Charting a Path for Prosperity - Long Plain First Nation's Urban Reserves Story

Learn how Long Plain First Nation is meeting the growing demands for housing, employment and training in their community through the establishment of their second urban reserve in Winnipeg, Manitoba.

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Transcript: Charting a Path for Prosperity - Long Plain First Nation's Urban Reserves Story

Narrator

In Winnipeg, Manitoba, Long Plain First Nation is paving the way for success and opportunity with a 2.81 acre property. The First Nation's second urban reserve has been a long time in the making, and is defined by its potential to achieve economic prosperity.

Tim Daniels - Economic Development Officer - Long Plain First Nation

Long Plain First Nation is an Ojibway Nation and is a part of Treaty One…. Long Plain is located 15 kilometers southwest of the City of Portage La Prairie…

… we have 4,200 band members with approximately 2,100 living on reserve. On August 3rd 1994 Canada and Long Plain First Nation settled its outstanding Treaty Land Entitlement Claim… Canada compensated Long Plain with 16.5 million dollars to purchase 4,169 acres.

Eunice Gross - AANDC Project Manager - Addition to Reserves

The Treaty Land settlement allowed for …Long Plain First Nation to purchase properties… more specifically the Madison property which is in the City of Winnipeg and it is 2.81 acres. When they purchased it that initiated the process for the Additions to Reserve and we set it apart for the use and benefit of Long Plain First Nation.

Tim Daniels - Economic Development Officer - Long Plain First Nation

In 2010 we signed a municipal services agreement with the City of Winnipeg … it spells out you know, the services that Long Plain will get from the City and how we're going to pay for them …

… but it also frames the property itself in terms of how we're going to develop it.

Tim Daniels - Economic Development Officer - Long Plain First Nation

The first project on the Madison Reserve was to refurbish and renovate the existing building that was there, for Yellowquill College.

Lyle Plett - First Nations Management & Administration Program Coordinator - Yellowquill College

Yellowquill College is a First Nations educational institution…

… we are a provider of educational services to Dakota Ojiway tribal council members, Long Plain being one of the tribal council members…

… we are also open to other treaty areas First Nations as well as open to the general public.

Tim Daniels - Economic Development Officer - Long Plain First Nation

In the Yellowquill College building, they're not using the full building so we are leasing it out to other businesses.

We have Eagle Vision as well as Manitowabi… and we're also planning to move a law firm in there - of Aboriginal lawyers.

In the summer of 2014 we hope to open the doors for our gas station… we've created a partnership with SunCor which is Petro Canada.

We're ideally situated, you know, we're 5 minutes from the airport and 10 minutes from downtown.

The gas station will be built on St Matthews where there's going to be a lot of traffic going from downtown and forth between the airport.

Right now we're doing a business plan and we're canvassing tenants for an 80,000 square foot office complex… it's 5 stories … about 16,000 square foot footprint.

Tim Daniels - Economic Development Officer - Long Plain First Nation

Long Plain is very fortunate to have two urban reserves… and we've learned quite a bit in developing our first urban reserve in the City of Portage La Prairie… we have a gas station there, office complex and a conference centre …

… and it certainly helped us in developing our urban reserve in the City of Winnipeg.

Chief Dennis Meeches - Long Plain First Nation

Government funding is not going to meet the demands of a growing First Nation and I think a lot of us right across the country understand that.

First Nations really can't meet the demand for housing, employment and training in their home communities- so you're seeing a migration of First Nations people into the cities…

The urban reserves that we have in Winnipeg and Portage represent an opportunity to create economic wealth for the First Nation.

I think it will benefit everybody… the education opportunities, the employment training opportunities that we can drive through the urban reserves …

And people will see it… I don't think Canadians in general should be afraid of what that represents…

… what it actually represents is getting people off the employment lines, you know, maybe raising the standard of living of

First Nations people, creating real partnerships that can work for all people within the Province here in Manitoba and across the country.

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