planned Spending 2015–2016 Planned Spending 2013–2014 Total Authorities Available for Use 2013–2014 Actual Spending (Authorities used) 2012–2013 Actual Spending (Authorities used) 2011–2012 Actual Spending (Authorities used)

The difference between Planned Spending, Total Authorities and Actual Spending can be found in Section II at the program and sub-program levels as applicable.

  1. Renamed Aboriginal Rights and Interests under the 2014–2015 PAA
  2. Renamed Management and Implementation of Agreements and Treaties under the 2014–2015 PAA
  3. Renamed First Nations Individual Affairs under the 2014–2015 PAA
  4. The Aboriginal Economic Development program has been restructured/reorganized under the new PAA for 2014–2015, with funding realigned to the Aboriginal Entrepreneurship, Community Development and Strategic Partnerships programs
  5. The Federal Administration of Reserve Land program has been restructured/reorganized under the new PAA for 2014–2015, with funding realigned to the Community Development and Infrastructure and Capacity programs
  6. Renamed Infrastructure and Capacity under the 2014–2015 PAA
  7. Funding for 2013–2014 and future years was realigned to the Urban Aboriginal Participation program pursuant to the revised PAA for 2013–2014
  8. Funding for 2013–2014 and future years was realigned to the Governance and Institutions of Government and Co-operative Relationships programs pursuant to the revised PAA for 2013–2014
  9. Funding for 2013–2014 and future years was realigned to the Co-operative Relationships program pursuant to the revised PAA for 2013–2014
Strategic Outcome: The Government
Governance and Institutions of Government 456,663,359 456,663,359 398,449,544 398,876,616 487,468,400 484,218,256 484,410,694 495,924,087
Co-operative Relationships1 396,521,554 396,521,554 826,318,323 810,894,607 990,390,491 485,123,423 674,086,734 423,350,424
Treaty Management2 713,591,894 713,591,894 719,340,126 695,479,312 718,050,234 715,832,560 717,808,669 735,709,878
Subtotal 1,566,776,807 1,566,776,807 1,944,107,993 1,905,250,535 2,195,909,125 1,685,174,239 1,876,306,097 1,654,984,389
Strategic Outcome: The People
Education 1,761,149,545 1,761,149,545 1,798,304,555 1,786,871,696 1,776,306,381 1,775,804,549 1,734,756,058 1,675,032,572
Social Development 1,614,979,902 1,614,979,902 1,666,669,213 1,709,806,062 1,724,806,452 1,723,318,991 1,709,912,535 1,678,033,128
Managing Individual Affairs3 28,808,744 28,808,744 25,228,617 25,232,223 34,336,163 33,836,437 37,059,921 43,315,378
Residential Schools Resolution 696,037,893 696,037,893 646,415,026 70,090,213 685,955,866 574,379,693 593,297,435 560,294,873
Subtotal 4,100,976,084 4,100,976,084 4,136,617,411 3,592,000,194 4,221,404,862 4,107,339,670 4,075,025,949 3,956,675,951
Strategic Outcome: The Land and Economy
Aboriginal Economic Development4 254,067,126 254,067,126 n/a n/a 259,054,960 224,607,972 238,105,460 239,201,680
Federal Administration of Reserve Land5 52,587,401 52,587,401 n/a n/a 134,117,966 133,423,081 112,438,523 207,290,932
Community Infrastructure6 1,221,345,124 1,221,345,124 1,160,687,268 1,062,361,066 1,039,313,770 1,038,948,588 1,073,406,412 1,096,884,900
Urban Aboriginal Participation 41,033,701 41,033,701 40,014,054 39,850,365 52,494,753 51,708,349 n/a n/a
Aboriginal Entrepreneurship n/a n/a 49,640,071 49,640,071 n/a n/a n/a n/a
Community Development n/a n/a 196,637,835 193,559,100 n/a n/a n/a n/a
Strategic Partnerships n/a n/a 24,738,453 24,738,453 n/a n/a n/a n/a
Subtotal 1,569,033,352 1,569,033,352 1,471,717,681 1,370,149,055 1,484,981,449 1,448,687,990 1,423,950,395 1,543,377,512
Strategic Outcome: The North
Northern Governance and People 136,927,492 136,927,492 130,218,356 129,358,653 178,720,859 170,331,482 136,472,218 126,585,267
Northern Science and Technology 12,898,583 12,898,583 7,320,522 5,927,137 18,743,641 13,504,948 12,862,568 15,996,208
Northern Land, Resources and Environmental Management 259,977,233 259,977,233 120,402,745 92,437,699 253,415,512 238,498,638 176,818,376 179,853,665
Subtotal 409,803,308 409,803,308 257,941,623 227,723,489 450,880,012 422,335,068 326,153,162 322,435,140
Strategic Outcome: Office of the Federal Interlocutor (Pursuant to the revised Program Alignment Architecture for 2013–2014, the Office of the Federal Interlocutor Strategic Outcome was reorganized/realigned for 2013–2014 and future years)
Urban Aboriginal Strategy7 n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a 52,255,804 14,899,569
Métis and Non-Status Indian Organizational Capacity Development8 n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a 14,814,062 16,343,335
Métis Rights Management9 n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a 7,870,718 9,504,333
Subtotal n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a 74,940,584 40,747,237
Internal Services 258,381,011 258,381,011 243,590,697 236,129,476 425,192,874 375,954,708 318,766,155 362,662,908
Total 7,904,970,562 7,904,970,562 8,053,975,405 7,331,252,749 8,778,368,322 8,039,491,675 8,095,142,342 7,880,883,137

Expenditures in the above table for 2014–2015 and future years reflect the streamlined Program Alignment Architecture for 2014–2015 which was undertaken in parallel with the Department's consolidation of transfer payment authorities to provide greater congruence in reporting financial and non-financial results.

Overall, the year-over-year changes primarily reflect an increase in funding provided to meet the demand for ongoing First Nation and Inuit programs and services as well as changes in targeted funding provided for major initiatives. These include implementation of the Indian Residential Schools Settlement Agreement, the Federal Contaminated Sites Action Plan, the Emergency Management Assistance Program, the First Nations Infrastructure Fund, investments to improve First Nations education and water and wastewater infrastructure, and changes to the approved funding profile for the negotiation, settlement and implementation of specific and comprehensive claims. Changes also reflect government-wide efforts to identify efficiencies and streamline departmental operations, while protecting program delivery to First Nations. Future settlements of claims and litigation and additional requirements stemming from the Indian Residential Schools Settlement Agreement will be added to planned spending levels through subsequent appropriations. Similarly, decisions in future federal budgets may lead to adjustments to appropriations. For additional explanation of the overall expenditure trend, please refer to the Departmental Spending Trend subsection in Section I of this report. For additional explanation of changes in 2013–2014 spending by program, please refer to Section II.

Canadian Polar Commission

2013–2014 Budgetary Financial Resources (Dollars)

Main Estimates Planned Spending Total Authorities
Available for Use
Actual Spending
(Authorities used)
Difference
(Actual minus planned)
2,576,669 2,576,669 2,593,936 2,590,009 13,340

2013–2014 Human Resources (FTEs)

Planned Actual Difference
(Actual minus planned)
9 11 2

Budgetary Performance Summary for Strategic Outcomes and Programs (Dollars)

Strategic Outcomes, Programs and Internal Services 2013–2014 Main Estimates 2013–2014 Planned Spending 2014–2015 Planned Spending 2015–2016 Planned Spending 2013–2014 Total Authorities Available for Use 2013–2014 Actual Spending (Authorities used) 2012–2013 Actual Spending (Authorities used) 2011–2012 Actual Spending (Authorities used)
Strategic Outcome: Increased Canadian Polar Knowledge
Knowledge Management and Communication 2,095,074 2,095,074 2,095,000 2,095,000 2,108,888 2,259,236 988,110 951,256
Internal Services 481,595 481,595 481,360 481,360 485,048 330,773 329,625 311,954
Total 2,576,669 2,576,669 2,576,360 2,576,360 2,593,936 2,590,009 1,317,735 1,263,210

Alignment of Spending with the Whole-of-Government Framework

Alignment of 2013–2014 Actual Spending with the Whole-of-Government Framework

Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Canada

Strategic Outcome Program Spending Area Government of Canada Outcome 2013–2014 Actual Spending (Dollars)
The Government Governance and Institutions of Government Social Affairs A diverse society that promotes linguistic duality and social inclusion 484,218,256
Co-operative Relationships Social Affairs 485,123,423
Treaty Management Economic Affairs Strong economic growth 715,832,560
The People Education Social Affairs A diverse society that promotes linguistic duality and social inclusion 1,775,804,549
Social Development Social Affairs 1,723,318,991
Managing Individual Affairs Social Affairs 33,836,437
Residential Schools Resolution Social Affairs 574,379,693
The Land and Economy Aboriginal Economic Development Economic Affairs Strong economic growth 224,607,972
Federal Administration of Reserve Land Economic Affairs 133,423,081
Community Infrastructure Economic Affairs 1,038,948,588
Urban Aboriginal Participation Economic Affairs 51,708,349
The North Northern Governance and People Social Affairs Healthy Canadians 170,331,482
Northern Science and Technology Economic Affairs An innovative and knowledge-based economy 13,504,948
Northern Land, Resources and Environmental Management Economic Affairs A clean and healthy environment 238,498,638

Total Spending by Spending Area

Spending Area Total Planned Spending (Dollars) Total Actual Spending (Dollars)
Economic Affairs 2,555,501,062 2,416,524,136
Social Affairs 5,091,088,489 5,247,012,831
International Affairs n/a n/a
Government Affairs n/a n/a

Canadian Polar Commission

Strategic Outcome Program Spending Area Government of Canada Outcome 2013–2014 Actual Spending (Dollars)
Increased Canadian Polar Knowledge Knowledge management and Communication Economic Affairs A clean and healthy environment 2,259,236

Total Spending by Spending Area

Spending Area Total Planned Spending (Dollars) Total Actual Spending (Dollars)
Economic Affairs 2,095,074 2,259,236

Departmental Spending Trend

The actual spending for AANDC in fiscal 2013–2014 was $8.0 billion, an increase of about $159 million compared with fiscal results from 2011–2012. This net increase primarily reflects the incremental funding provided to meet the demand for ongoing First Nation and Inuit programs and service (2% allowance for inflation and population growth), as well as changes in targeted funding for the following major initiatives/items:

Planned spending over the period from 2013–2014 to 2016–2017 decreases by about $1.2 billion, in great part because of reductions related to the sunset of targeted funding. Overall the major items include:

Departmental Spending Trend Graph

Note: Future settlements of claims and litigation as well as additional requirements stemming from the Indian Residential Schools Settlement Agreement will be added to planned spending levels through subsequent appropriations. Similarly, decisions in future federal budgets may lead to adjustments to appropriations, such as the renewed funding for sunset programs (included in the 2014–2015 Supplementary Estimates A) and reflected in the chart above for: the First Nations Water and Wastewater Action Plan; assessment, management and remediation of federal contaminated sites; and, comprehensive claims and self-government negotiations across Canada.

View text version of this image

The bar graph depicts the Actual and Planned spending trends as follows:

2011-2012: nil (Sunset Programs)
2011-2012: $7.9 Billion (Actual Spending)
2012-2013: nil (Sunset Programs)
2012-2013: $8.1 Billion (Actual Spending)
2013-2014: nil (Sunset Programs)
2013-2014: $8.0 Billion (Actual Spending)
2014-2015: $0.3 Billion (Sunset Programs)
2014-2015: $8.1 Billion (Planned Spending)
2015-2016: $0.3 Billion (Sunset Programs)
2015-2016: $7.3 Billion (Planned Spending)
2016-2017: nil (Sunset Programs)
2016-2017: $6.8 Billion (Planned Spending)

Estimates by Vote

For information on Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Canada's organizational Votes and statutory expenditures, consult the Public Accounts of Canada 2014 on the Public Works and Government Services Canada website.


Section II: Analysis of Programs by Strategic Outcome

Strategic Outcome: The Government

Good governance and co-operative relationships for First Nations, Métis, Non-Status Indians, Inuit and Northerners

Program 1.1: Governance and Institutions of Government

Description

The Governance and Institutions of Government Program contributes to The Government Strategic Outcome. This program provides frameworks (legislative and non-legislative) which are consistent with the legal, collective, human, and democratic rights and freedoms of Aboriginal people in Canada, and, where possible, enables and supports First Nation development of policies and programs that embrace these values. It provides funds, legislation and guidelines, certifications, education and training, advice, policies and plans, and implemented changes to support, condition and build capacity for Aboriginal governance. Typical activities include but are not limited to providing assistance to establish governance and associated capacities, processes and mechanisms (such as by-law making authority, election processes). Support is provided to First Nation and Inuit governments as well as First Nation institutions. Ultimately, good governance practices are essential for active Aboriginal participation in Canadian society and the economy.

2013–2014 Budgetary Financial Resources (Dollars)

Main Estimates Planned Spending Total Authorities
Available for Use
Actual Spending
(Authorities used)
Difference
(Actual minus planned)
The difference between Planned Spending and Total Authorities primarily reflects additional resources re-allocated during the 2013–2014 fiscal year for Indian government support activities, consultation and the basic organizational capacity of Aboriginal organizations.
456,663,359 456,663,359 487,468,400 484,218,256 27,554,897

2013–2014 Human Resources (FTEs)

Planned Actual Difference
(Actual minus planned)
469.7 441.6 (28.1)

Performance Results

Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Transparent and accountable First Nation governments and institutions Percentage of First Nations operating with a plan to develop governance capacity 80% by March 31, 2014 79%
Percentage of First Nations free of financial intervention as defined by the Department's Default Prevention Management Policy 70% by March 31, 2014 74%

Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

Governance grants and contributions funding, along with direct training, capacity support to communities and legislative development, led to significant advancements in community governance capacity. Although the target of 80% of First Nations operating with a plan to develop governance was missed by one percentage point, the Department set an ambitious target as this is a priority for enabling a community-focused approach to capacity investments. First Nation communities have made significant progress in this area from 53% in 2012–2013 to the current level of 79%.

Throughout 2013–2014, AANDC continued to support and facilitate community development and capacity by streamlining and consolidating governance capacity programs; advancing the Community Development Framework and related tools; strengthening the governance storyline through the redevelopment of the Governance and Institutions of Government Program in the Program Alignment Architecture, realigning the Chart of Accounts accordingly and developing a Performance Measurement Strategy to support it; and developing and implementing legislation to remove the barriers to First Nation governance.

In 2013–2014, the Department consolidated four governance capacity spending authorities, which simplified programming and application processes and broadened language to allow targeted investments based on community plans. In support of the new authority, a Performance Measurement Strategy was developed for the Governance and Institutions of Government Program of the Program Alignment Architecture, to guide the collection and analysis of information required for program evaluation and result measurement.

The First Nations Elections Act was re-introduced as Bill C-9 in October 2013, and the Department continued to support the bill as it moved through the parliamentary process. Developed in partnership with First Nations organizations, the Bill presents a solid alternative election system that will build the foundations of open, stable and accountable First Nations governments. At the same time, the Department renewed its partnership with the Atlantic Policy Congress of First Nations Chiefs to establish a joint work plan for the regulatory development and engagement required for implementing the First Nations Elections Act.

Efforts were also focussed on implementing the First Nations Financial Transparency Act, ensuring that the necessary systems and work processes were in place to allow AANDC to meet its statutory obligation to post the audited consolidated financial statements of participating First Nations on its website. This increased transparency of First Nations governments will inform potential investors contemplating economic development opportunities in First Nations and will provide financial information to First Nations members about their respective communities. The purpose of the First Nations Financial Transparency Act is to enhance the financial accountability and transparency of First Nations to their members so that members have the information required to make informed decisions on important aspects of their lives. To this end workshops were provided to First Nation administrators working with the Aboriginal Financial Officers Association.

Sub-Program 1.1.1: First Nation Governments

Description

This sub-program contributes to basic functions of First Nation Governments. Funds are provided through contributions to facilitate the exercise of core functions of government such as law-making, financial management and administration, and executive leadership. Capable governments attract investment, create opportunities, and effectively support their citizens.

2013–2014 Budgetary Financial Resources (Dollars)

Planned Spending Actual Spending Difference
(Actual minus planned)
The difference between Planned and Actual Spending largely reflects internal re-allocations from the First Nation Governments sub-program to the Institutions and Organizations sub-program.
424,533,948 410,479,036 (14,054,912)

2013–2014 Human Resources (FTEs)

Planned Actual Difference
(Actual minus planned)
467.4 434.5 (32.9)

Performance Results

Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
* The General Assessment supports the management of funding agreements that have been negotiated between AANDC and funding recipients. Completed by AANDC staff, and then shared and discussed with recipients, the General Assessment provides an annual snapshot of the funding recipient's past performance. It also identifies strengths and emerging risks that may have an impact on how AANDC manages its transfer payments to the recipient.
Stable First Nation governments Percentage of First Nations scoring "Low Risk" on the Governance section of the General Assessment* 50% by March 31, 2014 76%

Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

Ongoing support through the Band Support Funding grant and Band Employee Benefits funding and investments through contributions and direct supports to communities, combined with a strategic focus on legislative development, led to significant advancements in governance capacity. AANDC's goal of supporting an integrated approach to community development reinforced joint work with Health Canada and other federal partners. With a focus on communities with a capacity development plan in place, the Department will leverage partnerships with federal, provincial and other potential funders to promote an integrated community-focused approach to capacity investments.

The Professional and Institutional Development Program provides strategic and targeted funding for developing and implementing capacity development plans (i.e. Management Action Plans, Strategic Plan). In 2013–2014, approximately $13.5 million supported governance capacity building initiatives. AANDC continued to work with Health Canada and other government departments to support capacity building activities identified in community capacity plans.

Regarding governance legislative development, Bill C-428 (Indian Act amendment and replacement Act) is a Private Member's Bill that was reinstated in the House of Commons from the previous session on October 16, 2013. The proposed Bill was amended by the House of Commons Standing Committee on Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development and adopted on November 20, 2013. Presently, Bill C-428 is awaiting a Second Reading in the Senate. On a general note, the Bill proposes, amongst other things, to remove the discretionary disallowance power of the Minister regarding enacted by-laws under section 81 of the Indian Act.

Sub-Program 1.1.2: Institutions and Organizations

Description

This sub-program supports a wide range of institutions and organizations at the local, regional and national level dedicated to the development and support of aboriginal governments. Funds are provided through contributions to organizations and institutions with demonstrated expertise in service delivery and professional development. Delivery of governance related programs and services and support to First Nation Governments in the exercise of their responsibilities form the basis for these activities. Capacity development of individuals, systems, governments and organizations recognizes and responds to differentiated levels of community/organizational development. Capacity development will target gaps identified through assessments with a view to facilitating movement along a development continuum. Organizational core funding is provided to national, regional and local bodies to participate in a wide range of policy fora and represent their respective constituent groups. Capable, accountable institutions and organizations strengthen the fabric of aboriginal governments across Canada, attract investment, and support Aboriginal participation in the Canadian Economy.

2013–2014 Budgetary Financial Resources (Dollars)

Planned Spending Actual Spending Difference
(Actual minus planned)
The difference between Planned and Actual Spending largely reflects internal re-allocations from the First Nation Governments sub-program to the Institutions and Organizations sub-program. Additional resources were also re-allocated during the year for policy engagement.
32,129,411 73,739,220 41,609,809

2013–2014 Human Resources (FTEs)

Planned Actual Difference
(Actual minus planned)
2.3 7.1 4.8

Performance Results

Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Increased governance capacity Percentage of First Nations scoring "Low Risk" on the Governance section of the General Assessment 50% by March 31, 2014 76%

Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

To support Aboriginal governments in the delivery of programs and services to their constituents, Canada continued to provide core operational funding to a number of national Aboriginal organizations: the First Nations Tax Commission, the First Nations Financial Management Board, the First Nations Finance Authority, and the Aboriginal Financial Officers Association of Canada. In 2013–2014, these organizations continued to promote capacity development in First Nations governments and Aboriginal groups and provide demonstrated technical expertise in the areas of financial management, taxation and public administration.

The Department continues to explore options to address the issues raised during the Legislative Review of the First Nations Fiscal Management Act.

Sub-Sub-Program 1.1.2.1: Service Delivery

Description

This sub-sub-program consists in providing funding to Tribal Councils by contribution agreements. Tribal Councils are funded to provide direct support to First Nations with respect to governance capacity as well as support regarding the administration of other specified programs and services, depending on the needs of their members.

2013–2014 Budgetary Financial Resources (Dollars)

Planned Spending Actual Spending Difference
(Actual minus planned)
0 31,839,029 31,839,029

2013–2014 Human Resources (FTEs)

Planned Actual Difference
(Actual minus planned)
0 0 0

Performance Results

Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Tribal Councils are accountable to their members for services provided Percentage of member First Nations scoring "Low Risk" 50% by March 31, 2014 76%
Percentage of Tribal Councils scoring "Low Risk" on the Governance section of the General Assessment 100% by March 31, 2014 96%

Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

In 2013–2014, AANDC prepared for a shift in Tribal Council funding away from the requirement to deliver specific advisory services, to directing resources toward more efficient and effective delivery of essential programs and services. To accommodate the reduced level of funding, the Tribal Council Funding program was redesigned to include: a simpler funding formula; incentives for First Nations to aggregate program delivery through Tribal Councils; reduced administrative burden; and more flexibility with regard to advisory services. The emphasis will be on core funding for member First Nations capacity development and major program delivery through a simplified system with funding incentives based on the number of First Nations represented and the number of major programs delivered.

The target for the percentage of Tribal Councils scoring "Low Risk" on the Governance section of the General Assessment was missed as the Department set an ambitious goal, striving for 100% for 2013–2014. Lessons learned will be gathered as the revised program comes into effect in 2014–2015.

Sub-Sub-Program 1.1.2.2: Professional Development

Description

Through this sub-sub-program, financial and technical support is provided to Institutions and First Nations providing expertise in Government Capacity related programs and services. For example, this includes contribution funding for institutions (i.e., First Nations Tax Commission, First Nations Management Board), to carry out their mandate as per specific legislation and/or policy. This sub-sub-program also includes the provision of training to First Nations with respect to conducting elections, by-law and election code development. Funding is provided to reimburse participants' travel in accordance with Treasury Board Secretariat directives.

2013–2014 Budgetary Financial Resources (Dollars)

Planned Spending Actual Spending Difference
(Actual minus planned)
13,659,875 12,307,888 (1,351,987)

2013–2014 Human Resources (FTEs)

Planned Actual Difference
(Actual minus planned)
1.1 0.1 (1.0)

Performance Results

Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Institutions implement their corporate plans on time Percentage of deliverables met on time, as per institutions' corporate plans 100% by March 31, 2014 100%
Governments and individuals have the governance capacity to implement their roles and responsibilities Percentage of First Nations scoring "Low Risk" on the Governance section of the General Assessment 50% by March 31, 2014 76%

Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

AANDC continues to undertake a thorough review of the Institutions' Corporate Plans on an annual basis, which includes going over 12 months of information on progress for objectives set out in the previous years' Corporate Plan. It is important for the Department to continue to ensure the inclusion of this information in the Corporate Plan cycle, as the formal year-end Annual Report requirement of the Institutions is not submitted until July. This is consistent with legislative requirements set out in the First Nations Fiscal Management Act. The Institutions continue to demonstrate their ability to deliver on their expected results.

The Department continues to explore ways to standardize the Corporate Plan and Annual Report review process, to ensure that information is being consistently included and assessed.

Sub-Sub-Program 1.1.2.3: Representative Organizations

Description

This sub-sub-program provides technical, process and financial support to national, regional and local bodies to participate in different fora and represent their respective groups. This support could take several forms such as advice on how to engage community members in the development of community plan, as contribution for engaging with the Department at the technical level on the development of a specific policy or legislation program.

2013–2014 Budgetary Financial Resources (Dollars)

Planned Spending Actual Spending Difference
(Actual minus planned)
18,469,536 29,592,303 11,122,767

2013–2014 Human Resources (FTEs)

Planned Actual Difference
(Actual minus planned)
1.2 7.0 5.8

Performance Results

Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Accountable representative organizations Percentage of organizations that submit accepted audited financial statements 100% by March 31, 2014 The results will be available in summer 2015, when all funding agreements have been put in place, and when all financial statements are filed.
Percentage of organizations holding an annual general assembly and producing an annual report for their members 100% by March 31, 2014 The results will be available after the review of Audited Financial Statements is completed in January 2015

Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

Review of Audited Financial Statements will be completed by January 2015. For this reason, performance analysis and results are currently not available.

Program 1.2: Co-operative Relationships

Description

The Co-operative Relationships Program contributes to The Government Strategic Outcome. It seeks reconciliation and the strengthening of the relationship between governments and Aboriginal groups through mutual respect, trust, understanding, shared responsibilities, accountability and dialogue. This program addresses constitutional and historic obligations, as well as good public policy by: negotiating and implementing agreements which achieve clarity with respect to law-making authority and the ownership, use and control of lands and resources; addressing specific claims; developing multi-partner processes in areas jointly identified by Aboriginal groups and the federal government; supporting effective and meaningful consultation with Aboriginal groups and their representation in federal policy and program development. Through relationships built on trust, respectful partnerships will be established which may ultimately help to contribute to the strengthening of the social, economic and cultural well-being of Aboriginal communities and ultimately more active participation and engagement in the broader Canadian society.

2013–2014 Budgetary Financial Resources (Dollars)

Main Estimates Planned Spending Total Authorities
Available for Use
Actual Spending
(Authorities used)
Difference
(Actual minus planned)
The difference between Planned Spending and Total Authorities primarily reflects incremental funding provided through Supplementary Estimates for the settlement of specific claims and for continuing implementation of Justice at Last: Specific Claims Action Plan. The difference between Total Authorities and Actual Spending primarily reflects the re-profiling of funding for specific claims not required in the fiscal year; funding not required in 2013–2014 has been reprofiled to future years when it will be available for the intended purpose. In addition, the difference reflects unspent funding for Treaty Related Measures.
396,521,554 396,521,554 990,390,491 485,123,423 88,601,869

2013–2014 Human Resources (FTEs)

Planned Actual Difference
(Actual minus planned)
358.4 338.6 (19.8)

Performance Results

Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Relationships between parties based on trust, respect, understanding, shared responsibilities, accountability, rights and dialogue Percentage of active negotiation tables 90% of activeFootnote 3 tables by March 31, 2014 92%

Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

Canada continues to promote section 35 rights in the Constitution Act 1982 through negotiating and implementing comprehensive claims agreements. The benefit of comprehensive claims agreements is greater legal certainty with respect to the use and ownership of land and resources and the reduction of barriers that impede development, which is in the interest of all Canadians. Where self-government provisions are included, agreements provide Aboriginal groups with opportunities to improve accountability and governance in key areas such as education, allowing for meaningful changes in their communities to improve quality of life.

In addition, the Department continues to focus on policy impediments identified in the 2012 results-based approach engagement process in order to help reach agreements more quickly. AANDC also continues to explore options other than reaching final treaty agreements and options to streamline government mandating and approval processes. Two rounds of engagement have been held to better inform the development of policy proposals for establishing a new formula-based approach to funding in support of Aboriginal self-government.

AANDC continues negotiations of Final Agreements on Self-Government with the Mohawk Council of Akwesasne and the Union of Ontario Indians, negotiation of an Agreement-in-Principle with the Whitecap First Nation and completion of work needed for the Sioux Valley Dakota Nation Governance Act, which received Royal Assent on March 4th, 2014.

2013–2014 Additional Highlights:

  • Canada continued ongoing Treaty Negotiations Process Revitalization work with the Province of British Columbia, the First Nations Summit and the British Columbia Treaty Commission.
  • AANDC continued to support departments/agencies in fulfilling Canada's duty to consult by adding content to the Aboriginal and Treaty Rights Information System (ATRIS) available to federal officials, strengthening its functionality and providing webinar training on its use. It became accessible to the public in September 2013. AANDC also continued to offer enhanced training on consultation and accommodation across the country, including tailored sessions for departments and regions. Regional federal networks led by regional consultation coordinators supported regional information sharing on rights and assertions but also on departmental approaches, common challenges and best practices.

Sub-Program 1.2.1: Negotiations of Claims and Self-Government

Description

Canada is committed to the negotiation of claims and self-government agreements as the best means for reconciling pre-existing Aboriginal rights with Crown sovereignty to the benefit of all Canadians. With the participation of provincial and territorial governments, Canada negotiates comprehensive treaties, sectoral agreements and stand-alone self-government agreements that provide Aboriginal groups with a solid foundation for self-determination and for the improvement of social, cultural and economic conditions within their communities.

2013–2014 Budgetary Financial Resources (Dollars)

Planned Spending Actual Spending Difference
(Actual minus planned)
The difference between Planned and Actual Spending reflects operational economies achieved across multiple negotiation tables and activities throughout 2013–2014, and internal re-allocations to other departmental priorities.
99,867,576 78,513,492 (21,354,084)

2013–2014 Human Resources (FTEs)

Planned Actual Difference
(Actual minus planned)
252.4 226.1 (26.3)

Performance Results

Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Certainty and clarity with respect to law-making authority and the ownership, use and control of land and resources Percentage of objectives reached as identified in the action plans 75% by March 31, 2014 92%

Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

Canada continues to negotiate Comprehensive Land Claims and Self-Government Agreements in order to provide certainty and clarity with respect to law-making authority and the ownership, use and control of land and resources. Through negotiations, agreements such as the self-government arrangement with the Sioux Valley Dakota Nation help promote improved living conditions in Aboriginal communities and foster a positive climate for investment and economic development. Such agreements also put in place governance regimes that are more transparent, accountable and responsive to community needs and direction.

2013–2014 additional highlights include:

  • Signature of the Acho-Dene-Koe Agreement-in-Principle on February 5, 2014
  • Successful ratification vote for the Deline Self-Government Final Self-Government Agreement in March 2014
  • Signature of the Akwesasne Agreement-in-Principle on November 4, 2013

AANDC also made considerable progress in negotiating comprehensive claims agreements under the British Columbia treaty process. For example:

  • The Yale Final Agreement was signed on April 11, 2013 and Royal Assent of the Yale First Nation Final Agreement Act was received on June 19, 2013.
  • Federal approval to sign Sliammon Final Agreement was granted on December 17, 2013 (the Final Agreement was ratified by Sliammon First Nation on July 10, 2012 and the Province of British Columbia on March 14, 2013).
  • The Wuikinuxv Agreement-in-Principle (AIP) was initialled on July 23, 2013. Te'mexw Treaty Association accepted the closing land/cash offer on October 29, 2013, and on November 26, 2013, the parties reached a negotiators' understanding on the AIP.

The three month Deline Final Self-Government Agreement ratification effort yielded a successful outcome. Corporate lessons learned from previous ratification experiences, including the critical importance of social media, were applied and positively reinforced by the Deline experience. The very compressed timeframe created issues that were challenging to manage, however, and it is recommended that a slightly longer timeframe (six to eight months) be considered for future ratification efforts.

To achieve targets, the Department focuses resources (both financial and human) on Negotiation Tables in order to attain results, or where appropriate, pursue the exploration of alternatives to address shared interests in a timely fashion. Although negotiation tables have always been subject to strategic planning, planning is now more explicitly integrated as resources are aligned to advance objectives, while taking into account emerging opportunities or risks.

