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Table of Contents

 

Section I: Introduction

The Federal Sustainable Development Strategy (FSDS) and corresponding departmental sustainable development strategies (DSDS) fulfill the requirements of the Federal Sustainable Development Act (FSDA), passed by Parliament in 2008 with the aim of rendering environmental decision making more transparent and accountable to Parliament.

Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Canada's (AANDC) DSDS contributes to the FSDS. This Performance Report is intended to demonstrate the progress AANDC has made in meeting the objectives outlined in the 2012–2013 DSDS.

Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Canada Vision

Canada's economic and social well-being benefits from strong, self-sufficient Aboriginal and northern people and communities.

Our vision is a future in which First Nations, Inuit, Métis and northern communities are healthy, safe, self-sufficient and prosperous — a Canada where people make their own decisions, manage their own affairs and make strong contributions to the country as a whole.

Decision making under the Federal Sustainable Development Act

AANDC commits to:

Strategic Environmental Assessments at AANDC

The Strategic Environmental Assessment (SEA) is a key analytical tool used by the federal government to support environmentally sustainable decision making. It evaluates the environmental effects of a proposed policy, plan, or program and its alternatives, and informs strategic decision making through a careful analysis of environmental risks and opportunities. During 2012–2013 AANDC considered the environmental effects of initiatives subject to the Cabinet Directive on the Environmental Assessment of Policy, Plan and Program Proposals. Through the SEA process, these departmental initiatives were found to have no environmental effects on the 2010–2013 FSDS goals and targets.

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Section II: Information on Departmental Implementation Strategies and Clean Air Agenda

FSDS Theme I: Addressing Climate Change and Air Quality

Theme I: Addressing Climate Change and Air Quality GOAL 1: Climate Change — Reduce greenhouse gas emission levels to mitigate the severity and unavoidable impacts of climate change

Implementation Strategy 1.1.31

Work with Aboriginal and northern communities, organizations and governments on climate change issues, through the development of sustainable energy initiatives and support them in managing vulnerabilities and opportunities created by a changing climate. (AANDC, NRCan)

Sub-program 4.1.3: Climate Change Adaptation

This sub-program provides funding support to Aboriginal and northern communities, governments and organizations to assess vulnerabilities to climate change, develop adaptation plans, and develop related information and tools. The program builds capacity at the community level and develops partnerships with territorial governments to address broad northern issues. The assessment of climate change impacts and adaptation planning enhances community resilience and facilitates the integration of climate change considerations into decision making.

CAA Theme: Adaptation

Name: Climate Adaptation and Resilience Program for Aboriginals and Northerners

Total Approved CAA Funding (excluding PWGSC accommodations): $19,717,100
2012–2013
Planned Spending $4,359,420 Actual Spending $4,303,076

Program Expected Achievements for 2012–2013

AANDC's Climate Change Adaptation Program addresses the Adaptation Theme's goal of reducing vulnerability to climate change by supporting the assessment of, and adaptation to, climate change impacts in Aboriginal and northern communities.

Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Aboriginal and northern communities implement adaptation measures and decisions to protect community health and safety Number of communities implementing adaptation plans and measures to protect community health and safety 10 communities/ 5 years Measurement of this indicator is expected to begin in 2013–2014.
Funded projects under 4 categories: vulnerability assessments; tools; adaptation plans; knowledge dissemination Number of funded projects under each category 2012–2013: 20 projects; 90 projects/ 5-years 43 projects were funded in 2012–2013 under four categories:
Vulnerability Assessment – 26 projects;
Tools Development – 10 projects;
Adaptation Plans – 6 projects;
Knowledge Dissemination – 7 projects

Performance Summary, Analysis of Program and Lessons Learned

The Climate Adaptation and Resilience Program for Aboriginals and Northerners, referred to as the Climate Change Adaptation Program (CCAP), supports Aboriginal and northern partners in building awareness of climate change impacts and in developing adaptation measures. CCAP funded 43 community and regional projects supporting the development of vulnerability assessments, adaptation planning, tools/methods/best practices on assessment and planning, and knowledge dissemination. Nineteen of the projects involved 45 Aboriginal and northern communities and two projects addressed climate change on a regional scale.

The Program provides up to $500,000 per year to each territorial government over 4 years. This funding will support communities in managing climate change-related risks including territory-specific and pan-arctic impacts, such as terrain mapping, pine beetle outbreak, and permafrost degradation. In 2012–2013, 22 of the 43 projects were completed under these agreements.

