ARCHIVED - Horizontal Initiatives

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Table of Contents

Name of Horizontal Initiative: First Nations Water and Wastewater Action Plan

Name of Lead Department(s):

Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Canada (AANDC)

Lead Department PAA Program:

Community Infrastructure

Start Date:

April 1, 2008

End Date:

March 31, 2014

Total Federal Funding Allocation (from start date to end date):

In 2008, $735,639,806 in funding was announced for the first two years of this initiative. Of this amount, $202,500,000 in each of the fiscal years 2008–2009 and 2009–2010 was funded from existing reference levels. New funds of $165,318,143 during the period of 2008–2009 and $165,321,663 for the period of 2009–2010, including employee benefit plans and Public Works and Government Services Canada accommodation requirements, were sourced from the Fiscal Framework, as confirmed in Budget 2008.

The program was extended for an additional two years, with funding confirmed as part of Budget 2010. This provided an additional $845,547,800 in investments for water and wastewater infrastructure over the extended period of the program from 2010–2012.

Budget 2012 allotted the same investment amounts for the water and wastewater action plan for a further two-year period. The Government of Canada released $330.8 million dollars over the two years, in addition to the existing funding of $209,373,064 for 2012–1013 and $209,293,764 for 2013–2014. The total planned investment in safe water and wastewater for First Nations over the fiscal periods of 2012–2013 and 2013–2014 is $749,446,828. The total Federal Funding Allocation since 2008 has been $2,395,734,434.

Description of the Horizontal Initiative (including funding agreement):

The prime objective of the First Nations Water and Wastewater Action Plan (FNWWAP) is to support First Nation communities on reserves in bringing their drinking water and wastewater services to a level and quality of service comparable to those enjoyed by Canadians living in communities of similar size and location. There are five key activity areas in the FNWWAP: infrastructure investments; operations and maintenance; training; monitoring and awareness; and standards.

To meet the objectives of the FNWWAP, several program enhancements have been introduced, including a national engineering assessment of existing water and wastewater facilities; consultations on a new federal legislative framework for safe drinking water; increased training through the Circuit Rider training program; modification of existing policies related to small water and septic systems and agreements for water and wastewater services; investment in a National Wastewater Program; and development of waterborne illness procedures.

The FNWWAP was implemented as part of government commitments in the 2007 Speech from the Throne, Budget 2008, Budget 2010, and Budget 2012 to support First Nations' access to safe drinking water. It supports the continued commitment to promote access to clean water in Aboriginal communities announced in the 2011 Speech from the Throne.

The FNWWAP supports AANDC's strategic outcome, The Land and The Economy: Full participation of First Nations, Inuit, and Métis individuals and communities in the economy. The FNWWAP also supports the Health Canada (HC) strategic outcome of the department's First Nations and Inuit Health Programming and Services: Better health outcomes and reduction of health inequalities between First Nations and Inuit and other Canadians.

More information is available at these websites:

Shared Outcome(s):

The FNWWAP works toward the achievement of four outcomes:

  • First Nation communities have an increased capacity to address potential water quality problems.
  • Health risks associated with water quality and supply are reduced.
  • All First Nation community water and wastewater facilities meet federal standards.
  • First Nation communities have increased confidence in their drinking water.

Governance Structure(s):

The FNWWAP is a successor to the joint First Nations Water Management Strategy (2003–2008) and the AANDC Plan of Action for Drinking Water (2006–2008). A memorandum of understanding has been in place between AANDC and HC since 2005 regarding data sharing related to drinking water. AANDC shares information on the proposed water and wastewater infrastructure investments; the annual inspections of water and wastewater treatment plants; and action related to drinking water advisories. Conversely, HC shares information such as drinking water sample results that do not meet the Guidelines for Canadian Drinking Water Quality and reasons for recommending drinking water advisories. At the working level, the Strategic Water Management on Reserve Committee, which includes representatives from HC, AANDC, Environment Canada and the Assembly of First Nations, provides a forum for discussion to share information and coordinate joint action, although this is not a formal decision-making body. It also provides integrated and coordinated leadership to ensure safe drinking water for First Nation communities and to implement FNWWAP.

Directors general and assistant deputy ministers from HC and AANDC meet when needed to exchange and coordinate action on all relevant issues related to the FNWWAP.

Performance Highlights:

The Government and First Nations strongly believe that First Nation communities should have access to the same quality of safe, clean and reliable drinking water as Canadians outside of First Nations lands. Between 2006 and 2014, the Government of Canada will have invested approximately $3 billion to support First Nation communities in managing their water and wastewater infrastructure and in related public-health activities.

In response to the 2009–2011 National Assessment of First Nations Water and Wastewater Systems, the Government has worked with First Nations to develop a long-term plan to improve on-reserve water and wastewater founded on three pillars:

  • enhanced capacity building and operation training;
  • enforceable standards and protocols; and
  • infrastructure investments.