The Evaluation of the Process for Negotiating Comprehensive Land Claims and Self-Government Agreements was completed in November 2013 and contained several key findings indicating that some elements of the process needed improvement. The recommendations suggest adopting a proactive policy approach to more effectively manage and respond to risks and strategically shape or influence the evolving legal framework, strengthening the approach to oversight and reporting and to table reporting, implementing systems to maintain documents and manage negotiations and coordinating ongoing monitoring of the efficiency and effectiveness of comprehensive land claims and self-government negotiations to improve results-based reporting.

Sub-Program 1.2.2: Specific Claims

Description

The Specific Claims sub-program contributes to the Co-operative Relationships Program. Specific Claims relate to the fulfilment of outstanding treaty and government's obligations towards First Nations for the administration of Indian reserve lands, band funds and other assets. The government made the resolution of specific claims a priority when it announced the Specific Claims Action Plan in 2007, and reiterated its commitment to resolve claims in the 2010 Speech from the Throne. Key activities include the assessment of the historical and legal facts of the claim, the negotiation of a settlement agreement if it has been determined that there is an outstanding lawful obligation, and payment of compensation monies to First Nations pursuant to the terms of a settlement agreement. Addressing and resolving specific claims expediently helps build relationships and provides justice to First Nation claimants and certainty for all Canadians.

2013–2014 Budgetary Financial Resources (Dollars)

Planned Spending Actual Spending Difference
(Actual minus planned)
The difference between Planned and Actual Spending is explained at the Program level. See Program 1.2 Cooperative Relationships.
267,107,136 389,675,277 122,568,141

2013–2014 Human Resources (FTEs)

Planned Actual Difference
(Actual minus planned)
47.2 76.7 29.5

Performance Results

Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Canada fulfils its long-standing obligations to First Nations arising out of treaties, and the administration of lands, band funds and other assets Percentage of claims under assessment addressed within legislated 3 years Claims in assessment: address 100% within 3 years by March 31, 2016 Canada has responded to First Nations within the 3 year operational framework for assessment period 100% of the time. In 2013–2014 Canada assessed 44 claims, 22 were accepted for negotiation and 22 were not. As of March 31, 2014 there were 92 claims in assessment.
Number of claims in negotiation addressed Claims in negotiations: continue to negotiate with 100% of claimants and make best efforts to negotiate settlements with First Nations within 3 years by March 31, 2016 Canada continues to negotiate 100% of claims accepted for negotiation and to make best efforts to negotiate them within the 3 year operational framework. There were 231 claims in negotiation as of March 31, 2014.

Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

All 2013–2014 specific claim targets were met. 100% of claim submissions were assessed within the three year operational framework. Canada is negotiating 100% of the 231 claims accepted for negotiation. In 2013–2014, Canada concluded 54 claims, including 15 claims settled through negotiated settlement agreements valued at $369,287,076.60.

The introduction of process streamlining measures, such as the use of templates and electronic communication tools, has supported achievement of performance targets.

To ensure the continued success of the implementation of the Justice at Last initiative, additional resources were secured to supplement the Specific Claims Settlement Fund and to support operational requirements. The Specific Claims Settlement Fund was augmented by $1.35 billion (over three years). The Specific Claims Settlement Fund increase and supplemental FTEs supported by additional operational resources ensure that claims are being addressed in a fair and timely manner and that funds are readily available to pay out settlement agreements and awards of the Specific Claims Tribunal. The total number of claims settled by negotiated agreement since Justice at Last was announced has risen to 108, with a value of approximately $2.1 billion.

The Summative Evaluation of the Specifics Claims Action Plan was completed in April 2013 and found that the Action Plan has put the Department on the right path to meeting the three-year timeframe for negotiations. The recommendations suggested a need to include a risk strategy in the risk assessment framework to better manage concluded claims, a strategy to allow better use of mediation services and development of mechanisms that support the Justice at Last initiative and Additions to Reserves process more effectively.

In response to the recommendations, AANDC has developed a Management Response and Action Plan, which is currently being implemented. Additionally, a specific claims Performance Measurement Strategy was developed, which gives the Specific Claims Branch better insight into its work flow to improve the way claims are resolved.

Going forward into 2014–2015, a review of the mandate, structure, efficiency and effectiveness of the Specific Claims Tribunal will be carried out. The results of this review may define, or re-define, some elements of the specific claims process.

Sub-Program 1.2.3: Inuit Relations

Description

Inuit Relations sub-program fosters and maintains constructive working relationships with representative Inuit organizations and governments and is committed to working cooperatively with these organizations, as well as with provincial and territorial governments, to address issues of shared concern. It promotes and facilitates close working relationships between the Government of Canada and representative organizations to enhance their capacity in order for them to play an effective role in federal policy development processes. Partnerships are developed and financial contributions provided in order to support effective governance and research as well as to assist the organizations in the development of strategies, policy options, position papers and discussion papers in priority areas. Funds are also provided to facilitate Inuit participation in key events and processes where Inuit perspectives are beneficial. This sub-program also raises awareness of Inuit issues within the federal government and offers workshops and resource material to other government departments.

2013–2014 Budgetary Financial Resources (Dollars)

<
Planned Spending Actual Spending Difference
(Actual minus planned)
The difference between Planned and Actual Financial and human resources primarily reflects changes in the scope of work of the Inuit Relations Directorate as well as internal re-allocations to better align human resources between the Government Strategic Outcome and Internal Services.
2,564,054 455,256 (2,108,798)

2013–2014 Human Resources (FTEs)

Planned Actual Difference
(Actual minus planned)
10.7 1.8 (8.9)

Performance Results

Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Long term sustainable partnership with Inuit/Federal/Provincial/Territorial bodies/private/not-for-profit organizations that address Inuit priorities The number of partnerships created with Inuit/Federal/Provincial/Territorial bodies/private/not-for-profit organizations Increase in comparison to 2011–2012 baseline by March 31, 2014. (The 2011–2012 baseline was 7) 8

Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

Inuit Relations increased the number of partnerships created only slightly, by 1, moving from 7 fora to 8 overall. This increase saw the addition of the Nunavut Arts Funders Tri-Level Committee to the list of partnerships, which reflects joint work with Canada Council for the Arts on Inuit Arts Economy. Key joint processes have continued in all fora and progress has been achieved namely on Inuit Housing issues and with the Inuit Art Foundation to continue operations and to advance on the transfer of the Igloo Tag Program from the federal government to an Inuit body.

Sub-Program 1.2.4: Consultation and Engagement

Description

This sub-program provides technical, process and financial support to internal and external stakeholders to maintain co-operative relationships with Aboriginal groups and their representatives. This support could take several forms such as advice on how to engage community members in the development of a community plan, contributions to a representative organization for core operations (administration, elections, finance), contribution for engaging with the Department at the technical level on the development of a specific policy or legislation; engagement with Aboriginal groups and representatives and with industry or assistance to federal departments and agencies in fulfilling the Crown's duty to consult.

2013–2014 Budgetary Financial Resources (Dollars)

Planned Spending Actual Spending Difference
(Actual minus planned)
The difference between Planned and Actual Spending reflects economies achieved across all consultation and engagement activities, and internal re-allocations to other departmental priorities.
7,919,373 4,361,070 (3,558,303)

2013–2014 Human Resources (FTEs)

Planned Actual Difference
(Actual minus planned)
48.1 26.1 (22.0)

Performance Results

Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Assistance provided in fulfilling the Crown's legal duty to consult and, where appropriate, accommodate Number of initiatives/projects/activities where advice/assistance given by Consultation and Accommodation Unit supported the fulfillment of the Crown's duty to consult departmentally and across government 7000 projects/initiatives/activities where advice given supported fulfillment of duty by March 31, 2014 10,788
Engagement with stakeholders influences the development of policies and programs The degree to which recipient input and advice is being used to shape departmental policies and programs Establish target by March 31, 2013 Results from wide consultations with recipients through 2013–2014 were used as the basis to form the Aboriginal Representative Organizations (ARO) funding policy for 2014–2015. The target will be established in light of these consultations moving forward.

Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

The target set was exceeded in that advice given to over 10,000 projects/initiatives/activities supported the fulfillment of the Crown's duty to consult, including:

  • Delivering 45 training events (in-person and webinar) for using the Aboriginal and Treaty Rights Information System (ATRIS) involving approximately 400 federal officials. The public site was visited approximately 4,700 times since its launch in September 2013. The Consultation Information Service enhanced the system content, including integrating summaries of 30 Supreme Court of Canada decisions related to section 35 rights. When Canada's web site was launched, ATRIS was selected from among all federal systems to appear on page 1 of the site. This provided an opportunity to reach more Canadians.
  • Providing advanced training to about 325 officials to help strengthen their capacity to integrate the duty into their departmental activities. First joint training held with Nova Scotia.
  • Strengthening regional cooperation, including developing and implementing cooperative arrangements with provinces/territories and Aboriginal groups. Protocol evaluations were begun of protocols in Québec and Nova Scotia which will contribute to improvements in implementation and negotiation of future agreements. Funding provided to support existing consultation protocols contributed to the ability of Aboriginal groups to participate in federal consultations in a meaningful and timely manner, and to reduce the number of duplicative consultation interactions.
  • Continuing to support consultation related to major resource projects and help other departments developing operational policies to improve Aboriginal consultation and engagement in project reviews. The focus was on improving measures for earlier Aboriginal and proponent engagement. The Department supported the work of the Special Federal Representative on West Coast Energy Infrastructure.
  • Continuing to share information with other federal departments and agencies through an Interdepartmental Team on policy approaches, tools and best practices.
  • Leading policy development to clarify policy issues, including accommodation, while initiating development of the third edition of federal officials' guidelines for consultation and accommodation.

The focus of FTEs in the Consultation Information Service shifted to strengthening the Aboriginal and Treaty Rights Information System content, to foster efficient use of resources. Travel for regional events (e.g. interdepartmental networks) was minimized by having Regional Consultation Coordinators in the regions and, when travel was required, several meetings were scheduled to optimize travel expenditures. Outreach and relationship-building activities with Aboriginal groups were planned to take advantage of existing events where possible. Some policy development and operational activities were adjusted to reflect variances, including streamlining efforts to priority areas such as guidelines development and consultation on major projects.

Sub-Program 1.2.5: Métis and Non-Status Indian Relations and Métis Rights Management

Description

The Métis and Non-Status Indian Relations sub-program contributes to the Government Strategic Outcome. This sub-program aims to enhance the capacity, legitimacy, stability and democratic accountability of Métis and Non-Status Indian organizations to: represent their members; and have the capacity to build and expand partnerships with federal and provincial governments and with the private sector. Furthermore, the sub-program also works with representative Aboriginal organizations that have substantial Métis membership numbers to develop objectively verifiable membership systems for Métis members and harvesters in accordance with the 2003 Supreme Court Powley decision. In all, the objectives are to enhance the capacity of these organizations to find practical ways to improve the self-reliance, and social and economic conditions of Métis, and Non-Status Indians so that ultimately they can better realize their full potential within Canadian society, while assisting in the reconciliation of Métis Aboriginal rights within the Canadian Federation in a collaborative and practical manner.

2013–2014 Budgetary Financial Resources (Dollars)

Planned Spending Actual Spending Difference
(Actual minus planned)
The difference between Planned and Actual Spending reflects the Government's realignment of project funding available to Aboriginal Representative Organizations (a 20% reduction in Grants and Contributions) and internal re-allocations to other departmental priorities. The difference between Planned and Actual human resources reflects a re-allocation of resources from the Internal Services program to the Métis and Non-Status Indian Relations and Métis Right sub-program.
19,063,415 12,118,328 (6,945,087)

2013–2014 Human Resources (FTEs)

Planned Actual Difference
(Actual minus planned)
0 7.9 7.9

Performance Results

Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Relationships between parties based on trust, respect, understanding, shared responsibilities, accountability and dialogue Number of engagement sessions with Métis and Non-Status Indian organizations and provinces/key departments 4 by March 31, 2014 25

Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

In 2013–2014, AANDC engaged with Métis and Non-Status Indian Aboriginal Representative Organizations (ARO) via meetings, ARO annual general assemblies and board meetings. AANDC met primarily with the two National Aboriginal Organizations that represent Métis and Non-Status Indians: the Métis National Council and the Congress of Aboriginal Peoples, and their affiliate ARO. Of note, the Government of Canada and the Métis National Council renewed their 2008 Métis Nation Protocol and signed a new Governance and Financial Accountability Accord in April 2013.

In 2013–2014, AANDC continued to maintain tripartite partnerships with provinces that have Métis ARO: British Columbia, Alberta, Saskatchewan, Manitoba and Ontario. Discussions focused on funding, future initiatives and federal/provincial links to Métis and Non-Status Indian ARO. As part of the Powley initiative, which is due to sunset on March 31, 2015, draft Métis membership standards were developed in collaboration with Métis ARO and the Canadian Standards Association. These draft standards are intended to form the basis for a consistent approach to the registration of Métis people and issuance of harvester cards.

The Evaluation of the Federal Interlocutor's Contribution Program (FICP) and Powley Initiative was completed in September 2013 and contained key findings indicating that some areas of the program needed improvement. The recommendations suggested improving the clarity of objectives and roles and responsibilities, developing a comprehensive Performance Measurement Strategy for the FICP and Powley Initiative and examining the proportion of funding provided to internal operations relative to contributions. In response to the recommendations, AANDC has developed a Management Response and Action Plan that is being implemented in 2014–2015.

Program 1.3: Treaty Management

Description

The Treaty Management Program contributes to The Government Strategic Outcome. This program aims to create and maintain ongoing partnerships to support both historic and modern-treaties to fulfill Canada's legal obligations. This program supports First Nation and Inuit communities in articulating their interests, participating in land and resource development and management, where applicable, and demonstrating the importance of treaties and the treaty relationship between the Crown and Aboriginal people. This is achieved by honouring Canada's obligations as set out in final agreements, improving relationships between Canada and Aboriginal peoples, and improving the relationships between Canada and Historic Treaties First Nations. Creating and maintaining partnerships that honour historic and modern treaties contributes to the strengthened, healthy and sustainable First Nation and Inuit communities and ultimately supports them to optimize their participation in the broader Canadian society, thus benefitting all Canadians.

2013–2014 Budgetary Financial Resources (Dollars)

Main Estimates Planned Spending Total Authorities
Available for Use
Actual Spending
(Authorities used)
Difference
(Actual minus planned)
The difference between Planned Spending and Total Authorities primarily reflects incremental funding provided through Supplementary Estimates for the renewal of the Nunatsiavut Government Fiscal Financing Agreement and to fund Nunatsiavut Government health programs. The difference between Total Authorities and Actual Spending primarily reflects the deferral of funding for special claims. This deferred funding that was not required in 2013–2014 has been reprofiled to 2014–2015 when it will be available for the intended purpose.
713,591,894 713,591,894 718,050,234 715,832,560 2,240,666

2013–2014 Human Resources (FTEs)

Planned Actual Difference
(Actual minus planned)
78.4 66.9 (11.5)

Performance Results

Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Creation and maintenance of ongoing partnerships to support historic and modern-treaty structures Historic Treaties
Increased percentage of public understanding of identified Historic Treaties in Manitoba and Saskatchewan
Historic Treaties
Increase in general knowledge in comparison to the previous survey
The provincially led survey that measured public understanding is no longer taking place. An increase in public understanding was derived by the outreach activities by Treaty Commissions in Saskatchewan and Manitoba and the Office of the Treaty, including over 65 schools visited and 4,000 people reached.
Modern Treaties
Annual reports, tripartite committee and Board meetings to implement the treaties
Modern Treaties
1 annual report and 3 tripartite treaty implementation committee meetings for each modern-treaty per year by March 31, 2014
44 implementation committee meetings
6 annual reports
Board meetings as requested or required by the treaty 1 Board meeting requested and held
Board support funding provided All board funding was transferred

Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

The Office of the Treaty Commissioner in Saskatchewan and the Treaty Relations Commission of Manitoba continued building on their successes and provided public awareness, facilitation and research related to pre-1975 treaties. Both Commissions' mandates have been extended to March 2016.

The Office of the Treaty Commissioner in Saskatchewan and the Treaty Relations Commission of Manitoba were able to continue increasing participation in their initiatives and visits to their websites. The Speaker's Bureau remains popular, with over 65 schools visited and 4000 people reached.

In Saskatchewan, participation in the Shelter and Skills Development project tripled to 100 people, 550 teachers were trained as Treaty Catalyst Teachers and 300 RCMP officers participated in Aboriginal Perceptions Training. In Manitoba, 32 schools were visited, 200 resource kits were distributed and over 35 partnerships were established with private sector groups and municipal and other non-profit groups.

In terms of modern treaties, goals and priorities established in 2013–2014 have largely been achieved. Ongoing partnerships to support relationships and structures were developed and maintained through leading and attending Implementation Committees with each treaty partner, holding regional caucus meetings with other federal government departments and agencies and attending federal steering committee meetings to discuss fulfilling federal government obligations within modern treaties.

Six Annual Reports on activities of signatories to comprehensive land claims and self-government agreements were tabled in Parliament. However, there are currently 11 Annual Reports overdue, with 4 of these close to being tabled in Parliament. This target is behind due to the extensive collaboration process needed to complete each report. Each of the 3 tripartite parties contributes to the process. In 2013–2014, new Annual Report Guidelines were created to streamline the process of producing the reports and tabling them in Parliament. In the past year there has been a successful effort in relieving the backlog of overdue reports.

Nisga'a and Tsawwassen negotiations are ongoing in anticipation of the March 2015 conclusion of the current Fiscal Financing Agreement. The current Financial Transfer Agreement for Carcross/Tagish in the Yukon was extended to March 2015 to give the parties more time to resolve the current dispute. Seven other Yukon First Nations continue negotiating in anticipation of the March 2015 expiration of their fiscal financing agreements. Northwest Territory agreements have been extended until all negotiations for new fiscal agreements have concluded and renewal negotiations in Nunavut are underway.

Finally, the collaboration and training of other government departments and agencies are ongoing for both the Treaty Obligation monitoring System and for CLCA.net.

Sub-Program 1.3.1: Implementation of Modern-Treaty Obligations

Description

The fulfillment of modern treaty obligations is a priority. The successful implementation of modern treaties obligations builds on the certainty created by negotiating and settling agreements. Funding for implementation of Comprehensive Land Claim Agreements is provided through a grant authority to cover one-time statutory payments, and a grant authority to support implementation activities required by negotiated final agreements.

2013–2014 Budgetary Financial Resources (Dollars)

Planned Spending Actual Spending Difference
(Actual minus planned)
401,346,850 394,587,777 (6,759,073)

2013–2014 Human Resources (FTEs)

Planned Actual Difference
(Actual minus planned)
62.5 55.0 (7.5)

Performance Results

Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Canada honours all of its obligations as set out in final agreements Percentage of federal obligations implemented as per the agreements 75% completed on one-time obligations by March 31, 2014 84% completed one-time obligations (the remaining 16% are not yet due)

Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

This target has been met with the completion of 84% of all one-time obligations as set out in these Agreements. Implementation committees and regional caucuses have met regularly. Developing and maintaining positive relationships and partnerships have helped in the development of goals and implementation of agreements that support collaboration among federal government departments and agencies. AANDC continues its effort to ensure tools and resources are available for federal implementers.

Work was done to assess which obligations could be completed within fiscal year 2013–2014 and which could be appropriately deferred without breaching any legal requirements. Some implementation activities are better addressed at the regional level and additional roles they may have been able to assume was discussed. All travel expenditures were closely monitored as well to ensure that resources were absolutely necessary and several meetings were scheduled during these times for best use of funds. Implementation Branch continued to work closely with Human Resources to address outstanding vacancies and plans to fill them as soon as possible.

The Evaluation of the Impacts of Comprehensive Land Claims and Self-Government Agreements was completed in November 2013 and found that these agreements have put in place structures for governance, program and services, land and resource management and economic development. The recommendations suggested improving monitoring of the implementation and impact of modern treaties. In response to the recommendations, AANDC has developed a Management Response and Action Plan, which will be completed by 2015–2016.

Sub-Program 1.3.2: Management of Treaty Relationships

Description

The management of treaty relationships focuses on enhancing relationships between Canada and various implementation bodies, treaties commissions and tables, or Aboriginal governments through mutual exploration of historic treaties issues. The management of modern treaty relationships also focuses on working with Canada's internal stakeholders in fulfilling Canada's legal obligations set out in modern treaties. These are essential to the health and well-being of Aboriginal communities and promoting capital infrastructure investments and private/public Aboriginal partnerships. Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Canada has contribution authorities to support the various implementation bodies (i.e., surface rights boards, tribunals, etc.), negotiation tables and Treaty Commissions. Grants and contributions are being transferred to representative parties that oversee the settlements.

2013–2014 Budgetary Financial Resources (Dollars)

Planned Spending Actual Spending Difference
(Actual minus planned)
311,355,044 321,193,907 9,838,863

2013–2014 Human Resources (FTEs)

Planned Actual Difference
(Actual minus planned)
15.9 11.9 (4.0)

Performance Results

Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Improved relationships between Canada and Aboriginal entities created to support treaties Effectiveness of Self-Government and Land Claims Agreements Comparison against 2009 findings 75% renewed entities by March 31, 2014 (The next Audit is not until 2014 so there are no new findings) The provincially led survey that measured the public understanding is no longer taking place.
Improved relationships between Canada and Historic Treaties First Nations Increased percentage of public understanding of identified Historic Treaties discussions issues Comparison against 2009 baseline findings in Manitoba and Saskatchewan by March 31, 2014 The provincially led survey that measured public understanding is no longer taking place. Since the performance can no longer be measured by this identifier, a new performance management strategy will be developed for this expected result. An increase in public understanding was generated through outreach activities by Treaty Commissions in Saskatchewan and Manitoba and the Office of the Treaty, including over 65 schools visited and 4,000 people reached.

Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

The surveys conducted by provincial governments that allowed the measurement of public perception on treaties and treaty relationships are no longer taking place. For this reason, a new performance plan will be developed in 2014–2015 to ensure that this activity is properly measured.

The Office of the Treaty Commissioner in Saskatchewan and the Treaty Relations Commission of Manitoba continued to increase participation in their initiatives and visits to their websites. The Speaker's Bureau remains popular with over 65 schools visited and 4,000 people reached.

In Saskatchewan, participation in the Shelter and Skills Development project tripled to 100 people, 550 teachers were trained as Treaty Catalyst TeachersFootnote 4 and 300 RCMP officers participated in Aboriginal Perceptions Training. In Manitoba, 32 schools were visited, 200 resource kits were distributed and over 35 partnerships were established with private sector groups and municipal and other non-profit groups.

Sub-Program 1.3.3: Management of Other Negotiated Settlements

Description

The management of negotiated settlements focuses on those claims that did not meet the criteria set for comprehensive or specific land claims but were settled on moral grounds as opposed to strictly legal and as such, created new rights, responsibilities or an ongoing relationship. AANDC uses a specially sought grant authority to manage negotiated settlement payments to the representative group/committee that oversees the settlements through contributions and or grants. AANDC is fulfilling the negotiated settlements as per the agreements with the First Nations.

2013–2014 Budgetary Financial Resources (Dollars)

Planned Spending Actual Spending Difference
(Actual minus planned)
The difference between Planned and Actual Spending largely reflects funding reprofiled from 2013–2014 to 2014–2015.
890,000 50,876 (839,124)

2013–2014 Human Resources (FTEs)

Planned Actual Difference
(Actual minus planned)
0 0 0

Performance Results

Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Effective processes for managing treaty relationships Percentage of Canada obligations fulfilled as per agreements 75% completion of one-time obligations There were no other negotiated settlements in 2013–2014

Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

There were no other negotiated settlements in 2013–2014.

Strategic Outcome: The People

Individual, family and community well-being for First Nations and Inuit

Program 2.1: Education

Description

The Education Program contributes to The People Strategic Outcome. It aims to support First Nation and Inuit students in the achievement of education outcomes that are comparable to other Canadians. Such achievement is key to enhancing their participation in the labour market and their future success. AANDC has the principal role for elementary and secondary education for First Nations students ordinarily resident on-reserve. It also provides financial supports to eligible First Nations and Inuit students in Post-Secondary education. The focus of these programming efforts is to support students in their academic progression through elementary and secondary school, to provide appropriate learning environments with culturally relevant education programs and services; and to increase their participation in the labour market. Better outcomes and increased participation in the economy benefits all Canadians.

2013–2014 Budgetary Financial Resources (Dollars)

Main Estimates Planned Spending Total Authorities
Available for Use
Actual Spending
(Authorities used)
Difference
(Actual minus planned)
The difference between Planned Spending and Total Authorities relates primarily to incremental funding provided through Canada's Economic Action Plan 2013/Supplementary Estimates to support post-secondary education for First Nations and Inuit students and to promote business studies among Aboriginal students. In addition, funding was reallocated to implement the Education Information System.
1,761,149,545 1,761,149,545 1,776,306,381 1,775,804,549 14,655,004

2013–2014 Human Resources (FTEs)

Planned Actual Difference
(Actual minus planned)
268.9 267.8 (1.1)

Performance Results

Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
* 2011–2012 is the most recent year for which complete data is available.
First Nations and Inuit students achieve levels of education comparable to other Canadians Percentage of First Nation students ordinarily resident on-reserve who graduated from high school Increase year-after-year The 2011–2012 high school graduation rate is 48.5%.*
This rate is higher than reported in previous years because of improvements to student data collection and calculation methodology. For example, it excludes students who left high school for reasons other than graduation.
Number of First Nations and Inuit students funded through the Post-Secondary Student Support Program (PSSSP) and number of First Nations and Inuit PSSSP students who graduate with a post-secondary degree/diploma/certificate (by age-group, gender and region) Data for this indicator will begin to be collected in 2012–2013 The results will be available in November 2014

Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

The academic outcomes of First Nation students ordinarily resident on reserve require improvement to ensure an increase in graduation rates and to provide them with the opportunity to acquire the skills that they need to further their goals, enter the labour market and be full participants in a strong Canadian economy.

To improve elementary and secondary education outcomes, and build on recommendations from recent reports (the final report of the National Panel on Elementary and Secondary Education, the Senate Standing Committee on Aboriginal People and the Office of the Auditor General reports), AANDC conducted an intensive consultation process from December 2012 to April 2013 with First Nations and stakeholders across the country on developing a proposed First Nation Education Act (later named the proposed First Nations Control of First Nations Education Act) in advance of its introduction in Parliament in April 2014.

Following the resignation of the National Chief and resolutions adopted by the Assembly of First Nations Chiefs in Assembly in May 2014 and July 2014, the Bill has been placed on hold.

AANDC continues to invest in funding to improve access to post-secondary education opportunities for First Nation and Inuit students, including funding to assist eligible students with post-secondary costs. AANDC also provides resources to post-secondary institutions for designing and developing college and university level courses for First Nation and Inuit students through the Post-Secondary Partnerships Program.

Sub-Program 2.1.1: Elementary and Secondary Education

Description

This sub-program supports First Nations, Band Councils, Tribal Councils or regional First Nation education organizations in providing eligible on-reserve students with education services comparable to those of the province in which the reserve is located. Funding is used for teachers' salaries, instructional services in on-reserve schools (band operated and the seven federal schools), and reimbursement of tuition costs for on-reserve students attending provincial schools. Also, it provides student support services (e.g. transportation) and helps to enhance education services (e.g. curriculum and language development, teacher recruitment and retention, community and parents engagement in education, and Information Communication Technology capacity). It also supports schools' access to resources for learners with identified high cost special needs. Resources are provided for longer term improvements in education outcomes by focusing on school success planning, student learning and performance assessment and establishing new or advancing existing tripartite education partnerships with First Nations and provinces. In addition, the Elementary and Secondary Education sub-program also supports culturally appropriate education through the cultural education centers as well as provides supports for First Nations and Inuit youth to transition to the workplace and post-secondary education.

2013–2014 Budgetary Financial Resources (Dollars)

Planned Spending Actual Spending Difference
(Actual minus planned)
1,425,982,949 1,434,536,321 8,553,372

2013–2014 Human Resources (FTEs)

Planned Actual Difference
(Actual minus planned)
The difference between Planned and Actual human resources reflects an internal re-allocation of resources from the Elementary and Secondary Education sub-program to the Post-Secondary Education sub-program to more accurately assign resources.
267.6 252.1 (15.5)

Performance Results

Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
* All recipients of the First Nation Student Success Program must administer identical standardized tests to those utilized by the provincial ministry of education to assess student outcomes. Though the long-term goal is to approach provincial equivalence, the short- and medium-term goals are to demonstrate incremental improvements in achievement as a result of new program investments. These data provide a baseline for future comparisons.
First Nations students progress in their elementary and secondary education The percentage of students on-reserve who meet or exceed standard tests for reading, writing and numeracy (and science where measured provincially) in the province of reference at the testing interval adopted by that province, referenced by gender and province Short Term: Target development data collection began in September 2011
Long term: Equivalent to provincial standards
Below are the results of First Nation students on-reserve who participated in provincial standardized testing with details outlined in the text below.* These assessments took place in 2013–2014
Literacy, Atlantic: M: 65% F: 70%
Numeracy, Atlantic: M: 16% F: 54%
Literacy, Ontario: M: 21% F: 32%
Numeracy, Ontario: M: 18% F: 20%
Literacy, Manitoba: M: 53% F: 65%
Numeracy, Manitoba: M: 59% F: 50%
Literacy, Alberta: M: 28% F: 36%
Numeracy, Alberta: M: 21% F: 19%
Learning environments with appropriate education programs and support services are in place Regional AANDC elementary and secondary education funding for First Nations ordinarily on reserve equitable to provincial funding levels Development in 2013–2014 of kindergarten to grade 12 proposed funding mechanisms to ensure stable, predictable and sustainable funding for First Nations elementary and secondary education Policy and recommendations are on hold pending the outcome of Bill C-33.

Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

This is the first year in which data for students ordinarily resident on-reserve was provided for every province through the First Nations Student Success Program. The numeracy and literacy rates presented in the above table will provide a baseline to which future results will be compared. The data reported here is published as provided by First Nations recipients only for students who were tested. Provincial assessments are administered at selected grade levels, unique to each province (e.g., grade 3, 6 and 9). Calculations combine all students in all grades who were tested and provincial percentages were tabulated using a consistent national methodology. To meaningfully measure improvement, a given cohort of students should be tracked across testing intervals. For national consistency and privacy concerns, percentages are generated using all students in all grades that were tested, subdivided by gender. As such, data may not be comparable to provincial rates at this time due to different tabulation methodologies by province. In addition, Saskatchewan and Québec do not have standardised assessments. In British Columbia, assessment results are reported as outlined in the Tripartite Education Framework Agreement (TEFA). The 2013–2014 data have not yet been provided to the Department.

To help ensure readiness for the new First Nations education system, AANDC also implemented the Strong Schools, Successful Students Initiative (Canada's Economic Action Plan 2012 investments of $100 million over 3 years) through the First Nation Student Success Program (FNSSP) and the Education Partnership Program (EPP). In February of 2014, the National Selection Committee completed their proposal assessment and recommended 28 projects for funding in 2014–2015 under EPP and FNSSP. Funding through these programs supported the development and implementation of school success plans, student learning assessments and performance measurement systems, as well as implementation of joint initiatives between regional First Nations organizations, provincial school boards and Ministries of Education. Canada's Economic Action Plan 2012 targeted investments also supported early literacy initiatives and structural readiness activities to strengthen organizational capacity in core areas such as governance and leadership, parental/community involvement, planning/performance measurement and risk management, financial management, human resource management and organizational planning.