CCAP tracks the submission, review and implementation of projects in order to better understand the extent to which Aboriginal and northern communities recognize the need for, and are implementing, adaptation measures. CCAP directly supports the Adaptation Theme's immediate and intermediate outcomes. The Program works with Aboriginal governments, communities, and other government departments to develop partnerships and networks (output). The Program's focus is to provide funding to communities that recognize their need for adaptation and support their identification of adaptation measures to address risks and opportunities arising from climate change (immediate outcomes). Following the development of adaptation plans and identification of specific actions to reduce the impacts of climate change, some communities will move to implement adaptation measures, which is the Theme's intermediate outcome and the Program's ultimate outcome.

A key challenge for CCAP in 2012–2013 was over-subscription. CCAP received 152 letters of interest and funded 21 community projects. This reflects a growing interest in addressing climate change impacts, however, it also presents a challenge to clearly identify communities that are particularly vulnerable to climate change, effectively build capacity, engage the community, and provide meaningful information for decision makers. To better manage expectations, the Program further defined project eligibility criteria to align with departmental mandates for the 2013–2014 funding year. CCAP is also testing climate impact costing methodologies and mapping climate risks in an effort to better understand regional and community-level vulnerabilities.

Theme I: Addressing Climate Change and Air Quality GOAL 1: Climate Change — Reduce greenhouse gas emission levels to mitigate the severity and unavoidable impacts of climate change

Implementation Strategy 1.1.31

Work with Aboriginal and northern communities, organizations and governments on climate change issues, through the development of sustainable energy initiatives and support them in managing vulnerabilities and opportunities created by a changing climate. (AANDC, NRCan)

Sub-program 4.1.3: Climate Change Adaptation

This sub-program provides funding support to Aboriginal and northern communities, governments and organizations to assess vulnerabilities to climate change, develop adaptation plans, and develop related information and tools. The program builds capacity at the community level and develops partnerships with territorial governments to address broad northern issues. The assessment of climate change impacts and adaptation planning enhances community resilience and facilitates the integration of climate change considerations into decision making.

CAA Theme: Adaptation

Name: Integrating Adaptation into Codes and Standards for Northern Infrastructure

Total Approved CAA Funding (excluding PWGSC accommodations): $935,000
2012–2013
Planned Spending $187,000 Actual Spending $171,425

Program Expected Achievements for 2012–2013

AANDC's contribution to the Codes and Standards for Northern Infrastructure program addresses the Adaptation Theme's goal of reducing vulnerability to climate change by developing codes, standards and guidelines that support more resilient infrastructure and reduce impacts from climate change at the community level.

Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Aboriginal and northern communities implement adaptation measures and decisions to protect community health and safety Number of new and revised codes and standards for infrastructure being adopted in the North; Number of new and revised guidelines for infrastructure being adopted in the North 3 to 5 new and/or revised codes, standards, guidelines/ 5–10 years Development of four new standards began in 2012–2013 and is expected to be completed by 2015–2016.

Performance Summary, Analysis of Program and Lessons Learned

AANDC supports the Standards Council of Canada in the delivery of the Integrating Adaptation into Codes and Standards for Northern Infrastructure program, referred to as the Northern Infrastructure Standardization Initiative (NISI).

In 2012–2013, AANDC engaged over 250 Northerners and engaged 60 northern experts as participants on a technical committee and on working groups to oversee the development of four new infrastructure standards, which consider impacts on thermosyphonsFootnote 1, community drainage, permafrost on existing foundations and snow loading on roofs. Northerners were engaged through two focus group sessions to gather input on effective capacity building and engagement activities for use of the standards once completed in 2015–2016.

The NISI supports the Adaptation Theme's immediate outcome of identifying adaptation measures to address risks and opportunities arising from climate change, as well as the intermediate outcome of implementing adaptation measures. The development of new standards will be a tangible adaptation measure that can be adopted and used by jurisdictions throughout the North to strengthen infrastructure.

Interest and participation from Northerners in the NISI has to-date, far exceeded expectations requiring that efforts be put into managing expectations of the overall initiative. Moving forward, AANDC will work to create engagement and capacity building initiatives that are inclusive of the wide range of involved stakeholders.

