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2012–13 Departmental Performance Report

PDF Version PDF Version of Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Canada and Canadian Polar Commission — 2012–13 Departmental Performance Report (4,442 Kb, 118 Pages)

Table of Contents

Minister's Message

On behalf of Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Canada (AANDC) and the Canadian Polar Commission, I am pleased to present the 2012–2013 Departmental Performance Report.

This report demonstrates the constructive steps taken in the past year to make Canada a better place for Aboriginal peoples and northern communities. This progress could not have been made without partnerships that have been built with First Nations, Métis, Inuit and Northerners.

In 2012–2013, the Government continued to focus on its support of community development and governance. With the collaboration of willing partners, AANDC continued to pursue its mandate to encourage economic prosperity, develop healthier and more self-sufficient communities, and help Aboriginal peoples participate more fully in a strong Canadian economy to the benefit of all Canadians. We also continued working on unique initiatives that contribute to the North's prosperity, environment and health, including delivering on the Northern Strategy.

I am very proud of the collaborative efforts being made to find solutions to the challenges facing the individuals and communities we serve. However, concerted action and cooperation between our Government and First Nations, Métis, Inuit and northern communities, as well as provinces and territories and non-profit organizations, will be vital in the years to come. Together, we have been able to move forward on a number of priorities in 2012–2013. Education continues to be a top priority in improving outcomes for First Nations youth. The Government consulted with First Nations, provinces and others on a proposed framework for legislation on First Nations elementary and secondary education, outlined in the December 2012 Discussion Guide. Input was received on a variety of topics, including treaties, parental involvement in education, language and culture, the transition to legislation funding, and First Nation control over education. The Government will continue to work with willing partners to have a First Nation Education Act in place by Fall 2014.

Much has been accomplished in terms of progress on legislation and major initiatives.

The Northern Jobs and Growth Act brings increased predictability and efficiency to the regulatory and environmental review processes for major northern projects. In March 2013, a consensus was reached for achieving devolution for the Northwest Territories that will provide for an innovative, practical and effective governance model for the territory that will contribute to jobs and economic growth. The First Nations Financial Transparency Act came into force on March 27, 2013 and will help enhance the financial transparency and accountability of First Nation governments to their members.

The Nunavut Waters Regulations under the Nunavut Waters and Nunavut Surface Rights Tribunal Act came into force on May 2, 2013. New Nunavut Waters Regulations build on existing efforts to streamline approvals for resource projects, strengthen environmental protection and support Canada's Northern Strategy. The Safe Drinking Water for First Nations Act, which will bring safe reserve drinking water and wastewater treatment by developing much needed regulatory safeguards, received Royal Assent in June 2013. The Family Homes on Reserves and Matrimonial Interests or Rights Act, which received Royal Assent on June 19, 2013, ensures that women, children and families living on-reserve have similar rights and protections as those living off reserve. The Yale First Nation Final Agreement Act brings into effect the Yale First Nation Final Agreement. The Final Agreement includes 1,966 hectares of treaty settlement lands, a capital transfer of $10.7 million, along with greater self-sufficiency and decision-making powers through self-government for the Yale First Nation.

Building on the achievements presented in this report, the Government of Canada will continue to develop and strengthen its partnerships. By working together, we will secure a bright, healthy and prosperous future for Aboriginal peoples and Northerners, today and for generations to come.

Original signed by

The Honourable Bernard Valcourt, PC, QC, MP
Minister of Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development

 Table of Contents


Section I: Organizational Overview

Raison d'être

Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Canada (AANDC) supports Aboriginal people (First Nations, Inuit and Métis) and Northerners in their efforts to:

  • improve social well-being and economic prosperity;
  • develop healthier, more sustainable communities; and
  • participate more fully in Canada's political, social and economic development — to the benefit of all Canadians.

Responsibilities

The Department is responsible for two mandates, Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development, which together support Canada's Aboriginal and northern peoples in the pursuit of healthy and sustainable communities and broader economic and social development objectives. Efforts are guided by the mission statement:

"Working together to make Canada a better place for Aboriginal and northern people and communities"

The mandate for Aboriginal Affairs is derived from a number of sources which include, the Canadian Constitution, the Department of Indian Affairs and Northern Development Act, the Indian Act and its amendments over the years, statutes dealing with resource management, specific statutes enabling modern treaties, such as the Nisga'a Final Agreement Act, the Tsawwassen First Nation Final Agreement Act, the Maa-nulth First Nations Final Agreement Act and the Labrador Inuit Land Claims Agreement Act, and from more recently enacted statutes like the First Nations Fiscal and Statistical Management Act, the First Nations Land Management Act, and the First Nations Jurisdiction Over Education in British Columbia Act, designed to provide First Nations with jurisdictional powers outside the Indian Act. A significant part of the mandate is also derived from policy decisions and program practices that have been developed over the years; it is framed by judicial decisions many of which carry policy implications for the Department; and it is carried out through funding arrangements or formal agreements with First Nations and/or provincial or territorial governments.

AANDC negotiates and implements comprehensive and specific claims as well as self-government agreements on behalf of the Government of Canada; oversees implementation of claims settlements; provides support for services on reserve such as education, housing, community infrastructure and social support to Status Indians on reserves; administers the land management component of the Indian Act; and executes other regulatory duties under the Indian Act.

The Minister also acts as the government's primary interlocutor for Métis, Non-Status Indians and urban Aboriginal people. The responsibilities included within this role are to maintain and strengthen the Government of Canada's relations with organizations that represent Métis, Non-Status Indians and urban Aboriginal people; participate in negotiation processes with representative organizations and the provinces; and coordinate the government's Urban Aboriginal Strategy — an approach based on partnerships with provincial governments, urban Aboriginal organizations, municipalities and other federal departments.

The Department also serves as a focal point for Inuit issues which supports the inclusion of Inuit-specific concerns in federal program and policy development by liaising with national and regional Inuit organizations and governments.

The Northern Development mandate derives from the Canadian Constitution and from statutes enacted in the late 1960s and early 1970s, including the Department of Indian Affairs and Northern Development Act; from statutes enacting modern treaties north of 60°, such as the Nunavut Land Claims Agreement Act, or self-government agreements, such as the Yukon First Nations Self-Government Act; and from statutes dealing with environmental or resource management, and is framed by statutes such as the Canada-Yukon Oil and Gas Accord Implementation Act, and the Yukon Act, that enact the devolution of services and responsibilities from AANDC to territorial governments.

Through its Northern Development mandate, AANDC is the lead federal department for two-fifths of Canada's land mass, with a direct role in the political and economic development of the territories, and significant responsibilities for resource, land and environmental management. In the North, the territorial governments generally provide the majority of programs and services to all Northerners, including Aboriginal people.

The Canadian Polar Commission, a separate agency, supports polar research through its mandate to develop, promote and disseminate knowledge of the Polar Regions. It carries out this mandate by co-operating with organizations, institutions and associations, in Canada and elsewhere, to undertake, support and publish studies, recognize achievements and promote polar research and its application in Canada, report on polar issues and the state of polar knowledge and initiate and support conferences, seminars and meetings.

Strategic Outcomes and Program Alignment ArchitectureFootnote 1

Program Alignment Architecture
View text version of this image

This image is the Program Alignment Architecture of Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Canada (AANDC) for 2012-2013.

Horizontally across the top of the chart is a list of the Department's strategic outcomes:

  • The Government: Good governance and co-operative relationships for First Nations, Métis, Non-Status Indians, Inuit and Northerners
  • The People: Individual, family and community well-being for First Nations and Inuit
  • The Land and Economy: Full participation of First Nations, Métis, Non-Status Indians and Inuit individuals and communities in the economy
  • The North: Self-reliance, prosperity, and well-being for the people and communities of the North
  • Office of the Federal Interlocutor: Socio-economic well-being of Métis, Non-Status and urban Aboriginal people

Under the strategic outcomes is a list of the programs that support each strategic outcome, and sub-programs that support these programs.

The Government

  • The program Governance and Institutions of Government is supported by sub-programs First Nation Governments; and Institutions and Organizations.
  • The program Co-operative Relationships is supported by sub-programs Negotiations of Claims and Self-Government; Specific Claims; Inuit Relations; and Consultation and Engagement.
  • The program Treaty Management is supported by sub-programs Implementation of Modern-treaty Obligations; Management of Treaty Relationships; and Management of other Negotiated Settlements.

The People

  • The program Education is supported by sub-programs Elementary and Secondary Education; and Post-Secondary Education.
  • The program Social Development is supported by sub-programs Income Assistance; National Child Benefit Reinvestment; Assisted Living; First Nations Child and Family Services; and Family Violence Prevention.
  • The program Managing Individual Affairs is supported by sub-programs Registration and Membership; Management of Moneys; Estate Management; and Treaty Annuities.
  • The program Residential Schools Resolution is supported by sub-programs Common Experience Payments; Independent Assessment Process; Commemoration; and Support to the Truth and Reconciliation Commission.

The Land and Economy

  • The program Aboriginal Economic Development is supported by sub-programs Aboriginal Entrepreneurship; Activation of Community Assets; and Strategic Federal Investments and Partnerships.
  • The program Federal Administration of Reserve Land is supported by sub-programs Additions to Reserve; Registration of Rights and Interests in Reserve Lands; Clarity of Reserve Boundaries; and Environmental Management.
  • The program Community Infrastructure is supported by sub-programs Water and Wastewater Infrastructure; Education Facilities; Housing; Community Infrastructure Assets and Facilities; and Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency.

The North

  • The program Northern Governance and People is supported by sub-programs Political Development and Intergovernmental Relations; Nutrition North; and Climate Change Adaptation.
  • The program Northern Science and Technology is supported by sub-programs Northern Contaminants; and Science Initiatives.
  • The program Northern Land, Resources and Environmental Management is supported by sub-programs Oil and Gas; Mines and Minerals; Contaminated Sites; Land and Water Management; and Environmental Management.

Office of the Federal Interlocutor

  • The office of the Federal Interlocutor is supported by the programs Urban Aboriginal Strategy; Métis and Non-Status Indian Organizational Capacity Development; and Métis Rights Management. There are no sub-programs.

Horizontally along the bottom of the chart is the program Internal Services that supports all of the Department's strategic outcomes.


Organizational Priorities

In its 2012–2013 Report on Plans and Priorities, AANDC identified eleven priority areas which fall under three themes:

Transforming for Improved Results

  • Strengthening and Reforming Education
  • Empowering Citizens
  • Improving Economic Development and Sustainability
  • Sustaining the Momentum of the Northern Strategy

Improving Partnerships and Relationships

  • Implementing Reconciliation
  • Facilitating Community Development and Capacity
  • Increasing Partnering to Ensure Programs are More Responsive
  • Negotiating and Implementing Claims and Self-Government Agreements

Managing Resources Effectively

  • Implementing the New Policy on Transfer Payments to Improve the Management of Funding Relationships
  • Implementing the Results of the Administrative Shared Services Review
  • Implementing Public Service Renewal and Supporting the Excellence Agenda
Priority: Strengthening and Reforming Education Type:
Ongoing
Strategic Outcome: The People
The Department has continued to move forward on key components of the Reforming First Nation Education Initiative. Progress over the period of 2012–2013 includes:
  • Continued efforts to support the development of a First Nation Education Act. In December 2012, AANDC launched a consultation process. By the end of March 2013, 5 regional consultation sessions with First Nations Chiefs, educators, parents, elders, students and other community members had been conducted with 3 more to be completed in early 2013–2014. In addition, the Department's website hosted an online survey, providing opportunities for individuals or organizations, including provinces, to submit comments online. Information about the consultations, including a discussion guide, was also posted on this website. This initiative addressed the recommendations made by the National Panel on First Nation Elementary and Secondary Education to improve First Nation student outcomes and is linked to the commitment in Canada's Economic Action Plan 2012 to work with willing partners to have a First Nation Education Act in place by Fall 2014. The Act would establish the structures and standards required to support strong and accountable education systems on-reserve, and improve the educational outcomes for on-reserve students attending band-operated, provincial, or federally-operated schools;
  • The implementation of the Strong Schools, Successful Students Initiative (Canada's Economic Action Plan 2012 investment) through the Education Partnerships Program and the First Nation Student Success Program. The goal is to strengthen First Nation organizational capacity in preparation for the new First Nation Education Act in 2014. In the fall of 2012, 17 proposals were approved for Structural Readiness funding for the 2013–2014 fiscal year;
  • The launch of the Education Information System which is now available to all First Nations recipients on-line through the AANDC Services Portal. This on-line tool enables recipients of First Nation education funding to submit proposals, retrieve reports, and track the progress of their submissions; and
  • The participation of AANDC as a member of the National Committee in Inuit Education in an advisory role providing relevant knowledge and expertise to advance the Inuit Education Strategy and improve the education outcome for Inuit students.
Priority: Empowering Citizens Type:
Ongoing
Strategic Outcome: The People, The Government, The Land and Economy, Office of the Federal Interlocutor
In 2012–2013, AANDC undertook key activities and initiatives to support the empowerment of Aboriginal citizens to make informed decisions, acquire the skills they need to enter the labour market and, ultimately, improve their own well-being.

AANDC advanced the implementation of modern legislative frameworks that provide tools for Aboriginal citizens and their governments to assist them in identifying and responding to opportunities that will contribute to improved well-being. These advancements included:

  • Bill C-27, the First Nations Financial Transparency Act, which received Royal Assent on March 27, 2013, will help to enhance the financial transparency and accountability of First Nations governments to their members.
  • Bill S-6, the First Nations Elections Act, was passed by the Senate, and received First Reading in the House of Commons on May 4, 2012. Among the many improvements the Bill will bring to First Nations elections, it will support stability in First Nations governments by providing longer terms of office.
  • At the end of March 2013, the proposed Family Homes on Reserves and Matrimonial Interests and Rights Act was awaiting continuation of a second reading in the House of Commons and referral to the Standing Committee on the Status of Women. The Act received Royal Assent on June 19, 2013, and will provide basic rights and protections to individuals on reserves during a relationship, in the event of a relationship breakdown and on the death of a spouse of common-law partner regarding the family home and other matrimonial interests or rights.
  • The Department continues to explore options to address the issues raised during the Legislative Review of the First Nations Fiscal and Statistical Management Act.

In Canada's Economic Action Plan 2012, the Government of Canada committed to improving the incentives of the on-reserve Income Assistance Program while encouraging those who can work to access training that would improve their prospects for employment. In the period 2012–2013, AANDC invested more than $14 million to implement 36 pilot projects in 134 First Nations to enhance the delivery of active measures. Examples of these projects included:

  • Investments in Québec to provide single window service hubs at Adult Training Centres. These hubs that provided access to training opportunities and employment support services to five First Nation communities, including linkages to job opportunities in two mining corporations.
  • In Alberta, investments supported various First Nations in moving towards service hubs with multiple portfolios, including employment training, health and education programs. These hubs are able to better assist income assistant clients with multiple needs in finding training and/or employment as well as other related services.
  • In Saskatchewan, all Active Measures projects focused on building capacity for enhanced service delivery and client case management in the service hubs. In addition to training-to-employment, partnerships focused on workplace essential skills and job readiness programs.
Priority: Improving Economic Development and Sustainability Type:
Ongoing
Strategic Outcome: The Land and Economy, Office of the Federal Interlocutor
In 2012–2013, AANDC made considerable progress in modernizing and streamlining land management regimes, legislation, regulations, and policies, and in partnering with Aboriginal institutions on program and service delivery to facilitate economic development. This has included approving new First Nations to have greater autonomy in managing their own lands; developing new legislation and regulatory frameworks to improve and facilitate land management; partnering with Aboriginal Financial Institutions to deliver capital and business support services and financing to Aboriginal entrepreneurs; and continuing to support First Nations pursuing community economic opportunities and investments, including major projects.

Achievements included:

  • The announcement in January 2013 of eight new First Nations to enter into Land Management Agreements under the First Nations Land Management Regime, which enables the development of First Nation laws to manage reserve land, resources, and environment under a land code established by a First Nation. In fiscal year 2012–2013 a total of eight First Nations entered into Land Management Agreements, as well as a total of 18 having entered in 2011–2012. In addition, Canada's Economic Action Plan 2013 announced a two year investment of $9 million to expand the First Nation Land Management Regime further.
  • Bill C-45, the Jobs and Growth Act, 2012, which received Royal Assent on December 14, 2012, and which amended the Indian Act designation provisions to facilitate the leasing of land on reserve more at the speed of business. In addition, a new leasing model was developed through collaboration between AANDC, Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation, and Justice Canada that increases the security of large scale residential development on reserve. Also, to increase lender and investor confidence in leases on reserve, AANDC created a national commercial lease template with uniform requirements similar to off reserve commercial standards. Finally, a Joint Working Group with the Assembly of First Nations identified opportunities to update and modernize the policy and process to add land to reserve.
  • Implementation of the new Program Delivery Partnership initiative to further strengthen access to capital for Aboriginal businesses, which resulted in formal partnerships with 14 qualified Aboriginal Financial Institutions, serving all regions across the country, to deliver capital and business support services to Aboriginal entrepreneurs through more streamlined and efficient processes.
  • Investment under the AANDC Community Economic Opportunities Program of $16 million in 218 projects with First Nations in all regions across Canada by providing project-based support to create economic benefits in communities. This resulted in increased employment and revenues, greater utilization of lands and resources, enhanced community economic infrastructure, more contracts and sales from community businesses, and enhanced capacity within communities to address future economic opportunities.
  • Establishment of new regulatory regimes to support major projects on reserve, such as the First Nations Commercial and Industrial Development Act (FNCIDA) regulations for the proposed Kitimat Liquefied Natural Gas facility on the Haisla First Nation reserve. The Department developed the Haisla Nation Liquefied Natural Gas Facility Regulations to update and clarify legal provisions surrounding health, safety, and the environment, and ensure a comparable regulatory environment that modern off reserve laws provide. By providing for this regulatory certainty, FNCIDA is helping to effectively promote the sustainable use of reserve lands and resources for future generations. The goal of these changes will see First Nations better equipped to develop their economies, provide more tools to manage their resources, increase self-sufficiency and enhance their quality of life. The Department has also approved the Muskowekwan Potash Mining project as the next FNCIDA initiative.
Priority: Sustaining the Momentum of the Northern Strategy Type:
Ongoing
Strategic Outcome: The North
AANDC continued to lead the Northern Strategy throughout 2012–2013, by coordinating federal efforts on northern initiatives.

A number of key initiatives to support the development of sustainable Northern communities while simultaneously fostering a more conducive business environment were advanced. Key initiatives, by main category, included:

Exercising our Arctic Sovereignty

  • Collaborating with interdepartmental partners to prepare for Canada's chairmanship of the Arctic Council from 2013–2015.