Each of these areas has accomplished important results since the National Assessment:

  • The percentage of First Nation systems that have operators certified to the level of the drinking water systems has increased from 51% in 2011 to 64% in 2013, and those certified to the level of the wastewater systems has increased from 42% of operators in 2011 to 61% of operators in 2013.
  • Bill S-8, Safe Drinking Water for First Nations Act, was introduced in the Senate on February 29, 2012, and passed without amendment on June 18, 2012. The bill received First Reading in the House of Commons on June 19, 2012, and commenced Second Reading on November 1, 2012. Bill S-8 received Royal Assent in June 2013.
  • Capital investments have been prioritized for the highest risk systems and to address factors that are the greatest contributors to risk such as capacity, training, operations and maintenance. The percentage of high-risk drinking water systems has decreased to 19% (133 of 691 systems) and the percentage of high-risk wastewater systems to 10% (45 of 449 systems).

The Government recognizes that more needs to be done to reduce risk levels and deliver results for water and wastewater systems on-reserve. While funding is not part of the Safe Drinking Water for First Nations Act, the Government will continue to work with First Nations to develop enforceable standards and to make investments in infrastructure, monitoring and capacity.

Federal PartnersPAA ProgramsContributing activities/programsTotal Allocation (from start date to end date)
($ millions)
2012–13 ($ millions)
* These performance indicators support the FSDS target 3.10 Increase the percentage of First Nation communities with acceptable (defined as low) water and wastewater facility risk ratings by 2013. For more information consult the DSDS.

** Results exclude Saskatchewan. All regions have a water database in place to monitor sample results.
Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Community Infrastructure Capital Facilities and Maintenance Program 2,330.6 Planned Spending: 342.2

Actual Spending: 301.1

Expected Results:  
Increase in % of First Nations drinking water systems with low risk ratings.
Increase in % of First Nations wastewater systems with low risk ratings.

Contributing activity/program results (using specific indicators):

Water systems
  • 38% of First Nations drinking water systems have LOW risk ratings, exceeding the 2012–2013 target of 35%*.
Wastewater systems
  • 43% of First Nations wastewater systems have LOW risk ratings, which does not meet the 2012–2013 target of 50%*.
Health Canada First Nations and Inuit Health Drinking Water Safety Program – FNWWAP funding 54.8 Planned Spending: 27.4 Planned Spending: 32.6

Actual Spending: 24.4

Expected Results:

Increase in the number of First Nation communities south of 60° with increased or maintained capacity to monitor their drinking water quality as per Guidelines for Canadian Drinking Water Quality and to reduce health risks associated with drinking water quality and supply. 

Contributing activity/program results (using specific indicators): All (661 of 661) First Nation communities had access to trained personnel (Community-based Drinking Water Quality Monitor or Environmental Health Officer (EHO)) to sample and test drinking water quality at tap**.

All FNWWAP EHO positions were staffed**.

59.6% of public water systems (formerly called piped drinking water distribution systems) were monitored weekly in First Nations communities**.

A total of 134,246 water samples and 56,396 bacteriological samples were taken and analyzed in accredited laboratories. Analysis of 73,287 bacteriological samples was performed using a portable lab kit, 4,503 samples were analyzed for chemical parameters, and 60 samples were analyzed for radiological parameters**.

There were no instances where gastrointestinal illness was identified as a possible waterborne disease outbreak.

Thirty water, wastewater, and solid waste project proposals were reviewed at headquarters and 185 professional and technical advices were provided to First Nation communities within the context of public health protection.

Health Canada published and distributed the "Field Reference Manual: Non-Microbiological Drinking Water Quality Parameters".

Recruitment and retention strategies are on-going.
Drinking Water Safety Program – A based funding 10.3 Planned Spending: 5.2
Total 2,395.7 Total Planned Spending: 374.8

Total Actual Spending:
325.5

Comments on Variances:

Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Canada

The Planned Spending for the Department was $138,000,000 from Budget 2012 and $204,173,064 from A-base, for a total of $342,173,064. Actual Spending for water and wastewater initiative was $301,091,217 in 2012–2013, and $602,830 was paid to Public Works and Government Services Canada for accommodation costs. The remaining $40,479,017 represents A-base funding that was redirected from water and wastewater initiatives to address other urgent priorities, such as reconstruction following flooding in Manitoba.

Health Canada

Due to the Economic Action Plan 2012, personnel were cut back and activities were reduced.

