2014–2015 Departmental Sustainable Development Strategy — Themes I–IV

Overview of the Federal Government's Approach to Sustainable Development

The 2013–2016 Federal Sustainable Development Strategy (FSDS), tabled on November 4, 2013, guides the Government of Canada’s 2013–2016 sustainable development activities. The FSDS articulates Canada’s federal sustainable development priorities for a period of three years, as required by the Federal Sustainable Development Act (FSDA). The purpose of the FSDA is to provide the legal framework for developing and implementing a federal sustainable development strategy that will make environmental decision-making more transparent and accountable to Parliament. AANDC supports the implementation of the FSDS through the activities found in this departmental strategy.

Sustainable Development Management System

AANDC’s vision is a future in which First Nations, Inuit, Métis and northern communities are healthy, safe, self-sufficient and prosperous — a Canada where people make their own decisions, manage their own affairs and make strong contributions to the country as a whole.

Sustainable Development is an integral part of the department’s mandate and AANDC continues to take sustainable development and environmental risks into consideration in the development of policies, programs, plans and reports. The commitments made in this strategy are aligned with the Department’s Program Alignment Architecture and the Performance Measurement Framework.

Department-led Target

FSDS Goal FSDS Target Performance Indicator
Goal 3: Water Quality and Water Quantity — Protect and enhance water so that it is clean, safe and secure for all Canadians and supports healthy ecosystems. 3.1 Target Increase the percent of on-reserve First Nations water systems with low risk ratings from 27% to 50% by 2015. Increase the percent of on-reserve First Nations wastewater systems with low risk ratings from 35% to 70% by 2015. Risk rating for First Nations water and wastewater systems management.

Departmental Implementation Strategies

3.1.1 Increase on-reserve First Nations capacity to operate and maintain water and wastewater systems by improving access to and support for operator certification and training, in order to augment the number of certified operators. (AANDC)

3.1.2 Prioritize investment support to on-reserve First Nations to target highest-risk water and wastewater systems. (AANDC)

3.1.3 Provide on-reserve First Nations with funding and advice regarding, design, construction, operation and maintenance of their water and wastewater treatment facilities. (AANDC)

3.1.6 Develop, and update as required technical guidance protocols, such as the Protocol for Centralised Drinking Water in First Nations Communities and the Protocol for Centralised Wastewater Treatment and Disposal in First Nations Communities, and the Protocol for Decentralised Water and Wastewater Systems in First Nations Communities. (AANDC)

3.1.7 Develop appropriate regulatory framework and legislation for safe drinking water and wastewater treatment in First Nations communities on reserves. (AANDC)

Theme II: Maintaining Water Quality and Availability PAA Sub-program 3.3.1 Water and Wastewater Infrastructure

Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets
First Nation communities have a base of safe water and wastewater that meets established standards Percentage of First Nation drinking water systems that have LOW risk ratings 50%* (by March 31, 2015)
(2011 baseline: 27%)
Percentage of First Nation wastewater systems that have LOW risk ratings 65% (by March 31, 2015)
(2011 baseline: 35%)
Percentage of First Nation drinking water systems with treated water that meets prescribed standards in the Guidelines for Canadian Drinking Water Quality 85% (by March 31, 2015)
(2011 baseline: 46%)
Percentage of First Nation wastewater systems producing treated water that meet effluent quality regulations and guidelines 70% of systems meet current standards (by March 31, 2016)
*According to the National Assessment 2010 results, the baseline for the percentage of First Nation drinking water systems that had low risk ratings was set at 27%. It was assessed that the activities of the Capital Facilities Maintenance Program would have an incremental impact on the system risks enabling the Program to reach 50% of systems by 2015.

Departmental Implementation Strategies

FSDS Goal FSDS Target Departmental Implementation Strategy
Goal 1: Climate Change — In order to mitigate the effects of climate change, reduce greenhouse gas emission levels and adapt to unavoidable impacts. 1.1 Target: Climate Change Mitigation — Relative to 2005 emission levels, reduce Canada’s total GHG emissions 17% by 2020. (led by Environment Canada) 1.1.47: Work with Aboriginal and northern communities, organizations and governments on the development of sustainable energy.

Theme I: Addressing Climate Change and Air Quality PAA Sub-program 3.4.5: Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency

Clean Air Agenda Planned Spending for 2014–2015: $3,926,420

Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets
Greenhouse gas emissions in Aboriginal and northern communities are reduced Projected Reductions in GHG Emissions resulting from all projects funded by the ecoEnergy for Aboriginal and Northern Communities Program (2011–2016) Projected 1.5 Mt (by March 31, 2016)

FSDS Goal FSDS Target Departmental Implementation Strategy
Goal 1: Climate Change — In order to mitigate the effects of climate change, reduce greenhouse gas emission levels and adapt to unavoidable impacts. 1.2. Target: Climate Change Adaptation — Facilitate reduced vulnerability of individuals, communities, regions and economic sectors to the impacts of climate change through the development and provision of information and tools. (led by Environment Canada) 1.2.1: Work with Aboriginal and northern communities, organizations and governments on climate change issues by supporting them in managing vulnerabilities and opportunities created by a changing climate. (AANDC)

Theme I: Addressing Climate Change and Air Quality PAA Sub-program 4.1.3: Climate Change Adaptation

Clean Air Agenda Planned Spending for 2014–2015: $4,599,420

Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets
Aboriginal and northern communities implement adaptation measures and decisions to protect community health and safety Number of communities implementing adaptation plans and measures 10 Communities over 4 years (by March 31, 2016)