Promoting social and economic development

  • Advancing changes to Northern Regulatory Regimes such as Bill C-47, the Nunavut Planning and Project Assessment Act and the Northwest Territories Surface Rights Board Act, amendments to the Northwest Territories Waters Regulations and Mackenzie Valley Land Use Regulations, and developing Nunavut Waters Regulations;
  • Implementing a streamlined list of foods eligible for subsidy to improve access to healthy foods under the Nutrition North Canada program;
  • Selecting the design firm for the Canadian High Arctic Research Station and the site in Cambridge Bay, Nunavut;
  • Presenting the International Polar Year (IPY) findings at the 2012 IPY conference to advance discussions linking new knowledge to Canadian and global priorities and releasing the IPY Canadian Science Report; and
  • Issuing exploration licences to advance new directions in energy development in the central Mackenzie Valley and in the Beaufort Sea and Mackenzie Delta regions.

Protecting our environmental heritage

  • Pursuing environmental and socio-economic research as well as stakeholder engagement through the Beaufort Regional Environmental Assessment to influence oil and gas regulatory decisions and future projects in the Beaufort Sea; and
  • Implementing the Site Stabilization Plan and the environmental assessment process to advance the Giant Mine remediation project, developing a medium-term plan to address the high-risk elements of Faro Mine, and remediating four additional contaminated sites.

Improving and devolving governance

  • Achieving consensus on a final agreement for Northwest Territories devolution; and
  • Advancing discussions in Nunavut for the second phase of the devolution process.
Priority: Implementing Reconciliation Type:
Ongoing
Strategic Outcome: The People
AANDC continued to implement the Indian Residential Schools Settlement Agreement, including the Common Experience Payment process, the Independent Assessment Process, Commemoration, and support to the Truth and Reconciliation Commission. For the period 2012–2013:
  • AANDC continued to effectively administer the Common Experience Payment program. As of March 31, 2013, $1.613 billion of the $1.9 billion Designated Amount Fund (84.9%) has been disbursed to pay 78,859 (98.6%) of an estimated 80,000 former students who resided at a recognized Indian residential school. Of this, $14.9 million was paid to 869 former students in 2012–2013.
  • A total of $472.4 million was paid in claims following 4,194 Independent Assessment Process hearings and 730 claims resolved through the Negotiated Settlement Process. On average, 349 hearings were held per month in 2012–2013, an increase of 29 hearings per month compared to the average of the previous fiscal year.
  • The Truth and Reconciliation Commission provided AANDC with a total of 76 proposals that it recommended for Commemoration funding in 2012–2013. As of March 31, 2013, 75 contribution agreements were in place for a total of over $11 million. It is anticipated that all projects will be complete by March 31, 2014. Projects included the creation of plaques, gardens, totem poles and theatrical pieces, as well as the development of museum exhibitions and community gatherings.
  • AANDC continued to fulfill its obligations vis-à-vis the Truth and Reconciliation Commission, disclosing documents relevant to its mandate. In addition to the 1.2 million active and semi-active documents provided by AANDC, Library and Archives Canada disclosed almost 2.3 million historical documents to the commission, resulting in a total of approximately 3.5 million documents provided as of March 31, 2013.
  • The Minister participated in the Truth and Reconciliation Commission national events in Saskatoon and in Montreal.
  • As a gesture of reconciliation, a stained glass window was installed directly above the west entrance to Centre Block, commemorating the legacy of Indian residential schools and the Prime Minister's apology to former students on behalf of all Canadians. The window provides a unique opportunity for Parliamentarians and visitors to Parliament to learn about the history of Indian Residential Schools and Canada's ongoing reconciliation efforts.
  • On August 22, 2012, AANDC added Mistassini Hostels to the list of recognized institutions under the Indian Residential Schools Settlement Agreement. On March 27, 2013, the Quebec Superior Court approved an order allowing former students who resided at Mistassini Hostels to submit applications for Common Experience Payment and Independent Assessment Process.

The repeal of the Indian residential schools provisions of the Indian Act is part of Bill C-428, which received second reading in the House of Commons on December 5, 2012.

In addition, the Department continues to undertake activities that promote reconciliation between Aboriginal people and other Canadians.

Priority: Facilitating Community Development and Capacity Type:
New
Strategic Outcome: The Government, Office of the Federal Interlocutor
Throughout 2012–2013, AANDC continued to support and facilitate community development and capacity by streamlining and consolidating capacity development programs; introducing the First Nation Land Use Planning pilot; advancing the Community Development Framework and related tools; and continuing to work to develop a sustainable, streamlined grants and contributions funding model for low-risk communities. Initiatives included:

Streamlining and consolidating capacity development programs

  • Development of an approach to consolidate capacity development programs under the Regional Operations Capacity Development Partnerships Program (RO CDPP). This integrated approach to capacity development funding for governance and community infrastructure needs for First Nation communities will be implemented as a pilot project in 2013–2014 and fully implemented in 2014–2015.
  • Expansion of the Governance Capacity Planning Tool to include a planning component focused on Community Infrastructure capacity needs. This module provides a comprehensive assessment of community infrastructure capacity strengths and gaps and provides a template for First Nations to prepare Community Infrastructure Capacity Development Plans that can be used to access funding through the RO CDPP.

First Nation Land Use Planning Pilot

  • Supporting First Nation communities across Canada in the development of community land use plans. The Land Use Planning pilot seeks to assist First Nations in effectively coordinating community housing, infrastructure, land, and environment; as well as identify and pursue economic development opportunities. Approximately $1 million has been allocated to support this initiative.

Advancing the Community Development Framework and related tools

  • Responding to commitments of the 2011–2012 Canada-First Nations Joint Action Plan, AANDC partnered with Health Canada and Public Safety Canada to collaboratively support the Community Development and Capacity Building (CDCB) Framework.
  • Health Canada (HC) and AANDC implemented a number of strategic joint initiatives identified in the HC/AANDC Memorandum of Understanding on Community Development, which was supported by the HC/AANDC Intergovernmental Loan Agreement.
  • Instilling the principles of the CDCB Framework, HC/AANDC delivered the Indigenous Community Development (ICD) Training Program to 700 employees in 2012–2013.They will deliver this training to an additional 800 Government of Canada employees from across the country in 2013–2014.
  • The ICD Training Program was implemented by the ICD Facilitation Team, a group of 25 HC/AANDC and Public Safety employees who have volunteered their expertise to deliver this curriculum nationwide. Supported by HC/AANDC, the ICD Facilitation Team received accredited facilitation training by the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education at the University of Toronto in 2012–2013.
  • Expanded participation of The National Advisory Committee on Community Development, co-chaired between HC/AANDC, the Assembly of First Nations and the Inuit Tapiriit Kanatami.

Supporting improved economic development and sustainability in First Nation communities by working in partnership with First Nations towards improving housing management in First Nation communities and continuing to advance initiatives to improve and maintain community infrastructure, such as supporting the passage of Bill S-8: Safe Drinking Water for First Nations Act, to ensure access to safe, clean and reliable drinking water and effective treatment of wastewater as a foundation for healthy economic development. AANDC also developed new Minimum Program Requirements for the Circuit Rider Training Program (CRTP) for water and wastewater system operators, and delivered the first year of Canada's Economic Action Plan 2012 announcement to invest $175 million over three years to support First Nations education by building and renovating schools on reserve. Approximately $25 million in 2012–2013 supported 12 school projects and the exploration of a proposed Public Private Partnership (P3) to bundle four schools in Manitoba.

Continuing to work to develop a sustainable, streamlined grants and contributions funding model for low-risk communities.

Priority: Increasing Partnering to Ensure Programs are More Responsive Type:
Ongoing
Strategic Outcome: The Government, The People, The Land and Economy, The North, Office of the Federal Interlocutor, Internal Services
During the fiscal period of 2012–2013, AANDC reinforced collaboration with federal, provincial, territorial and municipal governments, post-secondary institutions, Aboriginal organizations, and the private and non-profit sectors. Key initiatives for two main categories included:

Partnering to Enhance Education and Social Development

  • Achieving several important milestones to strengthen collaboration and enhance education programming and services for First Nation students attending First Nation or provincial schools. This included the signature of a tripartite education Memorandum of Understanding with the Council of Yukon First Nations and the territorial government of the Yukon as well as between the First Nations Education Council of Québec and the provincial government of Quebec.
  • Continuing to support the ongoing implementation of the tripartite arrangements for income assistance in Quebec and Saskatchewan. The Tripartite Framework to improve the administration and delivery of Income Support for First Nation communities in Québec — between AANDC, the province of Quebec, and the First Nations of Quebec and the Labrador Health and Social Services Commission — generated a series of collaborative activities, including the development of a draft agreement on the exchange of information to facilitate the administration of the Income Support program, regarding decisions with respect to the eligibility of certain applicants for financial aid. Collaborative links and exchanges of information were established to provide both technical support and training related to income assistance in communities.
  • Facilitating the development and design of the Saskatchewan Industrial Trades and Employment Partnership in collaboration with Employment and Social Development Canada, the Province of Saskatchewan, Tribal Councils, and employers. Partnership processes related to major projects include a partnership with the Muskowekwan-Encanto potash mine, SaskPower and the Province of Saskatchewan to train and employ 64 people from the Black Lake First Nation to help build the Elizabeth Falls Hydroelectric Power Project; and a tripartite partnership for scaffolding training between File Hills Qu'Appelle Tribal Council, the Potash Corporation of Saskatchewan, and the Saskatchewan Indian Institute of Technologies.

Partnering for Economic and Resource Development

  • Launching the Strategic Partnerships Initiative Investment Committee, with Natural Resources Canada, the Canadian Northern Economic Development Agency, Employment and Social Development Canada and the National Aboriginal Economic Development Board, and implementing new assessment tools endorsed by federal signatories to enhance transparency in decision making, consistency in investments that are aligned with government priorities, and provide better results. This Committee introduced fifteen multi-year Strategic Partnership Initiative proposals 2012–2013.
  • Continuing to collaborate with the Indian Resource Council — a key stakeholder representing the 189 First Nations with oil and gas resources — in developing oil and gas policy for reserve lands.
  • Entering into tripartite arrangements with provinces and First Nations to enable major economic projects to proceed by reproducing the provincial rules and regulations that apply to similar large scale commercial and industrial projects off-reserve. Regulatory cooperation exemplified by this project promotes increased collaboration between First Nations, the provinces and the federal government.
  • Providing support to enable negotiations that establish various partnerships and joint ventures: e.g., Aamjiwnaang First Nation (Ontario) to develop a partnership agreement with Wind Energy Developments and Ojibways of the Pic River First Nation (Ontario) to negotiate an impact benefits agreement with Stillwater Canada Inc. in relation to the Platinum Group Metals mine.
  • Supporting the development of a Métis Economic Development Accord and strategy, through participation in the Métis National Council-Industry Roundtable on Skills, Partnerships and Economic Growth in Vancouver. This Council brings together Métis leaders, industry and government representatives to discuss best practices and collaborative approaches in support of Métis Nation economic development goals. AANDC also participated in a regional economic development session hosted by the Métis Nation of BC and Métis Nation of Alberta. Métis economic development sessions provided opportunities for industry proponents and Métis partners to review their collaborative work on procurement, access to capital and business development.
  • Fulfilling the Ministerial mandate to the National Aboriginal Economic Development Board with the completion of the recommendations on "Addressing Barriers to Economic Development on Reserve" in February 2013.
  • Finalizing the Government of Canada Ring of Fire Action Plan. In collaboration with Natural Resources Canada and the Major Projects Management Office, a number of inter-governmental initiatives were developed with both Ring of Fire First Nations and the Province of Ontario, most notably in the areas of environmental monitoring and community health and well-being that were aligned with the action plan.

AANDC and the Métis National Council (MNC) renewed the 2008 Métis Nation Protocol on April 19, 2013. The Protocol establishes a process for Canada and the Métis Nation to conduct discussions on a range of mutually identified key issues and objectives, such as economic development. It is the vehicle through which the Federal government and the Métis ensure that programming is responsive to their constituency by agreeing to prepare a joint progress report on the results achieved under the Protocol on an annual basis. As well, the Department signed a Governance and Accountability Accord with the MNC which outlines the roles and responsibilities and commitments both parties make to ensure the MNC is a fully accountable and transparent organization.

Finally, on January 24, 2013, AANDC issued a one-year Crown First Nations Gathering Progress Report that encompassed both joint efforts with the Assembly of First Nations as well as initiatives that the Government has pursued in support of the broader Aboriginal agenda. A Working Group on Financial Arrangements has also been established, which includes senior officials from AANDC, Treasury Board Secretariat, the Department of Finance, the Assembly of First Nations, as well as representatives from the Aboriginal Financial Officers Association and the Atlantic Policy Congress. The Working Group has met regularly since October 2012, and has focused on improving the management of transfer payments, reducing red tape and strengthening accountability, with a view to advancing towards a single, multi-year Government of Canada financial arrangement for First Nations.

Priority: Negotiating and Implementing Claims and Self-Government Agreements Type:
Ongoing
Strategic Outcome: The Government
Considerable progress was made in 2012–2013 by AANDC in the negotiation of claims and self-government agreements:
  • The Governance and Lands Agreements-in-Principle negotiations with the Akwesasne First Nation were finalized with the mandate to proceed to final negotiations received. Final negotiations are set to begin this year.
  • The consultation sessions for the Algonquins of Ontario Preliminary Draft Agreement-in-Principle with the general public, stakeholders, municipalities and neighboring First Nations are underway and will continue. Final negotiations are intended to commence this year.
  • The fiscal offer in support of the Self-Government Final Agreement on Education with the Union of Ontario Indians was tabled with the First Nations. They will conduct an analysis in comparison to their expectations and the Government of Canada will review their response once it is received.
  • Two Memoranda of Understanding for an exploratory process related to reconciliation with four Dakota-Lakota First Nations were concluded.
  • In the British Columbia treaty process, The Government of Canada and of British Columbia initialled agreements-in-principle (AIPs) with the Kitselas and Kitsumkalum First Nations on January 22, 2013 (the Kitselas community approved their AIP on February 20, 2013). An AIP was initialled with the Tla-o-qui-aht First Nation on October 1, 2012; however, the community subsequently voted against the AIP and is determining whether to hold a second ratification vote. The Tla'amin (Sliammon) Final Agreement was ratified by the First Nation (July 10, 2012) and British Columbia (March 14, 2013); the next step is federal ratification and authority to sign. Several other AIPs and final agreements are in advanced stages of negotiation.
  • Jointly with the Government of the Northwest Territories, the Government of Canada entered into consultation processes with twenty Aboriginal groups.
  • AANDC continued to meet with its treaty partners to ensure the implementation of our legal obligations as well as to provide a coordinating role on behalf of the Government of Canada.
  • On September 12, 2012, the Government of Canada and the Government of the Northwest Territories reached a comprehensive draft Final Self-Government Agreement with the community of Deline, pursuant to commitments in the 1993 Sahtu Dene and Metis Comprehensive Land Claim Agreement. Consultations on this draft agreement are now underway, and following information sessions for beneficiaries, the next major steps will be to seek approvals for initialling, followed by a ratification vote by the First Nation.
  • On May 31, 2013, AANDC introduced legislation to ratify the Yale First Nation Final Agreement. This marks a significant step forward as both the Yale First Nation and the Province of British Columbia have ratified the Yale First Nation Final Agreement.

The Government of Canada also continued to resolve specific claims in a manner consistent with the Justice at Last initiative announced in 2007. In fiscal year 2012–2013, 19 negotiated claim settlements were concluded and $556,685,516 was paid out in accordance with these settlements. Of particular note, in November 2012, an agreement was concluded with the Chippewa Tri-Council and the Chippewas of Nawash in Ontario that settled the Coldwater Narrows specific claim, valued at $307 million. On March 31, 2013, there were 231 specific claims in negotiation.

Priority: Managing Resources Effectively Type:
Ongoing
Strategic Outcome: The Government, The People, The Land and Economy, The North, Office of the Federal Interlocutor, Internal Services
2012–2013 was an exceptional year, defined by fiscal restraint efforts across the Public Service. With this in mind, AANDC continued to focus its efforts on excellence in service delivery with the implementation of various department-wide initiatives to strengthen the management and performance of programs, as follows:
  • In regards to implementing the Policy on Transfer Payments, AANDC developed service standards for the management of its transfer payments to recipients, a risk-based framework for implementing longer-term funding agreements, and a new tool for assessing the readiness of certain recipients for AANDC's most flexible funding approach. In addition, a Common Funding Agreement was developed in partnership with Health Canada to provide a single agreement to interested low-risk First Nations. The two departments selected six common recipients for audit and sent only one audit firm into the First Nation community thereby streamlining the process. Furthermore, a pilot project with the community of Mashteuiatsh resulted in financing from four federal departments being regrouped under one funding agreement and the harmonizing of business processes, thus reducing the reporting burden for the community.
  • In response to the Administrative Shared Services Review (ASR), AANDC participated in the Government of Canada mandated Information Management/Information Technology transformation by supporting the transition to Shared Services Canada (SSC). In 2012–2013, AANDC implemented efficiencies within the Department to respond to the ASR by actively participating in the governance of the E-mail Transformation Initiative and collaborating on the planning for data centre and network consolidation. The Department also consolidated the IT Call Centres within its organization to improve the manner in which AANDC conducts its business, increases accountability and reduces duplication and spending. In 2012–2013, AANDC was part of Wave 1 of the transfer of Pay Services to the Pay Centre located in Miramichi. By the end of March 2013, 2950 accounts were transferred and approximately 4950 by September 2013.
  • AANDC has pursued every aspect of the Public Service Renewal agenda. Its commitments to implementing Canada's Economic Action Plan 2012 fuelled the most significant internal change initiative within the Department in many years, triggered by a 10% reduction in AANDC's operating budget (Vote 1) and staff complement. The changes related to Canada's Economic Action Plan 2012 applied to every sector and all 10 regions: 47% of affected employees were located in the National Capital Region and 53% in other regions; 742 employees were affected, with the objective of eliminating approximately 480 positions. These changes have necessitated developing and implementing revised roles and responsibilities that were discussed with key stakeholders. For example, in preparation for the creation of the Business Management Units, a series of meetings were held to discuss changes to corporate business processes and to ensure executive administrative support roles. A new internal structure for the Department was required to support streamlined processes. Regular communication with employees ensured they were informed about transformation and renewal.

Risk Analysis

AANDC is faced with many challenges and opportunities as it strives to deliver its mandate and contribute to the achievement of the Government of Canada's priorities and commitments. AANDC funds or delivers programs and services to diverse groups of people with varied and distinct needs and priorities who live in a vast range of communities throughout the country. In addition, most of AANDC's services are delivered through partnerships with Aboriginal communities, the provinces and territories, Aboriginal organizations and organizations in the North. Other challenges are demographic (almost half [46.2%] of Aboriginal people are less than 25 years old), geographic (serving remote and isolated communities) and historical (addressing the treaty relationship with First Nations). This complex and continually changing environment creates certain risks for the Department.