Sub-Program 2.1.2: Post-Secondary Education

Description

The objective of the Post-Secondary Education sub-program is to help increase access and enable success in post-secondary education for eligible First Nation and Inuit students. The sub-program provides funding to Band Councils, Tribal Councils or regional First Nations education organizations to assist eligible students with the cost of tuition fees, books, travel, and living expenses (when applicable). It provides financial support to eligible First Nation and Inuit students for university and college entrance preparation programs, offered in Canadian post-secondary institutions, to enable them to attain the academic level required for entrance to degree and diploma credit programs. Resources are also available to post-secondary education institutions for the design and development of college and university level courses for First Nation and Inuit students, as well as research and development on First Nation and Inuit education.

2013–2014 Budgetary Financial Resources (Dollars)

Planned Spending Actual Spending Difference
(Actual minus planned)
335,166,596 341,268,228 6,101,632

2013–2014 Human Resources (FTEs)

Planned Actual Difference
(Actual minus planned)
The difference between Planned and Actual human resources reflect an internal re-allocation of resources from the Elementary and Secondary Education sub-program to the Post-Secondary Education sub-program to more accurately assign resources.
1.3 15.7 14.4

Performance Results

Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
First Nations and Inuit post-secondary students progress in their program of study Percentage of Post-Secondary Student Support Program (PSSSP)-funded students who completed their academic year and were funded the next academic year:
— Percentage of students who continued in their program of study;
— Percentage of students who changed programs; and
— Percentage of students who changed institutions.
TBD
Target in development — data collection commences August 2013
The results will be available in November 2014
Percentage of First Nations and Inuit students, funded through PSSSP, who continue beyond the first year of their program of study TBD
Target in development — data collection commences August 2013
The results will be available in November 2014
Supported First Nations and Inuit students participate in post-secondary education Percentage of University and College Entrance Program participants who transition to a post-secondary program TBD
Target in development — data collection commences August 2013
The results will be available in November 2014

Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

The government invested more than $322 million in funding to support post-secondary education for First Nation and Inuit students through the Post-Secondary Education (PSE) Program, which supported over 22,000 students in 2013–2014.

AADNC also funded Indspire, an organization with a proven record of success in promoting and investing in Aboriginal post-secondary education. Over and above the $817,000 of annual funding to Indspire, Canada's Economic Action Plan 2013 provided $10 million over two years to provide post-secondary scholarships and bursaries for First Nations and Inuit students.

AANDC reviewed and redesigned the Indian Studies Support Program (ISSP) to become the Post-Secondary Partnerships Program (PSPP) and changed the 2014–2015 Program guidelines accordingly to allow First Nations and Inuit students to benefit more effectively from courses designed and delivered to respond to their communities' needs and prepare them to join the labour market and be successful in the 21st-century economy. The revised guidelines also require greater performance measurement reporting from recipients and provide information on proposal assessment criteria to help candidates apply to the program.

Also, Canada's Economic Action Plan 2013 committed $5 million over five years for Cape Breton University's Purdy Crawford Chair in Aboriginal Business Studies to encourage Aboriginal students to take business courses. The investment will be contingent on the Purdy Crawford Chair securing matching funding from the private sector.

Program 2.2: Social Development

Description

The Social Development Program contributes to The People Strategic Outcome. Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Canada funds five social programs that aim to assist First Nation individuals and communities to become more self-sufficient; protect individuals and families at risk of violence; provide prevention supports that allow individuals and families to better care for their children; and support greater participation in the labour market. This program assists First Nations men, women and children in achieving greater independence and self-sufficiency in First Nations communities across Canada. It does so by flowing funds to First Nations, provincial representatives and others who provide on-reserve residents and Yukon First Nations with individual and family services that are developed and implemented in collaboration with partners. These services help First Nation communities meet basic and special needs; support employability and attachment to the workforce; and ensure that individuals and families are safe. First Nations that are engaged in advancing their own development are better equipped to leverage opportunities made available by their communities and actively contribute to the broader Canadian economy and society.

2013–2014 Budgetary Financial Resources (Dollars)

Main Estimates Planned Spending Total Authorities
Available for Use
Actual Spending
(Authorities used)
Difference
(Actual minus planned)
The difference between Planned Spending and Total Authorities relates primarily to re-allocation of resources, mainly from Community Infrastructure, to meet increased demand for social development programs and services. In addition, incremental funding was provided through Canada's Economic Action Plan 2013/Supplementary Estimates for the Family Violence Prevention Program and for case-management systems and training for on-reserve Income Assistance clients.
1,614,979,902 1,614,979,902 1,724,806,452 1,723,318,991 108,339,089

2013–2014 Human Resources (FTEs)

Planned Actual Difference
(Actual minus planned)
133.3 137.2 3.9

Performance Results

Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
First Nations men, women and children are engaged in advancing their participation in the labour market and take advantage of available opportunities Percentage of communities using innovative community-driven approaches to program delivery Year-over-year increasing trend in number of communities with innovative community-driven approaches to program delivery 70 out of 550 (13%)
(This is the first year collecting and reporting this indicator.)

Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

Over 2013–2014 the Department used various innovative measures to encourage First Nation individuals to take advantage of opportunities in the labour market and in their communities. Building on the Active Measures work done in previous years through Income Assistance Reform, AANDC is working with First Nations to improve the on-reserve Income Assistance Program help ensure First Nation youth can access the skills and training they need to secure employment. Enhanced Service Delivery is providing support to First Nation communities to create the service delivery capacity necessary to effectively support eligible youth as they participate in training and transition to employment. Out of 550 First Nation Communities, 70 started implementing Income Assistance Reform as of January 31, 2014. Another 65 Ontario First Nation communities are already delivering the employment assistance portion of Ontario Works being funded through the federal/provincial 1965 Welfare Agreement. The reform involves addressing service delivery capacity at the community level, facilitating access to pre-employment and employment supports for Income Assistance beneficiaries and improving overall program management while supporting the most vulnerable members. Income Assistance Reform is incremental and the plan is to add additional communities over the coming three years. Given the late start in fiscal year 2013–2014, First Nation communities are in the initial phases of putting in place their case management models, hiring staff and undertaking client assessments.

The First Nation Child and Family Services Information Management System, introduced in April 2013, facilitates effective ongoing program management and reporting on program performance. The system enables the production of aggregate data reports and demonstrates overall program performance while informing improved policy decisions. The Department is working with interested agencies to further automate data entry and improve the system through sound project planning and management. The project remains on time and on budget, and continues to meet both Treasury Board planning requirements, as well as the Department's overall business needs.

Since April 1, 2012, the Department has been the federal lead in the British Columbia First Nations Data Governance Initiative. A Tripartite Agreement was signed in February 2014 by the governments of Canada, British Columbia and First Nations, to support BC First Nations' move towards a model of First Nation community development through data governance and systems transformation (e.g. program management, Information Management/Information Technology, research, standards). In 2013–2014, 11 communities participated in data mapping activities for several social programs, including income assistance and assisted living. Furthermore, a number of initiatives to strengthen how AANDC and funding recipients manage social programs are underway, including an enhanced effort towards program compliance.

Sub-Program 2.2.1: Income Assistance

Description

The Income Assistance sub-program provides funding to assist eligible individuals and families who are ordinarily resident on-reserve with basic and special needs services that are aligned with those provided to other residents of the reference province/territory. The sub-program also funds delivery of pre-employment measures designed to increase self-reliance, improve life skills and promote greater attachment to the work force. The Income Assistance sub-program has four main components: basic needs; special needs; pre-employment supports; and service delivery. The expected outcome of the Income Assistance sub-program is an improved quality of life through the reduction of poverty and hardship on-reserve, as well as improved participation in, and attachment to, the workforce.

2013–2014 Budgetary Financial Resources (Dollars)

Planned Spending Actual Spending Difference
(Actual minus planned)
The difference between Planned and Actual Spending reflects a range of adjustments including additional resources for Enhanced Service Delivery, a reduction to the Income Assistance program as per Canada's Economic Action Plan 2012, adjustments to expenditure levels based on changes in provincial rates and the number of eligible clients, and internal re-allocations during the year.
866,386,660 873,513,527 7,126,867

2013–2014 Human Resources (FTEs)

Planned Actual Difference
(Actual minus planned)
46.6 74.2 27.6

Performance Results

Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
* The dependency rate is calculated by dividing the number of Income Assistance clients and dependants by the total on reserve population, which is a combination of registered and non-registered populations. This is a common indicator used by provinces and territories. The rate indicates the breadth of the population on reserve who are having their basic needs met through welfare.
Improved quality of life through the reduction of poverty and hardship on reserve Percentage of Income Assistance beneficiaries, aged 16–64, that exit to employment or education 3% (compared to baseline of 0.1% in 2011–2012) by end of fiscal year 2018–2019 Results will be available in 2014–2015
Improved participation in, and attachment to, the workforce Percentage of Income Assistance beneficiaries, aged 16–64, who participate in Active Measures 10% (compared to baseline of 1% in 2011–2012) by end of fiscal year 2018–2019 16% (2012–2013)
Income Assistance Dependency Rate* 31.4% (compared to baseline of 34.4% in 2010–2011) by end of fiscal year 2018–2019 34.5% (2012–2013)

Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

AANDC Income Assistance data for 2013–2014 will not be available until September 2014. Given that Income Assistance reform has just commenced, the Department will only be able to measure and report on progress at the end of 2014–2015. Based on 2012–2013 data, 16% of all income assistance clients participated in active pre-employment measures, compared to the targeted 10%. This does not reflect the new Enhanced Service Delivery activities that began in January 2014.

In 2013–2014, 22 First Nation recipients received funding ($10.289 million) to commence activities that help increase participation in the labour market based on a community-driven approach that is modeled on social assistance programs in their respective province. These organizations are delivering services on behalf of 70 First Nations. Additionally, $5.303 million was allocated to Ontario Works to expand the number of communities for which the province delivers the full suite of pre-employment Ontario Works programming, from 44 in 2012–2013 to 65 in 2013–2014. By the end of 2013–2014, excluding Ontario, 70 First Nations had formally moved to the Enhanced Service Delivery model. When combined with the 65 First Nations participating in the full Ontario Works, 135 of 550 First Nations were delivering a case management approach (i.e. almost 25 percent of Income Assistance providers).

The Department worked collaboratively with Employment and Social Development Canada to align their respective programs. This resulted in better support to Income Assistance clients as well as opportunities for individuals to access a range of services and programs aimed at advancing their participation in the labour market and taking advantage of available opportunities. AANDC actively pursued partnerships with First Nations, provinces, the Yukon, educational institutions and the private sector, including actual and potential employers and others, to ensure First Nations have access to employment opportunities.

Sub-Program 2.2.2: National Child Benefit Reinvestment

Description

The National Child Benefit Reinvestment (NCBR) is one component of the wider National Child Benefit (NCB) initiative. The NCB has two components: a financial benefits component that goes directly to individuals (e.g. the federal Canada Child Tax Benefit) and a reinvestment component — the National Child Benefit Reinvestment — that provides community-based supports and services for children in low-income families in provinces/territories that choose to operate this initiative. AANDC's NCBR is the on-reserve counterpart to reinvestment projects/programming administered by applicable provinces/territories off-reserve. There are five activity areas for the NCBR on-reserve: childcare; child nutrition; support for parents; home-to-work transition; and cultural enrichment. The expected outcomes include a reduction in the immediate effects of child poverty and decreased barriers for parents/guardians to become or remain attached to the workforce.

2013–2014 Budgetary Financial Resources (Dollars)

Planned Spending Actual Spending Difference
(Actual minus planned)
The difference between Planned and Actual Spending reflects internal re-allocations from the Income Assistance sub-program to the National Child Benefit Reinvestment sub-program. Going forward, the necessary steps have been taken to ensure that Planned Spending will be appropriately captured under the National Child Benefit Reinvestment sub-program.
1,898,988 50,531,076 48,632,088

2013–2014 Human Resources (FTEs)

Planned Actual Difference
(Actual minus planned)
0.3 3.3 3.0

Performance Results

Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Reduction in the immediate effects of child poverty In NCBR-eligible regions, percentage of First Nations, with an Income Assistance caseload that includes families with children aged 0–17 inclusive, with access to funding for NCBR projects/programming Baseline + 5% (baseline to be established in 2013–2014) by end of fiscal year 2023–2024 Preliminary results will be available late fall 2014

Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

The National Child Benefit Reinvestment provides funding to First Nation communities and organizations to support concrete actions to reduce the effects of poverty on children in low-income families living on reserve. By funding projects like breakfast and lunch programs, homework clubs and other supports in schools, daycares and Head Start programs, significant numbers of children and families on reserve benefited from NCBR funded projects in 2013–2014.

Evaluations of NCBR have found that school-based child nutrition projects have contributed to improved school attendance by children as well as improvements in their grades. Home-to-Work transition projects that help parents become or remain employed have provided skills-based training, uniforms and transportation to training or work. Childcare projects have given children a safe place to be while parents attended training or work.

To better support performance measurement, AANDC has revised the way in which it collects data on the NCBR program. NCBR baseline targets could not be established, as not all of the information required for measurement was collected from First Nations during this year. A baseline will be established in 2015–2016 using 2014–2015 data. The program also depends on multiple lines of evidence to tell the program performance story including data collection instruments from the programs, various national surveys and program stakeholders.

Sub-Program 2.2.3: Assisted Living

Description

The Assisted Living sub-program is a residency-based program that provides funding to assist in non-medical, social support services to seniors, adults with chronic illness, and children and adults with disabilities (mental and physical) so that they can maintain functional independence and achieve greater self-reliance. There are three major components to the program including in-home care, adult foster care and institutional care. The latter is for eligible individuals in need of personal non-medical care on a 24 hour basis. The Assisted Living sub-program is available to all individuals residing on-reserve, or ordinarily resident on-reserve, who have been formally assessed by a health care professional (in a manner aligned with the relevant province or territory) as requiring services and who do not have the means to obtain such services themselves. The expected outcome for the Assisted Living sub-program is that individuals maintain their independence for as long as possible while maximizing the quality of their daily experience at home and in the community.

2013–2014 Budgetary Financial Resources (Dollars)

Planned Spending Actual Spending Difference
(Actual minus planned)
84,015,177 99,847,454 15,832,277

2013–2014 Human Resources (FTEs)

Planned Actual Difference
(Actual minus planned)
The difference between Planned and Actual human resources reflects in-year adjustments for human and financial resources across the Department's five social programs to more accurately reflect effort.
1.2 15.3 14.1

Performance Results

Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Individuals maintain their independence for as long as possible while maximizing the quality of their daily experience at home and in the community Percentage of clients whose assessed needs are met Baseline + 5% (baseline to be established in 2013–2014) by end of fiscal year 2023–2024 Baseline will be established in 2014–2015
Percentage of Disabilities Initiative projects that meet or exceed their objectives Baseline + 5% (baseline to be established in 2013–2014) by end of fiscal year 2023–2024 Baseline will be available after receipt and review of 2013–2014 recipient reporting by late fall 2014

Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

Program funding was used to provide Assisted Living support in over 500 First Nations. AANDC worked directly with First Nations as well as partners like Health Canada and the provinces, to improve the delivery of social support services to a wide range of clients. As the Department is required to meet the demand for assisted living services, expenditures reflect a higher than anticipated demand. AANDC is validating eligible expenditures under the Assisted Living program's institutional care component and is working on proposals to clarify eligible Institutional Care expenditures that are consistent with the income-support mandate.

To better support performance measurement, AANDC has revised the way in which it collects data on the Assisted Living program. It will set a baseline against which it will report outcomes in 2015–2016.

The data elements to measure the Disabilities Initiative indicator were added to the Data Collection Instrument in 2013–2014. Results will be available after receipt and review of 2013–2014 recipient reports by end of September 2014 and a baseline will be established in 2014–2015. Reporting on outcomes will be possible from 2015–2016 onward.

The Assisted Living program continues to use its original 1982 definition of benefits and services (except Ontario), while the basket of income-tested benefits and services offered by provinces and territories off reserve has evolved. Work has begun on a detailed implementation plan to realign the program with current provincial/territorial practices.

Sub-Program 2.2.4: First Nations Child and Family Services

Description

The First Nations Child and Family Services (FNCFS) sub-program provides funding to assist in ensuring the safety and well-being of First Nations children on reserve by supporting culturally appropriate prevention and protection services for First Nations children and families. These services are provided in accordance with the legislation and standards of the province or territory of residence and in a manner that is reasonably comparable to those available to other provincial residents in similar circumstances. There are four components to the program including: development; maintenance; operations; and prevention. In 2007, the FNCFS program began shifting to an Enhanced Prevention Focused Approach (EPFA). This is consistent with provinces that have largely refocused their Child and Family Services programs from protection to prevention services. The expected outcome for the FNCFS sub-program is to have a more secure and stable family environment for children ordinarily resident on reserve. The implementation of the EPFA is expected to improve services, cohesion of the family, and life outcomes for First Nation children and families on reserve. AANDC also contributes to the funding of day care services for First Nation families in Ontario and Alberta.

2013–2014 Budgetary Financial Resources (Dollars)

Planned Spending Actual Spending Difference
(Actual minus planned)
The difference between Planned and Actual financial and human resources reflects internal re-allocations due to adjustments to provincial/territorial rates and costs of services to meet the rising cost of services to support children out of the parental home, and in-year adjustments for human and financial resources across the Department's five social programs to more accurately reflect effort.
643,616,747 666,830,943 23,214,196

2013–2014 Human Resources (FTEs)

Planned Actual Difference
(Actual minus planned)
82.7 35.3 (47.4)

Performance Results

Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
More secure and stable family environment for First Nation children ordinarily resident on reserve Number of permanent placements achieved, by type, out of the total number of children in care Baseline + 1% (baseline to be established in 2014–2015) by end of fiscal year 2024–2025 Results will be available late fall 2014
Rates of ethno-cultural placement matching Baseline + 1% (baseline to be established in 2014–2015) by end of fiscal year 2024–2025 Kinship placements have grown from 10 placements in 2007–2008 (1% of cases) to 1,575 placements in 2012–2013 (16% of cases). Results will be available late fall 2014

Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

In 2013–2014, AANDC continued to implement and oversee the EPFA to support the delivery of protection and prevention services to First Nation children, youth and families ordinarily resident on reserve through the First Nations Child and Family Services program. The approach has been implemented in six jurisdictions (Alberta, Nova Scotia, Saskatchewan, Quebec, Prince Edward Island and Manitoba). AANDC continues to work with First Nations and remaining jurisdictions that are at different stages of readiness.

Early results under the EPFA show improved tripartite relationships, increased kinship care, better awareness of the child welfare system in communities, promising prevention practices in some communities and increased community participation in prevention programs. Despite these early successes, enhanced prevention services will only demonstrate more significant and sustained results over the long term once the benefits of early intervention are firmly rooted in communities and the need to take children into protection is reduced. In the short term, as expected, an increase in the number of social workers doing prevention work in First Nation communities has resulted in increased caseloads.

Numerous reports from provincial child welfare advocates and provincial/territorial auditors released last year speak generally to the need for increased accountability at all levels of government, more partnerships, information-sharing, information collection, compliance and early intervention.

In an effort to strengthen relationships with partners, AANDC has engaged in discussions with several provinces with the intention of clarifying roles and responsibilities and increasing information sharing.

Implementation Evaluations of the EPFA were completed in 2013–2014 for several provinces:

  • Saskatchewan and Nova Scotia: The evaluation contained 22 key findings and 5 recommendations regarding elements such as adequate costing models, collaborative work with federal, provincial, agencies and First Nations organisations and adequate capacity to fully implement the program. In response to the recommendations, AANDC has developed a Management Response and Action Plan that was implemented in 2013–2014.
  • Québec and Prince Edward Island: The evaluation contained four key findings indicating that some areas of the approach needing improvement. The recommendations suggested improving the Social Development Performance Measurement Strategy for the EPFA and monitoring and reporting activities, assessing the costing model on a regular basis and developing a mentoring network. In response to the recommendations, AANDC has developed a Management Response and Action Plan, which is being implemented in 2014–2015.
  • Manitoba: The Implementation Evaluation of the EPFA in the province began in June 2013. Results of this evaluation will be available in the summer of 2014.

Sub-Program 2.2.5: Family Violence Prevention

Description


The Family Violence Prevention sub-program provides funding to assist First Nations in providing access to culturally appropriate family violence shelter services and prevention activities to women, children and families ordinarily resident on-reserve. There are two components to the sub-program: operational funding for shelters; and community-based prevention projects. The expected outcome of the Family Violence Prevention sub-program is the enhanced safety and security of First Nation women, children and families.

2013–2014 Budgetary Financial Resources (Dollars)

Planned Spending Actual Spending Difference
(Actual minus planned)
The difference between Planned and Actual financial and human resources reflects a range of adjustments including new funding from Canada's Economic Action Plan 2013, a realignment to meet the increasing demand for provincial shelter billings, and in-year adjustments for human and financial resources across the Department's five social programs to more accurately reflect effort.
19,062,330 32,595,991 13,533,661

2013–2014 Human Resources (FTEs)

Planned Actual Difference
(Actual minus planned)
2.5 9.1 6.6

Performance Results

Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Enhanced safety and security of women, children and families living on-reserve Number of communities, families and individuals accessing Family Violence Prevention Program (FVPP) prevention and protection supports and services Shelters: Baseline + 1% (baseline to be established in 2014–2015) Shelters: approximately 4,450 women and 2,750 children accessed family violence shelter services (2012–2013)
Prevention: Baseline + 1% (baseline to be established in 2014–2015) by end of fiscal year 2024–2025 Prevention: 249 recipients funded for prevention projects (2012–2013); 2013–2014 results will be available in Fall 2014

Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

In 2012–2013, approximately 4,450 women and 2,750 children accessed family violence shelter services (41 AANDC-funded family violence shelters in total) and the Department funded 249 recipients to deliver proposal-based family violence prevention and awareness projects. Results for 2013–2014 will be analyzed, and a baseline established, after receipt and review of 2013–2014 recipient reporting by end of September 2014.

As mentioned in Shelters for Abused Women in Canada, 2012, there were 601 shelters (including 41 AANDC-funded family violence shelters) for abused women operating across Canada: 74% (or 445 shelters) served clients residing off reserve and 26% (or 156 shelters) served clients residing on reserves. In 2011–2012, there were over 62,500 admissions of women to shelters (on and off reserve) across Canada. AANDC-funded shelter usage, while remaining relatively steady over the years, has increased slightly since 2006. This demonstrates a continued need, particularly because close to half of abused women in Canada do not report the incident to the police. This can be explained in part by the fact that the on-reserve violent crime rate is eight times higher than the violent crime rate off reserve, and also because of the prevalence of risk factors and root causes of family violence in First Nations communities.

FVPP is sunsetting as of March 31, 2015. Canada's Economic Action Plan 2013 committed funding of $24 million over two years for the Family Violence Prevention Program, allowing the Department to continue to offer its programming in 2013–2014 and 2014–2015 at an annual funding level of approximately $30.4 million. AANDC is working to renew the FVPP for April 1, 2015.

In 2013–2014, AANDC implemented a new approach to fund prevention projects more strategically based on regionally established proposal processes rather than using a population-based approach. New assessment criteria have been developed to maximize the effectiveness of prevention projects by leveraging partnership and funding opportunities.

AANDC is working actively to strengthen partnerships and improve coordination with key partners such as provinces and territories, Family Violence Initiative partners, National Aboriginal Circle Against Family Violence and other National Aboriginal Organizations.

In 2013–2014, FVPP initiated on-site shelter visits in an effort to strengthen program management and improve delivery of family violence prevention services. To date, on-site shelter visits have been conducted in 25 of 41 AANDC-funded shelters and action plans have been put in place where necessary to identify and address issues and ensure effective and efficient use of funds. The Program's terms and conditions have been revised and updated; new guidance developed, including a national prevention proposal template for consistency across the country; and reporting adjusted to collect better outcome-based client data.

Program 2.3: Managing Individual Affairs

Description

The Managing Individual Affairs Program contributes to The People Strategic Outcome by ensuring responsible federal stewardship of the legislative, administrative and treaty obligations of the Federal Government to First Nations that pertain to Estates, Indian Moneys, Registration, Band Membership and Treaty Annuities. This program administers the portions of the First Nations Oil and Gas and Moneys Management Act that relate to Indian Moneys and is critical to ensuring that the provisions of the Indian Act and other statutory obligations are fulfilled. Results are achieved through direct client-services and through partnerships with First Nations directed to: determine eligibility for registration under the Indian Act; issue the Secure Certificate of Indian Status (SCIS); ensure responsibility for management of Indian monies and estates under the Indian Act; and, to honour treaty annuity obligations to First Nations. In supporting responsible federal stewardship of historic treaties and Acts, a more respectful and productive relationship is achieved between First Nations, the Federal Government and Canada. A sound administration of individual affairs and moneys contributes to the well-being of First Nation individuals, families and communities, and facilitates their participation in the Canadian society.

2013–2014 Budgetary Financial Resources (Dollars)

Main Estimates Planned Spending Total Authorities
Available for Use
Actual Spending
(Authorities used)
Difference
(Actual minus planned)
The difference between Planned Spending and Total Authorities (including FTE variances) primarily reflects additional resources provided for registration administration through Supplementary Estimates and re-allocated internally during the year.
28,808,744 28,808,744 34,336,163 33,836,437 5,027,693

2013–2014 Human Resources (FTEs)

Planned Actual Difference
(Actual minus planned)
217.5 256.6 39.1

Performance Results

Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Legislative, administrative and treaty obligations for which AANDC is responsible are fulfilled Delivery of services within established service standards related to registration, membership, estates, treaty annuities and moneys as per the Indian Act and other related acts and regulations as demonstrated by the results in the sub-programs Deliver services as demonstrated in the sub-programs Services delivered as demonstrated below for each sub-program

Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

Pursuant to its legislative, administrative and treaty obligations, AANDC continued to exercise sound federal stewardship in managing First Nations individual affairs, supporting a positive relationship among First Nations, the Government of Canada and Canadians, and contributing to the well-being of First Nation individuals and communities.

The Office of the Indian Registrar continued to focus on improving effective client service delivery and program modernization, initiating the integration of registration to entitlement processes, policies and procedures with those of the Secure Certificate of Indian Status. This will ultimately result in a seamless, client-centric service delivery model for registration and card issuance.

Specifically, the Department met its responsibilities to deliver on the Federal government's obligations by continuing to register entitled individuals and issuing supporting certificates of Indian status. Overall, the Department made improvements in processing incoming entitlement registration applications and sending Acknowledgement of Receipt letters to 90% of applicants within the 30 day service standard. New registrations for the year totalled 21,004. Combined with the effect of removing the names of individuals from the Indian Register due to death, the net result was an Indian population of 923,375 representing an increase of 17,465 or 1.9%.

The Department is also modernizing the administration of Indian moneys. This will allow for consistency and coherence in policies, processes and procedures with First Nations' aspirations for more autonomy and control over their own funds. It will also improve internal administrative processes and enhance Estate Management among First Nation individuals and communities.

An Evaluation of Indian Moneys, Estates and Treaty Annuities (IMETA) was completed in April 2013. It contained 22 key findings and 15 recommendations regarding elements such as the alignment of IMETA with federal and departmental priorities, the reporting process, and implementation of alternative models for Band moneys. In response to the recommendations, AANDC has developed a Management Response and Action Plan that was implemented in 2013–2014.

Sub-Program 2.3.1: Registration and Membership

Description

Section 5 of the Indian Act mandates AANDC to maintain the Indian Register, a listing of all persons registered as Indians within the definition of the Indian Act, as well as band members for departmentally-controlled band lists. At the First Nation level, Indian Registration Administrators work on behalf of the Department to maintain the Indian Register and have specific authorities delegated to them through the Indian Registrar. In addition, the Individual Affairs Branch issues the Secure Certificate of Indian Status card, which is used to identify those eligible to receive key programs and services that are available to registered Indians. A current, up-to-date and accurate Indian Register is a fundamental component to the delivery of departmental programs and services as it identifies the entitled demographic.

2013–2014 Budgetary Financial Resources (Dollars)

Planned Spending Actual Spending Difference
(Actual minus planned)
The difference between Planned and Actual financial and human resources primarily reflects additional resources provided through Supplementary Estimates and internal re-allocations during the year. These additional resources were required mainly to address the inventory of applications related to Gender Equity in Indian Registration (C-3) and Qalipu.
22,264,269 26,027,121 3,762,852

2013–2014 Human Resources (FTEs)

Planned Actual Difference
(Actual minus planned)
166.5 200.4 33.9

Performance Results

Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Applications receive an accurate decision on entitlement under the Indian Act and are notified of the decision with stipulated service standards Percentage of registration applications addressed within the 6 month (entitlement), 8 month (adoptions) service standards. 90% of applicants are sent an "Acknowledgement of Receipt" letter within 30 days of their application received in the Office of the Indian Registrar (OIR) 90% of applicants were sent an Acknowledgement of Receipt letter within 30 days
90% of registration applications are addressed within 6 months of being received in OIR (Entitlement) or within 8 month service standard (Adoptions) 73% (21,004) of the 28,777 registration applications received were addressed within service standard
New SCIS is issued to eligible individuals/applicants Number of Registered Indians receiving new SCIS 100,000 SCIS complete application files are processed per year by March 31, 2014 Only 37,632 SCIS complete applications were received in 2013–2014; 44,210 SCIS cards were issued during the year
Percentage of SCIS issued within service standard 90% of eligible applications are issued a SCIS within 10 week service standard by March 31, 2014 100% of eligible SCIS applications were issued a SCIS within the service standard by March 31, 2014

Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

The Department received 28,777 applications for registration and processed 21,004 applications, bringing the total registered Indian population to 923,735 as of March 31, 2014. Given existing human resource constraints, the Department processed 73% (21,004) of the 28,777 registration applications received within service standard, leaving an inventory of 9,109 applications at the end of the fiscal year. Through its modernization projects, the Office of the Indian Registrar concentrated its efforts on addressing the historical inventory, as processing complex entitlement applications was below service standards.

The Department continued to streamline all straightforward applications requiring minimal genealogical research. Modernization of policies, procedures and processes, as well as production of employee tools for publication to a common reference database, has enhanced employee capacity and efficiency in the National Capital Region and in the Regional Offices.

The Department continued implementing the Agreement of the Recognition for the Qalipu Mi'kmaq Band with the announcement in July 2013 of the Supplemental Agreement between Canada and the Federation of Newfoundland Indians regarding the enrolment process for membership in the Qalipu Mi'kmaq First Nation. The total number of founding members of the band as of March 31, 2014 is 23,877. This process was assisted through allocation of additional resources.

The number of Secure Certificates of Indian Status issued in 2013–2014 was 44,210 (including 37,632 cards for complete applications received in-year and 6,578 for those received prior to April 1, 2013), bringing the total number of SCIS issued since inception to 121,346. The delivery network expanded nationally, allowing applicants to apply for a SCIS in person at any Regional/District Office or by the new mail-in process. Other initiatives such as newly developed tools, strategies and resources meant to inform applicants and stakeholders of the SCIS program were launched in 2013–2014. These were designed to coincide with the national delivery network expansion. A review of the impact of the revised SCIS In-Canada Issuance Policy, as well as policies, processes and procedures, aided in identifying new strategies to improve the issuance of cards within published service standards. Plans will be developed in 2014–2015 to increase SCIS awareness and access and improve application take-up by First Nations.