FSDS Goal FSDS Target Departmental Implementation Strategy
Goal 1: Climate Change — In order to mitigate the effects of climate change, reduce greenhouse gas emission levels and adapt to unavoidable impacts. 1.2. Target: Climate Change Adaptation — Facilitate reduced vulnerability of individuals, communities, regions and economic sectors to the impacts of climate change through the development and provision of information and tools. 1.2.5: Work with Aboriginal and northern communities to develop and deploy standards that support more resilient infrastructure and reduce impacts from climate change at the community level. (AANDC, SCC)

Theme I: Addressing Climate Change and Air Quality PAA Sub-program 4.1.3: Climate Change Adaptation

Clean Air Agenda Planned Spending for 2014–2015: $187,000

Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets
Community health and safety in the North is strengthened Number of new and revised codes and standards and guidelines for infrastructure in the North being adopted 2 out of 4 codes completed (by March 31, 2015)

FSDS Goal FSDS Target Departmental Implementation Strategy
Goal 4: Conserving and Restoring Ecosystems, Wildlife and Habitat, and Protecting Canadians — Resilient ecosystems with healthy wildlife populations so Canadians can enjoy benefits from natural spaces, resources and ecological services for generations to come. 4.7. Target: Environmental Disasters, Incidents and Emergencies — Environmental disasters, incidents and emergencies are prevented or their impacts mitigated. (led by Public Safety and Environment Canada) 4.7.4: In accordance with mandated responsibilities, provide environmental and/or other information to reduce the risk of, and advice in response to, the occurrence of events such as polluting incidents, wildlife disease events or severe weather and other significant hydro-meteorological events as applicable. (AAFC, AANDC, DFO, EC, HC, IC, NRCan, PC, PS, PWGSC, TC)

Theme III: Protecting Nature and Canadians PAA Sub-program 3.4.6: Emergency Management Assistance

Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets
First Nations respond to and recover from emergencies Percentage of eligible* emergency response costs that are funded 100% (by March 31, 2015)
Percentage of eligible* recovery projects that are funded 100% (by March 31, 2015)
*Eligible costs are outlined in the Emergency Management Assistance Program's Terms and Conditions (Authority #330).

The EMAP enters into agreements with emergency management providers to deliver response and recovery activities to First Nations. The program seeks funding from Treasury Board which is used to reimburse emergency management providers. While EMAP funding has an effect on First Nations, the actual response and recovery activities undertaken by First Nations or other providers are out of EMAP's control to measure. Due to the nature of emergency management, the only measureable performance indicator at this time for the EMAP is funding.


FSDS Goal FSDS Target Departmental Implementation Strategy
Goal 4: Conserving and Restoring Ecosystems, Wildlife and Habitat, and Protecting Canadians — Resilient ecosystems with healthy wildlife populations so Canadians can enjoy benefits from natural spaces, resources and ecological services for generations to come. 4.8. Target: Chemicals Management — Reduce risks to Canadians and impacts on the environment and human health posed by releases of harmful substances. (led by Environment Canada and Health Canada) 4.8.1: Implement the Federal Contaminated Sites Action Plan and complete remediation and risk management activities at known high priority federal contaminated sites. (AAFC, AANDC, CSC, DFO, DND, EC, NRC, PC, PWGSC, RCMP, TC)

Theme III: Protecting Nature and Canadians PAA Sub-program 3.2.4: Contaminated Sites (On Reserve)

Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets
Federal liabilities related to the existence of contaminated sites are reduced Dollar Reduction in total of the known federal financial liabilities in confirmed contaminated sites at the beginning of the fiscal year $8 million (by March 31, 2015)
First Nation land is available for development Number of contaminated sites completely remediated 5 (by March 31, 2015)
Decreased risk to public health and safety Number of Class 1 sites (with existing concerns for public health and safety) where risk reduction is occurring 15 (by March 31, 2015)

Theme III: Protecting Nature and Canadians PAA Sub-program 4.3.2: Contaminated Sites (Northern)

Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets
Contaminated sites are managed to ensure the protection of human health and the safety of the environment while bringing economic benefit to the North Number of sites in Step 8 (implementation) through Step 10 (monitoring) of the Federal Contaminated Sites Action Plan 10-step process 40 (by March 31, 2015)
Percentage of Northerners and Aboriginal peoples employed within Contaminated Sites projects 60% (by March 31, 2015)

FSDS Goal FSDS Target Departmental Implementation Strategy
Goal 4: Conserving and Restoring Ecosystems, Wildlife and Habitat, and Protecting Canadians — Resilient ecosystems with healthy wildlife populations so Canadians can enjoy benefits from natural spaces, resources and ecological services for generations to come. 4.8 Target: Chemicals Management — Reduce risks to Canadians and impacts on the environment and human health posed by releases of harmful substances. (led by Environment Canada and Health Canada) 4.8.7: The Northern Contaminants Program will continue monitoring contaminant levels in wildlife and people in the Canadian North. (AANDC)

Theme III: Protecting Nature and Canadians PAA Sub-program 4.2.1: Northern Contaminants

Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets
Contaminant related risk to ecosystem and human health is reduced Percentage decrease in concentrations of previously identified contaminants in northern wildlife 5 to 10% decrease in 3 indicator persistent organic pollutants concentrations over 1990 levels (by March 31, 2015)

1 to 3% decrease in Mercury concentrations over 1990 levels (by March 31, 2015)
Percentage decrease in concentrations of previously identified contaminants among northern populations 5 to 10% decrease in 3 indicator persistent organic pollutants concentrations over 1990 levels (by March 31, 2015)

1 to 3% decrease in Mercury concentrations over 1990 levels (by March 31, 2015)

Theme IV: Shrinking the Environmental Footprint — Beginning with Government Greening Government Operations

Details on AANDC's activities can be found in the Greening Government Operations Supplementary Information Table.