In order to mitigate these risks and achieve departmental objectives, AANDC employs a range of risk management practices. Identifying, assessing and mitigating the corporate risks are a shared responsibility amongst managers at all levels, including Assistant Deputy Ministers and the Deputy Ministers. At the corporate level, the Corporate Risk Profile (CRP) and Corporate Business Planning processes served as the primary means of assessing and planning the response to corporate risks. Once completed, the CRP informed the Department's business planning cycle and was a key input in the priority-setting exercise. The activities put forward in the plans not only addressed the operational needs of individual programs, but in turn, contributed to the overall management of the corporate risks for the Department.

The chart that follows outlines the Departments' potential key risks as articulated in the 2012–2013 CRP and tabled in the 2012–2013 Report on Plans and Priorities.

Risk Risk Response Strategy Link to Program Alignment Architecture (PAA) Link to Organizational Priorities
Aboriginal Relationship Risk (HIGH)

There is a risk that AANDC will not build and sustain strong, productive and respectful relationships with Aboriginal people, communities and organizations and governments which contributes to the delivery of its mandate.

  • Emphasis placed on meeting and communicating with communities and leaders and with broader membership
  • Fulfillment of consultation obligations with Aboriginal communities
  • Greater coordination with other government departments (OGDs)
  • Negotiation and implementation of claims and self-government agreements
Aboriginal Relationship Risk is linked to and impacts all areas of the PAA Improving Partnerships and Relationships
Implementation Risk (HIGH)

There is a risk that AANDC will lack the ability and capacity to successfully implement initiatives, while sustaining program delivery.

  • Implementation of project management processes and governance regimes for major change initiatives
  • Updated systems, new processes and tools to support transfer payment management to improve consistency, efficiency and effectiveness
  • Strong oversight function through a Quarterly Report process
  • Timely engagement of bargaining agents
  • AANDC has increased awareness by developing and launching the Treaties Obligation Management System and other monitoring and reporting initiatives
Implementation Risk is linked to and impacts all areas of the PAA Managing Resources Effectively
Resource Alignment Risk (HIGH)

There is a risk that resources will not be well aligned to support the effective and efficient delivery of AANDC's mandate.

  • Implementation of the General Assessment Tool in order to make financial decisions based on a recipient's risk profile
  • Regular senior management sessions focused on priority setting
  • AANDC financial management processes and governance structures
  • Introduction of a quarterly reporting process for performance and financial results has allowed for more timely resource allocation and re-allocation (i.e., mid-year)
  • Evaluation and audit functions provide insight to support program renovation
  • Concerted effort to redistribute human resources to areas of the department with the greatest need
Resource Alignment Risk is linked to and impacts all areas of the PAA Managing Resources Effectively
External Partnership Risk (MODERATE)

There is a risk that the Department may not be able to effectively and efficiently partner with the provinces, territories, local governments, industry, academia and non-governmental organizations in order to contribute to the delivery of its mandate.

  • Federal Framework for Aboriginal Economic Development
  • Urban Aboriginal Strategy
  • Proactive efforts by AANDC to develop relationships with other levels of government and external stakeholders
  • Joint working groups and committees (e.g., AANDC and provinces)
  • Initiatives and dedicated AANDC resources to identify opportunities for external partnering and developing relationships
  • Governance and Institutions of Government
  • Cooperative Relationships
  • Aboriginal Economic Development
  • Federal Administration of Reserve Land
Improving Partnerships and Relationships
Government Partnership Risk (MODERATE)

There is a risk that AANDC and its federal government partners will not effectively and efficiently collaborate in the development and delivery of policies and programs.

  • Federal Council, committees and working groups
  • Leadership by AANDC senior management in collaborating with OGDs has increased a common understanding of issues at the senior management level
  • Implementation of Canada's Action Plan 2012 on Aboriginal Consultation and Accommodation
  • Memoranda of Understanding and other arrangements between AANDC and OGDs have resulted in sustainable improvements to processes
  • AANDC participates in a Federal Steering Committee of all federal departments and agencies involved in land claims
  • Education
  • Social Development
  • Federal Administration of Reserve Land
  • Northern Governance and People
  • Northern Science and Technology
Improving Partnerships and Relationships

It should be noted that the Department's external environment is significantly influenced by the management and monitoring of its key internal risks. Areas like human resources and the alignment of other resources are a foundation to the activities of the Department and as such, these areas are among the highest risks on the Corporate Risk Profile. In addition to the mitigation measures mentioned for AANDC's external risks, the Department has taken significant action in mitigating its key internal risks.

For example, Human Resource Capacity and Capabilities Risk was rated HIGH. This risk refers to the Department's ability to recruit, develop and retain sufficiently qualified, experienced, and representative human resources in a timely manner. AANDC continues to support the recruitment of students and new graduates as a means of sustaining the workforce and contributing to a culture of innovation. The integration of human resource plans into business plans ensured a focus on the issues and allowed the Human Resources Branch to better support delegated managers. The Department updated its Human Resource Strategic Plan which led to a focus on initiatives designed to enhance recruitment and training. Last, the timely engagement of bargaining agents has led to better understanding of the issues, improvements in implementing change initiatives, and improved employee relations.

Resource Alignment Risk was assessed as HIGH. The Department implemented a number of risk-based approaches in order to ensure its resources were being managed effectively. First, the General Assessment Tool which assessed the risk associated with funding recipients, allowed the Department to make more informed financial decisions based on a recipient's risk profile. AANDC's financial management processes and governance structures were strengthened to ensure resources were allocated to activities which would derive the highest value. Senior management priority setting sessions improved the effectiveness of corporate planning. In addition to audit and evaluation findings, the integration of Corporate Business Planning with financial, Human Resources and operational plans, provided information that helped managers make better resource allocation decisions.

Summary of Performance

Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Canada

2012–2013 Financial Resources ($ millions) 2012–2013 Human Resources (FTEs)
Total Expenditures (Main Estimates) Planned Spending Total Authorities (available for use) Actual Spending (authorities used) Difference (Planned vs. Actual Spending) Planned Actual Difference
Figures include Budgetary and Non-Budgetary amounts (e.g. loans). FTEs are Full-Time Equivalents
7,796.9 7,796.9 8,638.2 8,139.0 (342.1) 4,932.2 4,997.2 (65.1)

Explanation of Variance

Variances between Main Estimates, Planned Spending, Total Authorities and Actual Spending are largely attributable to the timing of key elements of the fiscal cycle. The Main Estimates, as approved by Parliament in the initial appropriations, are the first step in the fiscal cycle.

The Planned Spending figure for 2012–2013 reflects the Main Estimates which were tabled in Parliament on February 28, 2012.

The difference between Planned versus Actual Spending ($342.1 million) is explained in two stages:

  • the difference between Total Authorities and Planned Spending ($841 million);
  • the difference between Actual Spending and Total Authorities ($499 million).

The Total Authorities represent the Main Estimates plus Supplementary Estimates and deemed appropriations, plus adjustments to authorities approved by Treasury Board, such as the operating budget carry-forward and paylist requirements, as well as the carry-forward from previous years of other various authorities. More specifically, the difference of $841 million between Total Authorities ($8,638 million) and Planned Spending ($7,797 million) is largely due to:

  • funding provided in Supplementary Estimates for:
    • awards to claimants resulting from the Independent Assessment Process and Alternative Dispute Resolution related to the Indian Residential Schools Settlement Agreement, as well as for the administration and research required to support the federal government's obligations under the Agreement;
    • specific claims settlements;
    • continued support for the implementation of the First Nations Water and Wastewater Action Plan;
    • development of systems and supports to ensure readiness for First Nation education legislation and to support the construction and/or renovation of schools on-reserve; and
    • on-reserve costs incurred by provincial, territorial or other emergency management organizations as required under the Emergency Management Assistance Program.
  • deemed appropriation for the transfer of funding from Canadian Heritage (pursuant to s. 31.1 of the Financial Administration Act and order in council P.C. 2012-0286 effective April 1, 2012);
  • the carry-forward from previous years of authorities for loans and guarantees of loans; and
  • operating budget carry-forward and paylist requirements (i.e., items such as parental benefits and severance payments).

Actual Spending reflects spending activity during the fiscal year as per the Public Accounts of Canada. A number of factors contributed to the difference of $499 million between Actual Spending ($8,139 million) and Total Authorities ($8,638 million), including:

  • the deferral of certain initiatives to future years where the funding will be used for the intended purposes (of particular note, payments related to specific claims settlements, the Indian Residential Schools Settlement Agreement and an out-of-court settlement);
  • carry-forward of resources (e.g. operating budget carry-forward) from fiscal year 2012–2013 to 2013–2014, as well as authorities for loans and guarantees of loans that were not used in 2012–2013, but that will be available for use in subsequent years; and
  • reduced requirements for Treaty Related Measures and for loans for First Nations involved in claim negotiations.

Performance Summary Tables for Strategic Outcomes and Programs

Strategic Outcome: The Government — Good governance and co-operative relationships for First Nations, Inuit and Northerners ($ millions)
Program Total Expenditures (Main Estimates) 2012–2013 Planned Spending Total Authorities (available for use) 2012–2013 Actual Spending (authorities used) Alignment to Government of Canada Outcomes
2012–2013 2013–2014 2014–2015 2012–2013 2011–2012 2010–2011*
Due to rounding, figures may not add up to total shown.

*In order to allow comparability with the figures reported for 2011–2012 and future years, figures for Actual Spending for 2010–2011 have been restated from figures previously reported in the 2010–2011 Performance Report to reflect the revised Program Alignment Architectures for 2011–2012 and future years.

**Figures include Budgetary and Non-Budgetary amounts (e.g. loans).

***Co-operative Relationships Program's 2012–2013 Actual Spending has increased compared to 2011–2012 Actual Spending due to Specific Claims Settlements

Governance and Institutions of Government 466.0 466.0 456.7 415.6 486.6 484.4 495.9 476.3 A diverse society that promotes linguistic duality and social inclusion
Co-operative Relationships** 795.6 795.6 466.8 359.1 933.0 718.0*** 472.5 816.5
Treaty Management 696.6 696.6 713.6 702.0 719.0 717.8 735.7 626.2 Strong economic growth
Sub-Total 1,958.1 1,958.1 1,637.1 1,476.7 2,138.6 1,920.2 1,704.1 1,919.0  
Strategic Outcome: The People — Individual, family and community well-being for First Nations and Inuit ($ millions)
Program Total Expenditures (Main Estimates) 2012–2013 Planned Spending Total Authorities (available for use) 2012–2013 Actual Spending (authorities used) Alignment to Government of Canada Outcomes
2012–2013 2013–2014 2014–2015 2012–2013 2011–2012 2010–2011*
Due to rounding, figures may not add up to total shown.

*In order to allow comparability with the figures reported for 2011–2012 and future years, figures for Actual Spending for 2010–2011 have been restated from figures previously reported in the 2010–2011 Performance Report to reflect the revised Program Alignment Architectures for 2011–2012 and future years.

Education 1,705.4 1,705.4 1,761.1 1,789.9 1,735.0 1,734.8 1,675.0 1,628.3 A diverse society that promotes linguistic duality and social inclusion
Social Development 1,604.6 1,604.6 1,615.0 1,626.6 1,710.2 1,709.9 1,678.0 1,610.9
Managing Individual Affairs 28.4 28.4 28.8 28.2 38.9 37.1 43.3 40.6
Residential Schools Resolution 466.8 466.8 696.0 105.0 711.1 593.3 560.3 516.8
Sub-Total 3,805.2 3,805.2 4,101.0 3,549.7 4,195.2 4,075.0 3,956.7 3,796.7  
Strategic Outcome: The Land and Economy — Full participation of First Nations, Inuit and Métis individuals and communities in the economy ($ millions)
Program Total Expenditures (Main Estimates) 2012–2013 Planned Spending Total Authorities (available for use) 2012–2013 Actual Spending (authorities used) Alignment to Government of Canada Outcomes
2012–2013 2013–2014 2014–2015 2012–2013 2011–2012 2010–2011*
Due to rounding, figures may not add up to total shown.

*In order to allow comparability with the figures reported for 2011–2012 and future years, figures for Actual Spending for 2010–2011 have been restated from figures previously reported in the 2010–2011 Performance Report to reflect the revised Program Alignment Architectures for 2011–2012 and future years. The 2010–2011 figure for Community Infrastructure includes funding for Canada's Economic Action Plan.

**Total Authorities for 2012–2013 include Budgetary and Non-Budgetary amounts (e.g. loans).

***Please note that the Urban Aboriginal Participation Program is reflected in the 2013–2014 and 2014–2015 Program Alignment Architecture and includes the following program elements: Urban Aboriginal Strategy, Aboriginal Friendship Centres, Cultural Connections for Aboriginal Youth and Young Canada Works for Aboriginal Urban Youth.

Aboriginal Economic Development** 264.9 264.9 254.1 244.7 321.1 238.1 239.2 227.4 Strong economic growth
Federal Administration of Reserve Land 53.0 53.0 52.6 36.7 113.5 112.4 207.3 125.4 A clean and healthy environment
Community Infrastructure 1,045.4 1,045.4 1,221.3 1,089.3 1,075.8 1,073.4 1,096.9 1,300.4 Strong economic growth
Urban Aboriginal Participation*** n/a n/a 41.0 40.9 n/a n/a n/a n/a Income security and employment for Canadians
Sub-Total 1,363.3 1,363.3 1,569.0 1,411.6 1,510.4 1,424.0 1,543.4 1,653.2  
Strategic Outcome: The North — Self-reliance, prosperity and well-being for the people and communities of the North ($ millions)
Program Total Expenditures (Main Estimates) 2012–2013 Planned Spending Total Authorities (available for use) 2012–2013 Actual Spending (authorities used) Alignment to Government of Canada Outcomes
2012–2013 2013–2014 2014–2015 2012–2013 2011–2012 2010–2011*
Due to rounding, figures may not add up to total shown.

*In order to allow comparability with the figures reported for 2011–2012 and future years, figures for Actual Spending for 2010–2011 have been restated from figures previously reported in the 2010–2011 Performance Report to reflect the revised Program Alignment Architectures for 2011–2012 and future years. The 2010–2011 figure includes funding for Northern Science and Technology related to the Canadian High Arctic Research Station project allocated via the Canada's Economic Action Plan initiative.

**Total Authorities for 2012–2013 include Budgetary and Non-Budgetary amounts (e.g. loans).

***The difference in planned spending from 2013–2014 to 2014–2015 is mainly due to the sunsetting of funding related to the assessment, management and remediation of federal contaminated sites. This funding will be reviewed in the next budget.

Northern Governance and People** 132.1 132.1 136.9 145.1 150.8 136.5 126.6 135.9 Healthy Canadians
Northern Science and Technology 13.0 13.0 12.9 7.4 15.2 12.9 16.0 64.4 An innovative and knowledge-based economy
Northern Land, Resources and Environmental Management*** 203.9 203.9 260.0 99.0 182.6 176.8 179.9 218.8 A clean and healthy environment
Sub-Total 348.9 348.9 409.8 251.4 348.6 326.2 322.4 419.1  
Strategic Outcome: Office of the Federal Interlocutor — Socio-economic well-being of Métis, Non-Status Indians and urban Aboriginal people ($ millions)
Program Total Expenditures (Main Estimates) 2012–2013 Planned Spending Total Authorities (available for use) 2012–2013 Actual Spending (authorities used) Alignment to Government of Canada Outcomes
2012–2013 2013–2014 2014–2015 2012–2013 2011–2012 2010–2011
Due to rounding, figures may not add up to total shown.

*The Urban Aboriginal Strategy Program has been recaptured under the Urban Aboriginal Participation Program in the 2013–2014 and 2014–2015 Program Alignment Architecture.

Urban Aboriginal Strategy* 0.0 0.0 n/a n/a 52.6 52.3 14.9 14.5 Income security and employment for Canadians
Métis and Non-Status Indian Organizational Capacity Development 16.0 16.0 n/a n/a 15.0 14.8 16.3 15.9 A diverse society that promotes linguistic duality and social inclusion
Métis Rights Management 11.9 11.9 n/a n/a 7.9 7.9 9.5 8.8
Sub-Total 27.8 27.8 n/a n/a 75.6 74.9 40.7 39.2  
Internal Services* ($ millions)
  Total Expenditures (Main Estimates) 2012–2013 Planned Spending Total Authorities (available for use) 2012–2013 Actual Spending (authorities used)
2012–2013 2013–2014 2014–2015 2012–2013 2011–2012 2010–2011
*The year-over-year decrease in Internal Services are attributable to the timing of out of court settlement payments, transfer of funding to Shared Services Canada for information technology services including email, data centre and network services during 2011–2012, transfer of compensation to Public Works and Government Services Canada Pay Center in Miramichi, payment in lieu of severance pay with the majority was paid out in 2011–2012, implementation of Canada's Economic Action Plan 2012 savings measures starting in 2012–2013 and lower Department of Justice Billings due to a reduction in activity level performed on AANDC litigation files in 2012–2013.
Sub-Total 293.5 293.5 258.4 245.9 369.7 318.8 362.7 407.6
Total AANDC Performance Summary ($ millions)
Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Canada Total Expenditures (Main Estimates) 2012–2013 Planned Spending Total Authorities (available for use) 2012–2013 Actual Spending (authorities used)
2012–2013 2013–2014 2014–2015 2012–2013 2011–2012 2010–2011
Sub-Total 7,796.9 7,796.9 7,975.3 6,935.4 8,638.2 8,139.0 7,930.0 8,234.9

Canadian Polar Commission

2012–2013 Financial Resources ($ millions) 2012–2013 Human Resources (FTEs)
Total Expenditures (Main Estimates) Planned Spending Total Authorities (available for use) Actual Spending (authorities used) Difference (Planned vs. Actual Spending) Planned Actual Difference
Due to rounding, difference does not reflect figures shown.
1.3 1.3 1.4 1.3 (0.1) 5 9 (4)
Strategic Outcome: Increased Canadian Polar Knowledge ($ millions)
Program Total Expenditures (Main Estimates) 2012–2013 Planned Spending Total Authorities (available for use) 2012–2013 Actual Spending (authorities used) Alignment to Government of Canada Outcomes
2012–2013 2013–2014 2014–2015 2012–2013 2011–2012 2010–2011
Research Facilitation and Communication 1.0 1.0 2.1 2.1 1.1 1.0 1.0 0.8 A clean and healthy environment
Sub-Total 1.0 1.0 2.1 2.1 1.1 1.0 1.0 0.8  
Internal Services ($ millions)
  Total Expenditures (Main Estimates) 2012–2013 Planned Spending Total Authorities (available for use) 2012–2013 Actual Spending (authorities used)
2012–2013 2013–2014 2014–2015 2012–2013 2011–2012 2010–2011
Sub-Total 0.2 0.2 0.5 0.5 0.2 0.3 0.3 0.2
Total Canadian Polar Commission Performance Summary ($ millions)
Canadian Polar Commission Total Expenditures (Main Estimates) 2012–2013 Planned Spending Total Authorities (available for use) 2012–2013 Actual Spending (authorities used)
2012–2013 2013–2014 2014–2015 2012–2013 2011–2012 2010–2011
Sub-Total 1.3 1.3 2.6 2.6 1.4 1.3 1.3 1.0

Expenditure Profile

2012–2013 Actual Spending by Strategic Outcome

The actual spending of $8.1 billion by the Department in fiscal 2012–2013 is captured by five strategic outcomes ($7.8 billion covering 16 programs), with the remaining $0.3 billion spent on the Internal Services program which supports all of the strategic outcomes. It should be noted that The People strategic outcome takes up the largest portion of the funding ($4.1 billion or 50%) and includes the two largest programs, Education and Social Development, each with funding of $1.7 billion. The Government strategic outcome accounts for a further 24% (or $1.9 billion) while The Land and Economy strategic outcome accounts for another 17% (or $1.4 billion). The remaining funding of $0.4 billion is allocated to The North, and the Office of the Federal Interlocutor strategic outcomes.