To improve performance in the area of registration and membership, the Department has re-structured both its business processes and its organizational structure with the intent of identifying areas for greater efficiencies and increasing the number of applications completed.

The Department has also integrated functions related to registration and SCIS issuance into a seamless, client centric service delivery model. This change will allow AANDC to deliver to its clients, a simplified, integrated registration and card issuance experience in which they deal with one point of contact, regardless of the service delivery option they choose. This will both improve and standardize the level of service to new and existing applicants.

Going forward in 2014–2015, in addition to modernizing its operations, the department will focus its efforts on addressing the historical inventory of registration applications, while maintaining service levels for simple applications. For SCIS, in order for the Department to reach its card issuance target, increased applications are required.

Sub-Program 2.3.2: Management of Moneys

Description

AANDC is responsible for the management of the Indian Moneys provisions of the Indian Act which define the collection, maintenance and accounting of Indian Moneys. The Indian Moneys section of the Individual Affairs Branch executes the overall administration of Indian Moneys held within the Consolidated Revenue Fund (CRF) for the use and benefit of Bands. These revenue moneys are defined as all Indian Moneys other than capital moneys (those derived from the sale of surrendered lands or non-renewable resources such as oil and gas) and may include, but are not limited to, the proceeds from the sale of renewable resources, rights-of-way, fines and interest earned on capital and revenue moneys held in the CRF.

2013–2014 Budgetary Financial Resources (Dollars)

Planned Spending Actual Spending Difference
(Actual minus planned)
The difference between Planned and Actual Spending primarily reflects additional resources re-allocated internally during the year. In certain regions, structural reorganization and success in staffing previously vacant positions also account for the difference in Planned and Actual human resources.
1,614,388 2,117,490 503,102

2013–2014 Human Resources (FTEs)

Planned Actual Difference
(Actual minus planned)
17.3 22.3 5.0

Performance Results

Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Canada's responsibilities for management of Indian moneys under the Indian Act are fulfilled Percentage of disbursement that meet established processing standards 90% (Increase of 1% per year) by March 31, 2014 100% (11 of 11) of disbursement requests were processed within the service standard as of March 31, 2014

Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

First Nations requested access to their Indian moneys for a variety of reasons, including but not limited to band administration activities, capital investments and funding for social and cultural activities on reserve. The target of 90% of disbursements meeting the established processing standards was exceeded as 11 of 11 disbursement requests were processed within the service standard. AANDC continued to utilize the improved Trust Funds Management System and updated internal manuals arising from the 2010 Audit of Trust Accounts, resulting in strengthened due diligence for the release of Indian Moneys and consistent application of the policies nationally.

Kawacatoose First Nation in Saskatchewan became the first community to opt in to the Moneys Management component of the First Nations Oil and Gas and Moneys Management Act and take full control over the management of its land and resource moneys. The community's financial code will now guide the First Nation's council on how their moneys are spent, rather than being required to submit a request to the Department for a disbursement of their money.

Sub-Program 2.3.3: Estate Management

Description

The Estate Management sub-program is comprised of two areas, the decedent and the living estates programs. It provides for the management and administration of the estates of deceased, mentally incompetent, and minor Indians on-reserve. The Estate Management sub-program derives its mandate from the Indian Act and the Indian Estates Regulations. The sub-program is responsible for developing policy, procedures and providing advice on the management and administration of Estates under the Act.

2013–2014 Budgetary Financial Resources (Dollars)

Planned Spending Actual Spending Difference
(Actual minus planned)
The difference between Planned and Actual Spending primarily reflects additional resources re-allocated internally during the year.
2,653,892 2,953,047 299,155

2013–2014 Human Resources (FTEs)

Planned Actual Difference
(Actual minus planned)
25.0 26.1 1.1

Performance Results

Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Canada's responsibilities for estates management under the Indian Act and related regulations are fulfilled Percentage of non-departmental administrators appointed in accordance with service standard of 90 to 120 days Due to factors outside of the programs control (i.e. availability of family members, etc.), 75% compliance with the target by March 31, 2014 91% (748 of 824) non-departmental administrators were appointed

Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

The Estates Management program continued to deliver a high level of service to regional offices in providing timely advice and guidance on complex estates matters, resulting in once again exceeding the target of non-departmental administrators being appointed. Regular national-level discussions were conducted in preparation for the full implementation of the Family Homes on Reserve and Matrimonial Interests or Rights Act, providing regions with information and guiding documentation for managing estates under this Act.

Sub-Program 2.3.4: Treaty Annuities

Description

The Treaty Annuities sub-program is responsible for administering payments and benefits according to the various treaties that First Nations signed with the British and later Canadian government. As each treaty is unique; so are the benefits to which each First Nation individual is entitled. Many treaties provide for annual payments, which are paid in cash at Treaty Day events.

2013–2014 Budgetary Financial Resources (Dollars)

Planned Spending Actual Spending Difference
(Actual minus planned)
The difference between Planned and Actual Spending primarily reflects additional resources re-allocated internally during the year.
2,276,195 2,738,779 462,584

2013–2014 Human Resources (FTEs)

Planned Actual Difference
(Actual minus planned)
8.7 7.8 (0.9)

Performance Results

Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Canada's Treaty Obligations to First Nations are honoured Percentage of First Nation treaty events requested are held in order to facilitate Treaty Annuity Payments 100% of events requested are held by March 31, 2014 100% of treaty payment events requested were conducted

Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

In 2013–2014, 100% of treaty events requested were held. A financial variance of $462,584 in excess of planned spending was reflective of the resource requirements to honour treaty obligations to First Nations.

Program 2.4: Residential Schools Resolution

Description

The Residential Schools Resolution Program contributes to The People Strategic Outcome and aims to support a fair and lasting resolution to the legacy of Indian Residential Schools and to promote reconciliation with former students, their families and communities. In this program, AANDC ensures the successful implementation of the Indian Residential Schools Settlement Agreement (IRSSA) by finalizing the Common Experience Payment (CEP) and implementing the Personal Credits strategy; resolving claims of abuse under the Independent Assessment Process (IAP), as per its obligations under the IRSSA; funding and monitoring Commemoration initiatives; and meeting the Government of Canada's obligations vis-à-vis the Truth and Reconciliation Commission (TRC). Additionally, AANDC supports complementary initiatives to further reconciliation such as funding and monitoring of the Advocacy and Public Information Program and promoting reconciliation between the Government of Canada and Aboriginal people, as well as between Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal people through specific reconciliation initiatives. Resolution to Indian Residential Schools ultimately contributes to improved relationships between Aboriginal people and the rest of Canada, and strengthens Aboriginal communities.

2013–2014 Budgetary Financial Resources (Dollars)

Main Estimates Planned Spending Total Authorities
Available for Use
Actual Spending
(Authorities used)
Difference
(Actual minus planned)
The differences between Planned Spending and Total Authorities primarily reflect reduced operating funding for implementation of the Indian Residential Schools Settlement Agreement, partially offset by incremental funding provided through Supplementary Estimates for the Commemoration initiative under the Agreement. The difference between Total Authorities and Actual Spending primarily reflects the deferral of Independent Assessment Process settlement payments. This deferred funding has been reprofiled to future years. The FTE variance is largely due to delays in staffing related to the sunsetting of IRSSA.
696,037,893 696,037,893 685,955,866 574,379,693 (121,658,200)

2013–2014 Human Resources (FTEs)

Planned Actual Difference
(Actual minus planned)
625.0 521.0 (104.0)

Performance Results

Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
A fair resolution to the legacy of Indian Residential Schools is supported Percentage of applications/claims responded to within the IRSSA service standards Targets established under each sub-program Actuals as reflected below for each sub-program

Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

AANDC continued to promote a fair resolution to the legacy of Indian Residential Schools, empowering Aboriginal individuals, strengthening their communities and improving the relationship between Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal Canadians. In 2013–2014, AANDC launched the Personal Credits process, including a Notice Plan, and received over 1,100 funding applications by end of the fiscal year. Additionally, Canada brought forward a Request for Direction to the Courts to close the Common Experience Payment process.

On January 30, 2014, the British Columbia Supreme Court approved the request of the Government of Canada and the parties to the Indian Residential Schools Settlement Agreement, to provide the Truth and Reconciliation Commission with a one-year extension to its operating period, until June 30, 2015. An Order-in-Council confirming this extension was approved on March 14, 2014.

AANDC also developed a departmental Reconciliation Framework to help all sectors and regions of the Department identify and develop opportunities to promote reconciliation with Aboriginal people.

Although Canada's Economic Action Plan 2012 had provided $725.6 million to continue implementing the Settlement Agreement until 2015–2016, many of the potential funding pressures identified in 2012 had already materialized in 2013–2014. Given the higher than anticipated volume of Independent Assessment Process applications received before the September 19, 2012 deadline and the increased costs these applications incurred, AANDC had identified a funding shortfall beyond 2013–2014 and started working with the Treasury Board Secretariat to determine how to address these pressures.

There is a degree of unpredictability to the implementation of the IRSSA, based largely on the number of applicants and the timing of hearings. The unique nature of the IRSSA made it hard to accurately predict the number of abuse claims. Differences in the interpretation of the IRSSA have also led to Court proceedings, resulting in decisions that had cost implications. The number of issues currently before the Courts means that this unpredictability will continue. AANDC will continue to address these issues as they arise, working with the Department of Justice to uphold the terms of the IRSSA and with the Treasury Board Secretariat to seek new funding authorities as pressures emerge.

Sub-Program 2.4.1: Common Experience Payments

Description

The Common Experience Payments (CEP) is one element of the Indian Residential Schools Settlement Agreement (IRSSA) which is paid to eligible former students who resided at a listed Indian Residential School. Eligible former students receive compensation based on number of years at a listed residential school. As per the IRSSA, once all Common Experience Payments have been made, if there is more than $40 million remaining in the trust fund, personal credits for educational purposes will be distributed to each eligible CEP recipient who applies. Any funds remaining in the trust fund after personal credits are paid will be distributed to two educational trusts to support Aboriginal educational initiatives.

2013–2014 Budgetary Financial Resources (Dollars)

Planned Spending Actual Spending Difference
(Actual minus planned)
The difference between Planned and Actual financial and human resources reflects funding renewal through a Treasury Board Submission for 2013–2014.
0 2,802,739 2,802,739

2013–2014 Human Resources (FTEs)

Planned Actual Difference
(Actual minus planned)
0 7.8 7.8

Performance Results

Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Eligible CEP applicants are validated and Initial Applications and Reconsiderations processed in accordance with the Settlement Agreement Percentage of applications/ claims processed within the IRSSA service standard. 80% of simple files done in 28 days service standard by March 31, 2014 92.9% (26 of 28)
20% of complex files are done in 28 days service standard by March 31, 2014 58.3% (28 of 48)
100% of new reconsideration requests are processed within 150 day service standard (90 days for reconsideration files with 60 additional days for complex files) by March 31, 2014 88.4% (259 of 293) This figure includes cases that were on hold pending additional information from the applicant

Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

As of March 31, 2014, $1.620 billion of the $1.9 billion Designated Amount Fund (85.3%) was disbursed to pay 79,215 out of an estimated 80,000 (99.0%) former students who resided at a recognized Indian residential school. Of this, $6.8 million was paid to 356 former students in the period 2013–2014.

During 2013–2014, AANDC received approval of the terms and conditions for Personal Credits. The notice plan was successfully launched and over 79,000 personalized application forms were sent to Common Experience Payment recipients. Eligible CEP recipients have until October 31, 2014 to apply for Personal Credits and until December 1, 2014 to submit their Personal Credits Redemption Form. As of March 31, 2014, over 1,100 applications have been received.

AANDC also began developing terms and conditions to transfer funds remaining after the disbursement of Personal Credits to the National Indian Brotherhood Trust Fund and the Inuvialuit Education Foundation.

Canada also sought direction on matters related to the close-out of CEP, including court challenges related to Article 12, incomplete CEP applications and other liabilities against the Designated Amount Fund. The Courts requested that AANDC pursue further efforts to address incomplete CEP applications and attempt to locate potential applicants.

Sub-Program 2.4.2: Independent Assessment Process

Description

The Independent Assessment Process (IAP) is one element of the Indian Residential Schools Settlement Agreement which provides compensation to former students who suffered serious physical abuse, sexual abuse and other wrongful acts while attending an Indian Residential School. The IAP is a claimant-centred, non-adversarial, out-of-court process.

2013–2014 Budgetary Financial Resources (Dollars)

Planned Spending Actual Spending Difference
(Actual minus planned)
The difference between Planned and Actual spending reflects the deferral of settlement payments that could not be completed in the fiscal year largely due to hearing delays and the re-allocation of financial resources to the Internal Services Program. Deferred funding has been reprofiled to future years. The difference between Planned and Actual human resources is largely due to delays in staffing due to the sunsetting nature of the Indian Residential Schools Settlement Agreement.
692,260,366 560,402,319 (131,858,047)

2013–2014 Human Resources (FTEs)

Planned Actual Difference
(Actual minus planned)
591.0 485.9 (105.1)

Performance Results

Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Canada's obligations, as per the terms of the Settlement Agreement, are fulfilled Percentage of Performance Indicators met, out of four (document packages submitted, hearings attended, negotiated settlements and payments processed). Meet standards for each of four performance indicators by March 31, 2014 Three out of four (75%) performance indicators were reached within established service standards in 2013–2014. Canada attended all scheduled hearings and exceeded its targets for negotiated settlements and payments processed, but was unable to meet service standards for document packages submitted to the Indian Residential School Adjudication Secretariat (IRSAS)

Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

As of March 31 2014, 37,848 claims had been received, more than three times the initial 2006 forecast. The variance in spending is mainly due to the fewer than forecast number of IAP hearings held during 2013–2014: 4,148 IAP hearings were held compared to the 4,500 predicted. On average, 347 hearings were held per month in 2013–2014, down slightly from the 2012–2013 average of 350 hearings per month. This is largely due to the low volume of hearing-ready claims. Despite this, the Government of Canada attended all scheduled hearings as planned.

At the end of the fiscal year, 770 claims were resolved through the Negotiated Settlement Process, representing 109% of the 2013–2014 target of 708. Since 2007, 26,728 claims have been resolved and $2.404 billion in settlement payments have been disbursed. A total of 11,120 claims remain in progress.

On January 14, 2014, the Ontario Superior Court rendered its decision on Canada's Request for Direction thus allowing Canada to release Ontario Provincial Police (OPP) documents relating to a 1990s investigation into allegations of abuse at St. Anne's Indian Residential School. On March 7, 2014, the Court ordered Canada to produce the OPP documents, transcripts and other documents by set deadlines, the first being April 30, 2014. As of March 31, 2014, Canada has begun providing these documents to the Truth and Reconciliation Commission, while working toward compliance of the further deadlines contained within the Court Order.

Because of the exceptionally high number of IAP applications received before the deadline in September 2012, the Department would be required to significantly increase the number of staff working on the preparation of document packages in order to comply with the service standard to produce these packages to IRSAS. As this is an impractical and inefficient solution for resolving claims, the Department and secretariat continue to review operational processes to ensure claims are resolved in the most timely and efficient manner possible.

Sub-Program 2.4.3: Commemoration

Description

Commemoration is a component of the Indian Residential Schools Settlement Agreement that is jointly administered by the Truth and Reconciliation Commission and AANDC, to fund projects that honour, educate, remember, memorialize and/or pay tribute to former students, their families and communities. The initiative is delivered through contribution agreements with communities, regional, and national Aboriginal organizations.

2013–2014 Budgetary Financial Resources (Dollars)

Planned Spending Actual Spending Difference
(Actual minus planned)
The difference between Planned and Actual Spending primarily reflects funding re-profiled through Supplementary Estimates from 2012–2013 to 2013–2014 for commemoration projects and funds re-allocated to meet Canada's document disclosure obligations to the Truth and Reconciliation Commission. The difference between Planned and Actual human resources reflects realignments to support Canada's implementation of the Indian Residential Schools Settlement Agreement.
3,777,527 10,755,837 6,978,310

2013–2014 Human Resources (FTEs)

Planned Actual Difference
(Actual minus planned)
34.0 23.3 (10.7)

Performance Results

Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Regional and national activities are undertaken to honour, educate, remember, memorialize and/or pay tribute to former students of Indian Residential Schools, their families and their communities Percentage of funded projects completed 100% by March 31, 2014 98%

Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

The IRSSA obligated AANDC to provide $20 million to approved Commemoration projects. Although some recipient projects withdrew from the initiative or were unable to use their entire contributions and returned excess funds to the Consolidated Revenue Fund, funding was provided to other approved projects in order to maximize the use of the $20 million under the Settlement Agreement.

Initial plans anticipated that all Commemoration funding would be allocated in 2011–2012 and 2012–2013. Since the Truth and Reconciliation Commission worked on the intake of proposals and AANDC worked with recipients on the completion of projects, time lines were not entirely under AANDC's control. As a result, some Commemoration funding was reallocated to 2013–2014 to allow approved projects to be completed. This explains the difference between planned and actual spending. Allowing funding to be reallocated from one year to another contributed to the successful implementation of the Commemoration initiative.

In situations where project officers were able to work face-to-face with recipients, the successful completion rate was higher than when such contact was not possible.

Sub-Program 2.4.4: Support to the Truth and Reconciliation Commission

Description

Under the Indian Residential Schools Settlement Agreement, the Government of Canada must provide the Truth and Reconciliation Commission (TRC) with documents relevant to Indian Residential Schools spanning over a century, and ensure the participation of high level government officials at TRC national events. The Department also provides the TRC with up to $1 million per year in in-kind services for 5 years.

2013–2014 Budgetary Financial Resources (Dollars)

Planned Spending Actual Spending Difference
(Actual minus planned)
The difference between Planned and Actual financial and human resources primarily reflects re-allocations from the Commemoration sub-program to the TRC under a Memorandum of Understanding.

Note that financial and human resources reported under this sub-program refer to in-kind services provided to the TRC only. Resources for document disclosure and the support of high-level participation in national events are reported under the Commemoration sub-program. This will be changed for 2014–2015, when document disclosure and in-kind services will be reported under the Support to the Truth and Reconciliation Commission sub-program.
0 418,798 418,798

2013–2014 Human Resources (FTEs)

Planned Actual Difference
(Actual minus planned)
0 4.0 4.0

Performance Results

Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Remaining relevant documents are disclosed to the TRC in an organized manner as outlined in the IRSSA Percentage of documents in the Government of Canada's holdings, relevant to the TRC's mandate, that are disclosed 100% by June 30, 2014 100% of known active and semi-active documents were disclosed to the TRC as of September 30, 2013

100% of known legacy documents were disclosed as of December 31, 2013

Documents held at Library and Archives Canada continue to be researched on a priority basis
Participation of high level government officials at TRC national events is ensured Percentage of TRC national events attended by high level government officials 100% by June 30, 2014 100%

Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

Support to the TRC comprised two elements: document disclosure and participation of government officials at TRC national events.

Canada completed the disclosure of its known "active and semi-active" documents (those in the possession of individual Departments) by September 30, 2013. Disclosure of known "legacy" documents (those held by the Department that speak to the legacy of Indian residential schools rather than to the operation of the schools) was completed by December 2013. Any hitherto unknown historical documents, such as Crown Personnel files, which continue to be identified as part of the IAP process, will be disclosed on an on-going basis.

Canada's remaining obligation is to disclose its holdings at Library and Archives Canada. This will not be completed by June 30, 2014. The documents held at Library and Archives Canada were not considered relevant until January 30, 2013, when the Ontario Superior Court clarified that the federal government's obligation to provide all relevant federal documents to the TRC included all documents housed at Library and Archives Canada. Initially, the federal government focused its document disclosure efforts on providing the TRC with all "active and semi-active documents." Although the TRC also asked the government to provide all relevant federal documents in Library and Archives Canada, the federal interpretation of the Settlement Agreement was that it was only mandated to provide "access" to its archives. This Court case and the decision added unanticipated costs to the sub-program in 2013–2014.

AANDC sought additional financial resources to fund a plan to disclose the documents held at Library and Archives Canada, as this cost had not been previously anticipated.

The challenges of the past year have highlighted that a central coordinating committee is vital to the success of a file this complex. In this case, 24 government departments needed to be engaged in order to complete the work. Without a central working group, this would have been impossible.

With respect to attendance at TRC national events, AANDC met its target of high-level officials attending all national events held by the TRC. The Minister of AANDC participated in all seven national events, including the three events held during 2013–2014.

The attendance of the Minister of AANDC was just one aspect of a significant federal presence at each national event. Funding allocated to this sub-program element allowed for federal booths, at which information about the IRSSA, other government programs and Canada's reconciliation efforts was shared with participants. In addition, funding provided through the Advocacy and Public Information Program allowed AANDC to support former students' participation at the national events as a gesture of reconciliation.

Strategic Outcome: The Land and Economy

Full participation of First Nations, Métis, Non-Status Indians and Inuit individuals and communities in the economy

Program 3.1: Aboriginal Economic Development

Description

The Aboriginal Economic Development Program contributes to The Land and Economy Strategic Outcome by aiming to build and promote viable Aboriginal businesses and opportunity-ready communities. This program supports the vision of increasing the participation of First Nation, Inuit and Métis individuals and communities in the Canadian economy and enables Aboriginal people to pursue the same opportunities for employment, income and wealth creation as other Canadians. These opportunities are initiated by focusing on key areas of the Federal Framework for Aboriginal Economic Development: strengthening Aboriginal entrepreneurship; enhancing the value of Aboriginal assets; working with Employment and Social Development Canada in developing Aboriginal human capital; forging new and effective partnerships; and focusing the role of the federal government in the area of Aboriginal economic development. AANDC can ensure long-term, sustainable economic development by promoting partnerships with provinces and territories and the private sector. Viable Aboriginal businesses and opportunity-ready communities will strengthen and benefit the Canadian economy.

2013–2014 Budgetary Financial Resources (Dollars)

Main Estimates Planned Spending Total Authorities
Available for Use
Actual Spending
(Authorities used)
Difference
(Actual minus planned)
The difference between Planned Spending and Total Authorities primarily reflects the carry-forward from previous years of funding for loans and loan guarantees through the Indian Economic Development Account offset by reduced requirements for the development/activation of community assets and Aboriginal entrepreneurship. The difference between Total Authorities and Actual Spending primarily reflects the carry-forward to future years of funding for loans and loan guarantees through the Indian Economic Development Account.
254,067,126 254,067,126 259,054,960 224,607,972 (29,459,154)

2013–2014 Human Resources (FTEs)

Planned Actual Difference
(Actual minus planned)
450.5 400.9 (49.6)

Performance Results

Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Viable Aboriginal businesses Survival rate for Aboriginal businesses after 3 years of receiving a financial contribution 50% by March 31, 2014 Not available
Percentage of Aboriginal procurement relative to total federal procurement spending 2% by March 31, 2014 2.8%
Opportunity-ready First Nations and Inuit communities Number of First Nation and Inuit communities providing public services in economic development to their community members 475 by March 31, 2014 458

Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

AANDC exceeded its annual 2% target for Aboriginal procurement relative to the total federal procurement spending by 0.8 percentage points, which translates into $124.9 million in Aboriginal procurement. The success of the Procurement Strategy for Aboriginal Business (PSAB) is a result of AANDC's analysis of procurement data to guide federal departments and agencies in setting reasonable targets for Aboriginal procurements; interventions in National Standing Offers and Supply Arrangements and federal purchases over $2 million to include an Aboriginal business set-aside or participation component; increase in the number of information and training sessions with Aboriginal businesses and federal procurement officers; and enhanced PSAB coordination representation among federal departments and agencies to increase departmental awareness and improve objective setting.

Since Canada's Economic Action Plan 2012, the Aboriginal Business Development Program has implemented significant changes making the program more responsive to Aboriginal entrepreneurs. This includes a partnership with Aboriginal Financial Institutions where they are now responsible for directly delivering funding support to Aboriginal entrepreneurs. This new delivery model has triggered a realignment of some performance indicators as well as the data collection methodology. New performance indicators have been identified to better reflect the current operational context, and the survival rate measure will be replaced with new measures. Starting in the 2014–2015 fiscal year, these new measures include the number of Aboriginal businesses created and expanded through the support of Aboriginal Financial Institutions and the Percentage of AFI-supported Aboriginal businesses actively repaying developmental loans, which will be easier to capture and more accurate.

The first part of the Family Homes on Reserve and Matrimonial Interests or Rights Act (the Act) came into force December 16, 2013. The Centre of Excellence for Matrimonial Real Property was established within the National Aboriginal Lands Managers Association to provide support to First Nations seeking to develop their own matrimonial real property law under the Act. First Nations were provided with information on the Act and the Centre of Excellence.

There were 458 First Nation communities providing economic development public services to their community members with funding from the Community Economic Development Program. This number is slightly lower than expected due to lower uptake and increased number of First Nations transitioning into self government arrangements in the British Columbia region. While the target was not met, the Department provided access to the program to First Nations across Canada who wanted to participate.

The Community Economic Development Program expended over $53 million to provide public service in economic development, the vast majority of which was transferred directly to First Nations governments by way of grants and contributions.

Sub-Program 3.1.1: Aboriginal Entrepreneurship

Description

A larger Aboriginal-owned private sector is key to improving income and employment opportunities for Aboriginal Canadians. Improving access to capital and strengthening other business development capacity tools, such as procurement, will encourage Aboriginal Canadians to start and/or expand their own businesses. This improvement will increase and strengthen the Aboriginal private sector and contribute to the expected outcome of viable Aboriginal businesses. In turn, a stronger private sector will, more effectively, support the development of opportunity-ready communities.

2013–2014 Budgetary Financial Resources (Dollars)

Planned Spending Actual Spending Difference
(Actual minus planned)
The difference between Planned and Actual financial and human resources primarily reflects the re-allocation of funds to other departmental priorities.
50,198,808 43,810,538 (6,388,270)

2013–2014 Human Resources (FTEs)

Planned Actual Difference
(Actual minus planned)
72.3 46.1 (26.2)

Performance Results

Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Strengthened Entrepreneurship Number of Aboriginal business created and expanded 650 by March 31, 2014 686

Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

AANDC exceeded its target of 650 Aboriginal businesses created and expanded. This is a culmination of the activities the Aboriginal Business Development program has supported through a number of programs including the Program Delivery Partnership (PDP) initiative, Developmental Lending and Enhanced Access to Capital. Through the decentralized PDP delivery model, AFIs are better suited to respond to the local needs of Aboriginal entrepreneurs and communities in funding their projects and initiatives.

Sub-Sub-Program 3.1.1.1: Access to Capital and Business Services

Description

This sub-sub-program includes the Loan Loss Reserve, Major Resource Development and Energy Investments, Aboriginal Business Development and Aboriginal Financial Institutions initiatives. These initiatives are designed to assist Aboriginal individuals and communities start-up, expand or acquire businesses by providing access to equity, debt financing and professional business advice. AANDC funds the Loan Loss Reserve used by commercial financial institutions as additional security on collateral to encourage lending to medium and large First Nation businesses located on-reserve and supports the establishment of investment funds for major resource or energy projects and late-stage equity required to leverage commercial financing. AANDC leverages financial participation from other levels of government, private and Aboriginal partners. The Department also assesses proposals and negotiates arrangements with commercial financial institutions and investment fund managers. The latter negotiate arrangements with Aboriginal businesses. AANDC provides non-repayable contributions to Aboriginal entrepreneurs and communities primarily aimed at small and medium sized business development. It provides funding for small businesses and community-owned medium and larger sized business to contract business and professional advisory services to undertake feasibility studies, business plans, market assessments and legal, technical, and financial advisory services to partners within the private sector. AANDC also provides funding for Aboriginal Financial Institutions to support their developmental lending capital pools, provides an interest rate subsidy for securing credit lines at more advantageous rates with mainstream financial institutions, ensures additional loan capital to service under-served areas through the Enhanced Access Loan Fund, undertakes training activities to improve management practices, and hires business support officers.

2013–2014 Budgetary Financial Resources (Dollars)

Planned Spending Actual Spending Difference
(Actual minus planned)
48,155,517 41,340,542 (6,814,975)

2013–2014 Human Resources (FTEs)

Planned Actual Difference
(Actual minus planned)
57.9 32.5 (25.4)

Performance Results

Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Aboriginal business and communities access capital and business services Value of business capitalization funding and business advisory services funding, including investments in major business opportunities, accessed by Aboriginal businesses and communities $45.0 million by March 31, 2014 $31.1 million

Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

Due to internal re-allocations to address urgent priorities, including $4.8 million to support First Nation Land Management and an additional $9.8 million for the consolidation of our economic programs authorities, only $31.1 million was available for Program Delivery Partners. The funding provided was utilized to its full extent. The demand for resources is actually exceeding the current resources provided and, if available, additional resources could be utilized by the Aboriginal Financial Institutions (AFI). Moreover, following Canada's Economic Action Plan 2012, the Aboriginal Business Development Program implemented the Deficit Reduction Action Plan, which has eliminated positions in regional offices and adopted a new third-party delivery model.

In 2013–2014, AANDC worked jointly with the National Aboriginal Capital Corporation Association (NACCA) and numerous Aboriginal Financial Institutions to implement the consolidated suite of programs. This includes a transfer of governance and program delivery from AANDC to NACCA, as well as the development of a suite of tools that will assist the AFI network in implementing new programming, including: the Aboriginal Developmental Lending Allocation, the Aboriginal Business Financing Program and the Aboriginal Capacity Development Program.

AANDC initiated an innovative partnership with Natural Resources Canada that created support for the participation of Aboriginal businesses in the Green Mining Initiative. The partnership received support from a large majority of the 23 participants from various federal departments and agencies during a Federal Round Table Discussion. A National Compendium of Aboriginal Businesses in Green Mining has been developed and will be used to create business readiness capacity and leverage private sector and other government department partnerships in the field of mining environmental management including supplying green mining equipment and services across Canada.

Sub-Sub-Program 3.1.1.2: Procurement Opportunities

Description

The objective of the Procurement Opportunities sub-sub-program is to enhance the successful participation of Aboriginal individuals and businesses in the Federal government procurement opportunities, thereby increasing Aboriginal economic development and employment. This objective is achieved when federal departments and agencies set-aside contract opportunities for the benefit of Aboriginal people, their businesses and their communities. Qualified Aboriginal firms can be awarded contracts through sub-contracting, joint ventures with Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal firms, or other business arrangements. Target populations and stakeholders include Aboriginal businesses, federal procurement officers and materiel managers. This sub-sub-program also aims to increase Aboriginal procurement-readiness training and procurement liaison support for Aboriginal businesses, increase the number of participants in the federal Aboriginal Business Directory and provide grants and contributions support for more Aboriginal procurement awareness and outreach activities with non-Aboriginal businesses. Support is delivered through proposal-based methods.

2013–2014 Budgetary Financial Resources (Dollars)

Planned Spending Actual Spending Difference
(Actual minus planned)
2,043,291 2,469,996 426,705

2013–2014 Human Resources (FTEs)

Planned Actual Difference
(Actual minus planned)
14.4 13.6 (0.8)

Performance Results

Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Aboriginal businesses participate in the federal Procurement Strategy for Aboriginal Business Number of Aboriginal businesses newly registered under the Procurement Strategy for Aboriginal Business 400 by March 31, 2014 405

Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

AANDC exceeded the registration target through increased outreach and awareness sessions and collaboration with Aboriginal organizations, other government departments and industry. During the 2013–2014 fiscal year, the number of Procurement Strategy for Aboriginal Business Network coordinators has increased from 50 to 90. These Network representatives marketed Procurement Strategy for Aboriginal Business to key people responsible for procurement activities in their respective federal departments and agencies.