Results Achieved by Non-Federal Partners (if applicable):

Not Applicable

Contact Information:

Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Canada

David Smith
Acting Director
Program Design and Regional Partnerships Directorate, Community Infrastructure Branch
Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Canada
Telephone: 819-953-6043
david.smith@aadnc-aandc.gc.ca

Health Canada

Ivy Chan
Director
Health Canada
Interprofessional Advisory and Program Support, Environmental Public Health Division
First Nations and Inuit Health Branch
Telephone:  613-948-7773
ivy.chan@hc-sc.gc.ca

 Table of Contents

Name of Horizontal Initiative: Urban Aboriginal Strategy

Name of Lead Department(s):

Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Canada (AANDC), Office of the Federal Interlocutor for Métis and Non-Status Indians (OFI)

Lead Department PAA Program:

Urban Aboriginal Strategy

Start Date:

April 1, 2007

End Date:

Ongoing

Total Federal Funding Allocation (from start date to end date):

From 2007-2012: $68.5 million

As of 2012: 13.5 million annually

Description of the Horizontal Initiative (including funding agreement):

The Urban Aboriginal Strategy (UAS) was developed in 1997 to help respond to the needs of Aboriginal people living in key urban centres. Through the UAS, the Government of Canada seeks to partner with other governments, community organizations, Aboriginal people and the private sector to support projects that address local priorities.

In 2007, Canada decided to set national priorities that focus on greater economic participation and made a long-term commitment by investing $68.5 million over five years to help respond effectively to the needs of Aboriginal people living in key urban centres.

Shared Outcome(s):

The primary goal of the UAS is to better address issues facing Aboriginal people living in cities across Canada, working toward the achievement of the following outcomes:

  • Urban Aboriginal socio-economic needs are targeted within new and renewed federal initiatives, where appropriate.
  • Access to and coordination of programs and services is improved.
  • Partners coordinate development and communication of research, policies and knowledge.
  • Horizontal linkages and policy integration within the federal government are improved for seeking opportunities for partnership (i.e., the federal government, provincial and municipal governments, Aboriginal groups, and private sector).

To accomplish these outcomes, UAS projects will focus investments in three priority areas: improving life skills; promoting job training, skills and entrepreneurship; and supporting Aboriginal women, children and families.

Governance Structure(s):

Steering committees are the catalysts for planning, making funding decisions, and coordinating work through the UAS — along with other community activities — to respond to urban Aboriginal issues. Each UAS steering committee is composed of a cross-section of the Aboriginal community, to ensure the steering committee's decisions reflect broad community concerns and priorities. While the steering committee structure is meant to be reflective of local circumstances, each steering committee includes representation from the local Aboriginal community, the federal government, other levels of government and the private sector. The inclusive nature of the steering committees is indicative of the principle of partnership that underlies the UAS, particularly in keeping with the objective to establish strong and active partnerships between government and community.

In some of the designated cities under the UAS, federal funding is administered through an incorporated community organization that has been delegated authority for delivering UAS projects on behalf of the various partners. Regardless of whether funding is delivered by a community organization, by federal officials or by a combination of the two, funding through the UAS is designed to promote co-operation with other key partners (including other federal departments) and stakeholders in support of community interests.

Performance Highlights:

Partnerships with AANDC have resulted in strengthened community capacity, legitimacy and informed decision-making, as well as funding for over 148 community-based projects (17 of which included other federal partners) to improve life skills; promote job training, skills and entrepreneurship; and support Aboriginal women, children and families. Examples of this work include joint funding with: the National Crime Prevention Centre within Public Safety; Employment and Social Development on four different programs; and with Canadian Heritage, through Aboriginal Women's Program Elements.

Federal PartnersPAA ProgramsContributing activities/programsTotal Allocation (from start date to end date)
($ millions)
2012–13 ($ millions)
Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Canada (Office of the Federal Interlocutor) Urban Aboriginal Strategy Urban Aboriginal Strategy   Actual Spending: 1.732

Expected Results: UAS projects will focus investments in three priority areas: improving life skills; promoting job training, skills and entrepreneurship; and supporting Aboriginal women, children and families.

Contributing activity/program results (using specific indicators): To address the issues facing Aboriginal people living in cities, the AANDC collaborated with four other federal partners on 17 separate projects to increase urban Aboriginal people's economic participation and to empower them to make important life choices.
Employment and Social Development Canada/Service Canada Aboriginal Skills and Employment Training Strategy   Actual Spending: 0.442

Expected Results: UAS projects will focus investments in three priority areas: improving life skills; promoting job training, skills and entrepreneurship; and supporting Aboriginal women, children and families.