Theme I: Addressing Climate Change and Air Quality GOAL 1: Climate Change — Reduce greenhouse gas emission levels to mitigate the severity and unavoidable impacts of climate change

Implementation Strategy 1.1.31

Work with Aboriginal and northern communities, organizations and governments on climate change issues, through the development of sustainable energy initiatives and support them in managing vulnerabilities and opportunities created by a changing climate. (AANDC, NRCan)

GOAL 2: Air Pollution — Minimize the threats to air quality so that the air Canadians breathe is clean and supports healthy ecosystems

Implementation Strategy 2.1.16

ecoACTION programs reduce greenhouse gas emissions and can directly or indirectly contribute to air pollutant emission reduction. (NRCan, Transport Canada, AANDC)

Sub-program 3.3.5: Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency

The ecoENERGY for Aboriginal and Northern Communities Program supports Aboriginal and northern communities, including off-grid communities, to reduce greenhouse gas emissions through the integration of proven renewable energy technologies such as residual heat recovery, biomass, geothermal, wind, solar and small hydro. The program provides funding support for the design and construction of renewable energy projects integrated with community buildings, and for the feasibility stages of larger renewable energy projects.

CAA Theme: Clean Energy

Name: ecoENERGY for Aboriginal and Northern Communities

Total Approved CAA Funding (excluding PWGSC accommodations): $19,632,100
2012–2013
Planned Spending $3,926,420 Actual Spending $3,767,292

Program Expected Achievements for 2012–2013

AANDC's ecoENERGY for Aboriginal and Northern Communities Program directly addresses the Clean Energy Theme's goal of reduced emissions of greenhouse gases from the energy sector by reducing emissions in Aboriginal and northern communities.

Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Reduced greenhouse gas emissions in Aboriginal and northern communities Projected reductions in GHG emissions resulting from all projects funded by the ecoENERGY for Aboriginal and Northern Communities Program (2011–2016) Projected 1.5 Megatonnes (Mt)/5-years Projects funded in 2011–2012 and 2012–2013 are expected to result in a projected 2.4 Mt reduction of GHG emissions over the course of their lifespan
Funded energy projects Number of projects funded by the ecoENERGY for Aboriginal and Northern Communities Program 10–20/year A total of 39 projects were funded

Performance Summary, Analysis of Program and Lessons Learned

The ecoENERGY for Aboriginal and Northern Communities Program (EANCP) received 110 proposals in 2012–2013, of which 39 were provided funding support. These supported projects were located in 39 different communities, 13 of which were off-grid communities and 20 communities of which had not previously received funding from the ecoENERGY program. Projects funded in 2011–2012 and 2012–2013 are expected to result in a 2.4 megatonnes reduction of GHG emissions over the course of their lifespan.

Included in the 39 funded projects were five community projects in the Northwest Territories (NWT) (four biomass and one solar Photovoltaic), which are expected to eliminate 103 kilotonnes of greenhouse gas emissions over the course of their lifetimes. The projects funded in the NWT are an example of how the Program collaborates with territorial governments to increase the uptake of renewable energy technologies in the North. Enhanced collaboration within the Department has allowed proposed projects to access the most appropriate AANDC funding sources. External collaboration led to the identification of new projects, better alignment of deliverables and multi-stakeholder collaborative discussions in Nunavut.

AANDC's ecoENERGY for Aboriginal and Northern Communities Program directly addresses the Clean Energy Theme's ultimate outcome of reduced emissions of greenhouse gases from the energy sector, by reducing emissions from Aboriginal and northern communities. With financial support in the early phases of development for renewable energy projects, communities have an increased capacity to adopt cleaner energy technologies (immediate outcome). When projects are implemented, as is directly the case with the energy projects integrated with the community buildings stream and later in the process with the renewable energy projects stream, clean energy technologies are adopted (intermediate outcome).

In previous years, funds flowed to communities late in the year despite efficient proposal management processes. For 2012–2013, the Program moved forward its application window, in order to flow funds to communities earlier in the fiscal year. Future Plans: Further adjustments in 2013–2014 are expected to enable communities to spend program funds more efficiently, achieving better project and overall program results.

A key challenge facing the Program was over-subscription. The Program worked to support projects that will have the greatest impact on their community, in terms of project viability, relative levels of GHG reductions and in fostering future reduction efforts.