In order to increase visibility of the Aboriginal Business Directory and additional businesses registered under the Procurement Strategy for Aboriginal Business, the Department initiated discussions with 68 business organizations. As a result, 19 organizations have added the Aboriginal Business Directory link to their websites.

Sub-Program 3.1.2: Activation of Community Assets

Description

In the Aboriginal context, particularly on reserve and in the North, major assets such as land, surface and sub-surface resources are frequently community owned, as opposed to individually owned. By building the value of their assets, communities can improve the well-being of their residents and generate income, thereby ensuring the maintenance and creation of wealth in the future. The systematic identification of economic opportunities, leveraging of partnerships, sound management of community assets and modernization of the land management regime on reserve, all contribute to enhancing the value of community assets and enabling communities to fully use their assets for economic development purposes. This sub-program will lead to increased value of Aboriginal assets which is consistent with the Framework's Strategic Priorities.

2013–2014 Budgetary Financial Resources (Dollars)

Planned Spending Actual Spending Difference
(Actual minus planned)
The difference between Planned and Actual Spending primarily reflects the re-allocation of resources to other departmental priorities.
178,660,847 158,184,618 (20,476,229)

2013–2014 Human Resources (FTEs)

Planned Actual Difference
(Actual minus planned)
308.6 290.1 (18.5)

Performance Results

Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Aboriginal community management regimes are established to enable communities to enhance the value of their assets Number of First Nations opting into alternative legislative, regulatory, and land and resource management regimes 9 by March 31, 2014 9

Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

AANDC met the performance target, as there were 8 successful votes held under the First Nations Land Management Regime and one First Nation opted in to the First Nation Commercial and Industrial Development process.

Further explanation is provided in the sub-sub programs 3.1.2.4 and 3.1.2.5.

Sub-Sub-Program 3.1.2.1: Investment in Economic Opportunities

Description

This sub-sub-program focuses on federal investments in Aboriginal community economic development towards real economic development opportunities and provides clear incentives for sustainable economic activity.

2013–2014 Budgetary Financial Resources (Dollars)

Planned Spending Actual Spending Difference
(Actual minus planned)
109,465,563 95,196,475 (14,269,088)

2013–2014 Human Resources (FTEs)

Planned Actual Difference
(Actual minus planned)
51.4 50.0 (1.4)

Performance Results

Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
The performance measurement information above pertains to Community Economic Opportunity Program only.
Investments are made in support of First Nations and Inuit community economic opportunities Value of investment made in support of First Nations and Inuit community economic opportunities $24.0 million by March 31, 2014 $24.5 million

Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

In 2013–2014, through the Community Economic Opportunities Program, AANDC supported projects in 147 First Nations communities totalling $24.5 million, which exceeded the target. This has leveraged an approximate $90 million of investments from other sources, including private sector, First Nations and other government departments. Out of 220 projects, 21 were economic infrastructure projects, which are helping to build a foundation for further economic growth.

The result achieved is mainly due to the consistent uptake from First Nations. The Program provides support to First Nations so they can participate in economic opportunities that have the most significant returns for their communities.

AANDC has developed the Lands and Economic Development Prioritization Framework through which projects with the greatest impact on communities are identified and funded. It has proven to be an effective tool to ensure the identification of projects that best support job creation, business development and partnerships with the private sector. AANDC will continue to use this tool and update it according to the economic context.

Sub-Sub-Program 3.1.2.2: Creation of Rights and Interests in Reserve Land

Description

This sub-sub-program includes the negotiation and creation of Third Party (non-Aboriginal entities) rights and interests in reserve land under the Indian Act such as leases, permits, easements and licenses. In the instance of Third Party leasing, the sub-sub-program also encompasses the designation process, including community approval and the processing of the Order in Council releasing the land back to the Crown for the purpose of leasing. The maintenance of these instruments includes rent and revenue collection, environmental monitoring and rent review, including land appraisals. Statutory obligations and court decisions have defined the Crown fiduciary obligations with respect to the leasing and permitting of reserve land, resources and environment as to act in the manner of prudent owner. All these activities are carried out by AANDC Regional Offices, and contribute to meeting the Department's fiduciary obligations when administering and creating third party rights and interests on reserve land and help create the conditions for economic development on that land.

2013–2014 Budgetary Financial Resources (Dollars)

Planned Spending Actual Spending Difference
(Actual minus planned)
16,974,187 17,932,578 958,391

2013–2014 Human Resources (FTEs)

Planned Actual Difference
(Actual minus planned)
140.1 127.8 (12.3)

Performance Results

Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Legal establishment of Third Party Rights and Interests in reserve land under the Indian Act that support economic development Number of permits, leases and sub-leases 1700 by March 31, 2014 903

Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

AANDC did not meet the target, as there were only 903 permits, leases and sub-leases in 2013–2014. The average number of permits, leases and sub-leases fluctuate annually, depending for example, on whether a high volume of lease renewals take place in the same fiscal year. For example, 877 lease renewals of all the 1306 leases registered in 2011–2012 were associated with a single First Nation. Removing this outlier, the average annual number of leases, permits and sub-leases over the last three years was 1077. While the 903 permits, leases and sub-leases was substantially less than the target of 1700, it is closer to the 3-year trend of 1077 annual permits, leases and sub-leases. This performance indicator is also sensitive to year-over-year changes to market force demand and circumstances of First Nations, who initiate permits and leases in response to and in support of economic development on reserve.

Lease development is often a multi-year project. FTE resources contributed to both the completion and registering of 903 leases, permits and sub-leases, but also supported over 1175 leases, permits and sub-leases in the developmental stage, including over 115 commercial and residential transactions.

Recent large-scale residential development and natural resource extraction transactions have highlighted that commercial transactions on reserve are becoming increasingly complex and require greater time to process and negotiate. In recognition that a smaller number of complex commercial transactions can yield significant economic benefits on reserve, departmental efforts in 2013–2014 focused on the development of a national commercial lease template as well as a new locatee lease policy to simplify, streamline and standardize the leasing process.

Sub-Sub-Program 3.1.2.3: Federal Management of Oil and Gas Interests in Reserve Land

Description

This sub-sub-program provides management and regulation for oil and gas development on First Nation reserve lands through Indian Oil and Gas Canada (IOGC) and pursuant to the Indian Oil and Gas Act and Regulations. IOGC works with First Nations to negotiate oil and gas agreements with companies for exploration, leasing and production. IOGC issues and administers the resulting agreements, ensures compliance, manages royalties and receives resulting revenues from companies on behalf of First Nations. While these activities are delivered directly, funding is also provided to the Indian Resource Council for their participation on IOGC's Board and for their involvement/role in changing the Indian Oil and Gas regulations.

2013–2014 Budgetary Financial Resources (Dollars)

Planned Spending Actual Spending Difference
(Actual minus planned)
13,980,680 12,645,107 (1,335,573)

2013–2014 Human Resources (FTEs)

Planned Actual Difference
(Actual minus planned)
78.7 78.4 (0.3)

Performance Results

Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
First Nations receive market based revenues from oil and gas operations conducted on reserve land Value of money collected by Indian Oil and Gas Canada on behalf of First Nations $120 million by March 31, 2014 $157.5 million

Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

Indian Oil and Gas Canada worked with First Nations and industry to leverage opportunities to develop oil and gas resources. As a result of oil and gas activities carried out during the fiscal year, IOGC collected $157.5 million on behalf of First Nations including $5.9 million collected pursuant to clause 5.08 of the Saskatchewan Treaty Land Entitlement Agreement. This exceeded the $120 million target, influenced by higher commodity prices offset by transportation constraints, economic demand, international supply, volatile product pricing, available transportation and infrastructure, perceived supply risk and changing technologies.

Indian Oil and Gas Canada has skilled, experienced, professional staff who contribute greatly to the achievement of targets and who depend on effective tools and up-to-date information and systems to track, monitor and process operations to achieve intended results. During 2013–2014, a business case was completed to request membership in Petrinex, the industry- and provincially-recognized authoritative source for hydrocarbon volume and pricing data. The business case was formally approved by the Petrinex Steering Committee and work will continue to implement access to these tools.

System improvements to keep current and investments in new systems are planned to support continued achievement of results and effective operations in a changing environment.

Work was also carried out with the Indian Resource Council of Canada (which represents 189 First Nations with oil and gas interests) and a Joint Technical Committee in the development of policy approaches for modernizing the regulations. Indian Oil and Gas Canada have supported regulatory drafters in the development of a draft of new regulations. Ongoing discussions and consultations are being held with oil and gas First Nations.

Sub-Sub-Program 3.1.2.4: First Nations Commercial and Industrial Development

Description

This sub-sub-program relates to the First Nations Commercial and Industrial Development Act which allows First Nations, pursuing large scale commercial or industrial development projects, to request that the Government of Canada develop regulations similar to provincial regulations applicable to comparable projects located off-reserve. The new regulatory regimes apply to a specific project and on a specific parcel of reserve land.

2013–2014 Budgetary Financial Resources (Dollars)

Planned Spending Actual Spending Difference
(Actual minus planned)
2,103,199 298,037 (1,805,162)

2013–2014 Human Resources (FTEs)

Planned Actual Difference
(Actual minus planned)
4.0 3.0 (1.0)

Performance Results

Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
First Nations have on reserve regulatory regimes comparable to those off reserve Number of additional First Nations that have on reserve regulatory regimes comparable to those off reserve 2 by March 31, 2014 0

Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

While one First Nation opted in to the First Nations Commercial and Industrial Development process, the two projects currently under development have not yet resulted in the stated target even though significant progress was achieved.

Although collaboration among federal, provincial and First Nation parties has been productive and regulatory drafting has progressed well, complex concerns emerged during the process that require further negotiation to resolve. This is largely due to the span of statutes that exist for similar developmental projects off reserve requiring a detailed review to determine their applicability to a project on reserve. This review and negotiation process requires the participation of all three parties and their agreement.

In addition, the projects under development are of a large magnitude and require a significant level of investment. First Nations must work together with their private partners to ensure the project's financial viability in the face of market fluctuations in order for the project to proceed successfully. In some instances, this has represented changes to the original business plan resulting in unforeseen elements requiring negotiation and decisions.

Maintaining momentum is critical to ensuring investor certainty and successful negotiations among parties. Though the lengthy timelines required to develop regulations may be viewed as a disincentive to economic development, this is usually more than offset by the fact that the First Nations Commercial and Industrial Development Act is often the only way such complex projects can move forward on reserve lands.

Emphasizing that the First Nations Commercial and Industrial Development Act is a First Nation-driven economic development tool, each proposed project needs to be assessed by the Department for its suitability on a case-by-case basis. Processes related to project intake and assessment are being refined to respond to enquiries more effectively and provide a consistent evaluation for the development of the regime based on experience gained from past projects.

Sub-Sub-Program 3.1.2.5: First Nations Land Management

Description

This sub-sub-program provides First Nations with the authority and capacity to manage their reserve land, resources and environment. It includes the following four programs: 53/60 Delegated Authority, Regional Lands Administration Program, Reserve Land and Environment Management Program and First Nations Land Management. The first three programs enable First Nations to manage their reserve land, resources and environment under the Indian Act and the fourth enables them to do so under the First Nations Land Management Act. AANDC provides funding for First Nations to develop their own land code, negotiate transfer of land management responsibilities, and for the certification and training of First Nation Land Managers. Once operational, First Nations are responsible for managing their reserve lands and associated revenues, as they are no longer governed by the 34 land management sections of the Indian Act.

2013–2014 Budgetary Financial Resources (Dollars)

Planned Spending Actual Spending Difference
(Actual minus planned)
34,201,543 32,112,421 (2,089,122)

2013–2014 Human Resources (FTEs)

Planned Actual Difference
(Actual minus planned)
34.4 30.9 (3.5)

Performance Results

Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
First Nations manage reserve land under the First Nation Land Management Act Number of additional First Nation communities who have assumed management of their reserve land under the First Nation Land Management Act 8 by March 31, 2014 8 communities ratified their Land Code
First Nations have the capacity to manage their reserve lands, resources and environment Number of Reserve Land and Environment Management Program certified land managers per year 15 by March 31, 2014 10

Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

In 2013–2014, AANDC has met the targeted number of additional First Nation communities who have assumed management of their reserve land under the First Nation Land Management Act, as 8 communities ratified their Land Codes.

In March 2014, the Department was able to secure funding to meet commitments made in Canada's Economic Action Plan 2013 to expand the Regime that supports the 8 new entrants announced in January 2013 and the 28 announced in September 2013. With these announcements, there are currently 110 First Nations either operating under their own Land Code or at various stages of the developmental process. Any unexpended funds were reallocated towards departmental priorities.

With over 50 First Nations now in the developmental phase of the Regime, AANDC has renewed its focus on working with key stakeholders to streamline program implementation. In partnership with Natural Resources Canada and the Lands Advisory Board and Resource Centre, AANDC is continuing to integrate business processes to ensure that program milestones are achieved and issues preventing to community progress are identified and resolved in a timely fashion. Further efficiencies in the completion of developmental activities are being explored. The use of electronic ratification has been identified as a tool that could help communities with large populations conduct votes in a more timely and cost effective manner.

Out of 15 enrolled First Nation students, 10 have completed Reserve Land and Environment Management Program (RLEMP) training and are now certified land managers under the Indian Act, which is less than the proposed target. Three students were not able to complete the program this year, but will become certified in the 2014–2015 year. Two other students left the program.

It is important to ensure that sufficient information on the time commitment required for the training program is provided to First Nations in order to ensure that consideration is given to the selection of the student. While AANDC can provide communication and information on the RLEMP, the Department cannot control uptake or the First Nation's need to withdraw from the program due to workload issues related to upcoming designation votes or other community priorities.

Sub-Sub-Program 3.1.2.6: First Nations Oil and Gas Management

Description

First Nations Oil and Gas Management provides First Nations, through the First Nations Oil and Gas and Moneys Management Act, with the authority and capacity to manage oil and gas on their reserve land. Funding is provided to First Nations for developing laws, codes and agreements, training and capacity development, and for community consultation and ratification.

2013–2014 Budgetary Financial Resources (Dollars)

Planned Spending Actual Spending Difference
(Actual minus planned)
1,935,675 0 (1,935,675)

2013–2014 Human Resources (FTEs)

Planned Actual Difference
(Actual minus planned)
0 0 0

Performance Results

Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
First Nations manage oil and gas on their reserve land under the First Nations Oil and Gas Management Act Number of First Nation communities that have assumed management and control of their oil and gas and/or monies under the First Nations Oil and Gas and Monies Management Act 2 by March 31, 2017 1

Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

The expected target for this sub-sub-program was revised to zero for 2013–2014 as First Nations did not express interest during the period in pursuing governance of their oil and gas. It was and is anticipated that First Nations are unlikely to be interested in moving into the First Nations oil and gas portion of the First Nation Oil and Gas and Monies Management Act until they understand what changes are being proposed to the regime they would be leaving (i.e. modernization of the Indian Oil and Gas Regulations). Ongoing discussions and consultations are being held with oil and gas First Nations on revising the regulations concerning federal management of oil and gas from First Nation lands.

Kawacatoose First Nation of Saskatchewan became the first community to opt in to the moneys management component of the First Nations Oil and Gas and Moneys Management Act and take full control over the management of their moneys.

Sub-Program 3.1.3: Strategic Federal Investments and Partnerships

Description

This sub-program refers to the building of relationships and partnerships that will enable Aboriginal economic development. The government recognizes that it does not hold all the economic development levers to single-handedly increase the participation of Aboriginal Canadians in the economy. Therefore, it is necessary to forge partnerships between the provinces and territories, the private sector, and Aboriginal organizations and institutions. This sub-program contributes to opportunity-ready communities, viable Aboriginal businesses, and a skilled Aboriginal labour force, by identifying all existing programming and services related to Aboriginal economic development and aligning them with federal investments. It also identifies and addresses gaps in the current suite of programming by leveraging funds to enable Aboriginal Canadians to act on specific and sectoral economic opportunities that fall outside the scope of existing federal programs. This sub-program ensures a partnership-based and whole-of-government approach to federal efforts on Aboriginal economic development by: utilizing a Federal Coordinating Committee to oversee the implementation of the Federal Framework for Aboriginal Economic Development; strengthening the National Aboriginal Economic Development Board; undertaking economic research; and, conducting ongoing engagement with stakeholders and Aboriginal Canadians.

2013–2014 Budgetary Financial Resources (Dollars)

Planned Spending Actual Spending Difference
(Actual minus planned)
25,207,471 22,612,816 (2,594,655)

2013–2014 Human Resources (FTEs)

Planned Actual Difference
(Actual minus planned)
69.6 64.7 (4.9)

Performance Results

Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
The Actual results reported are for the Strategic Partnerships Initiative only.
Enhanced cooperation and collaboration with internal partners, Aboriginal stakeholders and other federal departments Number of partnerships established with federal and non-federal partners under the Strategic Partnerships Initiative 3 by March 31, 2014 40
Strategic investments in Aboriginal economic opportunities Value of federal and non federal funds leveraged partners under the Strategic Partnerships Initiative $5.0 million by March 31, 2014 More than $5.4 million in federal funding and $25.2 million in non-federal funding was leveraged

Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

With the addition of Environment Canada and Canadian Environmental Assessment Agency this year, there are now 15 partnering federal departments and agencies in the Strategic Partnership Initiative. It is an innovative, horizontal program intended to coordinate federal efforts with respect to supporting Aboriginal participation in complex resource development opportunities.

Due to the strong relationships with federal departments, non-federal partners and the greater understanding of the nature of the Strategic Partnerships Initiative, AANDC has exceeded the performance target for 2013–2014. By investing over $14 million for 12 major initiatives under the Strategic Partnership Initiative, 40 new formal partnerships were established, leveraging an additional $30.6 million from other sources in support of these projects. In total, 399 Aboriginal communities participated in projects under this program.

In response to the 2012 governance review of the Strategic Partnership Initiative, an Investment Committee was established to determine priority areas for funding, placing greater focus on opportunity-driven initiatives, particularly large resource developments and related activities that will increase community readiness to participate at all stages of development. To ensure an appropriate level of engagement and oversight on the Strategic Partnerships Initiative evaluation, both a Working Group and an Advisory Group were established to support the evaluation effort.

A number of opportunities were presented by partners to the Investment Committee for consideration and it was determined that 14 proposals aligned well with the direction of the program. Supported initiatives included the Lower Churchill Hydro project, British Columbia Mining Initiative, Aboriginal Tourism Initiative through Parks Canada and the British Columbia Tourism Initiative, Potash Mining, Liquefied Natural Gas and the Northern Resource Development Initiative. It also included the continuation of the Ring of Fire, Atlantic and British Columbia shipbuilding, Aquaculture Initiative, Agricultural Initiative, Forestry Initiative, the First Nation Power Authority and Labrador Trough.

Program 3.2: Federal Administration of Reserve Land

Description

The Federal Administration of Reserve Land Program contributes to The Land and Economy Strategic Outcome by aiming to ensure that the Crown fulfills its statutory and fiduciary obligations as the administrator of reserve lands held in trust for the use and benefit of the First Nation for whom the land was set aside. These obligations are achieved through the timely response to requests for land transactions, the additions to reserve, the clarity of reserve boundaries, the designation of land for economic development purposes and environmental management. Economic benefits accrue to Aboriginal communities and ultimately enhance the Canadian economy, through the activation of reserve lands and the honouring of treaty obligations.

2013–2014 Budgetary Financial Resources (Dollars)

Main Estimates Planned Spending Total Authorities
Available for Use
Actual Spending
(Authorities used)
Difference
(Actual minus planned)
The difference between Planned Spending and Total Authorities primarily reflects: additional funding provided through Supplementary Estimates or re-allocated internally for on-reserve costs incurred by provincial/territorial or other emergency management organizations as required under the Emergency Management Assistance Program; funding for the assessment, management and remediation of federal contaminated sites; and reduced funding requirement reflecting the deferral of activities associated with the implementation of treaty land entitlement in Saskatchewan. Payments to the Saskatchewan Association of Rural Municipalities and to the Province of Saskatchewan to compensate for the loss of their tax base resulting from the settlement of treaty land were not required in 2013–2014 due to delays in the transfer of lands to reserve status; this deferred funding that was not required in 2013–2014 has been reprofiled to 2014–2015 when it will be available for the intended purpose.
52,587,401 52,587,401 134,117,966 133,423,081 80,835,680

2013–2014 Human Resources (FTEs)

Planned Actual Difference
(Actual minus planned)
Due to rounding, sub-sub-program FTE figures may not add up.
138.9 123.4 (15.5)

Performance Results

Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
* Class 1 indicates a high concern or threat to human health and the environment. Class 2 indicates a high potential for adverse off-site impacts, although the threat to human health and the environment is generally not imminent.
Timely administration of reserve land for First Nations Percentage of instruments registered within service standard of 10 days on average 90% by March 31, 2014
100% by March 31, 2016
80.4%
Percentage of leases and permits managed in Netlands (i.e. number of new leases and permits registered in the Indian Land Registry compared to number tracked in the NetLands monitoring system) 70% by March 31, 2014
100% by March 31, 2016
76%
Contaminated sites are remediated to ensure the protection of human health and the safety of the environment Number of contaminated sites remediated 5 by March 31, 2014 23 High Priority sites (identified as Class 1 and Class 2 sites)*

Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

AANDC registered 80.4% of instruments within the 10 day service standard, less than the proposed target of 90%. However, the Department did exceed the leasing and permit management target by registering and tracking 76% of new leases and permits in the Indian Lands Registry System and in Netlands.

The target to remediate 5 high priority contaminated sites was also exceeded. In 2013–2014, AANDC remediated and closed 23 high-risk sites that posed a high risk to human health and safety.

In the previous fiscal year, responsibility for the registration of instruments was transferred to regional offices to streamline the process and reduce duplication. All 7998 instruments that were registered under the new streamlined process in 2013–2014 were completed with an average processing time of 9.7 days. The gap in achieving the 10 day service standard for 90% of all transactions can be attributed to high-volume regions with lower registration capacity and to the proportion of instruments which required longer processing times due to the complexity of the commercial transactions involved. As part of the transfer of registration responsibility to regional offices, 3.5 FTEs have been deployed to a regional support centre to develop and provide training to improve regional registration.

Departmental efforts in 2013–2014 focused on engaging with regional offices to improve Netlands and the Indian Lands Registry System to better support the integration of these systems and lease and permit management. Additionally, enhanced reporting capability was developed in early 2013–2014, which integrated data from the two systems to better monitor the entry of leases and permits into both Netlands and the Indian Land Registry Systems.

The 2013 Audit of Land Management noted that training to support the transfer of registration responsibilities to regional offices was effective in explaining the process to register simple transactions. However, regions that managed more complex transactions found these types of transactions more difficult to register. In response, AANDC conducted further training tailored to address the specific registration challenges in different regions. The Department will continue to work with the regional support centre for registration and to develop further training, tools and strategies to build and maintain regional capacity.

Sub-Program 3.2.1: Additions to Reserve

Description

This sub-program involves adding land to existing reserves and creating new reserves. These activities fall under three broad categories: legal obligations, community expansion and new reserves/other. The bulk of this work contributes to the implementation of Treaty Land Entitlement and other specific claim settlement agreements and thereby to reconciliation between First Nations and the Crown. The land transfer process requires AANDC to exercise due diligence through environmental assessments, land appraisals, land surveys, consultations, and resolution of third party interests.

2013–2014 Budgetary Financial Resources (Dollars)

Planned Spending Actual Spending Difference
(Actual minus planned)
The difference between Planned and Actual Spending largely reflects internal in-year re-allocation of funds.
14,141,972 8,992,434 (5,149,538)

2013–2014 Human Resources (FTEs)

Planned Actual Difference
(Actual minus planned)
39.2 34.9 (4.3)

Performance Results

Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Increased economic development opportunities Number of Additions to Reserve submissions with an economic development component 10 by March 31, 2014 46
Treaty Land Claims in support of community expansion are implemented Acres added to reserve to meet Treaty Land Entitlement obligations in Manitoba and Saskatchewan 30,000 by March 31, 2014 20,342.44

Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

In 2013–2014, 46 Additions to Reserve submissions with an economic development component were approved, which exceeded the target. AANDC added 20,342.44 acres to reserves to meet Treaty Land Entitlement obligations in Manitoba and Saskatchewan, short of the 30,000 targeted for 2013–2014.

Success in completing economic development Additions to Reserve is partially related to the shortfall in achieving the targeted number of Treaty Land Entitlement acres. For example, over the last five years the average acre size per Addition to Reserve has decreased substantially, in part a reflection of a greater focus on smaller, strategic and more complex parcels of land with greater economic development potential. Guidelines were introduced in 2013–2014 to make application of the duty to consult on the Additions to Reserve process much clearer. The introduction of this new process created delays in the completion and approval of some Additions to Reserve planned for 2013–2014.

In 2013–2014, AANDC piloted grants and contribution investments to support the progress of Additions to Reserve that support economic development. There was less spending than anticipated, as the Additions to Reserve process is complex and requires multiple years to complete. Consequently, opportunities to inject resources to expedite the Additions to Reserve process for economic development require multi-year planning to be successful and proposed revisions to the Additions to Reserve policy encourages improved planning. Approximately $4.5 million was redirected to assess and remediate contaminated sites and support economic development opportunities. FTE resources were also redirected to staff two regional support centers to assist regions in completing the Additions to Reserve process. 2013–2014 was the first fully operational year for both centers, and their review, training and support services contributed significantly to the successful completion of 46 economic development Additions to Reserve.

In 2013, the Audit of the Additions to Reserve recommended that departmental guidance tools should be revised to clarify the procedural steps involved in Additions to Reserve, and highlighted the resolution of third-party interests as one of the major obstacles delaying the completion of the process. In partnership with the Assembly of First Nations, AANDC worked on developing a new Additions to Reserve policy and created guidelines to help complete municipal service agreements. AANDC has also provided support to the National Aboriginal Land Managers Association to update a toolkit designed to assist First Nations in navigating the Additions to Reserve process. Upon completion of the policy revisions, training will be provided to First Nations.

Sub-Program 3.2.2: Registration of Rights and Interests in Reserve Lands

Description

This Registration of Rights and Interests in Reserve Land sub-program fulfills statutory requirements for the Department to maintain land registries. These registries include the Indian Lands Registry, First Nations Land Registry and Self Governing First Nations Land Registry. The operation of the land registries involves examining, registering and maintaining documents related to such rights and interests including leases, permits, easements, licences and Certificates of Possession. This sub-program includes the internal survey program which defines the scope of these registered rights and interests. The statutory duties for the establishment of Rights and Interests in reserve land are carried out in accordance with the Indian Act and the Canada Lands Surveys Act.

2013–2014 Budgetary Financial Resources (Dollars)

Planned Spending Actual Spending Difference
(Actual minus planned)
The difference between Planned and Actual Spending reflects in-year re-allocation of funds.
0 1,847,114 1,847,114

2013–2014 Human Resources (FTEs)

Planned Actual Difference
(Actual minus planned)
15.1 10.6 (4.5)

Performance Results

Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Individual and third party interests are legally supported by Indian Act land tenure Number of registered instruments 10,000 by March 31, 2014 6,194

Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

AANDC registered 6,194 Indian Act instruments, a shortfall of the target of 10,000 instruments.

Indian Act instruments include a number of transactions that may impact interest in the land and are submitted to AANDC for registration by First Nations, individuals implicated in the transfer or their solicitor. In 2013–2014, AANDC did not achieve its target as the Department did not receive 10,000 instruments for registration. This is consistent with the trend over the last three years, as an average of 6,902 Indian Act instruments were registered annually over this period. While the number of incoming instruments for registration was lower than the target, departmental efforts focused on timely registration of all instruments. Including instruments associated with First Nations with their own land code or with self-governing First Nations, AANDC registered a total of 8,463 instruments with an average processing time of 9.7 days.

Sub-Program 3.2.3: Clarity of Reserve Boundaries

Description

The Clarity of Reserve Boundaries sub-program is related to the statutory requirement to maintain a surrendered land registry, which is now part of the Indian Lands Registry. This sub-program clarifies title through historical research, returns land to reserve that has been expropriated or surrendered without sale, and processes section 35 expropriations. This sub-program also includes the Reserve Boundary program which provides proper demarcation of external reserve boundaries. External Reserve Boundaries define the limits of both the federal jurisdiction and the limits of the land set aside for the individual band in accordance with section 18 of the Indian Act. These boundaries must be maintained on a cyclical basis to prevent encroachment and to correct for natural erosion and accretion.

2013–2014 Budgetary Financial Resources (Dollars)

Planned Spending Actual Spending Difference
(Actual minus planned)
17,565 132,846 115,281

2013–2014 Human Resources (FTEs)

Planned Actual Difference
(Actual minus planned)
0.7 0.2 (0.5)

Performance Results

Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Certainty of the extent of reserve boundaries and federal jurisdiction Number of kilometers of reserve boundary reviewed 225 by March 31, 2014 683

Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

AANDC exceeded the target in reviewing 683 kilometers of reserve boundary, which required additional financial resources.

AANDC has been working to improve the administration of surveys and was able to support survey activities earlier in the fiscal year. This allowed surveyors to initiate their work in a timelier manner and take advantage of a longer survey season prior to the arrival of winter. These improvements resulted in the surveying of 683 kilometers of reserve boundaries, which exceeded the target by 458 kilometers.

AANDC continued the pilot initiated in the previous year to test alternative survey funding and delivery models and develop capacity within the Aboriginal sector. Building upon their experience in the first year, the National Aboriginal Land Management Association was able to support the delivery of a greater number of surveys.

Experience from the administrative process changes and pilot from the previous year highlight the efficiencies that can be realized in survey administration. Changes in the processes to identify, prioritize and allocate funds to support surveys carried out in 2013–2014 resulted in twice the amount of kilometers of reserve boundaries being surveyed compared to the previous year. Based on this success, AANDC has collaborated with the Survey General at Natural Resources Canada to identify other changes that will further streamline the administration of surveys. In 2014–2015, AANDC will begin implementing changes to accelerate survey start-up and eliminate effort duplication, including: reducing regional research requirements; speeding up the issuance of survey instructions; implementing electronic approvals; and, eliminating duplication in the approval process.

Sub-Program 3.2.4: Environmental Management

Description

This sub-program supports compliance with federal environmental legislation, regulations and policies, the reduction of environmental liabilities and environmental and sustainable development. As outlined in the Environmental Stewardship Strategy, the sub-program facilitates the implementation of an integrated approach to environmental and natural resource management for reserve lands, in order to protect the health and safety of communities, as well as the integrity of the environment, while promoting economic and social development opportunities. Working in partnership with First Nations, this sub-program contributes to sustainable development on reserve.