Contributing activity/program results (using specific indicators): The UASand the Aboriginal Skills and Employment Training Strategy completed five joint initiatives that resulted in the following benefits:
  • Development of an Internet based series of training modules to supplement the existing, classroom-based curriculum in the Aboriginal labour skills training program. Through increased access, the online materials will encourage urban Aboriginal people who wish to increase their employability by improving their foundational skills and competencies.
  • 10 urban Aboriginal Journeypersons were provided with professional instruction skills and practical work experience that will increase their marketability as instructors in their respective fields of expertise.
  • 24 at-risk Aboriginal women were provided with life skills and pre-employment training to enable them to pursue education and career goals.
  • 2,108 Aboriginal youth and adults were supported through culturally appropriate life skills training focused on healthy lifestyle and health promotion to ensure they are healthy, capable and ready to pursue economic or educational opportunities.
  • 20 Aboriginal youth received construction experience, safety certificates, work gear, classroom education, and life skills development to enable them to increase their employment in the construction industry.
Homelessness Partnering Initiative   Actual Spending: 0.584

Expected Results: UAS projects will focus investments in three priority areas: improving life skills; promoting job training, skills and entrepreneurship; and supporting Aboriginal women, children and families.

Contributing activity/program results (using specific indicators):The UAS and the Homelessness Partnering Initiative completed five joint initiatives that resulted in the following benefits:
  • 450 Aboriginal women and children were supported through a range of services and programming to address their barriers to economic participation, such as access to suitable housing, and other programs.
  • A number of at-risk Aboriginal people were supported to overcome alcohol and drug addictions and other issues while learning life skills, independence, and self-reliance so they could increase their ability to participate in the economy.
  • 500 at-risk Aboriginal women were supported through extra programming to achieve their long-term objectives and pursue economic and educational opportunities.
  • 12 bed units for Aboriginal men were created to support Aboriginal men in conflict with the criminal justice system.
500 at-risk urban Aboriginal people were provided referrals to find housing, gain employment, access health services and escape abuse.
New Horizons for Seniors   Actual Spending: 0.02

Expected Results: UAS projects will focus investments in three priority areas: improving life skills; promoting job training, skills and entrepreneurship; and supporting Aboriginal women, children and families. 

Contributing activity/program results (using specific indicators): The UAS and the New Horizons for Seniors Program completed one joint initiative that resulted in the following benefits: 2,050 Aboriginal women and children were supported through culturally appropriate life skills training to enable them to better address abuse, violence and injury prevention, so they may pursue employment or educational opportunities.
  Youth Employment Strategy Canada Summer Jobs Actual Spending: 0.109

Expected Results: UAS projects will focus investments in three priority areas: improving life skills; promoting job training, skills and entrepreneurship; and supporting Aboriginal women, children and families.

Contributing activity/program results (using specific indicators): The UASand the Youth Employment Strategy completed two joint initiatives that resulted in the following benefits:
  • 700 people in Saskatoon received legal aid and referrals, while up to 70 Aboriginal law students received on the job training to further their legal careers.
10 youth received life skills, pre-employment and literacy training so they may pursue employment or educational opportunities.
Canadian Heritage Aboriginal Women's Program Elements   Actual Spending: 0.508

Expected Results: UAS projects will focus investments in three priority areas: improving life skills; promoting job training, skills and entrepreneurship; and supporting Aboriginal women, children and families.

Contributing activity/program results (using specific indicators): The UASand the Aboriginal Women's Program completed four joint initiatives that resulted in the following benefits:
  • The Aboriginal community in Lethbridge, Alberta was assisted to effectively plan and implement strategies that meet local objectives as well as increase the economic participation of urban Aboriginal people in the city.
  • 30 Aboriginal women and their children were supported through culturally appropriate life skills programming to promote healing and wellness and empower women to pursue employment and education opportunities.
  • 80 Aboriginal women and their children were counseled to overcome issues of family violence.
2,050 Aboriginal women and children were supported through culturally appropriate life skills training to enable them to better address abuse, violence and injury prevention, so they may pursue employment or educational opportunities.
Public Safety Canada National Crime Prevention Center   Actual Spending: 0.089

Expected Results: UAS projects will focus investments in three priority areas: improving life skills; promoting job training, skills and entrepreneurship; and supporting Aboriginal women, children and families.

Contributing activity/program results (using specific indicators): The UASand the National Crime Prevention Centre completed one joint initiative that resulted in the following benefits:
  • Over 90 Aboriginal families were supported through culturally appropriate programming to reduce Aboriginal youth involvement with the criminal justice system and enable them to pursue educational and employment opportunities.
Total 13.5 (see Comments on Variances) Total Actual Spending: 1.752

Comments on Variances:

The UAS is an opportunity-driven strategy—rather than planned funding projects—designed to maximize federal, provincial, municipal and private investment in its three priority areas: life skills; job training, skills and entrepreneurship; and supporting Aboriginal women, children and families. The main aim of the UAS is to increase horizontality among federal departments, align programming with provincial and municipal governments, and bring in other funding partners to maximize investment and increase the impact of that investment in urban Aboriginal communities.

