Legacy of Hope Foundation

See how the Legacy of Hope Foundation is educating Canadians on the history of Residential Schools

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Transcript: Legacy of Hope Foundation

Trina Cooper-Bolam, Director of Legacy Projects, Aboriginal Healing Foundation

The Legacy of Hope Foundation is a national Aboriginal charitable organization that was founded in 1998 to raise awareness and educate Canadians about the history and legacy of the residential school system and its impacts on First Nations, Métis and Inuit.

Richard Kistabish, President, Legacy of Hope Foundation

Every opportunity that I have in my life, I use it in order to tell the story about residential schools.

I believe strongly in that by telling the truth, you can bring togetherness.

Trina Cooper-Bolam, Director of Legacy Projects, Aboriginal Healing Foundation

The residential school system comprises 139 schools that operated throughout Canada from 1831 to 1996. The schools were mandatory for all Aboriginal children age 7 and up.

Jane Hubbard, Project Officer - Education, Legacy Projects, Aboriginal Healing Foundation

And because it's a shared history, it's Aboriginal history and it's non-Aboriginal history… it happened in Canada and that's something that has to be brought to light.

Kristin Kopra, Instructional Coach, Aboriginal Education, OCDSB

That is a huge part of the reconciliation process, right, is for us to first have an understanding of what actually happened and this has been a huge missing piece from our history classes for many, many years.

Richard Kistabish, President, Legacy of Hope Foundation (sound-up)

All the kids feel abandoned. We have this feeling of loss, we are lost. There's no way we can go home now.

Richard Kistabish, President, Legacy of Hope Foundation

By telling the stories of the residential school, it is a way to reconnect again, but this time the right way.

Trina Cooper-Bolam, Director of Legacy Projects, Aboriginal Healing Foundation

We have over the past ten years developed products, resources, information to support the healing movement and to support reconciliation and to support teachers.

We had to create very structured materials that would allow them to introduce this difficult subject with confidence and as such we created the 100 Years of Loss program…

 …and that's a three prong program, so it has the curriculum, and their in-class resources…

 …it makes use of oral histories and we invite survivors to come into the classroom.

Albert Dumont, Poet, Storyteller, Speaker, and an Algonquin Traditional Teacher

I have to say that I've been a speaker at schools and the first time I did it I asked the teacher, I said "do you think these children can handle the truth" because they were 7 and 8 year olds, and the teacher said that they can.

Jane Hubbard, Project Officer - Education, Legacy Projects, Aboriginal Healing Foundation

I really think that it's young people that will move the reconciliation and the healing process forward.

Clara Chapman, Grade 12, Glebe Collegiate Institute

What is extremely important is just that that our age group and you know, people going through school, slowly but surely, really do learn about this and it is, you know a part of history that is taught to them as fully as every other part of history.

Richard Kistabish, President, Legacy of Hope Foundation

One of my dreams, it's to have the stories of residential school to be mandatory across the country. I see that in every classroom in Canada and that will be amazing.

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