2012-2013 Actual Spending
View text version of this image

The pie graph breaks down the departmental 2012-2013 actual spending total of $8,139 million by strategic outcome and or Program as follows:

Strategic Outcome: The Government
The Program Governance and Institutions of Government: $484 million
The Program Co-operative Relationships: $718 million
The Program Treaty Management: $718 million

Strategic Outcome: The People
The Program Education: $1,735 million
The Program Social Development: $1,710 million
The Program Managing Individual Affairs: $37 million
The Program Residential Schools Resolution: $593 million

Strategic Outcome: The Land and Economy
The Program Aboriginal Economic Development: $238 million
The Program Federal Administration of Reserve Land: $112 million
The Program Community Infrastructure: $1,073 million

Strategic Outcome: The North: $326 million

Strategic Outcome: Office of the Federal Interlocutor: $75 million

The Program Internal Services: $319 million

Departmental Spending Trend

The actual spending for AANDC in fiscal 2012–2013 was $8.1 billion and has decreased slightly (by $0.1 billion) compared with fiscal results from 2010–2011. This primarily reflects the sunset of targeted funding provided through Canada's Economic Action Plan 2012 for First Nation housing and infrastructure as well as arctic research infrastructure (–$0.3 billion). It is partially offset by incremental funding (+$0.2 billion) to meet the demand for ongoing First Nation and Inuit programs and services (2% allowance for inflation and population growth).

Planned spending for the period from 2012–2013 to 2015–2016 diminishes in great part because of reductions related to the sunset of targeted funding. This includes:

  • implementation of the Indian Residential Schools Settlement Agreement;
  • Federal Contaminated Sites Action Plan;
  • investments provided in Canada's Economic Action Plan 2012 to improve First Nations education and water infrastructure.

Spending decreases also reflect changes in the approved funding profile for:

  • the negotiation, settlement and implementation of specific and comprehensive claims;
  • the implementation of the savings identified as part of Canada's Economic Action Plan 2012;
  • a better alignment of the on-reserve Income Assistance Program with similar social assistance systems in provinces where those who can work are encouraged to access the training they require to participate in the labour market.
Expenditure Trend
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The line graph depicts the Actual and Planned spending trends as follows:
2010-2011: $8.2 Billion (Actual Spending)
2011-2012: $7.9 Billion (Actual Spending)
2012-2013: $8.1 Billion (Actual Spending)
2013-2014: $8.0 Billion (Planned Spending)
2014-2015: $6.9 Billion (Planned Spending)
2015-2016: $6.8 Billion (Planned Spending)

Fiscal Cycle

Variances between Main Estimates, Planned Spending (as per the Report on Plans and Priorities) and Actual Expenditures are largely attributable to the timing of key elements in the fiscal cycle. The Main Estimates is the first step in the fiscal cycle. Additional funding for initiatives that were not ready in time to be included in the Main Estimates is provided through Supplementary Estimates. It should be noted that over the past three years (2010–2011 through 2012–2013), significant funding has been accessed through Supplementary Estimates beyond what was identified in the Main Estimates or Report on Plans and Priorities (primarily related to Budget announcements, claims settlements, obligations stemming from the Indian Residential Schools Settlement Agreement and on-reserve costs incurred by provincial/ territorial or other emergency management organizations as required under the Emergency Management Assistance Program).

Fiscal Cycle
View text version of this image

The bar graph depicts the fiscal cycle showing the variances between the Main Estimates, Total Authorities, Planned Spending and Actual Spending as follows:

2010-2011
Main Estimates: $7.3 Billion
Planned Spending: $7.3 Billion
Total Authorities: $8.5 Billion
Actual Spending: $8.2 Billion

2011-2012
Main Estimates: $7.4 Billion
Planned Spending: $7.4 Billion
Total Authorities: $8.1 Billion
Actual Spending: $7.9 Billion

2012-2013
Main Estimates: $7.8 Billion
Planned Spending: $7.8 Billion
Total Authorities: $8.6 Billion
Actual Spending: $8.1 Billion

Estimates by Vote

For information on Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Canada's organizational Votes and/or statutory expenditures, please see the Public Accounts of Canada 2013 (Volume II).

Contribution to the Federal Sustainable Development Strategy

The Federal Sustainable Development Strategy (FSDS) outlines the Government of Canada's commitment to improving the transparency of environmental decision-making by articulating its key strategic environmental goals and targets.

AANDC ensures that consideration of these outcomes is an integral part of its decision-making processes. AANDC contributes to the following FSDS 2010–2013 themes as denoted by the visual identifier(s) and associated programs below.

Theme I: Addressing Climate Change and Air Quality Theme I: Addressing Climate Change and Air Quality

3.3 Community Infrastructure
4.1 Northern Governance and People
4.2 Northern Science and Technology

Theme II: Maintaining Water Quality and Availability Theme II: Maintaining Water Quality and Availability

3.3 Community Infrastructure
4.2 Northern Science and Technology

Theme IV: Shrinking the Environmental Footprint — Beginning with Government Theme IV: Shrinking the Environmental Footprint — Beginning with Government

6.1 Internal Services

During 2012–2013, AANDC considered the environmental effects of initiatives subject to the Cabinet Directive on the Environmental Assessment of Policy, Plan and Program Proposals. Through the strategic environmental assessment (SEA) process, these departmental initiatives were found to have no environmental effects on the 2010–2013 FSDS goals and targets.

For additional details on AANDC activities that support sustainable development, please see Section II of the Departmental Performance Report and the Departmental Sustainable Development Strategy. For complete details on the FSDS, please visit the Environment Canada's website.

 Table of Contents


Section II: Analysis of Programs and Sub-Programs by Strategic Outcome

Strategic Outcome 1: The Government

Good governance and co-operative relationships for First Nations, Inuit and Northerners

The program descriptions in this report are those used in the 2012–2013 Report on Plans and Priorities (RPP). As part of the annual review of Departmental program structures and descriptions, some program titles and descriptions have been revised. New terminology will be used in the 2014–2015 RPP and the 2014–2015 Departmental Performance Report.

Program 1.1: Governance and Institutions of Government

Description

This program provides frameworks (legislative and non-legislative) which are consistent with the legal, collective, human, and democratic rights and freedoms of Aboriginal peoples in Canada, and where possible, enables and supports First Nation development of policies and programs that embrace these values. It provides funds, legislation and guidelines, certifications, education and training, advice, policies and plans, and implemented changes to support, condition and build capacity for Aboriginal governance. Typical activities include, but are not limited to, providing assistance to establish governance and associated capacities, processes and mechanisms (such as by-law making authority, election processes). Support is provided to First Nation and Inuit governments as well as First Nation institutions. These institutions include, but are not limited to, those that provide services in the areas of governance and taxation and financial management, and land claim organizations and professional associations. Support is also provided to representative organizations to participate in policy and legislation development. Ultimately, good governance practices are essential for the active participation of First Nation and Inuit in Canadian society and economy.

2012–2013 Financial Resources ($ millions) 2012–2013 Human Resources (FTEs)
Total Expenditures (Main Estimates) Planned Spending Total Authorities (available for use) Actual Spending (authorities used) Difference (Planned vs. Actual Spending) Planned Actual Difference
The difference between Planned Spending and Total Authorities primarily reflects additional resources re-allocated during the 2012–2013 fiscal year for Indian government support activities, consultation and the basic organizational capacity of Aboriginal organizations, as well as the realignment of program-specific support funding from the Internal Services Program to more appropriately reflect the cost associated with delivering programs and services and achieving results in the Governance and Institutions of Government Program.

FTE variance is the result of the implementation of the Canada's Economic Action Plan 2012.

466.0 466.0 486.6 484.4 (18.4) 494.4 462.3 32.1
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Capable and accountable First Nation governments and institutions Percentage of First Nations operating with a plan to develop governance capacity 50% by March 31, 2013 53% of First Nations are operating with a plan to develop governance capacity
Percentage of First Nations free of financial intervention as defined by the Department's Default Prevention Management Policy 70% by March 31, 2013 76% of First Nations are free of financial intervention as defined by the Department's Default Prevention and Management Policy
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

Bill C-27, First Nations Financial Transparency Act, which will help to enhance the financial transparency and accountability of First Nations governments, received Royal Assent on March 27, 2013.

Bill S-6, the First Nations Elections Act, was passed by the Senate, and received First Reading in the House of Commons on May 4, 2012. Among the many improvements the Bill will bring to First Nations elections, providing longer terms of office will support stability in First Nations governments.

The Department continues its analysis of the findings of the Exploratory ProcessFootnote 2 on Indian Registration, Band Membership and Citizenship. Over 100 reports were submitted by participating First Nations and Métis organizations and will be used to inform possible next steps on these matters.

Sub-Program 1.1.1: First Nation Governments

Description

This sub-program contributes to basic functions of First Nations governments. Funds are provided through contributions to facilitate the exercise of core functions of government such as law-making, financial management and administration, and executive leadership. Capable governments attract investment, create opportunities, and effectively support their citizens.

2012–2013 Financial Resources ($ millions) 2012–2013 Human Resources (FTEs)
Planned Spending Actual Spending Difference Planned Actual Difference
AANDC is reviewing its current methodology for assigning FTE and associated salary costs to the sub-program level to ensure greater accuracy in future year.
440.5 417.5 23.0 492.1 460.0 32.1
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
*This performance indicator is used more than once in the Performance Measurement Framework because First Nations scoring "Low Risk" on the Governance section of the General Assessment have a stable First Nations government which demonstrates an increase in government capacity.
Stable First Nation governments Percentage of First Nations scoring "Low Risk" on the Governance section of the General Assessment* 50% by March 31, 2013 76% of First Nations scored "Low Risk" on the Governance section of the General Assessment.
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

Investments in governance capacity programming, based on community capacity development plans, is being achieved through the Professional and Institutional Development Program, which provides strategic and targeted funding for the development and implementation of capacity development plans (i.e., Management Action Plans, Strategic Plan).

The Department continues to explore options for a consolidated approach to capacity development by streamlining and consolidating capacity development programs to support First Nations to obtain, strengthen and maintain their capabilities.

While AANDC continues to assist with various governance related legislative initiatives it will meet its obligations under the Indian Act concerning elections and law-making until Royal Assent is received on these initiatives.

Sub-Program 1.1.2: Institutions and Organizations

Description

This sub-program supports a wide range of institutions and organizations at the local, regional and national levels dedicated to the development and support of Aboriginal governments. Funds are provided through contributions to organizations and institutions with demonstrated expertise in service delivery and professional development. Delivery of governance related programs and services, and support to First Nations governments in the exercise of their responsibilities, form the basis for these activities. Capacity development of individuals, systems, governments and organizations recognizes and responds to differentiated levels of community/organizational development. Capacity development will target gaps identified through assessments with a view to facilitating movement along a development continuum. Organizational core funding is provided to national, regional and local bodies to participate in a wide range of policy fora and represent their respective constituent groups. Capable, accountable institutions and organizations strengthen the fabric of Aboriginal governments across Canada, attract investment and support Aboriginal participation in the Canadian economy.

2012–2013 Financial Resources ($ millions) 2012–2013 Human Resources (FTEs)
Planned Spending Actual Spending Difference Planned Actual Difference
The variances attributed to the higher level category of Planned Spending for Indian Government Support activities, such as Tribal Council Funding and Band Advisory Services is due to the actual expenditures captured within the subordinate Sub-Program 1.1.2: Institutions and Organizations. In this instance, the variances are as a result of a change in the level of reporting, not in a difference of planned versus actual spending for the intended purposes. The balance of the variance is as a result of reallocation of resources for Policy Engagement.
25.5 66.9 (41.4) 2.3 2.3 0.0
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Increased governance capacity Percentage of First Nations scoring "Low Risk" on the Governance section of the General Assessment 50% by March 31, 2013 76% of First Nations scored "Low Risk" on the Governance section of the General Assessment
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

To support Aboriginal governments in the delivery of programs and services to their constituents, Canada continued to provide core operational funding to a number of national Aboriginal organizations: the First Nations Tax Commission, the First Nations Financial Management Board, the First Nations Finance Authority, and the Aboriginal Financial Officers Association of Canada. In 2012–2013, these organizations continued to promote capacity development in First Nations governments and Aboriginal groups, and provide demonstrated technical expertise in the areas of financial management, taxation and public administration. Funding was also provided to the First Nations Statistical InstituteFootnote 3.

The Department continues to explore options to address the issues raised during the Legislative Review of the First Nations Fiscal and Statistical Management Act.

Program 1.2: Co-operative Relationships

Description

This program aims to reconcile the relationship between parties (governments and Aboriginal groups) through mutual respect, trust, understanding, shared responsibilities, accountability and dialogue. This program addresses constitutional and historic obligations, as well as good public policy by: negotiating agreements which achieve clarity with respect to law-making authority and the ownership, use and control of lands and resources; addressing specific claims; developing multi-partner processes in areas jointly identified by Aboriginal groups and the federal government; supporting an effective consultation and representation of Aboriginal groups in federal policy and program development; and providing funding to Aboriginal recipients through contributions and loan agreements. Through relationships built on trust, respectful partnerships will be established which may ultimately help to contribute to the strengthening of the social, economic and cultural well-being of Aboriginal communities and ultimately more active participation and engagement in the broader Canadian society.

2012–2013 Financial Resources ($ millions) 2012–2013 Human Resources (FTEs)
Total Expenditures (Main Estimates) Planned Spending Total Authorities (available for use) Actual Spending (authorities used) Difference (Planned vs. Actual Spending) Planned Actual Difference
The difference between Planned Spending and Total Authorities primarily reflects incremental funding provided through Supplementary Estimates for the settlement of specific claims.

The difference between Total Authorities and Actual Spending primarily reflects the deferral of certain specific claims for which negotiations were not concluded during the fiscal year; this deferred funding that was not required in 2012–2013 has been reprofiled to 2013–2014 when it will be available for the intended purpose. In addition, the difference reflects reduced requirements for Treaty Related Measures and loans for First Nations involved in claims negotiations.

FTE variance is the result of the implementation of the Canada's Economic Action Plan 2012, as well as adjustments related to supporting the Indian Oil and Gas Canada Modernization activities.

Figures include Budgetary and Non-Budgetary amounts (e.g. loans).

795.6 795.6 933.0 718.0 77.6 409.6 368.9 40.7
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Relationships between parties based on trust, respect, understanding, shared responsibilities, accountability, rights and dialogue Percentage of productive active negotiation tables 90% of active tables by March 31, 2013 As a result of Canada's result based approach to treaty and Self-government Negotiations ("The New Approach") announced by the Minister in September 2012, the annual process to assess the productivity of the negotiation tables was delayed to ensure it met the requirements under "The New Approach". Consequently, reporting on the percentage of productive negotiation tables has also been delayed until completion of the annual process.
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

Canada continues to promote section 35 rights in the Constitution Act, 1982 (section 35) through the negotiation and implementation of land claims and self-government agreements. The benefit of land claims agreements is greater legal certainty with respect to the use and ownership of land and resources and the reduction of barriers that impede development, which is in the interest of all Canadians. It provides Aboriginal groups with opportunities to improve accountability and governance in key areas such as education, allowing for meaningful changes in their communities to improve the quality of life for Aboriginal people.

The average length of time to negotiate an agreement is approximately 15 years, with some negotiations taking up to 30 years. Lengthy negotiations are costly for all parties and can create financial liabilities for Aboriginal groups as well as postpone opportunities for economic growth and self-sufficiency. If a timely agreement is not possible, other options should be in place to help address the aspirations of Aboriginal communities.

In addition, in September 2012, the Minister announced plans for AANDC to work with its partners on a new approach to treaty and self-government negotiations. Canada engaged with Aboriginal groups and provincial and territorial partners on the best way to achieve timely results at negotiating tables and ensure that resources are being used effectively to promote certainty, self-sufficiency and expeditious resolution. Discussions were also held at the national level with key Aboriginal organizations, such as the Assembly of First Nations, as part of ongoing joint work on these issues. The input from these meetings will help inform decision making with respect to Canada's participation at individual tables to achieve faster results.

To respond to calls for change, the Government of Canada is working with its partners to accelerate comprehensive land claims negotiations. A meeting between the Prime Minister and the Assembly of First Nations was held on January 11, 2013. The agreed items for the meeting focused on the implementation of the treaty relationship and economic development. As a result of this meeting, the Prime Minister agreed to high-level dialogue on the treaty relationship and comprehensive claims, with the need to provide enhanced oversight from the Prime Minister's Office and the Privy Council Office on Aboriginal matters.

A Senior Oversight Committee was also established after the Prime Minister's January 11th meeting with First Nation leaders, to oversee progress on the broader policy work on these claims and to provide advice to the government for a renewed comprehensive claims policy.

Work is underway with the Assembly of First Nations to explore ways to reinvigorate and enhance the treaty relationship, updating and reforming the policy, including developing recommendations.

2012–2013 Additional Highlights:

  • Access to the Aboriginal and Treaty Rights Information System (ATRIS) v.1 successfully provided to all federal departments and agencies, including several Port Authorities.
  • Full implementation of the Consultation Information Service (CIS) through the successful use of the departmental correspondence management system ensuring quality and rigor regarding the preparation of CIS responses to external stakeholders.
  • Advanced training on consultation and accommodation provided to close to 270 federal officials. Operational guidance pieces were also developed for officials and strategic advice provided on major projects and other key governments activities and priorities.
  • Continued to staff Regional Consultation Coordinator positions to strengthen regional cooperation, including the development and implementation of cooperative arrangements with provinces/territories and Aboriginal groups. Signed Memoranda of Understanding with Nova Scotia and two protocols with Mi'gmaq of Québec (Gaspé Region) and Mi'kmaq of Prince Edward Island. Memoranda of Understanding with some additional jurisdictions are near completion. Progress was made towards additional protocols.
  • After concluding two rounds of engagement in 2011 and 2012 on transparent formula approaches for fiscal arrangements with Aboriginal governments, officials have continued policy development and assessment of implementation issues, in particular, seeking approaches that can be reconciled with existing agreements. Canada continues to maintain and foster positive relationships with Aboriginal partners through ongoing implementation of comprehensive land claims and self-government agreements as well as providing timely payments as required by the agreements.
  • Continued the ongoing Treaty Negotiations Process Revitalization work with the Province of British Columbia and the First Nations Summit.
  • Implemented new recognition and reconciliation language at the Ktunaxa Kinbasket Treaty Council table. Draft guidelines have been developed for recognition and reconciliation purposes and are proceeding to Federal Steering Committee (FSC) this summer for approval.