In fiscal 2012–2013, the UAS was allocated $13.5 million for its entire budget ($9.48 million in contributions and $4.02 million in operating funds). However, not all UAS planned spending went to horizontal federal initiatives because of the strategic nature of the program. The UAS spent $1.73 million in contributions for 17 projects that it undertook with other federal departments who contributed an additional $1.72  million to the initiative. The remaining amount of UAS funding was used for other projects that had provincial, municipal, Aboriginal, private and philanthropic funding partners. Total UAS investments in 2012–2013 attracted $14.2 million from other funding partners.

Results Achieved by Non-Federal Partners (if applicable):

The UAS has proven effective in leveraging both monetary and in-kind contributions from a variety of funding partners. For the 148 UAS projects sponsored in 2012–2013, additional contributions from provincial and municipal government partners was $8.5 million, $1.05 million from the private sector and $4.63  million from Aboriginal and other organizations.

Contact Information:

Susan MacGowan
Acting Senior Assistant Deputy Minister
Regional Operations Sector
Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Canada
72 Laval Gatineau Quebec
819-953-5574
susan.macgowan@aadnc-aandc.gc.ca

 Table of Contents

Name of Horizontal Initiative: Aboriginal Economic Development Strategic Partnerships Initiative

Name of Lead Department(s):

Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Canada (AANDC)

Lead Department PAA Program:

Under AANDC's program alignment architecture, the Strategic Partnerships Initiative is categorized under the Strategic Outcome entitled "The Land and Economy". The Program for the Initiative is entitled "Aboriginal Economic Development".

Start Date:

June 17, 2010

End Date:

On-going

Total Federal Funding Allocation (from start date to end date):

$85.5 million over five years (total Grants and Contributions (G&C) and Operations and Maintenance (O&M))

Description of the Horizontal Initiative (including funding agreement):

The Strategic Partnerships Initiative (SPI) is a program intended to support Aboriginal participation in the economy, with a particular focus on forestry, fisheries, mining, energy and agriculture. A key component of the new Federal Framework for Aboriginal Economic Development, SPI enables more than a dozen partnering federal departments and agencies to provide a coordinated federal response to existing and emerging Aboriginal economic development opportunities, which are:

  • Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada
  • Canadian Northern Economic Development Agency
  • Economic Development Agency of Canada for the Regions of Quebec
  • Federal Economic Development Agency for Southern Ontario
  • Fisheries and Oceans Canada
  • Employment and Social Development Canada
  • Industry Canada, including FedNor
  • Natural Resources Canada
  • Office of the Federal Interlocutor for Métis and Non-Status Indians
  • Parks Canada
  • Status of Women Canada
  • Western Economic Diversification Canada.

SPI builds partnerships among federal departments, Aboriginal communities, provincial and territorial governments and the private sector to help Aboriginal Canadians take advantage of complex market-driven opportunities in key sectors of the economy. The initiative's funding is intended to fill gaps that cannot be addressed by existing programs.

SPI fosters a whole-of-government approach to Aboriginal economic development by enabling federal partners to align investments and resources around shared objectives. The program helps eliminate funding gaps in existing federal programming that could otherwise limit or exclude Aboriginal involvement in emerging economic development opportunities.

The initiative also helps to build closer partnerships with non-federal partners, including provincial and territorial governments, the private sector and Aboriginal individuals, organizations, businesses and communities. These partnerships will help bring together the people and resources required for Aboriginal communities to take advantage of opportunities in key sectors of the economy.

Shared Outcome(s):

The SPI is designed to ensure a horizontal approach to federal investments which will: ensure that federal investments are aligned and targeted toward market-driven opportunities; that the Government of Canada is able to anticipate, plan for, and engage in opportunities; and that the Government of Canada is able to maximize the results of federal investments and be better positioned to leverage funds from non-federal sources. Additionally, the SPI will create the possibility of a single window approach (shared application, monitoring and reporting) to federal investments in shared priorities and, where there are gaps in programming, a dedicated source of funds can be accessed to make contributions to recipients.

Governance Structure(s):

Central to the governance structure of the SPI is the Federal Coordination Committee for Aboriginal Economic Development (FCC). The FCC validates and prioritizes opportunities for a whole-of-government approach to investment under the SPI. The FCC also identifies relevant federal departments and agencies that will work together to develop work plans with Aboriginal groups to advance these opportunities.

Performance Highlights:

Increasingly, Aboriginal communities are pursuing economic opportunities in large and complex projects that have the potential to create sustainable business opportunities, a stable source of employment and income for members, and valuable streams of own-source revenue. With natural resource companies considering investing over $650 billion in major resources projects over the next decade, many Aboriginal Canadians stand to benefit from the economic, employment and business opportunities that these projects are likely to bring.

For the period 2012–2013, SPI investments supported Aboriginal communities in some of the largest resource development opportunities in Canada. Twelve major initiatives were reinforced under SPI resulting in 40 partnerships, $9.5 million in funding provided by other federal partners, and more than $16 million leveraged from non-federal sources. A total of 157 Aboriginal communities participated in projects sponsored by SPI this year.