2013–2014 Budgetary Financial Resources (Dollars)

Planned Spending Actual Spending Difference
(Actual minus planned)
The difference between Planned and Actual Spending largely reflects an increase in access to more Federal Contaminated Sites Action Plan funds from custodial departments and internal re-allocations and approved funding related to Emergency Management.
38,427,864 122,450,687 84,022,823

2013–2014 Human Resources (FTEs)

Planned Actual Difference
(Actual minus planned)
83.9 77.7 (6.2)

Performance Results

Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Departmental environmental liabilities reduced Number of enforcement actions issued Less than 15 by March 31, 2014 13

Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

AANDC met the target with only 13 enforcement actions issued in 2013–2014.

Efforts to address issues related to compliance with federal environmental regulations on reserve included building capacity within First Nations to undertake environmental management and on developing departmental policies and procedures to support compliance with federal environmental regulations. In 2013–2014, AANDC developed a new Environmental Review Process for projects on reserve that are not subject to the federal environmental assessment process under the Canadian Environment Assessment Act, 2012. Additionally, departmental efforts have focused on reviewing and updating environmental policies, including adding or revising environmental clauses to the proposed changes to the Additions to Reserve policy, the new Locatee Lease policy and the new national commercial lease template.

Sub-Sub-Program 3.2.4.1: Contaminated Sites on Reserve

Description

The Contaminated Sites on Reserve sub-sub-program provides for the assessment and remediation of contaminated sites on reserve land through the implementation of the Contaminated Sites Management Program and the Federal Contaminated Sites Action Plan, in accordance with departmental and federal policies and procedures. It also provides funding to First Nations and First Nation organizations for the identification, assessment, management and remediation of contaminated sites, as well as environmental capacity building.

2013–2014 Budgetary Financial Resources (Dollars)

Planned Spending Actual Spending Difference
(Actual minus planned)
17,909,251 33,246,013 15,336,762

2013–2014 Human Resources (FTEs)

Planned Actual Difference
(Actual minus planned)
16.1 11.5 (4.6)

Performance Results

Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
* Class 1 indicates a high concern or threat to human health and the environment. Steps 7, 8 and 9 refer to activities related to the development of a remediation and/or risk-management plan, remediation risk management and confirmatory sampling.
Highest ranked human health and ecological risks on reserve reduced (according to the priority ranking system) Number of Class 1 sites in Integrated Environmental Management System where risk reduction is occurring (Step 7, 8 and 9)* 15 by March 31, 2014 95
Improved characterization of contaminated sites on reserve Number of sites assessed 10 by March 31, 2014 67
Reduction of the known federal financial liability in confirmed contaminated sites Dollar Reduction in total contaminated sites liability for known sites in remediation/risk management $8.0 million by March 31, 2014 $24.7 million

Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

AANDC exceeded all targets, by supporting activities for 67 environmental site assessments and remedial activities on 95 high-priority sites, reducing the total environmental liability of known contaminated sites on reserve by $24.7 million.

The targets for on-reserve contaminated sites were exceeded as AANDC was able to access additional resources from the Federal Contaminated Sites Action Plan and from other sources. Success in securing and deploying additional resources can be attributed to AANDC's efforts to monitor and maintain a list of "shovel ready" projects, or projects where further investment could result in cost savings by avoiding costs associated with re-mobilizing heavy equipment.

AANDC's inventory South of 60 includes over 230 Class 1 sites and an additional 1100 sites requiring further assessment. As contaminated sites on reserve pose significant risks to human health and the ecological integrity of reserve lands, the Department seeks opportunities for additional investment to reduce these risks and help build conditions to support economic development on reserve lands. The Department prioritizes sites that have a higher risk to human health and safety and these sites are typically more costly, complex and require multiple years to remediate. In 2013–2014, AANDC was able to access more Federal Contaminated Sites Action Plan funds from custodial departments than in previous years, due to project delays or anticipated surpluses. AANDC targeted additional funds to projects with multiple sites to reduce mobilization costs, and these additional funds contributed to the Department's ability to exceed all targets linked to contaminated sites. For example, 19 higher risk sites in close proximity were completed by investing additional funding under one long term project.

Experience over the last year highlights the importance of coordination, project planning and maintaining a list of investment-ready projects and proper project management for projects delayed by reduced accessibility from poor weather, project tendering or equipment failure. The maintenance of a project list based on regional capacity, field season availability and monthly updates to identify changing circumstances, positioned AANDC to take advantage of surpluses from other Federal Contaminated Sites Action Plan custodial departments or other sources and advance remediation of high-risk sites.

Sub-Sub-Program 3.2.4.2: Environmental Sustainability

Description

The Environmental Sustainability sub-sub-program focuses on promoting environmental sustainability on reserve and includes activities related to the development, implementation and communication of departmental environmental policies and procedures in accordance with the Environmental Stewardship Strategy and federal environmental legislation. This promotion is done while building awareness of environmental responsibilities within AANDC and in First Nation communities. The sub-sub-program also provides contribution funding to First Nation communities to participate in environmental management processes.

2013–2014 Budgetary Financial Resources (Dollars)

Planned Spending Actual Spending Difference
(Actual minus planned)
8,648,906 9,486,421 837,515

2013–2014 Human Resources (FTEs)

Planned Actual Difference
(Actual minus planned)
49.2 46.1 (3.1)

Performance Results

Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Environmental safeguards are in place to inform project decision making with respect to significant adverse environmental implications Percentage of projects for which an environmental safeguard process was applied 100% by March 31, 2014 100%

Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

In response to changes to the Canadian Environmental Assessment Act in 2012, AANDC developed a new environmental review process to ensure that projects with less risk do not also cause significant adverse environmental effects on reserve. The new review process ensures that the depth of the environmental review is reflective of the risk and likelihood of significant adverse effects associated with carrying out the project. As a result of this new process, all 463 identified projects received an environmental review.

The Environmental Review Process was developed and piloted in 2013–2014. While the process and supporting tools were developed and successfully tested in collaboration with regional offices, lessons learned from the implementation of the new approach highlighted the need to support consistent tracking and information management. Adaptations were made in 2013–2014 to an existing information management system (the Integrated Environmental Management System) to support these requirements. In 2014–2015, AANDC will conduct training sessions with regional officers to build capacity and consistent application of the Integrated Environmental Management System.

Sub-Sub-Program 3.2.4.3: Emergency Management Assistance

Description

The Emergency Management Assistance sub-sub-program promotes an all hazards approach to the protection of the health and safety of on-reserve First Nations as well as their lands and critical infrastructure. The Emergency Management Assistance Program (EMAP) recognizes the Emergency Management Act, 2007 and promotes the four pillars of emergency management: mitigation, preparedness, response and recovery. The EMAP promotes efficiency by accessing existing resources and services of emergency management partners to address on-reserve emergencies. The EMAP reimburses these partners for eligible expenses as outlined in agreements. The EMAP also plays an important role in emergency recovery efforts as well as a coordinating role in integrating the emergency management efforts of the provinces, First Nations, other federal departments and emergency management organizations.

2013–2014 Budgetary Financial Resources (Dollars)

Planned Spending Actual Spending Difference
(Actual minus planned)
11,869,707 79,718,253 67,848,546

2013–2014 Human Resources (FTEs)

Planned Actual Difference
(Actual minus planned)
18.6 20.2 1.6

Performance Results

Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
First Nations are prepared and equipped to manage emergencies on reserve Percentage of First Nation communities with an Emergency Management Plan 95% by March 31, 2014 85%

Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

EMAP was enhanced in 2013–2014 to address the need for a comprehensive approach to emergency management on reserve. AANDC collaborated with Public Safety Canada to revise the approach to emergency activities on reserve across the four pillars of emergency management. An additional $25.9 million was added to the EMAP budget and another $41.5 million was expended to address on-reserve emergency management, including emergency preparedness, response and recovery activities.

In 2013–2014, the performance target of 95% of First Nations with emergency plans was not met. EMAP continued to support First Nation communities to develop emergency plans. To date, approximately 85% of First Nations have developed community emergency management plans, which is the highest percentage achieved thus far.

In 2013–2014, EMAP was audited by AANDC and by the Office of the Auditor General. The key recommendations were to develop a risk-based, all-hazards approach; clarify EMAP authority and guidelines; strengthen internal controls over funds and finalize a performance measurement strategy. In response to these recommendations, EMAP is implementing its approved performance measurement strategy, updating terms and conditions, revising the national plan and implementing a comprehensive approach to emergency management.

Program 3.3: Community Infrastructure

Description

This program contributes to The Land and Economy Strategic Outcome by supporting First Nation communities in acquiring, constructing, owning, operating and maintaining a base infrastructure that protects their health and safety and enables their engagement in the economy. This program provides funding and advice to support housing, capacity building and community infrastructure, including water and wastewater systems, education facilities, roads and bridges, electrification, and community buildings. Ultimately, this program enables First Nations to participate more fully in the Canadian economy by establishing a base of safe infrastructure that meets established standards, and a housing infrastructure that meets the needs of First Nations communities.

2013–2014 Budgetary Financial Resources (Dollars)

Main Estimates Planned Spending Total Authorities
Available for Use
Actual Spending
(Authorities used)
Difference
(Actual minus planned)
The difference between Planned Spending and Total Authorities primarily reflects re-allocations to address pressures in other programs, notably Social Development and Federal Administration of Reserve Land, as well as the deferral of funding provided through Canada's Economic Action Plan 2013 for certain high-priority school construction projects. This deferred funding that was not required in 2013–2014 has been reprofiled to 2014–2015 when it will be available for the intended purpose.
1,221,345,124 1,221,345,124 1,039,313,770 1,038,948,588 (182,396,536)

2013–2014 Human Resources (FTEs)

Planned Actual Difference
(Actual minus planned)
Planned numbers of FTEs in support of the Community Infrastructure as reported in the 2013–2014 RPP differ from the actual number of FTEs by program sub-activity as a result of a realignment and redistribution of FTEs that was undertaken in fiscal year 2013–2014 to better reflect FTE resources attributed to the following four sub-programs: 3.3.1, 3.3.2, 3.3.3, 3.3.4.
250.5 239.8 (10.7)

Performance Results

Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
* Community Well-Being Index from Census 2011 not currently available.
First Nations communities have a base of infrastructure that protects the health and safety and enables engagement in the economy Positive change in rating in the Community Well-Being Index (employment, income, education and housing sub-indices) Achieve Index rating greater than 57 by March 31, 2016 Baseline for 2006*
57 on-reserve
77 off-reserve

Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

The Safe Drinking Water for First Nations Act received Royal Assent in June 2013, and came into force on November 1, 2013. This provided the Government with the authority to develop federal regulations under the Act, together with First Nations and other stakeholders. AANDC and Health Canada have put in place the Regulatory Development Oversight Committee, a senior-level interdepartmental committee, to provide leadership and oversight for regulatory development under the Act.

AANDC has also been developing a structural-disaster mitigation priority-ranking framework to better prioritize mitigation infrastructure projects. This will help deliver the $40 million over 5 years, starting in 2015–2016, announced in Canada's Economic Action Plan 2014 for disaster mitigation programming in First Nations communities.

In partnership with the Aboriginal Firefighters' Association of Canada, the Department launched the national BeFireSafe education campaign on March 20, 2014 to raise awareness of the importance of fire prevention in First Nation communities. The year-long campaign aims to reduce fire-related deaths, injuries and damages by sharing seasonal fire safety tips and information through regular radio features and social media messaging.

While increasing fire safety education and awareness will help reduce the number of fires in First Nations across Canada, there continues to be a regulatory gap related to the application and enforcement of infrastructure codes on reserve. As enforceable building and fire codes are critical to protecting health and safety, AANDC has begun exploring potential options for addressing this gap in First Nation communities.

Sub-Program 3.3.1: Water and Wastewater Infrastructure

Description

This sub-program supports the provision of funding for the planning, design, construction, acquisition, operation and maintenance of infrastructure facilities, including: community water supply, treatment and distribution systems; and community wastewater collection, treatment and disposal systems. It includes the provision of funding for: coordination, training and capacity building for activities related to water and wastewater facilities, identification of on-reserve water and wastewater infrastructure needs, development of water and wastewater infrastructure capital plans, and the design and ongoing implementation of water and wastewater facilities maintenance management practices. The goal is to support First Nations in meeting health and safety standards and providing their residents with similar levels of service as off-reserve communities. First Nations identify their priorities and needs and present project proposals to the Department. Funding is provided for projects based on a priority assessment.

2013–2014 Budgetary Financial Resources (Dollars)

Planned Spending Actual Spending Difference
(Actual minus planned)
The difference between Planned and Actual Spending is explained at the program level under the Community Infrastructure Program.
328,586,032 295,097,655 (33,488,377)

2013–2014 Human Resources (FTEs)

Planned Actual Difference
(Actual minus planned)
77.0 63.3 (13.7)

Performance Results

Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
First Nations communities have a base of safe water and wastewater that meets established standards Percentage of First Nations drinking water systems that have LOW risk ratings 42% by March 31, 2014
50% by March 31, 2015
44%
Percentage of First Nations wastewater systems that have LOW risk ratings 60% by March 31, 2014
70% by March 31, 2015
52%
Percentage of First Nations drinking water systems with treated water that meets prescribed standards in the Guidelines for Canadian Drinking Water Quality 70% by March 31, 2014
85% by March 31, 2015
74%
Percentage of First Nations wastewater systems producing treated water that meet the requirements specified in the Wastewater Systems Effluent Regulations 80% of systems meet current standards by March 31, 2014

100% of systems meet current standards by March 31, 2016
63%

Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

Drinking water remains the investment priority due to the immediate impact on human health. While drinking water system targets were met, targets for wastewater were not. First Nations have the authority to allocate the funding they receive from the Department for ongoing management of community infrastructure to their various infrastructure priorities. These decisions may reduce the amount of funding dedicated to water and wastewater activities, which may contribute to slower progress in improving the risk ratings of wastewater systems. AANDC will continue to work with First Nations to support them in meeting Wastewater System Effluent Regulations requirements, through such initiatives as the Circuit Rider Training Program.

In 2013–2014, AANDC provided $295 million to support First Nations in delivering water and wastewater services on reserve through capacity building and operator training, enforceable standards and protocols and infrastructure investments. Although risk levels of First Nations water and wastewater systems are improving year to year, more needs to be done to ensure departmental targets are met within the expected timeframe.

In addition to reducing risk levels, other progress has been made. In 2013–2014, the Island Lake Tribal Council and partners completed Phase 2 of a multi-year plan to provide water and wastewater services to homes in their four member Northern Manitoba First Nations. Since 2011, 218 homes have been retrofitted with indoor plumbing and materials to retrofit an additional 207 homes were delivered over the 2013 winter road for the 2014 construction season.

The Evaluation of the First Nations Water and Wastewater Action Plan, completed in November 2013, found clear improvements to infrastructure and risk ratings. Recommendations from the evaluation support for further improvement included the need for a longer term investment plan in infrastructure and operator capacity and retention; the need to engage First Nations in the development of regulations under the Safe Drinking Water for First Nations Act; and the need to support communities in preparing to comply with regulations. In response to the recommendations, AANDC and Health Canada have developed a Management Response and Action Plan that will be fully implemented by 2016–2017.

Sub-Program 3.3.2: Education Facilities

Description

This sub-program supports the provision of funding for the planning, design, construction/acquisition, renovation, repair, replacement, operation and maintenance of band-operated elementary and secondary education facilities (including school buildings, teacheragesFootnote 5 and student residences) and any related facility services. This sub-program also supports the provision of funding for the acquisition, replacement, and repair of furniture, equipment and furnishing for schools, teacherages and student residences and for the identification of education facility needs and the development of education facility plans and the design and ongoing implementation of maintenance management practices. Also, this sub-program supports the provision of funding for agreements with provincial school boards for the planning, design, construction and acquisition of facilities, for the elementary and secondary education of Indian children.

2013–2014 Budgetary Financial Resources (Dollars)

Planned Spending Actual Spending Difference
(Actual minus planned)
The difference between Planned and Actual Spending is explained at the Program level under the Community Infrastructure Program.
300,465,700 214,242,389 (86,223,311)

2013–2014 Human Resources (FTEs)

Planned Actual Difference
(Actual minus planned)
0 12.3 12.3

Performance Results

Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
* Results are affected by data availability. There are many assets with unknown condition ratings, either because no information is available or the information available is not valid or outdated. Recently implemented reforms to the Asset Condition Reporting System should refine and improve school condition ratings as inspections are conducted on all schools over the next 3-year inspection cycle.
First Nations communities have a base of education facilities that meet established standards Percentage of First Nations schools with a greater than "fair" condition rating (based on physical/structural conditions) as assessed through the Asset Condition Reporting System inspections Maintain 70% by March 31, 2014
Maintain 70% by March 31, 2015
63%*

Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Canada invests annually to support First Nations across the country with the operation, maintenance, upgrades and repairs of their on-reserve school facilities. The Government of Canada has provided additional investments in school infrastructure through targeted initiatives so that education facilities meet established standards.

Canada's Economic Action Plan 2012 announced $175 million over 3 years for school infrastructure. With this investment, the Department committed to fund 13 school projects partially or completely (11 new schools and 2 renovation/additions) and examine the feasibility of a public-private partnership (P3) to construct 4 new schools in Northern Manitoba. The Department continued to deliver on these commitments in 2013–2014.

As of March 31, 2014, approximately $67 million of the $175 million committed in Canada's Economic Action Plan 2012 had been expended on building and renovating schools on reserve and by exploring new ways to deliver infrastructure ($25 million in 2012–2013 and $42 million in 2013–2014). One school is now complete, four are under construction, five are in design phase and two are in the tendering process. A business case to explore public-private partnership for a bundle of schools in Northern Manitoba is under development with an expected completion date in 2014. The outstanding $108 million will be expended in 2014–2015.

Specific to Canada's Economic Action Plan 2012 schools initiative of $175 million over 3 years, a reprofile of $33 million was approved in 2013–2014 and was re-allocated to the same projects for 2014–2015. Because high-priority school projects targeted with Canada's Economic Action Plan 2012 funds were required to go through a 12–18 months process of feasibility studies and design before being deemed "construction ready," it is normal that the majority of the funds were expended and re-allocated as the projects progress from planning to execution.

Sub-Program 3.3.3: Housing

Description

This sub-program supports the provision of funding to First Nations to plan and manage their housing needs including the design, construction and acquisition of new housing units as well as renovation of existing housing unit. The goal of this sub-program is to work with First Nation communities to increase the supply of safe and affordable housing in order to achieve better housing outcomes for their residents.

2013–2014 Budgetary Financial Resources (Dollars)

Planned Spending Actual Spending Difference
(Actual minus planned)
The difference between Planned and Actual Spending is explained at the Program level under the Community Infrastructure Program.
145,501,374 143,050,154 (2,451,220)

2013–2014 Human Resources (FTEs)

Planned Actual Difference
(Actual minus planned)
4.2 15.6 11.4

Performance Results

Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
* Housing data is based on self-assessments and self-reporting by First Nations using the Housing Data Collection Instrument. While the results cannot be independently verified, and may fluctuate from year to year, the Department continues to be reliant on this data. This may be reviewed in the future as part of ongoing efforts to improve outcomes and oversight for the department's on-reserve housing program.
Housing infrastructure meets the needs of First Nation communities Percentage of First Nations housing that is "adequate" as assessed and reported annually by First Nations ["Adequate" is defined in the Year-end Reporting Handbook for the Housing Data Collection Instrument.] Maintain 72% by March 31, 2014
Maintain 72% by March 31, 2015
75%*

Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

AANDC works with Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation (CMHC) and First Nations to help provide safe and affordable housing units on reserves across Canada. Through both organizations, the Government of Canada invests an average of $300 million in on-reserve housing each year. In 2013–2014, Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Canada alone invested approximately $143 million in on-reserve housing, which has supported an increase in the number of adequate houses on reserve. As a result, 75% of First Nations housing was deemed "adequate" as assessed and reported annually by First Nations, exceeding the 2013–2014 target of 72%.

Over the past year, AANDC continued its collaboration with CMHC to improve housing outcomes and to that purpose signed a Memorandum of Understanding in April 2013. This was an important milestone towards improving partnerships between federal organizations with the common goal of improving housing outcomes on reserve. It will enable the organizations to increase the sharing of information related to capacity-development initiatives and promote project collaboration where possible.

In February 2014, AANDC worked in collaboration with the Assembly of First Nations to run a two-day housing workshop as part of a broader national infrastructure conference that included 354 registered delegates, 269 of which were First Nation. The workshop included discussions on construction, mould, alternative financing, housing strategies and financing programs available for housing projects. It is anticipated that the discussions held at the housing workshop will help facilitate further collaboration and future improvements to on-reserve housing.

Further, AANDC helped to fund a pilot project in Alberta on safety code officer training. This is an important step towards improved code compliance on reserves as well as capacity development for a number of First Nations within this region. Other housing projects focused on increased capacity development and improved governance including support for the First Nation Building Officers Association, the implementation of a Housing Authority in Metapeniagiag and housing policy and capacity development in Shubenacadie First Nation and Tobique First Nation.

Sub-Program 3.3.4: Community Infrastructure Assets and Facilities

Description

This sub-program supports the provision of funding for the planning, design, construction, acquisition, operation and maintenance of community infrastructure assets and facilities. It also supports the provision of funding for coordination, training and capacity building for activities related to community infrastructure assets and facilities. The goal is to support First Nations in meeting health and safety standards and providing their residents with similar levels of service to off-reserve communities. Delivery of the program is devolved to First Nations, in support of AANDC's policy of devolution of responsibilities to First Nations. First Nations identify their priorities and needs and present project proposals to the Department. Funding is provided for projects based on a priority assessment.

2013–2014 Budgetary Financial Resources (Dollars)

Planned Spending Actual Spending Difference
(Actual minus planned)
The difference between Planned and Actual Spending is explained at the Program level under the Community Infrastructure Program.
442,897,450 382,643,078 (60,254,372)

2013–2014 Human Resources (FTEs)

Planned Actual Difference
(Actual minus planned)
160.9 141.4 (19.5)

Performance Results

Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
First Nations communities have a base of safe infrastructure that meets established standards (e.g., fire protection, electricity, safe roads and bridges, and telecommunications) Percentage of First Nations communities with access to broadband connectivity 60% by March 31, 2014
70% by March 31, 2015
80%
Percentage of bridges with greater than "fair" condition rating Maintain 65% by March 31, 2014
Maintain 65% by March 31, 2015
54%
Percentage of roads with greater than "fair" condition rating Maintain 45% by March 31, 2014
Maintain 45% by March 31, 2015
42%

Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

In 2013–2014, AANDC has helped provide access to broadband connectivity to 80% of First Nations communities. This exceeded the Department's performance target by a considerable margin of 20 percentage points. The First Nation Infrastructure Fund (FNIF) was the primary AANDC funding source to deliver connectivity infrastructure projects. In November 2013, the Government announced ongoing statutory funding for ten years for the FNIF through the Gas Tax Fund and the New Building Canada Fund. This recent renewal will result in additional projects in five eligible categories, including connectivity.

The 2013–2014 performance targets for roads and bridges were not met. Competing priorities at the community level for operation and maintenance funds contributed to this result. AANDC provided a subsidy of up to 90% of road and bridge operation and maintenance costs. First Nations have the flexibility to prioritize these funds to meet their needs, and competing priorities can divert funds away from maintenance of roads and bridges. In 2013–2014, AANDC transferred over $81 million to First Nations in support of roads and bridges in First Nation communities.

External factors also contributed to this result. Communities across Canada, on and off reserve, face similar challenges in maintaining roads, compounded by the harsh effects of Canadian winters and freeze-thaw cycles that cause deterioration and increase maintenance costs. The 2012 Canadian Infrastructure Report Card rated only 47.5% of roads assessed in 118 municipalities better than "fair" condition.

Sub-Program 3.3.5: Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency

Description

The ecoENERGY for Aboriginal and Northern Communities Program supports Aboriginal and northern communities, including off-grid communities, to reduce greenhouse gas emissions through the integration of proven renewable energy technologies such as residual heat recovery, biomass, geothermal, wind, solar and small hydro. The program provides funding support for the design and construction of renewable energy projects integrated with community buildings, and for the feasibility stages of larger renewable energy projects, thereby displacing natural gas, coal and diesel generation of electricity and heat.

2013–2014 Budgetary Financial Resources (Dollars)

Planned Spending Actual Spending Difference
(Actual minus planned)
3,894,568 3,915,312 20,744

2013–2014 Human Resources (FTEs)

Planned Actual Difference
(Actual minus planned)
8.4 7.2 (1.2)

Performance Results

Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Greenhouse gas emissions in Aboriginal and northern communities are reduced Projected reductions in GHG emissions resulting from all projects funded by the ecoEnergy for Aboriginal and Northern Communities Program (2011–2016) Projected 1.5 Mt by March 31, 2016 Projects funded from 2011–2012 to 2013–2014 are projected to result in a 3.3 Megatons reduction of GHG emissions over the course of their lifespan

Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

The ecoENERGY for Aboriginal and Northern Communities Program supports Aboriginal and northern communities to reduce greenhouse gas emissions through the integration of proven renewable energy technologies.

The Program received 110 proposals in 2013–2014, 32 of which received funding. These projects were located in 32 communities, 16 of which were off-grid communities.

Since 2011, the Program has funded a total of 96 distinct energy projects in 88 communities. Once fully implemented, projects funded from 2011–2012 to 2013–2014 are expected to result in a 3.3-Megatons reduction in greenhouse gas emissions over their 20-year project lifecycle. After the third year of a five-year program, this substantially exceeds the overall program target of 1.5 Megatons.

There was a significant increase in project proposals from the North submitted to the Program. In 2013–2014, 10 community projects were funded in the North reflecting the Department's increasing efforts to engage partners throughout the territories, including chairing a Nunavut Renewable Energy Working Group to bring stakeholders together and advance renewable energy projects in the territory.

An ongoing challenge facing the program is over-subscription. The program continues to focus on supporting projects in off-grid communities and communities that have not previously received funding through the program and where projects will have the greatest impact on the community in addressing energy needs, creating economic and social benefits and fostering immediate and future reduction efforts.

A challenge for communities has been the late flow of funds despite efficient proposal management processes. The program moved its application window forward in 2012–2013 and again in 2013–2014 to provide funds to communities earlier in the fiscal year. This has allowed communities to spend program funds more efficiently, achieving better project and overall program results.

Program 3.4: Urban Aboriginal Participation

Description

Urban Aboriginal programming contributes to the Land and Economy Strategic Outcome by supporting the participation of urban Aboriginal individuals and communities in the economy. Through programs such as the Urban Aboriginal Strategy, the Aboriginal Friendship Centers Program, the Cultural Connections for Aboriginal Youth, and Young Canada Works, it provides a vehicle by which the Federal Government can work with other governments, the urban Aboriginal community, and other stakeholders to reduce or remove barriers, and enhance the life skills and knowledge of urban Aboriginal individuals and communities. These enhancements allow them to access economic opportunities. The program allows the Federal Government to facilitate partnerships with all levels of government to align expenditures directed toward urban Aboriginal individuals and communities in key centres, achieving more substantive outcomes resulting from strength in numbers. The program will expand local labour market pools, allowing for increased economic development, and assist in moving urban Aboriginal communities towards self-reliance and a reduced dependency on government, thus helping to strengthen Canada's economy as a whole.

2013–2014 Budgetary Financial Resources (Dollars)

Main Estimates Planned Spending Total Authorities
Available for Use
Actual Spending
(Authorities used)
Difference
(Actual minus planned)
41,033,701 41,033,701 52,494,753 51,708,349 10,674,648

2013–2014 Human Resources (FTEs)

Planned Actual Difference
(Actual minus planned)
The difference between Planned and Actual human resources was the result of the consolidation of urban Aboriginal programs into the improved Urban Aboriginal Strategy. 31 Urban Aboriginal Participation (UAP) FTEs were not accounted for in the 2013–2014 Report on Plans and Priorities due to the above mentioned exclusion of resources in the Main Estimates 2013–2014 and 6.8 UAP FTEs were not staffed across the country in the 2013–2014 fiscal year due to a variety of operational reasons.
12.6 36.8 24.2

Performance Results

Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Urban Aboriginal people have the knowledge, skills and support to pursue social and economic opportunities Percent change in labour participation Increased employment rate in the Labour Force Survey by March 31, 2014 Participation rate increased from 64.7% in 2013 to 65.7% in 2014Footnote 6
Increased employment rate in the National Household Survey by March 31, 2017 Results will be available in 2017

Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

AANDC leads multiple stakeholders that support urban Aboriginal people increasing their participation in the economy. The difference between Planned Spending and Total Authorities primarily reflects incremental funding provided through Canada's Economic Action Plan 2012 and Supplementary Estimates for the Urban Aboriginal Strategy. To contribute to this objective in 2013–2014 AANDC, through Urban Aboriginal Participation, provided $16 million to the Friendship Centre Movement which is made up of National Association of Friendship Centres (NAFC), 115 Friendship Centres, 7 Provincial Territorial Friendship Centre Associations; $22 million to 73 Aboriginal organizations and the NAFC for 175 initiatives that supported urban Aboriginal youth make better life choices and participate fully in the Canadian economy; $1.4 million to the NAFC to support 213 Aboriginal students explore career choices and gain the employment skills through summer work experiences; and worked with all orders of government, urban Aboriginal communities and the non-profit and private sector to invest and build partnerships that resulted in 128 community-driven projects that supported increased economic participation of urban Aboriginal people.

Although Urban Aboriginal Participation's individual efforts cannot be directly attributable to increases in economic participation as measured by the participation rate, they have supported a framework for all stakeholders to work in a coordinated fashion and align expenditures to increase the participation of urban Aboriginal people in the economy. The urban Aboriginal participation rate slightly increased from 64.7% in 2013Footnote 7 to 65.7% in 2014,Footnote 8 showing some general progress with respect to increasing urban Aboriginal participation in the economy in 2013–2014.

A key lesson learned in 2013–2014, as in other years, was that more substantive outcomes can be achieved when federal departments, provincial governments and other partners focus on collaborative program implementation, plans and policy alignment. AANDC responded to this lesson in 2013–2014 by reviewing and renovating its urban programming to focus on the Government of Canada priority of increasing participation in the economy through partnership development, strategic planning and investments in communities. The new approach will be implemented in 2014–2015.

Strategic Outcome: The North

Self-reliance, prosperity and well-being for the people and communities of the North

Program 4.1: Northern Governance and People

Description

The Northern Governance and People Program contributes to The North Strategic Outcome. This program strengthens the North's communities and people by devolving to the governments of the North province-like responsibilities for land and natural resources; by fostering effective intergovernmental relations with territorial governments and providing support to Territorial Commissioners; by subsidizing the costs of nutritious perishable foods and other essential items in isolated Northern communities; by providing grants for hospital and physician services in Nunavut and the Northwest Territories; by working with Northern communities to identify the risks and challenges posed by climate change and by advancing interests of Canadians and Northerners through circumpolar forums. Canadians and Northerners will benefit with territorial governments ultimately having more control over their own affairs.