Sub-Program 1.2.1: Negotiations of Claims and Self-Government

Description

Canada is committed to the negotiation of claims and self-government agreements as the best means for reconciling pre-existing Aboriginal rights with Crown sovereignty. With the participation of provincial and territorial governments and in accordance with federal policies and Cabinet mandates, Canada negotiates comprehensive treaties, sectoral agreements and stand-alone self-government agreements that provide First Nations with a solid foundation for self-determination and for the improvement of social, cultural and economic conditions within their communities. All Canadians benefit.

2012–2013 Financial Resources ($ millions) 2012–2013 Human Resources (FTEs)
Planned Spending Actual Spending Difference Planned Actual Difference
Figures include Budgetary and Non-Budgetary amounts (e.g. loans).
173.4 123.9 49.5 262.9 244.1 18.8
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Certainty and clarity with respect to law-making authority and the ownership, use and control of land and resources Percentage of objectives reached as identified in the action plans 75% by March 31, 2013 Negotiations Central: 87%

Negotiations West: 82%

Negotiations East: 86%

For a combined average of: 85%

Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

In seeking to improve Aboriginal-Crown relations and provide Aboriginal groups with the opportunity to make meaningful changes in their communities, Canada continues to promote section 35, Constitution Act, 1982, rights through the negotiation and implementation of land claims and self-government agreements. The benefit is greater legal certainty with respect to the use and ownership of land and resources, which serves to remove barriers to development in the interest of all Canadians.

2012–2013 Negotiation Highlights:

  • Three consultation protocols were finalized in the Atlantic Region.
  • Signing of Consultation Agreements with the Mi'kmaq of Prince Edward Island and Mi'gmaq of Québec (Gaspé Region); Framework Agreement with the Mi'gmaq of Québec (Gaspé Region); and a National Parks interim arrangement with the Mi'kmaq of Nova Scotia.
  • Approval of the Innu of Labrador Final Agreement negotiation mandate (May 2012).
  • Signing of a draft Final Self-Government Agreement and financing agreement with the Deline (September 2012)
  • Signing of the List of jurisdictions, authorities and other subject matters to be negotiated in the Cree Nation Governance Negotiations (September 14, 2012)
  • Initialling of the Kitselas and Kitsumkalum Agreements-in-Principle (AIP) on January 22, 2013. The Kitselas community approved their AIP on February 20, 2013.
  • Initialling of the Tla-o-qui-aht Agreement-in-Principle on October 1, 2012; the Tla-o-qui-aht community subsequently voted against it.
  • Ratification of the Tla'amin (Sliammon) Final Agreement by the First Nation (July 10, 2012) and British Columbia (March 14, 2013); the next step is federal ratification and authority to sign.

In the past number of years, Canada has reached Final Agreements with a number of communities, the next step of which is ratification by the parties. It was observed that certain ratifications have failed to receive the support of the Aboriginal communities while others have been very successful. The Department undertook a project to analyze specific self-government ratification processes between the Crown and Aboriginal communities. The objective of the exercise was to better understand the factors that contribute to a successful and/or unsuccessful process and offer recommendations regarding improvements and best practices to support future ratifications.

In the past year, the British Columbia treaty process saw the Tla-o-qui-aht First Nations formally vote against an initialled agreement-in-principle and the 'Namgis First Nation informally demonstrated a lack of support for an uninitialled AIP. Canada appreciates the challenges that First Nations face explaining the contents of an agreement that is still under negotiation and with an incomplete range of benefits to their communities. The Department will explore, with its negotiating partners and with the British Columbia Treaty Commission, the potential for assisting First Nations with their community outreach efforts at the AIP stage of treaty negotiations. The report from the Department's recently completed "ratification best practice project" should prove a valuable resource in that regard.

Sub-Program 1.2.2: Specific Claims

Description

This sub-program contributes to the Co-operative Relationships Program. Specific Claims relate to the fulfillment of outstanding treaty and government obligations towards the First Nations relating to the administration of Indian reserve lands, band funds and other assets. The government made the resolution of specific claims a priority when it announced the Specific Claims Action Plan in 2007, and reiterated their commitment to resolve claims in the 2010 Speech from the Throne. Key activities include the assessment of the historical and legal facts of the claim, the negotiation of a settlement agreement if it has been determined that there is an outstanding lawful obligation, and transfer of compensation money to the First Nation, via grants, pursuant to the settlement agreement. Addressing and resolving specific claims more quickly helps build relationships and provide justice to First Nation claimants and certainty for all Canadians.

2012–2013 Financial Resources ($ millions) 2012–2013 Human Resources (FTEs)
Planned Spending Actual Spending Difference Planned Actual Difference
Figures include Budgetary and Non-Budgetary amounts (e.g. loans).
609.2 588.1 21.1 97.0 88.7 8.3
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Canada fulfils its long-standing obligations to First Nations arising out of treaties, and the administration of lands, band funds and other assets Meet or exceed the number of specific claims addressed, including number of decisions rendered (acceptance or non-acceptance for negotiation) on specific claims submitted to the department, and number of settlements reached through negotiation Baseline 2010–2011: 133 by March 31, 2013 In 2012–2013, 117 specific claims were addressed
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

In 2012–2013 the Specific Claims Action Plan moved into a critical new phase focussed on concluding negotiated settlements and preventing the recurrence of a backlog. Supplementary resources — fiscal and human — allocated by Parliament to support the implementation of the Action Plan were re-aligned to meet these new priorities. All claims are assessed within the established three-year operational time frame and internal measures have been implemented to accelerate the negotiated settlement of claims.

In November 2012, an audit of departmental support for the specific claims process found that there is generally effective governance of the process and strategic direction and that objectives align to government priorities and responsibilities.

In February 2013, a summative evaluation of the Specific Claims Action Plan was completed. The evaluation concluded that the Action Plan has yielded many achievements including: the establishment of the Specific Claims Tribunal, the clearing of the backlog of claims in the assessment stage of the process; and a significant increase in the number of claims in negotiation. The evaluation also determined that: significant numbers of claims are concluded without finality and could proceed to the Tribunal; the use of mediation services remains limited; First Nations and First Nation organizations are not acknowledging improvements to the process; and current levels of funding may be insufficient to meet compensation demands.

To correct some of these issues, the Joint Steering Committee on Litigation Issues Management has been identified as a senior level oversight body. A review of all information systems was completed and no changes are contemplated. Changes to business rules have been implemented at the corporate level to align record keeping practices. Negotiators are trained in the use of mediation services, facilitated by the Mediation Services Unit, and First Nations are made aware of the availability of services. The Specific Claims Settlement Fund is closely monitored by AANDC, the Department of Finance and Treasury Board to ensure sufficient funding is available to allow Canada to meet its obligations.

Going forward, a specific claims risk assessment framework, including an assessment of the risk of claims being referred to the Tribunal and/or recurring as "resubmissions", will be developed and integrated into the corporate risk assessment framework. This framework will contribute to improving practices by identifying obstacles to the achievement of finality in the resolution of specific claim and by identifying means to mitigate and overcome those obstacles. The final resolution of specific claims results in justice for First Nations and certainty for all Canadians.

Sub-Program 1.2.3: Inuit Relations

Description

The Canadian Government has committed to increase the understanding of Inuit interests, to resolve issues of common concern, and to work co-operatively with relevant provincial and territorial governments, and national and regional Inuit organizations, to improve the socio-economic and environmental well-being of Inuit. This sub-program consists of strengthening relations with Inuit by working with Inuit organizations and governments, and with federal government departments and agencies to bring greater coherency, relevance, and effectiveness to federal policies and programs as they affect Inuit. This is done through the Inuit Relations Secretariat which raises awareness of the distinct interests and needs of Canada's Inuit with federal government departments and agencies, and provincial and territorial governments. It coordinates, partners, and conducts research and serves as a repository for current Inuit research, to build federal knowledge and in-house expertise on Inuit issues, and to provide evidence-based advice on Inuit needs and priorities in federal policy and program development and authorities' renewal.

2012–2013 Financial Resources ($ millions) 2012–2013 Human Resources (FTEs)
Planned Spending Actual Spending Difference Planned Actual Difference
Due to rounding, difference does not reflect figures shown.
2.9 1.8 1.2 12.8 10.7 2.1
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
*Targets have been modified from the 2012–2013 Performance Measurement Framework of record to correct a typo.
Federal/Provincial/Territorial/ Inuit partnerships to inform AANDC and federal policy Number of formal multi-partner processes in areas jointly identified by Inuit people and the federal government 7 by March 31, 2013* 7
Inuit capacity development is supported Number of organizations funded under Basic Organizational Capacity are able to provide effective policy support on initiatives 8 by March 31, 2013* 8
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

The Inuit Relations Secretariat became the Inuit Relations Directorate on September 4, 2012, as a result of Canada's Economic Action Plan. The Inuit Relations Directorate (IRD) is now housed under the Aboriginal External Relations Branch in the Policy and Strategic Direction Sector. Its focus has shifted slightly, with a greater emphasis on policy and research.

With the new focus for the IRD, work plans have been adapted in order to meet overall objectives set at the outset of the fiscal year. Work continued smoothly and our partners were well informed of the organizational changes.

The work on the "Pangnirtung: Making Connections for Youth" continued where a single, streamlined 2013–2015 Government of Canada/Hamlet of Pangnirtung funding arrangement was established for federal youth programming.

The Nanilavut (Inuit Graves: Finding Lost Loved Ones) joint work was advanced. Work was finalized for the Nunatsiavut Housing Needs Assessment. "UNIKKAUSIVUT: Sharing our Stories" was launched and distributed in collaboration with the National Film Board (NFB) in order to make the NFB's Inuit related films more accessible to Canadians. Inuit Relations developed an Inuit 101 presentation and delivered it to federal employees on a demand basis, and staff worked with Nunavut Sivuniksavut to deliver 3 annual Inuit Awareness Workshops for federal employees.

Sub-Program 1.2.4: Consultation and Engagement

Description

This sub-program provides technical, process and financial support to internal and external stakeholders to maintain co-operative relationships with Aboriginal representatives. This support could take several forms, such as advice on how to engage community members in the development of a community plan, contributions to a representative organization for core operations (administration, elections, finance), contribution for engaging with the Department at the technical level on the development of a specific policy or legislation; engagement with Aboriginal representatives or assistance to federal departments and agencies in fulfilling the Crown's duty to consult.

2012–2013 Financial Resources ($ millions) 2012–2013 Human Resources (FTEs)
Planned Spending Actual Spending Difference Planned Actual Difference
10.1 4.2 5.9 36.9 25.5 11.4
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
*Indicator has been modified from the 2012–2013 Performance Measurement Framework as support/advice is a more measurable indicator than integrated consultation. The performance indicator was also changed (from a percentage to a number) to align with the targets and actual results. The target has also been established.
Assistance provided in fulfilling the Crown's legal duty to consult and, where appropriate, accommodate Number of times support was given to federal officials who are fulfilling the legal duty* Establish a target by March 31, 2012 (Date to achieve target March 31, 2013)

7,000 projects/initiatives/activities where advice given and the department supported fulfillment of Crown's duty*

Over 10,500 projects/initiatives/activities where advice and information given and the department supported fulfillment of the Crown's duty
Engagement with stakeholders influences the development of policies and programs The degree to which recipient input and advice is being used to shape departmental policies and programs Establish target by March 31, 2013 (Date to achieve target March 31, 2014) No specific results to be reported
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

The Department assisted the Crown in fulfilling the duty to consult by providing information, advice and guidance to departments and agencies through a wide range of activities, such as: answers to information requests to the Consultation Information Service; use of the Aboriginal and Treaty Rights Information System by federal officials; delivery of training sessions; guidance provided by Regional Consultation Coordinators; and file-specific advice on major projects and other government activities and priorities.

Furthermore, through the Consultation and Policy Development Program, the Department works in partnership with many Aboriginal Representative Organizations across the country on a wide variety of issues. Work in 2012–2013 was carried out in many areas including First Nation and Inuit education, additions to reserves, First Nation elections and with the Inuit Circumpolar Council on natural resource development in the Arctic.

Program 1.3: Treaty Management

Description

This program aims to create and maintain ongoing partnerships to support both historic and modern-treaties to fulfill Canada's legal obligations. This program supports First Nation and Inuit communities in articulating their interests, participating in land and resource development and management, where applicable, and demonstrating the importance of treaties and the treaty relationship between the Crown and Aboriginal people. This is achieved by honouring Canada's obligations as set out in final agreements, improving relationships between Canada and Aboriginal peoples, and improving the relationships between Canada and Historic Treaties First Nations. Creating and maintaining partnerships that honour historic and modern treaties contributes to the strengthened, healthy and sustainable First Nation and Inuit communities and ultimately supports them to optimize their participation in the broader Canadian society, thus benefitting all Canadians.

2012–2013 Financial Resources ($ millions) 2012–2013 Human Resources (FTEs)
Total Expenditures (Main Estimates) Planned Spending Total Authorities (available for use) Actual Spending (authorities used) Difference (Planned vs. Actual Spending) Planned Actual Difference
Due to rounding, difference does not reflect figures shown.

The difference between Planned Spending and Total Authorities primarily reflects incremental funding provided through Supplementary Estimates for: construction and renovation of schools for Mi'kmaw Kina'matnewey in Nova Scotia; increased pressures for volume driven development activities, such as public hearings and environmental impact reviews, required for public government institutions created under comprehensive land claim agreements; renewal and the implementation of Self-Government Financial Transfer Agreements with Yukon First Nations; and, self-government costs of the Nunatsiavut Government.

The difference between Total Authorities and Actual Spending primarily reflects the deferral of funding for special claims; this deferred funding that was not required in 2012–2013 has been reprofiled to 2013–2014 when it will be available for the intended purpose.

FTE variance is the result of the implementation of the Canada's Economic Action Plan 2012.

696.6 696.6 719.0 717.8 (21.3) 89.0 76.4 12.6
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Creation and maintenance of ongoing partnerships to support historic and modern treaty structures Percentage of initiatives or structures established to support historic and modern-day treaty relationship 75% by March 31, 2013 Modern Treaties:
91% up to date for ongoing obligations
83% completed for one-time obligations

Historic Treaties:
100% of historical treaty structures in place (i.e., treaty Tables and Commissions)

Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

The Treaty Commissions in Manitoba and Saskatchewan were established by the Department in partnership with representative Aboriginal organizations (Association of Manitoba Chiefs and Federation of Saskatchewan Indian Nations), acting as a neutral third party that coordinates research on treaty issues and engages in public information and awareness programming to advance understanding among all Canadians on treaty issues. The success of both existing Treaty Commissions has increased interest from Aboriginal groups in other areas with historical treaties (pre-1975).

Treaty Tables were also established with Treaty 6 and 8 (in Alberta), with First Nations in Saskatchewan and with Nishnawbe Aski Nation in Ontario; these tables provide an opportunity to jointly discuss historic treaty issues and find common understanding, conduct research and public education.

As part of the new approach to treaty and self-government negotiations announced in September 2012, an evaluation of all treaty tables was conducted. Decisions from the Minister on the future of treaty tables will be communicated with groups when the review process is complete.

The January 11th meeting between the Prime Minister and First Nations leaders led to an agreement for high level dialogue on the treaty relationship, with enhanced oversight from the Prime Minister's Office and the Privy Council Office on Aboriginal matters. A Senior Oversight Committee on Historic Treaties has been established by Canada and the Assembly of First Nations.

In terms of modern treaties, goals and priorities established in the first quarter of 2012–2013 have been achieved. Implementation committees met regularly, as have regional caucuses. Developing and maintaining positive relationships and partnerships has helped to determine goals and the implementation of the agreements that support collaboration among federal government departments and agencies. Three annual reports (Labrador Inuit Land Claims Agreement Annual Report, Nisga'a Final Agreement Annual Report and Tsawwassen First Nation Final Agreement Annual Report) were tabled in Parliament. The Implementation Branch developed Annual Report Guidelines which will help to ensure reports are smaller and focused on the activities and goals established by the implementation committees.

AANDC's role in coordinating the federal government implementation of these Agreements has continued throughout the year. The Treaty Obligation Monitoring System continues to be discussed with federal departments and agencies, with final rollout anticipated in 2013–2014. Efforts to continue training other government departments and agencies in the area of CLCA.net are ongoing and successful.

Goals set out in the Implementation Management Framework have also been successful. The Federal Steering Committee on Self-Government and Comprehensive Claims has approved related Implementation Branch negotiation mandates, as well as the Annual Report Guidelines. Additionally, two Fiscal Financial Agreements (FFA) were renewed during the year and two other expiring FFA's were extended, with the signatories continuing their efforts to negotiate new fiscal arrangements.

Sub-Program 1.3.1: Implementation of Modern-treaty Obligations

Description

The fulfillment of modern treaty obligations is a priority. The successful implementation of modern treaty obligations builds on the certainty created by negotiating and settling agreements. These treaties outline one-time and ongoing obligations including the establishment of land and water management boards, Aboriginal government structures (education, child care, etc.) and implementation committees. These committees are supported by AANDC and play a vital role in managing the treaty relationships by supporting and promoting resource development and the delivery of programs and services. They are essential to the health and well-being of Aboriginal communities and promoting capital infrastructure investments and private/public Aboriginal partnerships. Funding for implementation of Comprehensive Land Claim Agreements is provided through a grant authority to cover one-time statutory payments, and a grant authority to support implementation activities required by negotiated final agreements.

2012–2013 Financial Resources ($ millions) 2012–2013 Human Resources (FTEs)
Planned Spending Actual Spending Difference Planned Actual Difference
Due to rounding, difference does not reflect figures shown.
405.4 409.9 (4.6) 67.3 60.5 6.8
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Canada honors all of its obligations as set out in final agreements Percentage of federal obligations implemented as per the agreements 75% of initiatives or structures established and 75% completed on one-time obligations by March 31, 2013 83% one-time obligations met
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

Goals and priorities established in the first quarter of 2012–2013 have been achieved. Implementation committees met regularly, as have regional caucuses. Developing and maintaining positive relationships and partnerships has helped in the development of goals and the implementation of the agreements that support collaboration among federal government departments and agencies. AANDC continues its efforts to ensure tools and resources are available to federal implementersFootnote 4. The Annual Report Guidelines were approved by the Federal Steering Committee, and training has continued for the Treaty Obligation Monitoring System and CLCA.netFootnote 5. As well, the Implementation Branch provided two overall updates on implementation activities to federal caucus.

Sub-Program 1.3.2: Management of Treaty Relationships

Description

The management of treaty relationships focuses on enhancing relationships between Canada and various implementation bodies, treaties commissions and tables, or Aboriginal governments through mutual exploration of historic treaties issues. AANDC has contribution authorities to support the various implementation bodies (i.e., surface rights boards, tribunals), negotiation tables and Treaty Commissions. Grants and contributions are being transferred to representative parties that oversee the settlements.