SPI is a catalyst in aligning federal efforts and investments. For example, SPI has been an effective mechanism for the development of a federal action plan regarding the Ring of Fire which focuses combined federal efforts in five key areas: business, infrastructure, human capital development, community health and well-being and community capacity to engage in the regulatory process. Another example is the $7.4 billion Lower Churchill Hydroelectric Project currently underway at Muskrat Falls, Labrador, which represents one of the largest untapped renewable energy projects in North America. To further facilitate the participation of Aboriginal groups that can benefit from this project, SPI continues to address gaps in community and business capacity in order to gain from opportunities identified in the environmental scan.

SPI is also enabling and strengthening outreach within the Department and with other government department partners, as opportunity profiles are developed which identify complex opportunities that could benefit from a collaborative federal approach. In 2012–2013, six opportunity profiles were completed.

Given the extensive federal cooperation that has developed as a result of SPI, discussions began with other departments who have expressed an interest in becoming signatories to the program. Their participation in the program will improve federal efforts to address key impediments to community readiness, including issues related to community health and well-being and the capacity to participate in federal and provincial regulatory processes. Throughout the upcoming fiscal year, partners will continue to be engaged to complete this process.

Federal PartnersPAA ProgramsContributing activities/programsTotal Allocation (from start date to end date)
($ millions)
2012–13 ($ millions)
Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Strategic Partnerships Initiative N/A   Planned Spending: N/A

Actual Spending: 16.4

Expected Results: Strategic investments under SPI are expected to report on: number of formal partnerships established with federal and non-federal partners under SPI; number of agreements and dollar value of non-federal funds leveraged from partners under SPI and number of Aboriginal communities participating as proponents or partners in economic opportunities under SPI per sector.

Contributing activity/ program results (using specific indicators): In 2012–2013, 40 partnerships were established under SPI. These partnerships included 30 different federal partners and 63 different non-federal partners. 82 contribution agreements were put in place to support projects in the mining, energy, fisheries, forestry, and agriculture sectors leveraging non-federal funds of $16 million. An additional $9.5 million in federal funding was also provided in support of these projects. In total, 157 Aboriginal communities participated as proponents or partners in economic opportunities in 2012–2013.
Total 85.5 Total Planned Spending: N/A

Total Actual Spending: 16.4

Comments on Variances:

N/A

Results Achieved by Non-Federal Partners (if applicable):

N/A

Contact Information:

Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Canada:
Gerry Huebner
Manager
Strategic Partnerships Initiatives
Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Canada
Telephone: (819) 953-4108
Gerry.Huebner@aadnc-aandc.gc.ca

 Table of Contents

Name of Horizontal Initiative: Indian Residential Schools Settlement Agreement – Health Support Component

Name of Lead Department(s):

Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Canada (AANDC)

Lead Department PAA Program:

Residential Schools Resolution

Start Date:

September 2003 (Resolution Health Support Program), July 2004 (Crisis Line)

End Date:

March 31, 2013 (RHSP), October 31, 2013 (Crisis Line)

(Note: Funding for the implementation of the Indian Residential Schools Settlement Agreement (IRSSA) has been approved through to the fiscal year 2015–2016 but funding beyond the fiscal year 2013–2014 must be accessed via a letter to Treasury Board.)

Total Federal Funding Allocation (from start date to end date):

$32.2 million (Crisis Line) + $325  million (RHSP) = $357.2 million

Description of the Horizontal Initiative (including funding agreement):

AANDC's Resolution and Individual Affairs Sector supports former students in crisis by funding the National Indian Residential School Crisis Line, a national 24-hour toll-free support service (1-866-925-4419) operated by trained Aboriginal crisis counselors. AANDC is also responsible for coordinating the verification of program eligibility, and ensuring that Health Canada is aware of dates for Independent Assessment Process hearings and Truth and Reconciliation and Commemoration events as they arise, so that health supports can be provided to former students in a seamless fashion.

Health Canada's Indian Residential Schools Resolution Health Support Program (IRS RHSP), a component of the Indian Residential Schools Settlement Agreement (IRSSA), assists former students of Indian residential schools and their families in safely addressing a broad spectrum of mental wellness issues related to the disclosure of childhood abuse through all phases of the IRSSA. The RHSP components include: cultural support services provided by Elders; emotional support services provided by Resolution Health Support Workers (RHSWs); professional counselling; and assistance with the cost of transportation to access counseling, Elder, and/or traditional healer services.

Shared Outcome(s):

The IRSSA Health Supports component works toward the achievement of two outcomes:

  • Eligible former students of Indian Residential Schools and their families have access to mental health and emotional support services; and
  • Eligible former students of Indian Residential Schools can safely address a broad spectrum of mental wellness issues related to the disclosure of childhood abuse.