Theme I: Addressing Climate Change and Air Quality Theme II: Maintaining Water Quality and Availability GOAL 2: Air Pollution — Minimize the threats to air quality so that the air Canadians breathe is clean and supports healthy ecosystems.

Implementation Strategy 2.3.7 and 3.12.6

The Northern Contaminants Program will continue monitoring contaminant levels in wildlife and people in the Canadian North.

Sub-program 4.2.1: Northern Contaminants

This sub-program engages Northerners and world-class Canadian scientists in research and monitoring of long-range contaminants in the Canadian Arctic. The health and well-being of all Northerners is augmented as northern people consume traditional/country foods based in part on information and advice made possible by this sub-program. The sub-program has international influence as a leader in the Arctic Council — Arctic Monitoring and Assessment Programme, and is a key contributor of scientific data to international agreements, such as the United Nations Environment Program Stockholm Convention, and helps to position Canada as an international leader in arctic science. The Northern Contaminants sub-program generated data is used to assess ecosystem and human health, and the results of these assessments are used to influence policy that results in action to eliminate contaminants from long-range sources. This action ensures the safety and security of traditional country foods that are important to the health of Northerners and Northern communities.

Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Reduced contaminant related risk to ecosystem and human health Percent decrease in concentrations of previously identified contaminants in northern wildlife 5% decrease in concentration over 1990 levels by March 31, 2014 Exceeded targets for legacy Persistent Organic Pollutants, but not for mercury, as of March 31, 2013
Percent decrease in concentrations of previously identified contaminants among northern populations 5% decrease in concentration over 1990 levels by March 31, 2014 Exceeded targets for most contaminants of concern, as of March 31, 2013

Performance Summary, Analysis of Program and Lessons Learned

The Northern Contaminants Program continued to make significant progress towards achieving its targets in 2012–2013. Concentrations of the original 12 persistent organic pollutants listed in the Stockholm Convention have decreased in arctic wildlife between 5% and 90% since 1990. Ten new pollutants were added to the Stockholm Convention since 2009 and some are starting to stabilize in recent years. Mercury concentrations have been highly variable, most showing an increasing trend since 1990. The Northern Contaminants Program released a five-year assessment on mercury pollutants in Canada's North.

The program's results provided the foundational science that informed the January 2013 global legally-binding treaty on Mercury, which will lead to decreasing levels of mercury and improve the health of arctic people and wildlife over the long-term.

This program underwent an evaluation by the Department in 2012–2013. The evaluation concluded that the program is recognized in Canada and internationally for its emphasis on strong partnerships, involving Northerners in research, for integrating traditional knowledge and for its emphasis on providing clear and consistent direction over the past 20 years. The evaluation recommended that the program needed to improve some elements of its communication plan to further engage with Northerners. In response to these recommendations, the program completed a Communications Strategy, established a Risk Communications Subcommittee that will determine best practises for communicating northern health advisories in a clear and culturally sensitive way, and is in the process of enhancing its web presence to foster better information sharing and collaboration with the public and program partners.

FSDS Theme II: Maintaining Water Quality and Availability

Theme II: Maintaining Water Quality and Availability GOAL 3: Water Quality: Protect and enhance the quality of water so that it is clean, safe and secure for all Canadians and supports healthy ecosystems.

Target 3.10: Drinking Water Quality

Increase the percentage of First Nation communities with acceptable water and wastewater facility risk ratings by 2013. (Federal Lead: this target is co-lead Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Canada and Health Canada).

The following AANDC implementation strategies support target 3.10 Drinking Water Quality.

3.10.1: Undertake a National Assessment of First Nation communities to assess the current status and associated risk for all existing communal water and wastewater systems and analyze various options for community serviceability

3.10.4: Ensure that training is available for all operators and that a regime is in place so that all water systems have oversight of a certified operator

3.10.5: Enhance and expand the number of qualified waste and wastewater system operators in First Nation communities:

3.10.5.1: Enhance the Circuit Rider Training Program

3.10.5.2: Increase the number of Circuit Rider trainers and operators

3.10.9: Develop and continuously update technical guidance protocols, such as the Protocol for Safe Drinking Water in First Nation Communities and the Protocol for Wastewater Treatment and Disposal in First Nation Communities. (AANDC and Environment Canada are jointly responsible for this implementation strategy)