2012–2013 Financial Resources ($ millions) 2012–2013 Human Resources (FTEs)
Planned Spending Actual Spending Difference Planned Actual Difference
290.3 307.8 (17.5) 21.7 15.9 5.8
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Improved relationships between Canada and Aboriginal entities created to support treaties Effectiveness of implementation committees and other venues for resolving/addressing issues Comparison against 2009 findings 75% renewed entities by March 31, 2014 [NOTE in the Performance Measurement Framework: The next Audit is not until 2014 so there are no new findings]
Improved relationships between Canada and Historic Treaties First Nations Increased percentage of public understanding of identified Historic Treaties discussions issues Comparison against 2009 baseline findings in Manitoba and Saskatchewan by March 31, 2014 Comparison against 2009 baseline findings in Manitoba and Saskatchewan will be conducted by March 31, 2014 derived from provincially conducted surveys
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

In 2012–2013, the funding of the Manitoba and Saskatchewan Treaty Commissions supported various awareness campaigns and educational initiatives for an increased understanding of historic treaties and the treaty relationship within the provinces of Manitoba and Saskatchewan. A quantitative analysis will be conducted in the spring of 2014.

Sub-Program 1.3.3: Management of Other Negotiated Settlements

Description

The management of other negotiated settlements focuses on those claims that did not meet the criteria set for comprehensive or specific land claims but were settled on moral grounds as opposed to strictly legal grounds and as such, created new rights, responsibilities or an ongoing relationship. AANDC uses a specially sought grant authority to manage negotiated settlement payments to the representative group/committee that oversees the settlements through contributions and or grants. AANDC is fulfilling the negotiated settlements as per the agreements with the First Nations.

2012–2013 Financial Resources ($ millions) 2012–2013 Human Resources (FTEs)
Planned Spending Actual Spending Difference Planned Actual Difference
Due to rounding, difference does not reflect figures shown.
0.9 0.0 0.8 0.0 0.0 0.0
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Effective processes for managing treaty relationships Percentage of Canada obligations fulfilled as per agreements 75% completion of one-time obligations as specified in the agreement N/A
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

N/A — There were no other negotiated settlements in 2012–2013.

There was minimal activity associated with settlement agreements. Due to rounding, minimal expenditures do not appear in the table, the remaining amount has been reprofiled to 2013–2014.

Strategic Outcome 2: The People

Individual, family and community well-being for First Nations and Inuit

The program descriptions in this report are those used in the 2012–2013 Report on Plans and Priorities (RPP). As part of the annual review of Departmental program structures and descriptions, some program titles and descriptions have been revised. New terminology will be used in the 2014–2015 RPP and the 2014–2015 Departmental Performance Report.

Program 2.1: Education

Description

The Education program aims to support First Nation and Inuit learners in the achievement of education outcomes that are comparable to other Canadians. Such achievement is a key to enhancing their participation in the labour market and their future success. AANDC has primary responsibility under the Indian Act for elementary and secondary education of students living on-reserve. As a matter of social policy, AANDC also supports eligible First Nations and Inuit students in the pursuit of post-secondary education. The focus of these programming efforts is on supporting students in relation to: academic progression in elementary and secondary education; provision of appropriate learning environments with culturally relevant education programs and services; and participation in post-secondary education and advancement in programs of study. The improvement of education outcomes and increased participation in the economy and society benefits all Canadians.

2012–2013 Financial Resources ($ millions) 2012–2013 Human Resources (FTEs)
Total Expenditures (Main Estimates) Planned Spending Total Authorities (available for use) Actual Spending (authorities used) Difference (Planned vs. Actual Spending) Planned Actual Difference
Due to rounding, difference does not reflect figures shown.

The difference between Planned Spending and Total Authorities relates primarily to the re-allocation of resources, mainly from Community Infrastructure, to meet increased demand for education programs and services. In addition, incremental funding was provided through Supplementary Estimates for the development of systems and supports to ensure readiness for First Nation education legislation and for First Nations SchoolNet Youth Initiatives.

1,705.4 1,705.4 1,735.0 1,734.8 (29.3) 279.6 276.7 2.9
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
*Reworded to reflect the National Household Survey as the correct data source.

**Sources: Statistics Canada, 2006 Censuses of Population, 2011 National Household Survey, AANDC tabulations.

First Nations and Inuit learners achieve levels of education comparable to other Canadians Percentage of First Nation students ordinarily resident on-reserve who graduated from high school* Increase of 8% over five years (from 2011–2012 to 2016–2017) Provincial comparability by 2029 Graduation rate for grade 12 (grade 11, in Quebec) was 35.39% in 2010–2011. The 2011–2012 graduation data will be available in winter 2014 as these calculations require 2012–2013 data.
First Nations and Inuit post-secondary educational attainment as measured by the percentage of First Nation and Inuit population with post-secondary certification Target for increased attainment under development awaiting 2011 National Household Survey results* Between 2006 (Census) and 2011 (NHS), for the population age 25 to 64, Registered Indian with a university certificate or degree went from 7.03% to 8.35% and Inuit went from 3.67% to 5.14%. Registered Indian with a college or other certificate below bachelor went from 20.95% to 22.06% Inuit went from 19.14% to 17.24%**
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

The academic outcomes of First Nations students ordinarily resident on-reserve require improvement to ensure an increase in graduation rates, success in post-secondary education and/or to a transition into the labour market.

To address this situation at the elementary and secondary education levels, and to build on previous reports (the final report of the National Panel on Elementary and Secondary Education, the Senate Standing Committee on Aboriginal People and the Office of the Auditor General reports), in December 2012, AANDC announced Phase 1 of consultations with First Nations on the development of a First Nation Education Act. The Department invited all First Nations to provide input on important issues of improving education outcomes, funding mechanisms and the proposed way forward for education legislation. In 2013–2014 a draft of the legislation will be shared with all First Nation communities across Canada, as well as with provincial governments and other stakeholders, for their input.

AANDC continues to explore and assess the way it proceeds to ensure priority programs produce better results for Aboriginal peoples and all Canadians. This year, the Indian Studies Support Program (ISSP) was improved by introducing a national selection process to evaluate proposals.

In 2012–2013, the Department conducted two evaluations (Summative Evaluation of the Elementary/ Secondary Education Program On-Reserve and a Summative Evaluation of the Post-secondary Education Program).

In response to those evaluations, actions will be taken based on the recommendations made. Having a First Nation Education Act in place by Fall 2014 will help to establish the structures and standards required to support strong and accountable education systems on-reserve, and improve educational outcomes for on-reserve students attending band-operated, provincial, or federally operated schools. More information is available under sub-programs 2.1.1 and 2.1.2.

Sub-Program 2.1.1: Elementary and Secondary Education

Description

The objective of this sub-program is to ensure that First Nation students have access to provincially comparable education programs and services. Through this sub-program, AANDC fulfils its responsibility for the elementary and secondary education of students living on-reserve. The sub-program supports First Nations, Band Councils, Tribal Councils or regional First Nation education organizations in providing eligible on-reserve students with education services comparable to those of the province in which the reserve is located. Funding is used for teachers' salaries, instructional services in on-reserve schools (band operated and the seven federal schools), and reimbursement of tuition costs for on-reserve students attending provincial schools. Also, it provides student support services (e.g., transportation) and helps to enhance education services (e.g., curriculum and language development, teacher recruitment and retention, community and parents' engagement in education, and Information Communications Technology capacity). It also supports schools' access to resources for learners with identified high cost special needs. Resources are provided for longer term improvements in education outcomes by focusing on school success planning, student learning and performance assessment and establishing new or advancing existing tripartite education partnerships with First Nations and provinces. In addition, Elementary/Secondary Education program also supports culturally appropriate education through the cultural education centers as well as provides support for First Nations and Inuit youth to transition to the workplace and post-secondary education.

2012–2013 Financial Resources ($ millions) 2012–2013 Human Resources (FTEs)
Planned Spending Actual Spending Difference Planned Actual Difference
AANDC is reviewing its current methodology for assigning FTEs and associated salary costs to the sub-program level to ensure greater accuracy in future years.

*This number includes approximately 126 FTEs providing instructional services in the 7 federally-operated schools.

1,376.4 1,403.1 (26.7) 277.6 275.4* 2.2
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
*Note: Reporting on data for this indicator is only required from funding recipients within the 3rd year of receiving funding. As the applicants approval are staggered over a few years, it is anticipated that trends in information will only begin to be available in 2012.

**Expenditure data includes funding for instructional services, student support services, targeted programs, the special education program, estimated band employee benefits and band support funding related to education and self-government education agreements. Expenditures also include Yukon related funding for 42 FTE students who reside and go to school in northern British Columbia. Expenditures do not include funding for headquarters and major capital.

First Nations students progress in their elementary and secondary education The percentage of students who meet or exceed standard tests for reading, writing and numeracy (and science where measured provincially) in the province of reference at the testing interval adopted by that province, referenced by gender, former early childhood education learners and province* Short Term: Target development data collection begins in September 2011

Long term: On with provincial standards

Reporting against the established baseline will begin in September 2013

Instruments to collect data on the percentage of students who met or exceeded provincial standardized assessments for literacy and numeracy were developed in 2012–2013. Data collection began in September 2011 and continued in 2012. (There are currently no provincial standardized assessments in Saskatchewan and Quebec. British Columbia First Nations student results are currently not available but will be provided in future reporting).

Of those students in Newfoundland and Labrador, Prince Edward Island, Nova Scotia, New Brunswick, Ontario and Alberta that were reported as taking the provincial standardized assessment in literacy, 32% met or exceeded the provincial standard and, of those students that were reported as taking the provincial standardized assessment in numeracy, 16% met or exceeded the provincial standard.

Reporting by recipient, province, and gender is on track to be fully implemented by September 2013 as targeted in AANDC's 2012–2013 Performance Measurement Framework

Learning environments with appropriate education programs and support services are in place Percentage of Band operated schools meeting benchmarks, as per comparable provincial standards, by region, as measured by:
a) student/teacher ratio
All- Short term, target in development — data collection commences September 2012 a), b), c), e) and f) Long term — to be on par with provincial standards d) Long term — comparable to provincial allocations, as per comparable intent of the education funding (e.g., funding for teacher salaries)

Reporting against the established baseline will begin in September 2013 a,) b,) c), d,) e), f)

a) The ratio of students: teacher in 2011–2012 was 14:1
b) teacher certification rate b) The teacher certification rate was 84% in 2011–2012. The new methodology used a broader sample, which has had an impact on the result.
c) teacher years of experience c) In 2011–2012 the teacher average years of experience were 10.7 years
d) average funding per student provided, as per the funding provided by AANDC education for elementary and secondary education d) In 2011–2012 AANDC provided an average funding of $14,056** per FTE student for First Nation elementary and secondary education.
e) student/computer ratio e) The ratio of students: computer in 2011–2012 was 4:1
f) percentage of schools with minimum standard connectivity: proportion of schools which connectivity at a speed equal to or above regional standards f) IT-Regional Management Organizations serve over 500 First Nation schools and other facilities. Close to 90% have at least 1.5 mbps speed (download) (based on 2011–2012 data).
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

To ensure readiness for the implementation of a First Nation Education Act in 2014, AANDC implemented the Strong Schools, Successful Students Initiative in 2012–2013 (Canada's Economic Action Plan 2012 investments/$100 million over three years) through the Education Partnerships Program (EPP) and the First Nation Student Success Program (FNSSP). In the fall of 2012, AANDC's call for proposals related to the new initiative was launched. Seventeen proposals were approved for funding for 2013–2014 under EPP and FNSSP.

AANDC launched the Education Information System (EIS) in 2012–2013. EIS is now available to all First Nations recipients on-line through AANDC Services Portal. The launch of this on-line tool allows First Nation education funding recipients to submit proposals, retrieve reports, and track the progress of their submissions for a series of programs. More programs and functions are being added to the EIS throughout 2013–2014.

The report of the Summative Evaluation of the Elementary/Secondary Education Program On-Reserve (ESE) was approved in June 2012, and posted on the departmental website. The evaluation contains twelve key findings and eight recommendations, suggesting the need for revisions to ESE programming. These recommendations focused on strategic investment of new funds, stronger accountabilities, and exploring future policy development in areas such as second to higher level services (administrative functions associated with operating schools such as broad curriculum development, strategic vision, professional development, etc.), early childhood education, culture and language retention, and special needs. AANDC has developed a Management Response and Action Plan in response to the report's recommendations, which will be implemented in 2013–2014.

Sub-Program 2.1.2: Post-Secondary Education

Description

The objective of this sub-program is to help increase access and enable success in post-secondary education for eligible First Nation and Inuit students. The sub-program provides funding to Band Councils, Tribal Councils or regional First Nations education organizations to assist eligible students with the cost of tuition fees, books, travel, and living expenses (when applicable). It provides financial support to eligible First Nation and Inuit students for university and college entrance preparation programs, offered in Canadian post-secondary institutions, to enable them to attain the academic level required for entrance to degree and diploma credit programs. Resources are also available to post-secondary education institutions for the design and development of college and university level courses for First Nation and Inuit students, as well as research and development on First Nation and Inuit education.

2012–2013 Financial Resources ($ millions) 2012–2013 Human Resources (FTEs)
Planned Spending Actual Spending Difference Planned Actual Difference
Due to rounding, difference does not reflect figures shown.

AANDC is reviewing current methodology for assigning FTEs and associated salary costs to the sub-program level to ensure greater accuracy in future years.

329.0 331.7 (2.6) 2.0 1.3 0.7
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
*Indicator has been modified from the 2012–2013 Performance Measurement Framework of record as the previous indicator was there only as a placeholder.
First Nations and Inuit post-secondary students progress in their program of study Percentage of Post-Secondary Student Support Program (PSSSP) — funded students who completed their academic year and were funded the next academic year:
  • Percentage of students who continued in their program of study;
  • Percentage of students who changed programs; and
  • Percentage of students who changed institutions*
Baseline TBD in Fall 2013 Reporting against baseline will begin in Fall 2014 because the reporting is based on a school year cycle and data collection begins with the 2012–2013 report due in the summer of 2013
Supported First Nations and Inuit students participate in post-secondary education Rate of participation in post-secondary education:
  • Percentage of First Nations and Inuit students, funded through the Post-Secondary Student Support Program, who continue beyond the first year of their program of study (as applicable to their program).
  • Percentage of University and College Entrance Program (UCEP) participants who transition to a post-secondary program
TBD

Target in development — data collection commences August, 2013

TBD

Reporting against baseline will begin in Fall 2014 because the reporting is based on a school year cycle and data collection begins with the 2012–2013 report due in the summer of 2013

Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

In 2012–2013 AANDC continued to invest in post-secondary education with $331.7 million spent to support the participation of eligible First Nations and Inuit students in post-secondary programs. In the fall of 2012 AANDC launched The Aboriginal Bursaries Search Tool, a mobile-friendly tool. It contains an inventory of over 750 scholarships and bursaries, estimated at more than $10 million, and assists Aboriginal students (First Nations, Métis and Inuit) in accessing post-secondary education financial support. Promotional activities were held throughout the year, including mail-out of promotional cards for the application, participation in career fairs, as well as on-going monitoring of the related website.

The Indian Studies Support Program (ISSP) was refined in 2012–2013 by AANDC in order to get the best value for money spent, by introducing a national selection process to evaluate and approve proposals. This represents a change to the internal ISSP proposal approval process. The approach will ensure the best proposals from post-secondary institutions are funded and that design and delivery of courses and activities financed through the program are consistent with the program priorities. This includes ensuring that courses funded through ISSP are: focused on the labour market, with specific outcomes and objectives; will lead to high-demand job occupations; and meet the needs of First Nation and Inuit communities.

A summative Evaluation of the Post-Secondary Education Program was conducted during 2012–2013. The evaluation highlights a considerable need for AANDC to review its current approach to post-secondary programming to better ensure short-term successes and long-term benefits to First Nation and Inuit people as well as to the Canadian economy and the broader society. In response to the findings, AANDC will continue to examine ways to improve post-secondary education access for First Nations and Inuit post-secondary students through a new approach that would be more effective, accountable, and coordinated with other federal student support programs. AANDC has also revised its data collection instruments, as well as the timing of the reporting process, to improve the reliability and completeness of data. In addition, the Education Information System was launched by AANDC in 2012–2013 which, when fully deployed, will contribute to improved data collection for post-secondary programs.

Program 2.2: Social Development

Description

This program aims to assist First Nation individuals and communities to become more self-sufficient; protect individuals and families at risk of violence; provide prevention supports that allow individuals and families to better care for their children; and support greater participation in the labour market. This program assists First Nations men, women and children in achieving greater independence and self-sufficiency on reserves across Canada. It does so by flowing funds to First Nations, provincial representatives and other recipients who provide on-reserve residents and Yukon First Nations with individual and family services that are developed and implemented in collaboration with partners. These services help First Nation communities meet basic and special needs; support employability and attachment to the workforce; and ensure that individuals and families are safe. First Nations that are engaged in advancing their own development are better equipped to leverage opportunities made available by their communities and actively contribute to the broader Canadian economy and society.

2012–2013 Financial Resources ($ millions) 2012–2013 Human Resources (FTEs)
Total Expenditures (Main Estimates) Planned Spending Total Authorities (available for use) Actual Spending (authorities used) Difference (Planned vs. Actual Spending) Planned Actual Difference
The difference between Planned Spending and Total Authorities relates primarily to the re-allocation of resources, mainly from Community Infrastructure, to meet increased demand for social development programs and services. In addition, incremental funding was provided through Supplementary Estimates for the Family Violence Prevention Program and the First Nations Child and Family Services Program Information Management System.
1,604.6 1,604.6 1,710.2 1,709.9 (105.3) 125.2 130.1 (4.9)
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
*The data necessary to update the Community Well-Being index (CWB) comes from the 2011 National Household Survey (NHS). In order to update the index, all variables from the NHS need to be released by Statistics Canada which will occur in a staggered fashion starting in 2013. Once this date is available, a 2011 CWB will be generated and a re-computing of the CWB historically may be required to ensure the index is comparable over time.

**Labour Force Activity (LFA) is one of the four components of the CWB (the other three components consist of Income, Education and Housing). LFA is based on scores from the Employment Rate and Labour Force Participation Rate. The Labour Force Participation Rate refers to persons who were either employed or unemployed whereas the Employment Rate refers only to persons who were employed.