Governance Structure(s):

AANDC is responsible for the oversight of the IRSSA and is working in partnership with Health Canada to ensure it has the capacity to provide services for former Indian residential school students throughout all phases of the IRSSA.

Performance Highlights:

AANDC and Health Canada provide demand-driven health support services to former Indian residential school students and their families through all phases of the IRSSA by providing access to services in the claimants' community, at Independent Assessment Process hearings and at Truth and Reconciliation events. In 2012–2013, the Crisis Line responded to a total of 7,787 calls for support, providing a wide range of services including suicide intervention on 115 calls. Also in 2012–2013, Health Canada met the demand for health services at 4,192 Independent Assessment Process (IAP) hearings and the Truth and Reconciliation Commission's (TRC) one national event (Saskatchewan), a regional event (Yukon) and 30 community events.

Federal PartnersPAA ProgramsContributing activities/programsTotal Allocation (from start date to end date)
($ millions)
2012–13 ($ millions)
AANDC Residential Schools Resolution Indian Residential Schools Crisis Line 32.2 Planned Spending: 4.0

Actual Spending: 3.8

Expected Results: Demand-driven health supports are provided to former Indian residential school students and their families through all phases of IRSSA.

Contributing activity/ program results (using specific indicators): Demand-driven health supports have been provided to former Indian residential school students, their families and persons of interest, through all phases of the IRSSA. In 2012–2013, a total of 7,787 calls for support were responded to by the team of crisis counsellors, compared to 6,124 calls received in 2011–2012, providing a wide range of services including suicide intervention on 115 calls. The Indian Residential School Crisis Line continues to provide critical and culturally appropriate support to former Indian residential school students, their families and persons of interest, from all areas of the country (including many isolated regions where alternate services are very limited). The increase in calls was anticipated, as the IAP program became the predominant component within the IRSSA and the deadline for applications approached. Additionally, TRC events and the broadcast of the film "We Were Children" in March, added to the increase in call volumes. The results were as expected and within service levels for 2012–2013 (financially, slightly below total obligations; operationally, consistently exceeding the 95% service agreement level).
Health Canada First Nations and Inuit Health Programming and Services Indian Residential Schools Resolution Health Support Program 325 Planned Spending: 65.4

Actual Spending: 57.3

Expected Results: Demand-driven health supports are provided to former Indian residential school students and their families through all phases of IRSSA.

Contributing activity/ program results (using specific indicators): Provided health support services at the TRC national event in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan (where an estimated 19,000 health support interactions took place), a large regional event in Yukon and at 30 community events across the country. Health supports were provided to 100% of the 4,192 former Indian residential school students who requested support at an IAP hearing.
Total 357.2 Total Planned Spending: 69.4

Total Actual Spending: 61.1

Comments on Variances:

Actual spending for the Resolution Health Support Program was less than planned as a result of an over-estimation of the costs associated with the Truth and Reconciliation events. The reported variance between actual and planned expenditures is further expanded by the exclusion of the Employee Benefits Plan and corporate costs from actual expenditures. Surplus funds will be carried over to the next fiscal year and used to deliver health support services to eligible claimants.

Results Achieved by Non-Federal Partners (if applicable):

N/A

Contact Information:

Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Canada:

Alia Butt
Director
Policy and Reconciliation Directorate
Resolution and Individual Affairs Sector
Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Canada
Tel: 613-996-2603
Alia.Butt@aandc-aadnc.gc.ca

Health Canada:

Julie Orth
Manager, Indian Residential School Resolution Health Support Program
Mental Wellness Division
Inter-professional Advisory and Program Support Directorate
First Nations and Inuit Health Branch, Health Canada
Phone: 613-952-1377
Julie.Orth@hc-sc.gc.ca

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Name of Horizontal Initiative: Nutrition North Canada

Name of lead department(s):

Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Canada (AANDC)

Lead department PAA Program:

Northern Governance and People

Start date:

April 1, 2011

End date:

On-going

Total federal funding allocation (from start date to end date):

$301,359,500 over five years

Description of the horizontal initiative (including funding agreement):

The objective of AANDC's food subsidy program is to make healthy foods more accessible and affordable to residents of isolated northern communities.

Registered retailers in the North, country food processors/distributors located in eligible communities, and food suppliers in the South who supply small retailers, institutions and individuals in these isolated communities, can apply for a subsidy based on the weight of eligible foods shipped by air to eligible northern communities. These subsidies are to be passed on to northern consumers by appropriate reductions in the selling prices of eligible foods. The terms of the funding arrangements with AANDC's subsidy recipients (northern and southern retailers/wholesalers) will be governed by contribution agreements.

Since price is not the only factor that influences consumption, the Program will be supported by targeted Health Canada initiatives that encourage the purchase, preparation and consumption of healthy foods. Funding will flow to communities via contribution agreements with Aboriginal communities/organizations, and/or territorial governments.