3.10.11: Develop appropriate regulatory framework and legislation for safe drinking water and wastewater treatment in First Nation communities

Sub-program 3.3.1: Water and Wastewater Infrastructure

This sub-program supports the provision of funding for the planning, design, construction, acquisition, operation and maintenance of infrastructure facilities, including: community water supply, treatment and distribution systems; and community wastewater collection, treatment and disposal systems. It includes the provision of funding for: coordination, training and capacity building for activities related to water and wastewater facilities; identification of on-reserve water and wastewater infrastructure needs; development of water and wastewater infrastructure capital plans; and the design, and ongoing implementation of water and wastewater facilities maintenance management practices. The goal is to support First Nations in meeting health and safety standards and providing their residents with similar levels of service to off-reserve communities. First Nations identify their priorities and needs and present project proposals to the Department. Grants and contribution funding is provided for projects based on a priority assessment.

Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
* A total of 1140 funded water and wastewater treatment systems were inspected in the 2012–2013 Annual Performance Inspection. Out of 691 inspected water treatment systems, 38% were low risk, 43% were medium risk and 19% were high risk. Out of 449 inspected wastewater treatment systems, 43% were low risk, 46% were medium risk and 10% were high risk.
First Nation communities have a base of safe water and wastewater that meets established standards* Percentage of First Nations drinking water systems that have LOW risk ratings 35% by March 31, 2013
50% by March 31, 2015
38% of First Nations drinking water systems have LOW risk ratings, exceeding the 2012–2013 target of 35%.
Percentage of First Nations wastewater systems that have LOW risk ratings 50% by March 31, 2013
70% by March 31, 2015
43% of First Nations wastewater systems have LOW risk ratings, which does not meet the 2012–2013 target of 50%.
Percentage of First Nation communities that have primary operators certified to the level of the wastewater systems 47% by March 31, 2013 61% of primary operators are certified to level of wastewater systems, exceeding the 2012–2013 target of 47%.
Percentage of First Nation communities that have primary operators certified to the level of the drinking water systems 55% by March 31, 2013 64% of primary operators are certified to level of drinking water systems, exceeding the 2012–2013 target of 55%.
First Nation communities have an infrastructure base that protects the health and safety and enables engagement in the economy Develop or update protocols as required Protocols developed or updated as required New Minimum Program Requirements were developed for the Circuit Rider Training Program (CRTP) and are being implemented.
Development and approval of legislation Approval of legislation Bill S-8 was introduced in the Senate on February 29, 2012 and passed without amendment in June 2012. It received first reading in Parliament on June 19, 2012 and second reading on November 1, 2012. As of March 31, 2013, it was in second reading. In June 2013, it received Royal Assent.

Performance Summary, Analysis of Program and Lessons Learned

In 2012–2013, AANDC invested $302.5 million to support water and wastewater infrastructure on reserve through: enhanced capacity building and operator training, enforceable standards and protocols, and infrastructure investments. Although risk levels have improved since the 2009–2011 National Assessment of First Nations Water and Wastewater Systems, more needs to be done.

In 2012-2013, new Minimum Program Requirements for the Circuit Rider Training Program (CRTP) were developed to standardize the delivery of on-site, hands-on training and mentoring for on-reserve water and wastewater system operators. AANDC invests approximately $10 million annually to support the CRTP.

As of March 31, 2013, Bill S-8, the Safe Drinking Water for First Nations Act, was in Second Reading in Parliament. Bill S-8 received Royal Assent in June 2013. The Government of Canada will now work together with First Nations to develop proposals for regulations. With support from AANDC, the Atlantic Policy Congress has been developing an Atlantic Protocol with proposed technical benchmarks based on existing regulations governing drinking water, wastewater, and protection of sources of drinking water in the Atlantic Provinces, which could form the basis for regulatory regimes in other Regions.

Procurement and construction was initiated for four systems under the five-year Canada–Ontario First Nations Drinking Water Initiative in fiscal 2012–2013. The use of alternative procurement methods and of a collaborative project management governance model has resulted in greater competitiveness, lowers costs and a wider range of technologies available to First Nations.

The Internal Audit Report of Water and Wastewater Infrastructure conducted in 2012–2013 found inconsistencies in the annual inspection process carried out on First Nation water and wastewater systems. In response, AANDC issued new Annual Performance Inspections guidelines to improve consistency in data collection and reporting.