First Nations men, women and children have options, are engaged in advancing their development and take advantage of available opportunities Positive change in Indices of Individual, Family and Community Well-Being Targets in development — data collection commences April 1, 2013 The average CWB* scores for First Nation communities from 1981–2006 increased from 47 in 1981 to 57 in 2006. Average income scores for First Nation communities increased from 43 in 1981 to 55 in 2006. Average labour force activity** scores for First Nation communities increased from 67 in 1981 to 71 in 2006. Within the labour force activity component, average employment rate scores in First Nation communities decreased from 82 in 1981 to 77 in 2006 while average labour force participation rate scores increased from 51 to 65 over the same time period.
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

Funding of community-based supports and services continued in 2012–2013. AANDC continued to work with other government departments and stakeholders to support solid steps forward in the reform of social policies and programs to assist First Nations men, women and their families in First Nation communities to become more self-reliant, advance their own development and take advantage of opportunities to support enhanced individual, family and community well-being in First Nations across Canada.

Measuring the performance of Social Development programs as a whole began in 2012–2013. Performance measurement collectively tracks the improved well-being of men, women, children, families, and ultimately communities.

One of the major challenges for the Social Development programs is collecting and/or accessing meaningful and reliable data with which to make informed decisions. Challenges with utilizing the Community Well Being Index (CWB) to support evidence-informed decisions are threefold: the data is only available every five years; the four indicators of well-being pertain mainly to socioeconomic well-being; and the indicators used in the CWB do not fully capture the economic realities of some First Nation communities.

These limitations mean that the CWB is used in conjunction with numerous other sources of data to support evidence-based decision-making. Some of the secondary data sources utilized by the Social Development programs include the First Nations Regional Health Survey and the Uniform Crime Reporting Survey. AANDC is also identifying opportunities and supporting data initiatives in First Nation communities and organizations to improve access to quality, timely First Nation data required by both First Nations and federal governments to plan, account for investments, and report on outcomes.

Improving individual and community well-being requires AANDC social development staff to work daily with First Nations to address program management and service delivery issues including ensuring that individuals have access to benefits. A new National Social Programs Manual, introduced in April 2012 provides clearer and consistent guidance to all First Nations. Work to further consolidate regional manuals into National Social Programs Manual continues in 2013–2014. Further updates to the National Social Progams Manual will take place as required in accordance with federal/provincial/territorial program changes. Investments were made to reduce the amount and frequency of reporting, thereby allowing First Nations to focus on local programming priorities. AANDC staff worked on articulating and then implementing policy and program reform across the suite of five social programs in partnership with First Nations, provinces, Yukon Territory and other stakeholders in order to improve program outcomes.

Sub-Program 2.2.1: Income Assistance

Description

This sub-program provides funding to assist eligible individuals and families who are ordinarily resident on-reserve with basic and special needs services that are aligned to those provided to other residents of the reference province/territory; and pre-employment measures designed to increase self-reliance, improve life skills and promote greater attachment to the work force. There are four major components of the sub-program: basic needs; special needs; pre-employment supports; and service delivery. The expected outcome of the Income Assistance sub-program is an improved quality of life through the reduction of poverty and hardship on-reserve and improved participation in, and attachment to, the workforce.

2012–2013 Financial Resources ($ millions) 2012–2013 Human Resources (FTEs)
Planned Spending Actual Spending Difference Planned Actual Difference
AANDC is reviewing its current methodology for assigning FTEs and associated salary costs to the sub-program level to ensure greater accuracy in future years.
860.6 865.3 (4.7) 41.2 46.6 (5.4)
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
*% changed to percentage points to more accurately describe what is being measured.
First Nations men, women and children's basic needs are met Income Assistance dependency rate Reduce the income assistance dependency rate by 2 percentage points* by March 31, 2012, to meet the target of a 5% reduction in 2015

Reporting against established baseline will begin April 1, 2015

For 2011–2012, the national income assistance dependency rate was situated at 34%, down 1.3 percentage points from the previous fiscal year
Men and women are employable and able to become and/or remain attached to the workforce Percentage of Income Assistance clients who found employment Target in development — data collection commences April 1, 2013

Reporting against established baseline will begin April 1, 2014

Data collection commences April 1, 2013, and reporting against established baseline will begin April 1, 2014
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

In Canada's Economic Action Plan 2012–2013, the Government of Canada committed to reform the Income Assistance Program by addressing skill and labour market mismatches for the on-reserve population, a population that is currently underrepresented in the workforce. AANDC worked closely with Employment and Social Development Canada to better align their respective programs that support income assistance clients to encourage employment and self-sufficiency.

To prepare for the reform, AANDC worked with First Nation income assistance service providers to fund 34 pilot projects which provided greater access to pre-employment training and support for on-reserve income assistance clients.

The Department worked with Employment and Social Development Canada to identify and collect performance data for the Income Assistance Reform that will assist with program evaluation. This analysis revealed the importance of using a coordinated approach to establish program indicators and to measure success. Income Assistance indicators must be considered in context with all the indicators for the five social sub-programs to provide a more comprehensive picture of social development.

Increased human and financial resource efforts have focused on working directly with First Nation Income Assistance service providers to build capacity so that clients receive support to transition from income assistance to employment. Lessons learned from recent Active measures pilot projects are informing better approaches for case management and client supports that are focused on increasing employability. Partnerships with First Nations, the provinces and the Yukon, and the private sector were actively pursued to ensure First Nations have access to employment opportunities. Collectively, this work has assisted the Department in establishing performance measures associated with the employability of income assistance recipients.

Sub-Program 2.2.2: National Child Benefit Reinvestment

Description

This sub-program is one component of the wider National Child Benefit initiative. This initiative has two components: a financial benefits component that goes directly to individuals (e.g., the federal Canada Child Tax Benefit) and a reinvestment component — the National Child Benefit Reinvestment — that provides community-based supports and services for children in low-income families in the provinces/territories that choose to operate this initiative. AANDC's National Child Benefit Reinvestment is the on-reserve counterpart to reinvestment projects/programming administered by applicable provinces/territories off-reserve. There are five activity areas for this sub-program on-reserve: childcare; child nutrition; support for parents; home-to-work transition; and cultural enrichment. The expected outcomes include a reduction in the immediate effects of child poverty and decreased barriers for parents/guardians to become, or remain, attached to the workforce.

2012–2013 Financial Resources ($ millions) 2012–2013 Human Resources (FTEs)
Planned Spending Actual Spending Difference Planned Actual Difference
Due to rounding, difference does not reflect figures shown.

AANDC is reviewing its current methodology for assigning FTEs and associated salary costs to the sub-program level to ensure greater accuracy in future years.

1.3 49.9 (48.7) 0.3 0.3 0.0
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Eligible men, women and children in need or at-risk have access and use supports and services to meet basic and special needs In National Child Benefit Reinvestment eligible Regions, the percentage of First Nations (with an Income Assistance caseload that includes children aged 0–17 inclusive) with approved funding for National Child Benefit Reinvestment projects/programming Target in development — data collection commences April 1, 2013

Reporting against established baseline will begin April 1, 2014

Data collection commences April 1, 2013, and reporting against established baseline will begin April 1, 2014
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

The National Child Benefit Reinvestment (NCBR) initiative supported First Nation communities and organizations to provide an array of assistance to alleviate the depth and effects of poverty for children in low-income families on-reserve. Data indicates that approximately 90,000 families and 200,000 children on-reserve benefit from these efforts annually.

In 2012–2013, the NCBR provided funding for child nutrition projects such as hot breakfast/lunch programs in schools, daycares and Headstart programs. Evaluations of the initiative have noted that school-based child nutrition projects have contributed to improved school attendance by children, as well as improvements in their grades. The National Child Benefit Reinvestment also supported Home-to-Work transition projects to help parents become, or remain, employed. These transition projects included skills-based training, transportation to training or work, and childcare — providing children with a safe place to be while parents attended training or work.

Given the unique scope and flexibility of the NCBR, First Nations have been able to establish and operate a wide range of programs and services that otherwise may not exist in many of these communities. As in previous years, the Department remains committed to the initiative and will work closely with First Nations to ensure continued results. Particular attention is being placed on how the Home-to-Work transition and child care components can complement the increased support to income assistance clients for pre-employment and skills training and development for the eventual transition to employment.

There is a need to validate allocations methodology for all regions, based on applying the reinvestment model of each reference province/territory. AANDC has launched a project to do so, which will continue into 2013–2014 (forecast completion end of fiscal), to inform ongoing program management.

Sub-Program 2.2.3: Assisted Living

Description

This sub-program is a residency-based program that provides funding to assist in non-medical, social support services to seniors, adults with chronic illness, and children and adults with disabilities (mental and physical) so that they can maintain functional independence and achieve greater self-reliance. There are three major components to the sub-program including in-home care, adult foster care and institutional care. The latter is for eligible individuals in need of personal non-medical care on a 24-hour basis. The Assisted Living Program is available to all individuals residing on-reserve, or ordinarily resident on-reserve, who have been formally assessed by a health care professional (in a manner comparable to the relevant province or territory) as requiring services and who do not have the means to obtain such services themselves. The expected outcome for this sub-program is that individuals maintain their independence for as long as possible while maximizing the quality of their daily experience at home and in the community.

2012–2013 Financial Resources ($ millions) 2012–2013 Human Resources (FTEs)
Planned Spending Actual Spending Difference Planned Actual Difference
AANDC is reviewing its current methodology for assigning FTEs and associated salary costs to the sub-program level to ensure greater accuracy in future years.
83.8 98.3 (14.5) 1.2 1.2 0.0
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
First Nations men, women and children's special needs are met Percentage of assessed clients who are receiving Assisted Living services Target in development — data collection commences April 1, 2013

Reporting against established baseline will begin April 1, 2014

In 2011–2012 over 10,000 clients benefitted from services funded through the Assisted Living program (2012–2013 data is not yet available). No data is available to determine the percentage of assessed clients. As such, the performance indicator for this program has been revised and a new indicator and targets will be used effective 2013–2014.
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

Program funding was used to provide services to over 10,000 clients. As with other social programs, AANDC worked directly with First Nations as well as partners like Health Canada and the provinces, to improve the delivery of social support services to a wide range of clients. Understanding how services are used is key to better positioning the program to address needs going forward. Recent data analysis of Institutional Care, one of the program's three main components, found that this component accounted for over 50% of program expenditures while serving less than 10% of the total number of clients in the program. Analysis also shows that there were large discrepancies between regions with respect to spending on institutional care. For example, institutional care expenditures represented 95% of total program expenditures in the Yukon region, but only 8% in the Alberta region.

To ensure consistent and predictable spending across all regions, AANDC is validating eligible expenditures under the Assisted Living program's institutional care component and is working on proposals to clarify eligible Institutional Care expenditures that are consistent with the income-support mandate.

Sub-Program 2.2.4: First Nations Child and Family Services

Description

This sub-program provides funding to assist in ensuring the safety and well-being of First Nations children on-reserve by supporting culturally appropriate prevention and protection services for children and families. These services are provided in accordance with the legislation and standards of the province or territory of residence and in a manner that is reasonably comparable to those available to other provincial residents in similar circumstances. There are four components to the sub-program including: development, maintenance, operations, and prevention. In 2007, the First Nations Child and Family Services sub-program began shifting to an Enhanced Prevention Focused Approach. This is consistent with provinces that have largely refocused their child and family services programs from protection to prevention services. The expected outcome for this sub-program is to have a more secure and stable family environment for children ordinarily resident on-reserve. The implementation of the Enhanced Prevention Focused Approach is expected to improve services, cohesion of the family, and life outcomes for First Nation children and families on-reserve. AANDC also contributes to the funding of day care services for First Nation families in Ontario and Alberta and participates in activities that promote Early Childhood Development coordination across departments.

2012–2013 Financial Resources ($ millions) 2012–2013 Human Resources (FTEs)
Planned Spending Actual Spending Difference Planned Actual Difference
AANDC is reviewing its current methodology for assigning FTEs and associated salary costs to the sub-program level to ensure greater accuracy in future years.
640.5 662.0 (21.5) 81.5 79.4 2.1
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Men, women and children in need or at-risk have access and use prevention and protection supports and services Percentage of First Nations men, women and children in need or at-risk, ordinarily resident on-reserve, that are using prevention and protection supports and services Target in development — data collection commences April 1, 2013

(Prevention and protection supports and services are available in 100% of First Nation communities)

Reporting against established baseline will begin April 1, 2014

As of March 31, 2012, 5.8% of First Nations children were in care (ordinarily resident on-reserve)

Data collection commences on April 1, 2013 to include data on prevention and reporting against established baseline will begin April 1, 2014.

Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

In 2012–2013, AANDC continued to implement and monitor the Enhanced Prevention Focused ApproachFootnote 6 (EPFA) and Directive 20-1Footnote 7 to deliver protection and prevention services to First Nation children, youth, and families ordinarily resident on-reserve through the First Nations Child and Family Services (FNCFS) program. The approach has been implemented in six jurisdictions, and AANDC is working with the remaining jurisdictions to transition as well. AANDC finalized a Service Delivery Agreement with British Columbia in preparation for the transition to EPFA. The Department continues to share lessons learned and remains willing to work with other jurisdictions as they adapt their own approaches transition to the EPFA. Transitioning each jurisdiction involves a significant amount of tripartite work and depends on partner readiness and on the status of the province's or territory's own shift to a different approach. In Alberta, work continues to establish a First Nations Child and Family Service Engagement Process and a bilateral Accountability Framework which will assist AANDC, and the province, to clarifying roles and responsibilities and strengthening the delivery of services to First Nations children and their families by the First Nation agencies.

The First Nations Child and Family Services Information Management System (FNCFS IMS), which was introduced in April 2013, will facilitate effective ongoing program management and reporting on program performance. The FNCFS IMS will simplify reporting, improve work processes, and provide essential data to inform program policy. The next release (scheduled for April 2014) will focus on performance measurement and prevention data. FNCFS also began discussions on data sharing agreements with the provinces of Alberta and Manitoba.

In 2012–2013, a number of program audits, evaluations and management plans to address findings were completed for First Nations Child and Family Services. Recommendations touch on: the ongoing review of costing models developed under the Enhanced Prevention Focused Approach; FNCFS agency capacity building; and more formalized collaboration between provinces, territories and FNCFS agencies. AANDC will engage with partners through formal tripartite processes as a step towards addressing the recommendations. The Department will also review financial pressures and business plans to ensure agencies are supported.

Sub-Program 2.2.5: Family Violence Prevention

Description

This sub-program provides funding to assist First Nations so that they can provide access to culturally appropriate family violence shelter services and prevention activities to First Nations women, children and families on-reserve that are reasonably comparable to those available to other provincial and Yukon residents in similar circumstances. There are two components to the sub-program: operational funding for shelters; and community-based prevention projects. The expected outcome of the Family Violence Prevention sub-program is the enhanced safety and security of First Nations women, children and families.

2012–2013 Financial Resources ($ millions) 2012–2013 Human Resources (FTEs)
Planned Spending Actual Spending Difference Planned Actual Difference
AANDC is reviewing its current methodology for assigning FTEs and associated salary costs to the sub-program level to ensure greater accuracy in future years.
18.5 34.4 (15.9) 1.0 2.5 (1.5)
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
*This is secondary data pulled from the 2008–2010 First Nations Regional Health Survey (RHS) reports on injuries and assaults compared to the 2002 RHS.

The Family Violence Prevention Program uses secondary data sources to report on "personal injury rates" as AANDC has been receiving data from the Uniform Crime Reporting Survey for 2 years. Although this secondary data will continue being collected, it will no longer be reported in the Departmental Performance Report or appear as an indicator in the future.

Men, women and children are safe Personal injury rates Target in development — baseline to be achieved by March 31, 2013
Reporting against established baseline will begin April 1, 2014
A 2008–2010 survey* reported that 18.6% of adults aged 18 years or older in First Nation communities across Canada had been injured in the previous 12 months. Assaults, including domestic or family violence, were the cause of approximately 11% of injuries.

A 2002 survey reported that 28.8% of First Nations adults reported injuries requiring treatment; a rate two times the Canadian average. Of that group, 4.8% of First Nations adults reported that they had suffered at least one instance of violence in the preceding year. Results revealed that causes of injury varied by age and gender.

Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

Funds from Budget 2012 were fully allocated to maintain the program in 2012–2013. Budget 2013 renewed the Family Violence Prevention Program for an additional two years, allowing AANDC to continue to offer family violence shelter and prevention services at a funding level of $30.4 million, similar to previous years.

In 2012–2013, AANDC implemented approaches to distribute prevention funds more strategically by funding "best practices" proposals aimed at promoting longer-term results, such as: "train-the-trainer" programs; intervention and awareness activities; and encouraging proposals that included partnerships between communities and organizations. AANDC also worked with the National Aboriginal Circle Against Family Violence (NACAFV) to support capacity for shelters. For example, AANDC supported a NACAFV's Shelter Director's Conference in November 2012, and an Annual Training Forum for front-line shelter workers and shelter directors in Montreal in February 2013.

AANDC continued to participate in the Family Violence Initiative — an intergovernmental forum for national collaboration on issues related to family violence — to strengthen linkages across the federal government and worked with key partners to increase collaboration and coordination on promoting best practices in policy and programming to address family violence issues.

In an effort to strengthen program management and improve delivery of family violence services, on-site shelter visits (compliance reviews) were initiated. On-site visits are continuing in 2013–2014.

AANDC has also modified the program's annual report to better reflect levels of partnership, community planning, and overall performance measurement within the funded proposal. This will evaluate the extent to which these aspects are being implemented by funding recipients and will allow the program to encourage these elements in future proposals.

Program 2.3: Managing Individual Affairs

Description

The Managing Individual Affairs program contributes to The People Strategic Outcome by ensuring responsible federal stewardship of the legislative, administrative and treaty obligations of the Federal Government to First Nations that pertain to Estates, Indian Moneys, Registration, Band Membership and Treaty Annuities. This program administers the portions of the First Nations Oil and Gas and Moneys Management Act that relate to Indian Moneys and is critical to ensuring that provisions of the Indian Act and other statutory obligations are fulfilled. Results are achieved through direct client-services and through partnerships with First Nations directed to: determining eligibility for registration under the Indian Act; issuing the Secure Certificate of Indian Status; ensuring responsibility for management of Indian moneys and estates under the Indian Act; and honouring treaty annuity obligations to First Nations. A sound administration of individual affairs and moneys contributes to the well-being of First Nation individuals, families and communities and enhances their participation in the Canadian society.

2012–2013 Financial Resources ($ millions) 2012–2013 Human Resources (FTEs)
Total Expenditures (Main Estimates) Planned Spending Total Authorities (available for use) Actual Spending (authorities used) Difference (Planned vs. Actual Spending) Planned Actual Difference
The difference between Planned Spending and Total Authorities primarily reflects additional resources provided for registration administration through Supplementary Estimates or re-allocated internally during the year, as well as the realignment of program-specific support funding from the Internal Services Program to more appropriately reflect the cost associated with delivering programs and services and achieving results in the Managing Individual Affairs Program.

FTE variance is the result of the implementation of the Budget 2012, as well as an internal realignment of FTEs from Management and Individual Affairs to Residential Schools Resolution Program.