Shared outcome(s):

By making nutritious food more accessible and affordable, the Program seeks to increase its consumption and contribute to better overall health of the population, both Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal. It is expected that the subsidy will help lower the prices of nutritious foods in the North. In combination with complementary health promotion activities, it is expected that consumption of these foods will increase in the short and mid-term, and that in the longer term more individuals living in eligible communities are expected to adopt healthier eating patterns which will contribute to decreases in the rates of chronic and infectious diseases.

Governance structure(s):

An Oversight Committee and an external Advisory Board were created to provide direction and oversight for the new Program. The role of the Oversight Committee is to monitor the achievement of Program objectives and the effectiveness of cost containment measures, and provide strategic direction to Program managers on Program policy and operational matters. AANDC chairs the committee and seeks advice from Health Canada on health and nutrition-related issues, and from Transport Canada on transportation-related issue such as the impacts of the new Program on northern air services.

The Nutrition North Canada Advisory Board will be composed of five to seven members who represent the perspectives and interests of northern residents and communities in relation to the management and effectiveness of the Program.

Performance highlights:

After two years of operation, the Nutrition North Canada (NNC) program is well implemented and on track to achieve the immediate outcomes in line with the NNC Performance Measurement Framework:

  • Access to subsidized nutritious food in eligible communities
    • 52 million kilograms of eligible products were subsidized and purchased in eligible communities.
    • Food basket prices have decreased by an average of 8% in communities eligible for a full subsidy.
  • Residents in eligible communities are informed about the program and subsidy levels
    • NNC has been posting data on a quarterly basis, including purchasing and shipping information, audit compliance reviews, reports and food basked prices.
    • Two major advertising campaigns, 14 news releases, and 30 media interviews were released. Traditional mail outs have reached 21,265 households.
    • NNC is on Facebook, Twitter, YouTube, and many more media.
Federal PartnersPAA ProgramsContributing activities/programsTotal Allocation (from start date to end date)
($ millions)
2012–13 ($ millions)
Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Canada Northern Governance and People Nutrition North 286.9 Planned spending: 57.4

Actual spending: 65.4

Expected results: Consumption of nutritious food in eligible communities

Contributing activity/program results (using specific indicators): As an indicator of consumption of nutritious food, the estimated weight of eligible food purchased per capita is expected to increase annually. For the period 2012–2013, there were 267 kg per capita of subsidized foods purchased (streamlined food eligibility list). This represents a 5.5% increase over the volume of the same food items shipped in 2011–2012.
Health Canada First Nations and Inuit Primary Health Care Nutrition North Canada Nutrition Education Initiatives 14.5 Planned spending: 2.9

Actual spending: 2.7

Expected results: 
  • 70 communities served by NNC nutrition education initiatives
  • 300 NNC nutrition education initiatives supported
Contributing activity/program results:
  • Achieved. Over 70 communities served by Nutrition North Canada (NNC) nutrition education initiatives.
Exceeded. Support for over 1,000 NNC nutrition education initiatives such as: promotion of healthy foods, cooking skills classes, youth-focused activities, in-store taste tests and grocery store tours as well as activities to support traditional or country food knowledge and skills.
Total 301.4 Total planned spending: 60.3

Total actual spending: 68.1

Comments on Variances:

Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Canada:

Of the nearly $8 million variance between planned and actual spending for the period 2012–2013, $2.2 million was used to subsidize items added to the extended eligibility list put in place during the 18-month transition period from April 1, 2011, to September 30, 2012.

The remaining variance of $5.8 million is attributed to growth in demand for subsidized food, coupled with the effects of the October 2011 subsidy rate adjustment. Subsidy rates were adjusted in order to prevent a lapse in subsidy dollars during the first year of the program in 2011–2012.

Health Canada

The surplus is the result of Health Canada implementing cost-saving measures, such as teleconference/videoconference, coordinated travel to communities to support multiple programs at one time, and joint training sessions so that operational funds from other sources supported a number of necessary activities.

Results Achieved by Non-Federal Partners (if applicable):

In fulfillment of its mandate, the Nutrition North Canada Advisory Board held 3 face-to-face meetings in 2012–2013, including 2 public sessions in northern communities. The results of the face-to-face meetings are conveyed in letters to the Minister of Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development, in which advice and recommendations are included, as warranted. Following the first year of the program, the Board communicated the activities and the issues it considered in its First Report of the Advisory Board: for the Period February 2011-March 2012, which is available in the Advisory Board section of the Program website.

Contact information:

Stephen van Dine
Director General Devolution and Territorial Relations
Northern Affairs Organizations
Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Canada
Telephone: (819) 997-0223
Stephen.VanDine@aadnc-aandc.gc.ca

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