2013–2014 Budgetary Financial Resources (Dollars)

Main Estimates Planned Spending Total Authorities
Available for Use
Actual Spending
(Authorities used)
Difference
(Actual minus planned)
The difference between Planned Spending and Total Authorities primarily reflects additional funding provided through Supplementary Estimates to meet the Government of Canada's obligations under the Northwest Territories Lands and Resources Devolution Agreement. In addition, funding was re-allocated internally to support the operation of the Nutrition North Canada program. The difference between Total Authorities and Actual Spending primarily reflects the deferral of activities associated with the Government of Canada's obligations under the Northwest Territories Lands and Resources Devolution. This deferred funding that was not required in 2013–2014 has been reprofiled to 2014–2015 when it will be available for the intended purpose.
136,927,492 136,927,492 178,720,859 170,331,482 33,403,990

2013–2014 Human Resources (FTEs)

Planned Actual Difference
(Actual minus planned)
69.0 67.6 (1.4)

Performance Results

Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
* The weight of food shipped is used as a proxy for the amount of food purchased.
The people of the Northwest Territories and Nunavut are responsible for the governance of Northern land and resources Completion of devolution phases in Northwest Territories and Nunavut against the 5 phases devolution process (5-phases process: protocol, Agreement-in-Principle (AIP), final agreement, legislation and implementation) By March 31, 2014
Northwest Territories: Complete Phase 5
Nunavut: Commence Phase 2
Northwest Territories: Phase 5 completed on March 31, 2014 making devolution effective as of April 1, 2014
Nunavut: Negotiation strategy and options being finalized for Agreement-in-Principle negotiations to begin in 2014–2015 commencing Phase 2
Consumption of nutritious food in eligible communities Estimated weight of eligible food purchased per capita Increase annually 277 kg per capita of eligible foods were shipped to fully eligible communities. This represents a 4% increase over the volume of the same food shipped in 2012–2013*

Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

Negotiations concerning the transfer of provincial-like responsibility for land and resource management are conducted according to a five-phase process: protocol, agreement in principle, final agreement, legislation and implementation. Devolution was successfully implemented in the Northwest Territories with the signing of Northwest Territories Lands and Resources Devolution Agreement and the Royal Assent to the Northwest Territories Devolution Act, which allowed devolution to take effect on April 1, 2014. In Nunavut, work continued to advance towards phase two of negotiations. Devolution in Yukon occurred in 2003.

Resource levels were adjusted so Canada could meet legal obligations in the Northwest Territories Lands and Resources Devolution Agreement to fund activities in 2013–2014 prior to devolution taking effect and in 2014–2015 post devolution.

The Department supports isolated Northern communities access to perishable healthy foods by providing a retail subsidy to suppliers and retailers through Nutrition North Canada. In addition, the program allows retailers to achieve supply chain efficiencies that contributed to the 0.8% decrease in the cost of the Revised Northern Food Basket in fully eligible communities between 2012–2013 and 2013–2014. As a result, healthy food shipped to these communities increased to 277 kg per capita in 2013–2014.

Active engagement between Nutrition North Canada and clients/stakeholders took place to encourage discussions on ways to enhance the design and delivery of the program. The northern-based Nutrition North Canada Advisory Board provided an ongoing engagement vehicle for Northerners, stakeholders and experts so that the program continues to respond to the needs of Northerners while meeting its objectives.

The Climate Change Adaptation Program provided support to Aboriginal and northern communities to identify and develop plans to address vulnerabilities to climate change.

Sub-Program 4.1.1: Political Development and Intergovernmental Relations

Description

This sub-program facilitates the growth of strong, effective and efficient government structures in the North. The devolution of province-like responsibilities for land and resource management will strengthen northern governance. Support for legislation and policy initiatives, the advancement of intergovernmental processes, the appointment of Territorial Commissioners and general federal-territorial relationships are also supported by this sub-program. Additionally, the interests of Canadians are reflected in circumpolar cooperation activities and grants are provided to Territorial Governments for hospital and physician services.

2013–2014 Budgetary Financial Resources (Dollars)

Planned Spending Actual Spending Difference
(Actual minus planned)
The difference between Planned and Actual Spending reflects funding re-profiled to 2013–2014 to meet the Government of Canada's obligations under the Northwest Territories Lands and Resources Devolution Agreement.
74,975,478 99,098,555 24,123,077

2013–2014 Human Resources (FTEs)

Planned Actual Difference
(Actual minus planned)
52.7 52.4 (0.3)

Performance Results

Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Devolution of land and resource management to Government of Northwest Territories Completion of devolution phases in NWT against the 5 phases devolution process (5-phases process: protocol, AIP, final agreement, legislation and implementation) Complete Phase 5 by March 31, 2014 Phase 5 completed on March 31, 2014 making devolution effective as of April 1, 2014
Devolution of land and resource management to Government of Nunavut Completion of devolution phases in Nunavut against the 5 phases devolution process (5-phases process: protocol, AIP, final agreement, legislation and implementation) Commence Phase 2 by March 31, 2014 Negotiation strategy and options being finalized for Agreement-in-Principle negotiations to begin in 2014–2015 to commence Phase 2
Canadian Priorities, as articulated in the Northern Strategy, are reflected in National Circumpolar cooperation activities Percentage of Canadian priorities actioned through activities under Arctic Council and Canada–Russia cooperation 80% by May 2013 All Arctic Council Canadian priorities have been actioned and are underway

Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

The Northwest Territories Lands and Resources Devolution Agreement was signed in June 2013 following completion of public and section 35 consultations on the consensus draft agreement reached by all parties in March 2013.

Following public and section 35 consultations on draft legislation in fall 2013, the Northwest Territories Devolution Act introduced into Parliament in December 2013 received Royal Assent on March 25, 2014 making devolution effective on April 1, 2014 along with modernized governance provisions in the Northwest Territories Act.

Extensive pre-devolution implementation activities were completed to meet Canada's legal obligations in the Northwest Territories Lands and Resources Devolution Agreement and Implementation Plan. The Plan includes schedules for the Devolution Agreement and transfer of securities, assets, contracts, records and staff to the Government of the Northwest Territories.

Devolution activities for Nunavut in 2013–2014 included making progress on options towards an agreement-in-principle. The October 2013 Speech from the Throne reiterated the federal commitment to "giving the people of the North a greater say in their own affairs" through negotiating devolution in Nunavut.

The devolution experiences from Yukon and the Northwest Territories will help inform and guide a future process in Nunavut.

During 2013–2014, AANDC provided strategic policy advice and organizational support to Canada's Arctic Council Chairmanship to ensure that northern domestic priorities are reflected in the Department's international circumpolar activities. This included substantive preparations for two high-level meetings of Arctic Council Senior Officials and the Northern Tour for the Diplomatic Heads of Missions led by the Assistant Deputy Minister of the Northern Affairs Organization (AANDC) in May 2013.

AANDC also played a leadership role in planning, organizing and hosting three meetings of the Sustainable Development Working Group. Through its Arctic Council activities, AANDC advanced initiatives of importance to Canada domestically and internationally including: Promoting Mental Wellness; Adaptation Actions for Climate Change; Traditional Local Knowledge and others. AANDC also worked to launch the Social Economic and Cultural Expert Group, which will contribute to capacity building for Indigenous participants, including those of Canada.

In addition, AANDC successfully completed its two-year work plan under its Canada-Russia Memorandum of Understanding on Northern and Aboriginal Development.

Sub-Program 4.1.2: Nutrition North

Description

This sub-program provides increased access to perishable nutritious food in isolated northern communities through a retail subsidy. It is supported by an Advisory Board that ensures that Northerners have a direct voice in the program. Eligible northern communities will benefit from improved access to healthy food.

2013–2014 Budgetary Financial Resources (Dollars)

Planned Spending Actual Spending Difference
(Actual minus planned)
The difference between Planned and Actual Spending reflects internal re-allocations into the Nutrition North sub-program.
57,152,873 66,234,771 9,081,898

2013–2014 Human Resources (FTEs)

Planned Actual Difference
(Actual minus planned)
9.0 8.1 (0.9)

Performance Results

Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
* The weight of food shipped is used as a proxy for the amount of food purchased.
Subsidized food available in eligible communities Weight of eligible food shipped per capita Increase annually 277 kg per capita of eligible foods were shipped to fully eligible communities. This represents a 4% increase over the volume of the same food shipped in 2012–2013*
Nutrition North Canada food basket price trends Comparable to food price trends for the rest of Canada The food basket price for fully eligible communities as of September 2013 is 6.3% lower than it was in 2011. This compares to an approximate increase of 4% for the rest of Canada during the same period

Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

The Department continued to focus on subsidizing nutritious perishable foods, with 25 million kilograms of nutritious food shipped to isolated northern communities in 2013–2014. Approximately 29% of the weight shipped consisted of perishable vegetables and fruits, 25% was milk and other dairy products, 17% was fresh and frozen meat, poultry and fish and 12% was perishable grain product.

As Nutrition North Canada operates with a capped budget, in a demand-driven environment additional resources were required in 2013–2014. The Department re-allocated additional funds, which meant that subsidy rates did not need to be reduced. A rate adjustment would likely have resulted in a sudden increase of food costs for eligible communities.

In 2013–2014, two Nutrition North Canada Advisory Board meetings were held, in addition to a number of teleconferences. These meetings focused on reviewing program operations (including nutrition education), and establishing a revised terms of reference and the development of a work plan for 2014–2015. The Advisory Board also met with the Minister to discuss matters pertaining to Nutrition North Canada.

The program also continued to promote transparency through social media posts (Facebook and Twitter) as well as posting information on the website.

The internal Audit of the Nutrition North Canada Program was completed in June 2013, and the Implementation Evaluation was completed in September 2013. Findings indicated that the program is measurably achieving its objectives with increased access to subsidized food in eligible communities and greater efficiencies in the transportation supply chain as a result of increased flexibility for retailers to negotiate shipping rates and routes. Findings also suggested reviewing certain elements of the program's policy, governance structure and current communication approach. It was also recommended that AANDC continue to develop data collection systems to measure performance and coordinate departmental efforts with provincial and territorial partnerships. In response to the recommendations, AANDC has developed a Management Response and Action Plan. Many of the recommendations were effected as of March 31, 2014, which included revising and updating the Advisory Board Terms of Reference, developing a strategy for ongoing policy review and implementation and developing a new database for data collection.

Sub-Program 4.1.3: Climate Change Adaptation

Description

This sub-program provides funding support to Aboriginal and northern communities, governments and organizations to assess vulnerabilities to climate change, develop adaptation plans, and develop related information and tools. The program builds capacity at the community level and develops partnerships with territorial governments to address broad northern issues. The assessment of climate change impacts and adaptation planning enhances community resilience and facilitates the integration of climate change considerations into decision making.

2013–2014 Budgetary Financial Resources (Dollars)

Planned Spending Actual Spending Difference
(Actual minus planned)
4,799,141 4,998,156 199,015

2013–2014 Human Resources (FTEs)

Planned Actual Difference
(Actual minus planned)
7.3 7.1 (0.2)

Performance Results

Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Aboriginal and northern communities implement adaptation measures and decisions to protect community health and safety Number of communities implementing adaptation plans and measures 10 communities over 4 years by March 31, 2016 Measurement of single-year, completed projects will begin in 2014–2015

Measurement of multi-year projects will begin in 2015–2016

Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

In 2013–2014, the Climate Adaptation and Resilience Program for Aboriginals and Northerners, referred to as the Climate Change Adaptation Program, funded a total of 40 community and territorial projects, exceeding plans to fund 20 projects each year.

The projects supported vulnerability assessments, adaptation planning, tools and knowledge dissemination. Eighteen of the projects supported 25 Aboriginal and northern communities.

The program also provides up to $500,000 per year to each territorial government to help communities manage climate change related risks including territory specific and pan-arctic impacts. The territorial governments were able to undertake 22 projects in 2013–2014.

The increase in resources allowed the program to build awareness of climate change impacts at AANDC and support key programs in the Department through identification of regional- and community-level vulnerabilities and climate impact costs.

An ongoing challenge for the Climate Change Adaptation Program in 2013–2014 was oversubscription. The program received 87 letters of interest and funded 18 community projects. These numbers were slightly lower than the previous year because the program had further defined project eligibility criteria to align with departmental mandates. To further support ongoing projects and better manage expectations, the 2014–2015 Call for Proposals clearly indicated that priority funding support would be provided to currently funded multi-year projects.

In addition to the Climate Change Adaptation Program, AANDC's Northern Infrastructure Standardization Initiative supported pan-Northern consultation, decision-making and technical expert committees engaged in the development of infrastructure standards to consider impacts on thermosyphonsFootnote 9, community drainage, permafrost on existing foundations and snow loading on roofs. Public review of the thermosyphon standard was completed in 2013–2014. The permafrost standard was issued for public review in 2014. All four standards are expected to be completed in 2014–2015.

Program 4.2: Northern Science and Technology

Description

The Northern Science and Technology Program contributes to The North Strategic Outcome. It aims to support scientific research and technology in the North by providing researchers and scientists with increased access to programs and infrastructure to further research science and technology. The focus of this program is: researching and monitoring contaminants and their impacts on the ecosystem as carried out through the Northern Contaminants Program; supporting initiatives including the creation, management and dissemination of scientific data and results that contribute to informed public policy making; supporting the work to establish the Canadian High Arctic Research Station. Northerners and all Canadians will benefit from a knowledge base that supports health and sustainable development, and the positioning of Canada as an international leader in Arctic science and technology.

2013–2014 Budgetary Financial Resources (Dollars)

Main Estimates Planned Spending Total Authorities
Available for Use
Actual Spending
(Authorities used)
Difference
(Actual minus planned)
The difference between Planned Spending and Total Authorities primarily reflects additional funding provided through Supplementary Estimates and the capital budget carry-forward for the Canadian High Arctic Research Station. The difference between Total Authorities and Actual Spending primarily reflects the deferral of activities associated with the construction of Canadian High Arctic Research Station. This deferred funding that was not required in 2013–2014 has been carried forward to 2014–2015 when it will be available for the intended purpose.
12,898,583 12,898,583 18,743,641 13,504,948 606,365

2013–2014 Human Resources (FTEs)

Planned Actual Difference
(Actual minus planned)
43.3 40.7 (2.6)

Performance Results

Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Northerners and all Canadians benefit from a knowledge base that supports health and sustainable development Percent decrease in concentration of contaminants in the North 5% decrease in concentration over 1990 levels by March 31, 2014 Exceeded target for certain legacy persistent organic pollutantsFootnote 10 and target not met for mercury as of March 31, 2014
Canada is positioned as an international leader in Arctic science and technology Launch of the Canadian High Arctic Research Station Completion of construction of the research station by July 1, 2017 Pre-construction design phase completed

Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

The Northern Contaminants Program continued to monitor contaminant levels in wildlife and people in the Canadian North, in partnership with stakeholders, and transferred this knowledge to Northerners. It contributed data, information and expertise to Canadian and international assessments on contaminants and human health, as well as to the Arctic Council's Arctic Monitoring and Assessment Programme and the Stockholm Convention's Global Monitoring Plan. Northern Contaminants Program results provided foundational science that led to the Minamata Convention on Mercury, a global treaty to protect human health and the environment from the adverse effects of mercury signed by 97 countries in October 2013.

Concentrations of persistent organic pollutants that have been globally banned or restricted by the Stockholm Convention since 2004 have decreased substantially in arctic biota.Footnote 11 In contrast, there are wildlife populations showing no decrease or even showing increases in mercury concentrations since 1990. Decreases in these levels in wildlife are anticipated over the long term as the October 2013 Minamata Convention enters into force in approximately two to three years.

The pre-construction design phase for the Canadian High Arctic Research Station ended in 2013–2014. The Canadian High Arctic Research Station's role as a key component of the network of Northern research infrastructure continued to be developed. The Science and Technology Plan was approved and implementation will begin in 2014.

As funding opportunities for capacity development in the North are increasingly scarce (e.g. end of funding for Nasivvik) there are increasing demands on the Northern Contaminants Program. As a result, the Northern Contaminants Program is looking for opportunities for ongoing cost-sharing with other programs that share similar goals of developing capacity in the North (e.g. ArcticNet and Canadian High Arctic Research Station).

Sub-Program 4.2.1: Northern Contaminants

Description

This sub-program engages Northerners and world-class Canadian scientists in research and monitoring of long-range contaminants in the Canadian Arctic. The health and well-being of all Northerners is augmented as northern people consume traditional/country foods based in part on information and advice made possible by this sub-program. The sub-program has international influence as a leader in the Arctic Council — Arctic Monitoring and Assessment Program, and is a key contributor of scientific data to international agreements, such as the UNEP Stockholm Convention, and helps to position Canada as an international leader in Arctic science. The Northern Contaminants sub-program generated data is used to assess ecosystem and human health, and the results of these assessments are used to inform policy that results in action to eliminate contaminants from long-range sources. This action supports the safety and security of traditional country foods that are important to the health of Northerners and Northern communities.

2013–2014 Budgetary Financial Resources (Dollars)

Planned Spending Actual Spending Difference
(Actual minus planned)
4,909,400 4,843,566 (65,834)

2013–2014 Human Resources (FTEs)

Planned Actual Difference
(Actual minus planned)
7.6 8.9 1.3

Performance Results

Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Contaminant related risk to ecosystem and human health is reduced Percent decrease in concentrations of previously identified contaminants in northern wildlife 5% decrease in concentration over 1990 levels by 2014 Concentrations of legacy persistent organic pollutants have decreased by about 80% in arctic biota

No consistent trend in mercury concentrations in wildlife populations across the Arctic
Percent decrease in concentrations of previously identified contaminants among northern populations 5% decrease in concentration over 1990 levels by 2014 Concentrations of legacy persistent organic pollutants have decreased in adult Inuit by 50–70% since the early 1990s

Mercury concentrations have decreased in adult Inuit by 25–50% since the early 1990s

Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

The Northern Contaminants Program continued to make significant progress towards achieving its targets in 2013–2014 by ensuring that contaminant level monitoring in wildlife and people in the Canadian North was carried out efficiently, in partnership with stakeholders, and by contributing data, information and expertise to Canadian and international assessments on contaminants and human health, as well as to the Arctic Council's Arctic Monitoring and Assessment Programme and the Stockholm Convention's Global Monitoring Plan.

Concentrations of the original 12 persistent organic pollutants listed in the Stockholm Convention have decreased in Arctic wildlife by about 80% since 1990 and have decreased by 50% to 70% in adult Inuit over the same time. Newer persistent organic pollutants, like polybrominated diphenyl ethersFootnote 12 have increased in wildlife by almost 200% since 1990 but may be starting to decrease since being added to the Stockholm Convention in 2009. Mercury concentrations have decreased in adult Inuit by 25% to 50% since the early 1990s, while there is currently no consistent trend in mercury concentrations in wildlife across the North over the same period. There are some wildlife populations showing increases in mercury concentrations, such as a 50% increase in freshwater fish from Mackenzie Valley and a 30% increase in concentration in seabird eggs. As the Minamata Convention enters into force in approximately two to three years, mercury levels are anticipated to decrease, which in turn will lead to improved health of Arctic people and wildlife over the long term.

The program released a comprehensive assessment of persistent organic pollutants in the North, a report that drew in the expertise of more than 50 world-class experts, with results that cover the period of 2003 to early 2013.

To save on costs and reduce overall travel, the venue for the 20th Annual Northern Contaminants Program Results Workshop was changed from Inuvik, NWT to Yellowknife, NWT and then again to Ottawa to further reduce costs. Management Committee meetings have also been held in Ottawa since 2013–2014 for the same reason. In addition, the Northern Contaminants Program Management Committee has decided to hold the results workshop every two years instead of every year, again to reduce costs and travel. As a result, our Northern partners have expressed dissatisfaction with the new direction. They have asked that the Northern Contaminants Program consider having more meetings/workshops in the North for face-to-face communications and management meetings. In this way, the program would be closer to where the work is carried out and nearer to the people who are dealing with the issue of contaminants in traditional food on a daily basis. In moving forward, the Northern Contaminants Program is looking for opportunities to host at least one meeting in the North annually.

Sub-Program 4.2.2: Science Initiatives

Description

This sub-program works to position Canada as a leader in Arctic science through the establishment of the Canadian High Arctic Research Station. The Station will be a world-class, year-round, multidisciplinary facility on the cutting edge of Arctic issues that will anchor a strong research presence in Canada's Arctic to serve Canada and the world. It will advance Canada's knowledge of the Arctic in order to improve economic opportunities, environmental stewardship, and the quality of life of Northerners and all Canadians.

2013–2014 Budgetary Financial Resources (Dollars)

Planned Spending Actual Spending Difference
(Actual minus planned)
The difference between Planned and Actual Spending is due to reprofiling resources to 2014–2015 so that they are available for their intended purpose as the project enters into its construction phase.
7,989,183 8,661,382 672,199

2013–2014 Human Resources (FTEs)

Planned Actual Difference
(Actual minus planned)
The difference between Planned and Actual human resources reflects the shifting needs of the team responsible for the development and implementation of the Canadian High Arctic Research Station.
35.7 31.8 (3.9)

Performance Results

Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Researchers have access to world-class Arctic infrastructure in the Canadian North Launch of the Canadian High Arctic Research Station Completion of construction of the research station by July 1, 2017 Pre-construction design phase completed

Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

Progress on the establishment of the Canadian High Arctic Research Station continued in 2013–2014 with the completion of the design development report and preliminary construction documents, marking the end of the project's pre-construction design phase.

The Station's role as a key component of the network of Northern research infrastructure was further developed through the engagement of key national and international stakeholders from Aboriginal organizations, academia, government and industry. This included participation in the inaugural Board of Directors for the Canadian Network of Northern Research Operators and the engagement of youth and interested stakeholders through social media by hosting the Department's first Google Hangout.

In 2013–2014, the Chief Scientist was hired to lead the Canadian High Arctic Research Station's Science and Technology Program. A Manager of Operations was hired and is located in Cambridge Bay to facilitate the establishment of the research station's presence in the community.

An Audit of the Canadian High Arctic Research Station was undertaken in 2013–2014. Results indicated that governance structures related to the infrastructure project should be formalized and should recognize the evolving nature of the project. Terms of Reference and documentation processes for key governance and oversight committees were formalized. A plan to address the evolving governance structure was developed and will be revisited quarterly as the project moves into construction and commissioning.

Program 4.3: Northern Land, Resources and Environmental Management

Description

The Northern Land, Resources and Environmental Management Program supports The North Strategic Outcome. It focuses on the management, sustainable development and regulatory oversight of the land, water, natural resources, and environment of the North, delivering on the Department's role as the Government of Canada's natural resource manager North of 60°. This program involves: managing oil and gas resources development; supporting the sustainable management of active mineral exploration and development; supporting the sound management of contaminated sites and of land and water in the North; and ensuring the identification of territorial land use zones for conservation, development and other uses. Northerners and Canadians will benefit from economic opportunities and sustainable development.

2013–2014 Budgetary Financial Resources (Dollars)

Main Estimates Planned Spending Total Authorities
Available for Use
Actual Spending
(Authorities used)
Difference
(Actual minus planned)
The difference between Planned Spending and Total Authorities primarily reflects the deferral of activities associated with the assessment, management and remediation of federal contaminated sites under the Federal Contaminated Sites Action Plan, partially offset by the refund of amounts credited to revenues in previous years. The deferred funding that was not required in 2013–2014 has been reprofiled to future years when it will be available for the intended purpose. The difference between Total Authorities and Actual Spending also reflects the deferral of activities associated with the management of contaminated sites. This deferred funding has also been reprofiled to 2014–2015 and 2015–2016 when it will be available for use in the portfolio.
259,977,233 259,977,233 253,415,512 238,498,638 (21,478,595)

2013–2014 Human Resources (FTEs)

Planned Actual Difference
(Actual minus planned)
338.8 345.8 7.0

Performance Results

Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Effective regulatory regimes in each of the three territories, which provide certainty to project proponents, Aboriginal organizations and Northerners, are established Territorial ratings for three factors reported in the Fraser Institute Annual Survey of Mining Companies:
1) administration, interpretation, enforcement of regulations;
2) environmental regulations;
3) regulatory duplication and inconsistencies
The percentage of industry encouraged to invest, or not deterred by, the three factors shall increase by 10 percentage points for each territory by March 31, 2014 Yukon ratings decreased by 2, 5, and 10 percentage points respectively

NWT ratings decreased by 9, 11, and 3 percentage points respectively

Nunavut ratings increased by 3, 8 and 16 percentage points respectively
Percentage of projects approved within regulated time lines in process, including decisions on environmental assessments 75% by March 31, 2014 75% target achieved (3 of 4 large environmental assessment decisions completed within standard timelines)

Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

On March 25, 2014, Bill C-15, the Northwest Territories Devolution Act, received Royal Assent. This Bill completes the legislative changes proposed for the Northwest Territories as part of the Action Plan to Improve Northern Regulatory Regimes, by amending the Mackenzie Valley Resource Management Act, Territorial Lands Act and Northwest Territories Waters Act to, among other improvements, implement beginning-to-end time limits on environmental assessments and water licences, restructure the Mackenzie Valley land and water boards, and ensure sound environmental stewardship through increased fines and the introduction of administrative monetary penalties.

Consultations with Aboriginal groups, territorial governments, regulatory boards and industry took place on draft proposals to amend the Yukon Environmental and Socio-economic Assessment Act and Nunavut Waters and Nunavut Surface Rights Tribunal Act.

It is anticipated that the changes resulting from Bill C-15 and the proposed changes to legislation in Yukon and Nunavut will have a positive impact on the performance indicators in the future, as these changes will improve environmental assessment timelines and increase investor confidence in resource development.

Environmental Assessments were completed on time in all but one case where decision complexity has delayed the closure of the file. Environmental Regimes in the Northwest Territories were updated with the passing of Bill C-15 and there are now shorter and clearer timelines that provide more certainty to proponents. The Nunavut regime is in the process of being updated through the Nunavut Planning and Project Assessment Act.

AANDC is working closely with CanNor's Northern Project Management Office to co-ordinate Environmental Assessment processes and decisions in the Northwest Territories and Nunavut. Better coordination between the two organizations has reduced the timeframes required and clarified the process.

Sub-Program 4.3.1: Oil and Gas

Description

This sub-program manages the oil and gas resource interests of Northerners, Aboriginal peoples and Canadians generally on federal lands in the Northwest Territories, Nunavut and in the northern offshore. It focuses on the management of rights issuance for new exploration rights and the establishment and administration of the terms and conditions of exploration, significant discovery and production licenses. The sub-program also reviews and approves Canada Benefits plans, assesses and collects royalties, maintains a rights registry that is open to the public, and regularly engages federal, territorial and Aboriginal organizations to consider socio-cultural and environmental sensitivities related to oil and gas activities. Specific projects managed by this sub-program include the Beaufort Regional Environmental Assessment and the Department's federal lead responsibility for the Mackenzie Gas Project.

2013–2014 Budgetary Financial Resources (Dollars)

Planned Spending Actual Spending Difference
(Actual minus planned)
The difference between Planned and Actual Spending reflects additional funding provided through internal re-allocation to support the operation of the Oil and Gas program.
8,090,219 9,181,459 1,091,240

2013–2014 Human Resources (FTEs)

Planned Actual Difference
(Actual minus planned)
28.9 27.2 (1.7)

Performance Results

Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Oil and gas resources are managed in the NWT, Nunavut and northern offshore regions for the benefit of Northerners and all Canadians The number of hectares licensed for oil and gas exploration (based on a five-year moving average) as a reflection of the amount of work conducted in the region with an opportunity to generate benefits to Northerners and all Canadians 3-million hectares by March 31, 2014 3,881,448 hectares under licence

Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

At the end of 2013, the five-year rolling average of hectares under licence for oil and gas exploration in the Canadian North was 3,881,448, thus achieving the target of 3 million hectares by March 31, 2014. During the reporting period, industry was offered opportunities to acquire licences through three Calls for Bids. As a result, new exploration licences were announced for the Central Mackenzie Valley region as well as the Beaufort Sea and Mackenzie Delta region. Industry did not respond to the opportunity to acquire a significant discovery licence in the Arctic islands of Nunavut region.

AANDC continued to implement the Beaufort Regional Environmental Assessment, in partnership with Inuvialuit and industry stakeholders, to prepare for offshore oil and gas activity in the Beaufort Sea. By the end of 2013–2014, the program's third year, a total of 10 research projects were completed and milestones reached on Oil Spill Preparedness and Response, Climate Change and Regional Waste Management priorities.

In 2013–2014, AANDC undertook preliminary discussions with Northwest Territories and Yukon Governments to explore interests and discuss forward looking plans for Arctic offshore oil and gas governance.

Following Minister's approval in April 2013, the administrative requirements of Calls for Bids for exploration licences were amended to increase the amount of the bid deposit which secures a bid submission from $10,000 to $50,000 in order to ensure that all bids submitted for consideration are credible. This new requirement was included in the three Calls for Bids mentioned above.

In light of the devolution of responsibilities for lands and resources to the Government of the Northwest Territories on April 1, 2014, as well as the declining level of industry interest in the Calls for Bids since 2009, the Department is evaluating how it administers its priorities for petroleum and minerals and will engage with industry, Aboriginal groups and other governments to consider improvements.

Sub-Program 4.3.2: Mines and Minerals

Description

This sub-program manages the mines and mineral resource interests of Northerners, Aboriginal peoples and Canadians generally on federal lands in the Northwest Territories, Nunavut and in the northern offshore. This is accomplished through the administration of a mineral tenure system, the assessment and collection of Crown royalties, participation in environmental assessment of northern mining projects, mineral resource assessment and land use planning, and the promotion of Aboriginal participation in mining.

2013–2014 Budgetary Financial Resources (Dollars)

Planned Spending Actual Spending Difference
(Actual minus planned)
The difference between Planned and Actual Spending reflects a credit note for the reduction of over $20.6 million in a multinational mining company's royalty receivable for over-calculated royalty in 2008 based on overstated sales, general and indirect expenses being understated and the processing of assets being understated.
12,609,639 31,647,167 19,037,528

2013–2014 Human Resources (FTEs)

Planned Actual Difference
(Actual minus planned)
35.3 35.1 (0.2)

Performance Results

Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Mineral resources are managed in the NWT and Nunavut for the benefit of Northerners and all Canadians The percent of total Canadian mineral exploration and deposit appraisal expenditures made in the NWT and Nunavut 15% by March 31, 2014 15.6%

Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

Exploration activities in the Northwest Territories and Nunavut continue to be affected in 2013–2014 by the general slowdown in global exploration activity and low commodity prices, but still represented 15.6% of the national total at the end of 2013.

The federal diamond valuation process and royalty audit function completed 10 diamond valuations and two audits in order to ensure that the $26 million in Crown royalties collected by AANDC represented the full amount due.

The former Northwest Territories and Nunavut Mining Regulations was repealed and replaced by two separate federal mining regulations: the Nunavut Mining Regulations and the Northwest Territories Mining Regulations. The new regulations came into force on March 31, 2014. The updated regulations more closely meet current administrative, industry and legal standards.

Implementation of the online map selection system for mineral claims in Nunavut progressed as planned through standard system development stages, concluding with the successful installation of release one, the internal Nunavut Map Selection application.

Mining companies can request an appeal to the Minister if they disagree with a decision made by the Department concerning claims, leases and royalty assessment. In 2013–2014, a ministerial decision was rendered following an appeal on a royalty file. While this situation does not occur often, completing the required steps under the mining regulations turned out to be a lengthy process. This led the Department to look for ways to expedite the process in the future, for example by engaging stakeholders early.

Sub-Program 4.3.3: Contaminated Sites

Description

This sub-program ensures that contaminated sites are managed to ensure the protection of human health and safety as well as the environment for all Northerners by assessing and remediating contaminated sites and supporting the employment and training of Northerners, particularly Aboriginal peoples.