Theme IV: Shrinking the Environmental Footprint — Beginning with Government FSDS Theme IV: Shrinking the Environmental Footprint — Beginning with Government

Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Canada contributes to the Greening Government Operations targets through the Internal Services program activity. The Department contributes to the following ­target areas of Theme IV (Shrinking the Environmental Footprint — Beginning with Government) of the FSDS:

For additional details on AANDC's Greening Government Operations activities, please see the Greening Government Operations table in Section III of the AANDC Departmental Performance Report 2012–2013.

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Section III: Additional Departmental Sustainable Development Activities and Initiatives

This section contains other activities that indirectly support the FSDS.

Theme I: Addressing Climate Change and Air Quality Theme II: Maintaining Water Quality and Availability Contaminated Sites

Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Canada contributes to the cleanup of contaminated sites in Canada through two programs: Contaminated Sites on Reserve and Northern Contaminated Sites, which support two departmental strategic outcomes. These programs link to FSDS and the achievement of Target 2.3 Chemicals Management under Theme I — Addressing Climate Change and Air Quality and Target 3.12 Chemicals Management under Theme II — Maintaining Water Quality and Availability.

Sub-sub-program: 3.2.4.1 Contaminated Sites on Reserve

This sub-sub-program provides for the assessment and remediation of contaminated sites on reserve land through the implementation of the Contaminated Sites Management Program and the Federal Contaminated Sites Action Plan, in accordance with departmental and federal policies and procedures. It also provides funding to First Nation organizations and individual First Nations for the identification, assessment, management and remediation of contaminated sites, as well as environmental capacity building.

Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Reduction of highest ranked human health and ecological risks on reserve according to the priority ranking system Number of Class 1 and 2 sites in IEMS where risk reduction is occurring (Step 7, 8 and 9) 25 by March 31, 2013 54 (42 Class 1, 12 Class 2)
Improved characterization of contaminated sites on reserve Number of sites assessed 30 by March 31, 2013 61 sites completed assessments (not including First Nations Land Management sites)
Reduction of the known federal financial liability in confirmed contaminated sites Dollar Reduction in total contaminated sites liability for known sites in remediation/risk management 9 Million by March 31, 2013 $20,023,211.08

Sub-program 4.3.3: Northern Contaminated Sites

This sub-program ensures that contaminated sites are managed to ensure the protection of human health and safety as well as the environment for all Northerners by assessing and remediating contaminated sites and supporting the employment and training of Northerners, particularly Aboriginals.

Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Contaminated sites are managed to ensure the protection of human health and the safety of the environment while bringing economic benefit to the North Number of suspected contaminated sites assessed 890 by March 31, 2013 2021 suspected sites were assessed in total. The Northern Contaminated Sites Program no longer has any suspected sites.
Number of sites in Step 8 (implementation) through Step 10 (monitoring) of the Federal Contaminated Sites Action Plan 10-step process 40 by March 31, 2013 41
Level (%) of Northerners and Aboriginal peoples employed within Contaminated Sites projects 60% by March 31, 2013 60%

Theme III — Protecting Nature Protected Areas Strategy

Sub-program 4.3.5: Environmental Management

This sub-program manages environmental interests of Northerners, Aboriginal Peoples and Canadians in the Yukon, Northwest Territories and Nunavut. Protected areas, land use planning, environmental assessments and environmental monitoring are important and complementary pieces of AANDC's environmental management responsibilities as required by policy, legislation, and comprehensive land claims agreement obligations.

AANDC's contributes to the establishment of protected areas in the NWT through the NWT Protected Areas Strategy and supports the achievement of Target 6.1 Terrestrial Ecosystems and Habitat — Non-Park Protected Habitat under Theme III — Protecting Nature.

Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Protected areas are established in NWT Number of areas brought under protection through the NWT Protected Areas Strategy 6 areas by March 31, 2013 As of March 31, 2013, five candidate protected areas have been identified under the NWT Protected Areas Strategy (PAS), and four of them are currently under interim protection.
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Footnotes

Footnote 1

A thermosyphon is a hollow pipe that is half buried near infrastructure to maintain the integrity of the temperature of the soil. It uses passive heat exchange, moving gas cooled by the outside air from the top of the pipe to the buried (bottom) portion, where warmer air is displaced. This process continues as long as the air temperature is colder than the ground temperature.

Return to footnote 1 referrer

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