2013–2014 Budgetary Financial Resources (Dollars)

Planned Spending Actual Spending Difference
(Actual minus planned)
The difference between Planned and Actual Spending primarily reflects the deferral of activities with the management of contaminated sites, $43.8 million of which has been reprofiled to 2014–2015 and 2015–2016 when it will be available for use in the portfolio. Reasons for deferrals include the requirement for additional field work, procurement delays and additional time to complete the required preparation (e.g. permitting, approvals).
199,102,595 154,006,007 (45,096,588)

2013–2014 Human Resources (FTEs)

Planned Actual Difference
(Actual minus planned)
64.4 66.7 2.3

Performance Results

Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Contaminated sites are managed to ensure the protection of human health and the safety of the environment while bringing economic benefit to the North Number of sites in Step 8 (implementation) through Step 10 (monitoring) of the Federal Contaminated Sites Action Plan 10-step process 40 by March 31, 2014 44 sites
Level (%) of Northerners and Aboriginal peoples employed within Contaminated Sites projects 60% by March 31, 2014 56%

Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

The financial and human resources attributed to the Northern Contaminated Sites Program contributed to the management of 99 contaminated sites across the three territories. As of March 31, 2014, the Program's portfolio of contaminated sites counted 44 sites at or beyond Step 8 (implementation of the remediation strategy); this represents an increase of 3  sites compared to last year.

Not taking into consideration the Giant Mine and the Faro Mine remediation projects, approximately 70% of the workforce employed in the contaminated site projects managed by the Program consists of Northerners and Aboriginal peoples. Giant Mine and Faro Mine are in the planning phase and therefore utilize highly skilled expertise from all areas of Canada.

The Faro Remediation Project commenced implementation of a medium-term plan to protect human health and safety prior to commencing the environmental assessment and regulatory processes. This plan deals with high-risk issues on site such as improving dam stability and constructing an interim water treatment plant. The project also continued to advance the long-term remediation plan including developing detailed engineering designs and commencing the preparation of regulatory applications.

As part of the effort to protect human health and safety as well as the environment, the Giant Mine Remediation Project continued to implement the Site Stabilization Plan. This included making progress on addressing high-risk site elements such as deconstruction of the Roaster Complex and stabilization of the underground mine. Progress was also made on the Environmental Assessment process that is nearing completion.

To ensure consistent and effective project management practices, the Northern Contaminated Sites Program developed and received approval for the Major Project Standards and Guidance Manual. This manual will ensure that a professional project-management standard is applied to all major projects in the portfolio of contaminated sites, including Giant and Faro mines.

Sub-Program 4.3.4: Land and Water Management

Description

This sub-program manages the land and water interests of Northerners, Aboriginal peoples and Canadians in the Northwest Territories and Nunavut. This is achieved through the administration of land rights; inspection and investigation services for land use permits and water license, and the management of their securities.

2013–2014 Budgetary Financial Resources (Dollars)

Planned Spending Actual Spending Difference
(Actual minus planned)
31,575,596 34,722,087 3,146,491

2013–2014 Human Resources (FTEs)

Planned Actual Difference
(Actual minus planned)
180.4 188.4 8.0

Performance Results

Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Land and Water regimes in the Northwest Territories and Nunavut are managed for the benefit of Northerners and all Canadians Number and percentage of land and water authorizations (risk based approach), under the responsibility of the Department, inspected NWT = 15%
Nunavut = 25% by March 31, 2014
NWT = 62% and Nunavut = 37% inspections completed as identified by regions' risk assessments and inspection plans
Percentage of land authorizations and water licenses issued within legislation time limit 100% by March 31, 2014 100%

Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

The management of land and water in the North as required under policy, legislation and comprehensive land claim agreements is complex and demands a sound understanding of the operating environment.

The geography of the North also plays a very large role in the way that AANDC approaches its management responsibilities. The inspection of authorizations for land and water use is one of the areas where the various factors intersect, and the logistical difficulties in the North in terms of distance, weather and cost make the inspection of all authorizations next to impossible. Therefore AANDC has adopted a risk-management approach to the authorization inspection that is relevant, effective and efficient in order to ensure sound management of land and water.

In 2013–2014, the rate of inspections exceeded the targets set at the beginning of the planning cycle in order to ensure effective devolution to the Government of the Northwest Territories.

Continued refinement of the Risk Management tool is necessary to reflect the enforcement goals of the Department while simultaneously accounting for the changing operating environment. In order to generate more accurate inspection plans, greater attention needs to be paid to the use of the information being entered into the Risk Assessment Model.

In 2013–2014, the draft Intent Document for the Northwest Territories-Alberta Transboundary Waters Management Agreement was finalized. AANDC provided technical advice and support to the process, working in close collaboration with the Government of the Northwest Territories, to whom this responsibility was devolved on April 1, 2014.

Sub-Program 4.3.5: Environmental Management

Description

This sub-program manages environmental interests of Northerners, Aboriginal Peoples and Canadians in the Northwest Territories and Nunavut. Protected areas, land use planning, environmental assessments and environmental monitoring are important and complementary pieces of AANDC's environmental management responsibilities as required by policy, legislation, and comprehensive land claims agreement obligations.

2013–2014 Budgetary Financial Resources (Dollars)

Planned Spending Actual Spending Difference
(Actual minus planned)
8,599,184 8,941,918 342,734

2013–2014 Human Resources (FTEs)

Planned Actual Difference
(Actual minus planned)
29.8 28.4 (1.4)

Performance Results

Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Sound environmental protection and management is fostered and promoted for the benefit of Northerners and all Canadians Number of land use plans that have been drafted or approved 4 (Revised Interim Dehcho Land Use Plan; Final Draft 3 Sahtu Land Use Plan; Draft Nunavut Land Use Plan and Revised Final Gwich'in Land Use Plan) by March 31, 2014 1 Land Use Plan (Sahtu) completed
Number of areas brought under protection through the NWT Protected Areas Strategy 5 by March 31, 2014 All Interim land withdrawalsFootnote 13 successfully extended to beyond devolution transfer date. Final decisions will rest with the Government of Northwest Territories
Completion of a National Environmental Monitoring System (NEMS) to provide accessibility to the public and decision-makers on environmental trends in the North Publicly accessible AANDC database to provide environmental monitoring and trend analysis data by March 31, 2014 Gate 2 (Business Case) was completed. The objective was subsequently cancelled due to NWT devolution

Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

AANDC contributed to the completion of regional land-use plans in the Northwest Territories, the implementation of environmental monitoring programs through the Northwest Territories Cumulative Impact Monitoring Program and the Nunavut General Monitoring Plan, and advanced the establishment of protected areas under the Northwest Territories Protected Areas Strategy.

There were delays in the completion of the Gwich'in, Dehcho and Nunavut land-use plans. These delays were outside of AANDC control as the Department must wait until Land Claim Organizations complete their work on the plans before the program provides final input and comments prior to the Minister's decision.

Interim Land Withdrawals were extended and AANDC worked with the Government of the Northwest Territories to transfer the Protected Area Strategy files to them prior to the April 1, 2014 devolution date. AANDC worked with partners to conclude technical analysis, consultation and creation of working group reports for candidate National Wildlife Areas that will inform post-devolution decisions on potential conservation sites.

The Northwest Territories Cumulative Impact Monitoring Program was transferred to the Government of Northwest Territories as part of the devolution process. As a result, the development of a common Northern Environmental Monitoring System is no longer a desirable approach to meet the information management needs of the Northwest Territories Cumulative Impact Monitoring Program and the Nunavut General Monitoring Plan. In light of the devolution of the Northwest Territories and the recent review of the Nunavut General Monitoring Plan information management needs, the programs focused on their respective short-term information management needs instead.

The evaluation of the Advancing Conservation Interests in the Northwest Territories Initiative was completed in April 2013 and contained several key findings indicating that some areas of the initiatives needed improvement. The recommendations suggested addressing the capacity constraints at the community level, reviewing the role of the Steering Committee and current funding mechanisms and developing an approach that will foster better understanding and communication of the Northwest Territories Protected Areas Strategy as it pertains to the devolution of lands and resources. To respond to the report's recommendations, AANDC has developed a Management Response and Action Plan that was implemented in 2013–2014. It included working with the Government of Northwest Territories on devolution to ensure a smooth transition of AANDC activities. Capacity Issues at the community level and the role of the steering committee are being reviewed by the Government of Northwest Territories post devolution.

Internal Services

Description

Internal Services are groups of related activities and resources that are administered to support the needs of programs and other corporate obligations of an organization. These groups are: Management and Oversight Services; Communications Services; Legal Services; Human Resources Management Services; Financial Management Services; Information Management Services; Information Technology Services; Real Property Services; Materiel Services; Acquisition Services; and Other Administrative Services. Internal Services include only those activities and resources that apply across an organization and not to those provided specifically to a program.

2013–2014 Budgetary Financial Resources (Dollars)

Main Estimates Planned Spending Total Authorities
Available for Use
Actual Spending
(Authorities used)
Difference
(Actual minus planned)
The difference between Planned Spending and Total Authorities primarily reflects: incremental funding provided through Supplementary Estimates for out-of-court settlements; incremental funding for the operating budget carry-forward and paylist requirements; billings from the Department of Justice for work on AANDC litigation files; and incremental costs related to information technology services (i.e. application/database development and maintenance). The difference between Total Authorities and Actual Spending primarily reflects operating resources to be carried forward to 2014–2015 and the deferral of funding for an out-of-court settlement to future years when it will be available for the intended purpose.
258,381,011 258,381,011 425,192,874 375,954,708 117,573,697

2013–2014 Human Resources (FTEs)

Planned Actual Difference
(Actual minus planned)
The difference of 80.7 FTEs between Planned and Actual Human Resources is mainly explained by: 1) Internal reorganizations (12 FTEs); and 2) Various reductions related to the implementation of 3 Hubs (Accounting, Procurement and Human Resources) (19 FTEs), funding reduction (23 FTEs) and regular departures (26 FTEs).
1,542.1 1,461.4 (80.7)

Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

With a continued focus on service improvement and transformation, in 2013–2014 AANDC continued to advance the Public Service Excellence Agenda toward the delivery of high-quality, client-centred and results-focused services, while ensuring the efficient and effective management of public funds.

Service Improvement and Transformation — To improve and transform internal services in 2013–2014, AANDC:

  • Continued to make progress in improving the management of transfer payments by offering new optional funding agreements, refreshing policy instruments, introducing a consistent approach for case management and strengthening its compliance and monitoring functions.
  • Fully implemented the consolidation of Pay Services to Public Works and Government Services Canada in Miramichi, New Brunswick As an early adopter of this Government-wide initiative, we shared lessons learned with other departments: the need for on-going communication internally and with the new service provider and the need for monitoring implementation issues and tracking follow-ups.
  • Implemented training strategy that ensured an efficient transition for all centralized units (hubs) and their respective clients following the implementation of the new financial system SAP. 933 AANDC and CanNor employees received training and 114 courses were given for a total of 338 course days.
  • Finalized a national service desk model and continued the transition of common technology services to Shared Services Canada to improve the efficiency and effectiveness of first-level information management and technology support services.
  • As an early adopter to the Common HR Business Process initiative, promoted roles and responsibilities to the management team as it moves forward with the culture change in the standardization of HR services and processes.
  • Put in place its National Accommodation Space Optimization Strategy to conform to the Government Workplace 2.0 standards and reduce/optimize existing space. 11 Retrofit projects and 7 National Capital Region Reconciliation projects were implemented.
  • Implemented a human resources strategy in support of the devolution of AANDC's responsibilities for land and resources to the Government of the Northwest Territories, resulting in the transfer of 130 AANDC employees.
  • Developed an Enterprise Architecture (EA) strategy in line with the Treasury Board Secretariat proposed strategy. Once implemented, EA will enable improved management of information and technology within AANDC.
  • AANDC worked closely with key stakeholders to ensure the integrity of government policy and program areas and alignment with the evolving Aboriginal jurisprudence.

Advancing the Excellence Agenda — To advance a culture and environment of high performance, in 2013–2014, AANDC:

  • Seized opportunities in an environment of fiscal restraint to gain efficiencies where possible to optimize financial and human resources (i.e. internal tools and processes were developed, including the identification of risks and impacts associated to financial decisions).
  • Launched the Deputy Minister Aboriginal Workforce Initiative II to support the Aboriginal Peoples' hiring goal and the commitment to recruit, retain and provide career development opportunities to Aboriginal employees. The Aboriginal Leadership Development Initiative is now implemented in partnership with Treasury Board Secretariat and Correctional Services Canada.
  • To implement the AANDC Values and Ethics Code, provided employee training (for 523 employees) and scenarios related to risk areas to further clarify expected behaviours.
  • Continued active monitoring of long-term sick leave without pay, with positive results. Tools were developed, including the delivery of training sessions to help managers address such cases in a sensitive and well managed manner, to create the appropriate conditions for successful return to work where possible.
  • Streamlined the 2014–2015 Program Alignment Architecture from 75 to 54 program elements. As a result, AANDC will report on 16 programs and 39 sub-programs in 2014–2015.
  • Carried out an integrated and staged approach for effective planning and delivering on priorities. As a first stage, planning cycles for business objectives, resources and human resources planning were aligned so that all three were launched at the same time.
  • Released three major products in a banner year for data: the National Household Survey, the Program for the International Assessment of Adult Competencies and the Aboriginal Peoples Survey. Twenty-one research products were developed and 16 research presentations were offered to support evidence-based decision-making on the priority issues of well-being, education and employment, youth, urban issues and governance. Responded to over 640 statistical enquiries and produced over 50 documents with the latest authoritative Aboriginal demographic and socio-economic statistics and analyses that were posted to the intranet, the Internet or GCpedia for broad access and to support evidence-based decision making.
  • Continued to ensure effective oversight of operations, conducting 17 audit engagements and 9 evaluations. A neutral assessment of AANDC's evaluation function was completed in January 2014 concluding that the evaluation function was in accordance with expectations set out in policy, standards and directives and that it added value to policy discussions in the Department. The assessment recommendations focused on process improvements related to evaluation planning. A comprehensive consultation process was implemented to develop the Department Corporate Risk Profile and Risk-Based Audit Plan.

Canadian Polar Commission

Strategic Outcome: Increased Canadian Polar Knowledge

Program: Knowledge Management and Communication

Description

The Canadian Polar Commission is Canada's national institution for furthering polar knowledge and awareness. It maintains and builds active knowledge networks, synthesizes polar knowledge to identify opportunities, issues and trends, and communicates polar knowledge, in the North and to all Canadians.

This strategic outcome creates the conditions for Canada to acquire the wide range of information needed for effective policy and research program development in the polar regions and to maintain Canada's position as a leading polar nation.

2013–2014 Budgetary Financial Resources (Dollars)

Main Estimates Planned Spending Total Authorities
Available for Use
Actual Spending
(Authorities used)
Difference
(Actual minus planned)
2,095,074 2,095,074 2,108,888 2,259,236 164,162

2013–2014 Human Resources (FTEs)

Planned Actual Difference
(Actual minus planned)
7.5 9.5 2.0

Performance Results

Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
The Commission facilitates Canada fully embracing its place as a polar nation Polar knowledge networks are maintained and enhanced Knowledge content of the Canadian Polar Commission website is current and accessible The Commission's website is fully compliant with current government standards and updated frequently. Knowledge content is also disseminated through the Polar Blog (in partnership with Canadian Geographic magazine) and the Polar Knowledge mobile application
Synthesis and analysis of priority polar issues are published One major analysis published annually The Commission completed the State of Northern Knowledge in Canada report, which analyses knowledge gains since International Polar Year 2007, to determine present research opportunities
Communications channels to disseminate polar knowledge to Canadians are strengthened Number of downloads of Canadian Polar Commission communications products doubles Downloads are up by a factor of 2.5 over the previous year. New communications channels include the Polar Blog, a Facebook page and the Polar Knowledge mobile application

Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

All 2013–2014 targets were met, with the exception of the creation of a technical advisory committee on matters associated with polar knowledge and research, because of a Board of Directors decision not to proceed at this time.

  • The Commission organized discussions with stakeholders and decision-makers, including Northerners via the Commission's northern office, to help facilitate the use of polar knowledge to influence programs and policies for the benefit of Canadians. This contributed significantly to the State of Northern Knowledge in Canada report which analyses gains and gaps in northern knowledge since International Polar Year 2007–2008 to help determine current and future research opportunities.
  • Commission guidance and support allowed the leaders and membership of the Canadian Network of Northern Research Operators to incorporate as a non-profit organization, elect a slate of directors, initiate a strategic planning exercise and begin fundraising efforts.
  • The Commission supported Canadian work in the Sustaining Arctic Observing Networks (SAON) initiative, which promotes Arctic-wide observing activities and developed a partnership with the Association of Polar Early Career Scientists to disseminate the results. The Commission now represents Canada on the SAON International Executive Committee.
  • The Commission financially supported the participation of Canadian experts in International Arctic Science Committee working groups and participated actively during Arctic Science Summit Week 2013. The Commission reinvigorated the Canadian Committee on Antarctic Research (CCAR) and supports CCAR in developing a Canadian national Antarctic research program.
  • The Commission began administering the Northern Scientific Training Program, which this year distributed nearly $1 million in funding to 34 universities across the country to help support 378 students in northern field research projects.
  • The Commission communicated polar knowledge to Canadians via its website, the Polar Blog (in partnership with Canadian Geographic magazine and tapping into their large readership/viewership), its new Facebook page and the Polar Knowledge App mobile application. Downloads of polar knowledge material from the Commission website more than doubled.
  • The Commission's annual Northern Science Award, which recognizes a major contribution to northern knowledge, was presented to Dr. Gérard Duhaime by the Governor General, His Excellency the Right Honourable David Johnston.
  • The Commission facilitated Canadian expert input to a U.S. National Academies of Science study team developing a report on emerging research questions in the Arctic.
  • The Canadian Polar Commission Board determined that it was not necessary to establish a formal technical advisory committee at this time, as external advice can continue to be effectively sought on an ad-hoc basis.
  • The Commission organized and delivered four engagement workshops on its State of Northern Knowledge in Canada project. These involved officials from federal agencies and departments; academics and other experts; northerners and private sector representatives; and representatives from international missions in Ottawa.

Internal Services

Description

Internal Services are groups of related activities and resources that are administered to support the needs of programs and other corporate obligations of an organization. These groups are: Management and Oversight Services; Communications Services; Legal Services; Human Resources Management Services; Financial Management Services; Information Management Services; Information Technology Services; Real Property Services; Materiel Services; Acquisition Services; and Other Administrative Services. Internal Services include only those activities and resources that apply across an organization and not to those provided specifically to a program.

2013–2014 Budgetary Financial Resources (Dollars)

Main Estimates Planned Spending Total Authorities
Available for Use
Actual Spending
(Authorities used)
Difference
(Actual minus planned)
481,595 481,595 485,048 330,773 (150,822)

2013–2014 Human Resources (FTEs)

Planned Actual Difference
(Actual minus planned)
1.5 1.5 0

Section III: Supplementary Information

Financial Statements Highlights

Condensed Statement of Operations and Departmental Net Financial Position (unaudited)
For the year ended March 31, 2014 (Dollars)

  2013–2014 Planned Results 2013–2014 Actual 2012–2013 Actual Difference
(2013–2014 Actual minus 2013–2014 planned)
Difference
(2013–2014 Actual minus 2012–2013 actual)
Total expenses 7,113,226,784 7,150,422,246 7,919,978,750 37,195,462 (769,556,504)
Total revenues 750,000 1,460,183 2,422,548 710,183 (962,365)
Net cost of operations before government funding and transfers 7,112,476,784 7,148,962,063 7,917,556,202 36,485,279 (768,594,139)
Departmental net financial position (12,385,082,091) (12,695,158,076) (13,565,525,320) (310,075,985) 870,367,244

Expenses by Type

Total expenses were $7,150 million in 2013–2014, representing a 9.7% decrease from the previous year's expenses of $7,920 million. Transfer payments, the majority to Aboriginal people and Aboriginal organizations, amounted to $6,238 million or 87.2% of total expenses. Other significant expenses included court awards and other settlements totaling $518 million (7.2%).

Expenses by Type Graph
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The pie chart breaks down the Department's total expenses by type into percentages.

Transfer payments: 87.2 percent
Court awards and other settlement: 7.2 percent
Other: 5.6 percent

Revenues by Type

Total revenues for 2013–2014 amounted to $1.5 million, representing a 39.7% decrease over the previous year's total revenues of $2.4 million. Respendable revenues from the provision of financial and administrative services represent $0.7 million or 46.7% of total revenues. Respendable revenues from the proceeds from the sale of surplus Crown assets, included in miscellaneous revenue, account for the remaining $0.8 million (53.3%).

Significant changes

The change in total expenses can be attributed mainly to a significant decrease in the provision for claims in litigation, resulting in a large year-end credit to expenses.

The change in total revenues can be attributed mainly to a decrease from the prior year in the proceeds from the sale of surplus Crown assets, which are included in respendable revenues.

Revenues by 
Type graph
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The pie chart breaks down the Department's total revenues by type into percentages.

Financial and administrative services: 46.7 percent
Miscellaneous revenue: 53.3 percent

Condensed Statement of Financial Position (unaudited)
As at March 31, 2014 (Dollars)

  2013–2014 2012–2013 Difference
(2013–2014 minus 2012–2013)
Total net liabilities 14,458,492,218 15,388,799,381 (930,307,163)
Total net financial assets 1,656,102,350 1,725,900,566 (69,798,216)
Departmental net debt 12,802,389,868 13,662,898,815 (860,508,947)
Total non-financial assets 107,231,790 97,373,496 9,858,294
Departmental net financial position (12,695,158,078) (13,565,525,319) 870,367,241

Liabilities by Type

Total net liabilities were $14,458 million at the end of 2013–2014, which was a decrease of $930 million (−6.0%) from the previous year's total net liabilities of $15,389 million. The provision for claims and litigation represents the largest portion of liabilities at $9,755 million or 67.5% of total liabilities. Other significant liabilities include environmental liabilities of $2,703 million (18.7%), trust accounts of $890 million (6.2%), accounts payable of $633 million (4.4%) and the liability for settled claims in the amount of $356 million (2.5%).

Liabilities 
by Type graph
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The pie chart breaks down the Department's total liabilities by type into percentages.

Claims and litigation: 67.5 percent
Environmental liabilities: 18.7 percent
Trust accounts: 6.2 percent
Accounts payable: 4.4 percent
Settled claims: 2.5 percent
Other: 0.7 percent

Net Financial Assets by Type

Total net financial assets were $1,656 million at the end of 2013–2014, which was a decrease of $70 million (−4.1%) from the previous year's total net financial assets of $1,726 million. The asset due from the Consolidated Revenue Fund (CRF) accounted for 95.8% of total net financial assets at $1,587 million and accounts receivable accounted for the remaining 4.2% of net financial assets at $69 million.

Net 
Financial Assets by Type graph
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The pie chart breaks down the Department's Net financial assets by type into percentages.

Due from the Consolidated Revenue Fund: 95.8 percent
Accounts receivable: 4.2 percent

Non-Financial Assets by Type

Total non-financial assets were $107 million which was an increase of $10 million (10.3%) from the previous year's total non-financial assets of $97 million. Tangible capital assets represent 63.6% or $68 million of total non-financial assets while land held for future claims settlements represents the remaining 36.4% at $39 million.

Significant Changes

The change in total liabilities can be attributed mainly to a decrease in the provision for claims and litigation due to the settlement of many previously outstanding claims, a decrease in the liability for settled claims due to payments made on outstanding claims throughout the year and a decrease in accounts payable. These decreases were partially offset by an increase in the amount accrued for environmental liabilities due to the availability of revised estimates for the cost of remediating contaminated sites.

The change in total net financial assets can be attributed mainly to a decrease in the asset due from the CRF as a result of a decrease in accounts payable and a decrease in trust account liabilities.

The change in total non-financial assets can be attributed mainly to an increase in tangible capital assets primarily due to assets under construction related to the Canadian High Arctic Research Station as well as information technology systems.

Non-Financial Assets by Type graph
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The pie chart breaks down the Department's Non-financial assets by type into percentages.

Tangible capital assets: 63.6 percent
Land held for future claim settlements: 36.4 percent

Financial Statements

Please refer to the Financial Statements on AANDC's website for more information.

Supplementary Information Tables

The supplementary information tables listed in the 2013–14 Departmental Performance Report can be found on the Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Canada's website.

Tax Expenditures and Evaluations

The tax system can be used to achieve public policy objectives through the application of special measures such as low tax rates, exemptions, deductions, deferrals and credits. The Department of Finance Canada publishes cost estimates and projections for these measures annually in Tax Expenditures and Evaluations. The tax measures presented in the Tax Expenditures and Evaluations publication are the sole responsibility of the Minister of Finance.


Section IV: Organizational Contact Information

Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development

Les Terrasses de la Chaudière
10 Wellington Street, North Tower
Gatineau, Quebec
Mailing Address: Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0H4
E-mail: webmaster@aadnc-aandc.gc.ca

General and statistical inquiries and publication distribution
Telephone (toll-free): 1-800-567-9604
TTY (toll-free): 1-866-553-0554
E-mail: InfoPubs@aadnc-aandc.gc.ca

Departmental Library
Telephone: 819-997-0811
E-mail: Reference@aadnc-aandc.gc.ca

Media Inquiries — Communications
Telephone: 819-953-1160

Canadian Polar Commission

Constitution Square
360 Albert Street, Suite 1710
Ottawa, Ontario K1R 7X7
Telephone: 613-943-8605 or (toll-free) 1-888-POLAR01 (1-888-765-2701)

Appendix: Definitions

appropriation: Any authority of Parliament to pay money out of the Consolidated Revenue Fund.

budgetary expenditures: Include operating and capital expenditures; transfer payments to other levels of government, organizations or individuals; and payments to Crown corporations.

Departmental Performance Report: Reports on an appropriated organization's actual accomplishments against the plans, priorities and expected results set out in the corresponding Reports on Plans and Priorities. These reports are tabled in Parliament in the fall.

full-time equivalent: A measure of the extent to which an employee represents a full person-year charge against a departmental budget. Full-time equivalents are calculated as a ratio of assigned hours of work to scheduled hours of work. Scheduled hours of work are set out in collective agreements.

Government of Canada outcomes: A set of 16 high-level objectives defined for the government as a whole, grouped in 4 spending areas: economic affairs, social affairs, international affairs and government affairs.

Management, Resources and Results Structure: A comprehensive framework that consists of an organization's inventory of programs, resources, results, performance indicators and governance information. Programs and results are depicted in their hierarchical relationship to each other and to the Strategic Outcome(s) to which they contribute. The Management, Resources and Results Structure is developed from the Program Alignment Architecture.

non-budgetary expenditures: Include net outlays and receipts related to loans, investments and advances, which change the composition of the financial assets of the Government of Canada.

performance: What an organization did with its resources to achieve its results, how well those results compare to what the organization intended to achieve and how well lessons learned have been identified.

performance indicator: A qualitative or quantitative means of measuring an output or outcome, with the intention of gauging the performance of an organization, program, policy or initiative respecting expected results.

performance reporting: The process of communicating evidence-based performance information. Performance reporting supports decision making, accountability and transparency.

planned spending: For Reports on Plans and Priorities (RPPs) and Departmental Performance Reports (DPRs), planned spending refers to those amounts that receive Treasury Board approval by February 1. Therefore, planned spending may include amounts incremental to planned expenditures presented in the Main Estimates.

A department is expected to be aware of the authorities that it has sought and received. The determination of planned spending is a departmental responsibility, and departments must be able to defend the expenditure and accrual numbers presented in their RPPs and DPRs.

plans: The articulation of strategic choices, which provides information on how an organization intends to achieve its priorities and associated results. Generally a plan will explain the logic behind the strategies chosen and tend to focus on actions that lead up to the expected result.

priorities: Plans or projects that an organization has chosen to focus and report on during the planning period. Priorities represent the things that are most important or what must be done first to support the achievement of the desired Strategic Outcome(s).

program: A group of related resource inputs and activities that are managed to meet specific needs and achieve intended results that are treated as a budgetary unit.

results: An external consequence attributed, in part, to an organization, policy, program or initiative. Results are not within the control of a single organization, policy, program or initiative. Instead, they are within the area of the organization's influence.

Program Alignment Architecture: A structured inventory of an organization's programs depicting the hierarchical relationship between programs and the Strategic Outcome(s) to which they contribute.

Report on Plans and Priorities: Provides information on the plans and expected performance of appropriated organizations over a three-year period. These reports are tabled in Parliament each spring.

Strategic Outcome: A long-term and enduring benefit to Canadians that is linked to the organization's mandate, vision and core functions.

sunset program: A time-limited program that does not have an ongoing funding and policy authority. When the program is set to expire, a decision must be made whether to continue the program or not. In the case of a renewal, the decision specifies the scope, funding level and duration.

target: A measurable performance or success level that an organization, program or initiative plans to achieve within a specified time period. Targets can be either quantitative or qualitative.

whole-of-government framework: Maps the financial contributions of federal organizations receiving appropriations by aligning their Programs to a set of 16 government-wide high-level outcome areas, grouped under four spending areas.


 
 

Footnotes

Footnote 1

The "bundling" or "grouping" of multiple projects creates larger construction contracts which draw interest from experienced consultants/construction firms resulting in a business environment where economies of scale can be realized.

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Footnote 2

The original priority has shifted from "implementing" to "maximizing the use of" the Policy on Transfer Payments, to better reflect the policy's status in the Department.

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Footnote 3

Active negotiation tables refer to instances where the Parties have concluded a major component and/or have met or surpassed Departmental negotiation objectives and where the negotiations continue to make steady progress to move in the direction of a successful conclusion.

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Footnote 4

The primary role of Treaty Catalyst Teachers is to provide leadership and expertise at the school/division level to support their colleagues as they attempt to teach treaties.

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Footnote 5

A house or lodging provided for a teacher.

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Footnote 6

Measure is an aggregate from all population centres in the Labour Force Survey. Urban Aboriginal people, refers to Aboriginal people living in "population centres" which are centres with more than 1000 people or more than 400 people per square kilometer.

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Footnote 7

Source: Statistics Canada, Labour Force Survey March 2013. Measure is an aggregate from all population centres. Urban Aboriginal people refers to Aboriginal people living in "population centres" which are centres with more than 1000 people or more than 400 people per square kilometer.

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Footnote 8

Source: Statistics Canada, Labour Force Survey March 2014 Measure is an aggregate from all population centres. Urban Aboriginal people refers to Aboriginal people living in "population centres" which are centres with more than 1000 people or more than 400 people per square kilometer.

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Footnote 9

A thermosyphon is a hollow pipe that is half buried near infrastructure to maintain the integrity of the temperature of the soil. It uses passive heat exchange, moving gas cooled by the outside air from the top of the pipe to the buried (bottom) portion, where warmer air is displaced. This process continues as long as the air temperature is colder than the ground temperature.

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Footnote 10

Legacy persistent organic pollutants are the original 12 contaminants that were listed under the Stockholm Convention on Persistent Organic Pollutants when it entered into force in 2004.

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Footnote 11

Biota refers to all living organisms of a particular region.

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Footnote 12

Polybrominated diphenyl ethers, or PBDEs, are a class of substances used as flame retardants in a wide variety of products.

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Footnote 13

An interim land withdrawal is a temporary restraint, approved by the Governor in Council and implemented under the Territorial Lands Act, on the Department from issuing land and/or resource rights to third parties within a specific tract of land.

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