28.4 28.4 38.9 37.1 (8.7) 303.7 259.7 44.0
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Federal stewardship of the legislative, administrative and treaty obligations for which AANDC is responsible Delivery of services within established service standards related to registration, membership, estates, treaty annuities and moneys as per the Indian Act and other related acts and regulations as demonstrated by the results in the sub-programs Service standards and performance targets are defined for each sub-program Services delivered as demonstrated below for each sub-program
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

During 2012–2013, AANDC focused on ensuring consistent and timely processing of registration and secure card applications. Registration and membership functions were affected by 44.0 fewer FTE employees, at headquarters and in the regions combined, than planned. The Office of the Indian Registrar continued to focus on improving effective client service delivery and program modernization, initiating the integration of the registration to entitlement processes, policies and procedures, with those of the Secure Certificate of Indian Status (SCIS). This will ultimately result in a seamless, client-centric service delivery model for registration and card issuance.

The SCIS delivery network, expanded nationally, now permits applicants to apply in-person nation-wide or to apply utilizing the new mail-in process. The SCIS Issuance Policy was redesigned to support a more stringent application process for eligible persons.

AANDC continued modernization of operations in the management of Indian Moneys and estates. A risk-based framework was developed for the disbursement of Indian moneys. Decisions for the effective release of trust funds are based on information that is pertinent, consistent and accurate in order to fulfill accountability, legal and statutory obligations.

Sub-Program 2.3.1: Registration and Membership

Description

Section 5 of the Indian Act mandates AANDC to maintain the Indian Register which is a listing of all persons registered as Indians within the meaning of the Indian Act as well as band members for departmentally-controlled band lists. At the First Nation level, Indian Registration Administrators work on behalf of the Department to maintain the Indian Registration Program and have specific authorities delegated to them through the Indian Registrar. In addition, the Individual Affairs Branch issues the Secure Certificate of Indian Status card, which is used to identify those eligible to receive key programs and services that are available to registered Indians. A current, up-to-date and accurate Indian Register is a fundamental component for the delivery of departmental programs and services as it identifies the entitled demographic.

2012–2013 Financial Resources ($ millions) 2012–2013 Human Resources (FTEs)
Planned Spending Actual Spending Difference Planned Actual Difference
Due to rounding, difference does not reflect figures shown.

AANDC is reviewing its current methodology for assigning FTEs and associated salary costs to the sub-program level to ensure greater accuracy in future years.

22.8 29.3 (6.6) 244.0 208.6 35.4
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Eligibility is determined for registration under the Indian Act Percentage of registration applications addressed within the 3–6 month service standard TBD 77% of applicants (9,905 of 12,910) received an "Acknowledgement of Receipt" letter within 30 days of being received

83% of registration applications (10,736 of 12,910) addressed within service standard, e.g., 90% of registration applications are addressed within 6 months (entitlement), or 8 months (adoptions) of being received

Eligible individuals receive a new Secure Certificate of Indian Status Number of Registered Indians receiving new SCIS as a percentage of total Registered Indian Population The entire registered Indian population will be issued a SCIS by end of fiscal year 2015–2016 As of March 31, 2013, 77,119 SCIS issued; representing 8.51% of the 906,270 registered Indians
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

In 2012–2013, the program focused on effective client service delivery and program modernization. A total of 15,141 new registrations were completed, bringing the total registered Indian population to 906,270. With 35.4 fewer full-time equivalent employees than was planned, there was an impact on the rate of processing of entitlement applications which continued to lag below service standards. Of 12,910 applications received, 9,905 (77%) were sent an Acknowledgement of Receipt letter within 30 days and 10,736 (83%) were addressed within six months of being received. There were 22,030 vital events (births, deaths, new registrations) recorded in 2012–2013, which required updating band lists for 350 First Nations.

The applications for entitlement to registration, which extended beyond the six month service standard, were managed by hiring additional resources and implementing simplified policies, processes and procedures, as well as with staff training. In partnership with the Canada School of Public Service, e-Courses were developed and piloted in order to standardize training of processing agents. Given the complexities of the registration processing work, standardized training has proven crucial to ensuring quality assurance of entitlement decisions are made in accordance with the Indian Act.

To address applications received pursuant to the enactment of the Gender Equity in Indian Registration Act within the six-month service standard, a successful pilot project streamlined all straight-forward applications requiring minimal genealogical research. It also allowed applications to be processed in a digitized manner. The modernization of policies, procedures and processes, as well as the production of job aids, has enhanced employee efficiency at headquarters and in the regions.

The implementation of the Agreement of the Recognition of the Qalipu Mi'kmag Band, created on September 22, 2011, continued with the issuance of the third order in council in June 2012. This brought the total number of founding members of the band to 23,877.

As of the end of fiscal 2012–2013, 77,119 new Secure Certificates of Indian Status (SCIS) had been issued. The delivery network expanded nationally, enabling applicants to apply for a SCIS at all Regional and District Offices, or by the new mail-in process. Newly developed and updated tools, resources and strategies to inform applicants and stakeholders about the SCIS program, designed to coincide with the national delivery network expansion, were also launched.

SCIS application response was outside of established service standards. AANDC examined the process to identify program gaps, resulting in the implementation of a redefined SCIS In-Canada Issuance Policy and a more efficient service delivery model. A review of the impacts of the revised SCIS In-Canada Issuance Policy will further identify any possible strategies to eliminate card issuance delays. AANDC will also continue to provide ongoing support for the SCIS national delivery network; and maintain a commitment to raise awareness and promote the SCIS in First Nation communities. Increased issuance of the SCIS should diminish fraudulent abuse of benefits accorded by registration.

Sub-Program 2.3.2: Management of Moneys

Description

AANDC is responsible for the management of Indian moneys provisions of the Indian Act which define the collection, maintenance and accounting of Indian Moneys. The Indian Moneys section of Lands and Trust Services executes the overall administration of Indian moneys held within the Consolidated Revenue Fund for the use and benefit of Bands. These revenue moneys are defined as all Indian moneys other than capital moneys (those derived from the sale of surrendered lands or non-renewable resources such as oil and gas) and may include, but are not limited to, the proceeds from the sale of renewable resources, rights-of-way, fines and interest earned on capital and revenue moneys held in the Consolidated Revenue Fund.

2012–2013 Financial Resources ($ millions) 2012–2013 Human Resources (FTEs)
Planned Spending Actual Spending Difference Planned Actual Difference
AANDC is reviewing its current methodology for assigning FTEs and associated salary costs to the sub-program level to ensure greater accuracy in future years.
1.4 2.0 (0.6) 21.1 17.3 3.8
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Canada's responsibilities for management of Indian moneys under the Indian Act are fulfilled Percentage of disbursement that meets established processing standards 90% of Indian Moneys disbursement request recommendations to the Minister completed within 90 days from date of receipt 93% (13 of 14) requests
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

In response to the 2010 Audit of Trust Accounts, the Department improved the Treaty Funds Management System and the internal manuals which reinforced due diligence for the release of Indian Moneys and ensured consistent application of the policies nation-wide.

First Nations requested access to their Indian moneys for a variety of reasons including, but not limited to band administration activities, capital investments, and funding for social and cultural activities on-reserve. Thirteen of the 14 First Nations requests received at AANDC and recommended to the Minister were completed within the service standard.

Sub-Program 2.3.3: Estate Management

Description

This sub-program is comprised of two areas, the decedent and the living estates programs and provides for the management and administration of the estates of deceased, mentally incompetent and minor Indians on-reserve. The Estate Management sub-program derives its mandate (authority) from the Indian Act and the Indian Estates Regulations. The sub-program is responsible for developing policy, procedures and providing advice on the management and administration of estates under the Act.

2012–2013 Financial Resources ($ millions) 2012–2013 Human Resources (FTEs)
Planned Spending Actual Spending Difference Planned Actual Difference
AANDC is reviewing its current methodology for assigning FTEs and associated salary costs to the sub-program level to ensure greater accuracy in future years.
2.4 2.6 (0.2) 30.1 25.0 5.1
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Canada's responsibilities for estates management under the Indian Act and related regulations are fulfilled The appointment of non-departmental administrators in accordance with Section 43(a) of the Indian Act Due to factors outside of the programs control (i.e., availability of family members), 75% of estate administrators appointed are non-departmental by March 31, 2013 94% (923 of 982) non-departmental administrators appointed
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

The Department continued towards the goal of increasing the proportion of non-departmental estate administrators (ideally family members) appointed pursuant to section 43(a) of the Indian Act. Where this is not possible, the Department is vested with the responsibility of administering the estate of the deceased in compliance with its statutory authority. By March 31, 2013, 923 of 982 (93.9%) non-departmental appointments were made, exceeding the target of 75%.

Sub-Program 2.3.4: Treaty Annuities

Description

This sub-program is responsible for administering payments and benefits according to the various treaties that First Nations signed with the British and later Canadian government. As each treaty is unique, so are the benefits to which each First Nations individual is entitled. Many treaties provide for annual payments, which are paid in cash at Treaty Day events and amount to roughly $1.7 million annually.

2012–2013 Financial Resources ($ millions) 2012–2013 Human Resources (FTEs)
Planned Spending Actual Spending Difference Planned Actual Difference
AANDC is reviewing its current methodology for assigning FTEs and associated salary costs to the sub-program level to ensure greater accuracy in future years.
1.8 3.1 (1.3) 8.4 8.7 (0.3)
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Canada honors its Treaty Obligations to First Nations Percentage of First Nation treaty events requested and held in order to facilitate Treaty Annuity Payments 100% of events requested are held by March 31, 2013

100% of band requests are accommodated by March 31, 2013

100% of scheduled treaty payment events were held
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

For the period 2012–2013, all of the treaty events requested were held. The availability of volunteers to support regions at treaty events through the Treaty Annuity Payment Experience (TAPE) was significantly reduced in the last two years, due to the current fiscal environment. As a result the TAPE that was coordinated by AANDC was cancelled in November 2012.

Program 2.4: Residential Schools Resolution

Description

This program aims to support a fair and lasting resolution to the legacy of Indian Residential Schools and to promote reconciliation with former students, their families and communities. In this program, AANDC ensures the successful implementation of the court-supervised Indian Residential Schools Settlement Agreement (IRSSA) by finalizing the Common Experience Payment and implementing the Personal Credits strategy; resolving claims of abuse under the Independent Assessment Process; funding and monitoring Commemoration initiatives; and meeting the Government of Canada's obligations towards the Truth and Reconciliation Commission. Additionally, AANDC supports complementary initiatives to further reconciliation such as funding and monitoring of the Advocacy and Public Information Program and promoting reconciliation between the Government of Canada and Aboriginal people, as well as between Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal people.

2012–2013 Financial Resources ($ millions) 2012–2013 Human Resources (FTEs)
Total Expenditures (Main Estimates) Planned Spending Total Authorities (available for use) Actual Spending (authorities used) Difference (Planned vs. Actual Spending) Planned Actual Difference
The difference between Planned Spending and Total Authorities primarily reflects incremental funding provided through Supplementary Estimates for: awards to claimants resulting from the Independent Assessment Process and Alternative Dispute Resolution related to the Indian Residential Schools Settlement Agreement; administration and research required to support the federal government's obligations under the Agreement; and, the Commemoration Initiative under the Agreement which honours, educates, memorializes and/or pays tribute to former Indian Residential School students, their families and their communities.

The difference between Total Authorities and Actual Spending primarily reflects the deferral of awards to claimants and certain commemoration projects that address the Indian Residential Schools experience that could not be completed in the fiscal year; this deferred funding that was not required in 2012–2013 has been reprofiled to future years when it will be available for the intended purpose.

Indian Residential Schools Settlement Agreement was originally scheduled to sunset in 2012–2013 but was renewed until 2015–2016. Additionally, there was an internal realignment of FTEs from Management and Individual Affairs to Residential Schools Resolution Program.

466.8 466.8 711.1 593.3 (126.5) 153.0 504.8 (351.8)
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
IRSSA is well-managed in order to contribute to a fair resolution of Indian Residential Schools Percentage of applications/claims responded to within the IRSSA service standards Number of applications/claims addressed within service standards by March 19, 2013 Services delivered as indicated below for each Sub-Program
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

In 2012, AANDC received $725.6 million for four fiscal years, from 2012–2013 to 2015–2016, for the continued implementation of the Indian Residential Schools Settlement Agreement (IRSSA). This funding has allowed AANDC to continue to meet its ongoing obligations in this regard including the Common Experience Payment (CEP) process, the Independent Assessment Process (IAP), Commemoration, and support to the Truth and Reconciliation Commission (TRC).

The Advocacy and Public Information Program (APIP) continued to ensure that the Aboriginal community, particularly former students and their families, are aware of the aspects of the Settlement Agreement, especially the CEP and IAP deadlines, and to fund projects that promote reconciliation. In 2012–2013, $3.7 million was provided to Aboriginal organizations from this program.

As a gesture of reconciliation, a stained glass window was installed directly above the west entrance to Centre Block, commemorating the legacy of Indian residential schools and the Prime Minister's apology to former students on behalf of all Canadians. The window provides a unique opportunity for Parliamentarians and visitors to Parliament to learn about the history of Indian residential schools and Canada's ongoing reconciliation efforts.

The repeal of the Indian residential schools provisions of the Indian Act is part of Bill C-428, which received second reading in the House of Commons on December 5, 2012.

On August 22, 2012, AANDC added Mistassini Hostels to the list of recognized institutions under the Settlement Agreement and on March 27, 2013, the Quebec Superior Court approved an order allowing former students who resided at Mistassini Hostels to submit applications for CEP and IAP by September 3, 2013.

Sub-Program 2.4.1: Common Experience Payments

Description

This component of the Indian Residential Schools Settlement Agreement provides compensation to former students in recognition of the impacts of "common experience" at an Indian residential school. In order to provide an effective and efficient process that was easier for most recipients, the Common Experience Payment (CEP) sub-program was negotiated by parties to the Settlement Agreement to pay all former students who were residents of Indian residential school.

2012–2013 Financial Resources ($ millions) 2012–2013 Human Resources (FTEs)
Planned Spending Actual Spending Difference Planned Actual Difference
AANDC is reviewing its current methodology for assigning FTEs and associated salary costs to the sub-program level to ensure greater accuracy in future years.
0.0 4.2 (4.2) 0.0 8.7 (8.7)
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Eligible CEP applicants are validated and Initial Applications and Reconsiderations processed in accordance with the Settlement Agreement

80% of original applications processed within the 28 day service standard

To process new reconsideration requests within the 150 day service standard

Percentage of applications processed within service standard Initial Applications: 80% processed within 28 days by March 19, 2013

Reconsideration: 90 days and an additional 60 days for complex files by March 19, 2013

Initial Applications:
52% (391 of 751) of all initial applications were completed within the 28 day service standard

43.6% (328 of 751) of initial CEP applications did not require extensive research; of these, 97% (319 of 328) were completed within the 28 day service standard

Reconsideration:
89% (512 of 574) of reconsideration requests were completed within the 150 day service standard. This figure includes cases that were on hold pending additional information from the applicant

Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

As of March 31, 2013, $1.613 billion of the $1.9 billion Designated Amount Fund (84.9%) was disbursed to pay 78,859 out of an estimated 80,000 (98.6%) former students who resided at a recognized Indian residential school. Of this, $14.9 million was paid to 869 former students in the period 2012–2013.

Education experts representing Canada, the Assembly of First Nations and Inuit organizations and an expert firm in class action settlements were appointed by the Courts and have developed draft terms and conditions for Personal Credits. The expert in class action settlement administration has developed an administration plan based on those terms and conditions. Canada has developed a Request for Direction for Court approval. It is anticipated that implementation will begin once that approval is received.

Sub-Program 2.4.2: Independent Assessment Process

Description

This component of the Indian Residential Schools Settlement AgreementFootnote 8, a comprehensive Independent Assessment Process, was created as a mechanism to individually determine appropriate compensation for more serious physical abuse, sexual abuse and other wrongful acts, which are outside of the objectives and parameters of the Common Experience Payment.

2012–2013 Financial Resources ($ millions) 2012–2013 Human Resources (FTEs)
Planned Spending Actual Spending Difference Planned Actual Difference
AANDC is reviewing its current methodology for assigning FTEs and associated salary costs to the sub-program level to ensure greater accuracy in future years.
456.4 574.3 (117.9) 153.0 466.3 (313.3)
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Canada fulfills its obligations as per the terms of the Settlement Agreement Number of Performance Indicators met, out of four (document packages submitted, hearings attended, negotiated settlements and payments processed) Meet standards 82% (4069 of 4933) of standard track document packages were disclosed to the Adjudication Secretariat within the 165 day service standard

78% of 3,526 hearing-ready claims offered hearing within 40 calendar days subject to party availability

100% (4,194) of hearings were attended by Canada

730 negotiated settlements were completed within 2012–2013 (106 over the fiscal target of 624)

93% (4,194) first-claimant hearings held in 2012–2013

4041 total decisions released to parties: 2108 Regular Decisions sent — 76.9% released within 21 calendar days

1933 Short Form Decisions sent — 48.1% released within 7 calendar day service standard

89% (3,729 of 4,187) of IAP represented claimants were paid within 20 days after the decision review period

Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

The variance in spending is due to the greater than forecast number of applications received and admitted under the Indian Residential Schools Settlement Agreement (IRSSA). Close to 8,000 applications were received from the beginning of September 2012 until the September 19, 2012 deadline for applying to the IAP, which is a significant figure when compared to the monthly average of 447 applications over the previous year. In response, additional funding and FTEs have been required to meet the continuing need to implement the IRSSA, respond to court/Article 12 challenges, and process and resolve claims in a timely fashion.

A notice plan focusing on, the Independent Assessment Process application deadline of September 19, 2012 was implemented from March to June, 2012. Available in English, French, and 16 Aboriginal languages, this notice was delivered through Aboriginal and mainstream publications, English, French and Aboriginal television, radio, on-line banners, a mass mail-out and targeted outreach to homeless people. It reached 83% of the target population (Aboriginal people over the age of 25) an average of 4.65 times per person.

Based on academic studies, the original number of applications forecast was approximately 12,500. As of March 31, 2013, 37,716 claims had been received, three times more than the 2006 forecast. Of these, 20,413 applications were confirmed and resolved.

For the fiscal period of 2012–2013, 4,194 IAP hearings were held and 730 claims were resolved through the Negotiated Settlement Process (NSP), totaling $472.4 million paid in claims.

On average, 349 hearings were held per month in 2012–2013, an increase of 29 hearings per month compared to the average of the previous fiscal year. Since the implementation of the Indian Residential Schools Settlement Agreement began in 2007, 20,413 IAP claims have been resolved (almost 54% of all claims received into the IAP). A total of $1.951 billion has been paid out to claimants. The average amount per claim, including legal costs, is $114,736. This is well above the anticipated average of $86,000 which was based on the Alternative Dispute Resolution process.

A limited supply of hearing-ready files affected the IRSAS' ability to achieve the target of 4,500 first-claimant hearing in 2012–2013. The IRSAS is implementing new initiatives to address this issue, and to more efficiently and effectively move claimant files through to completion. AANDC and the IRSAS continue to work closely to address administrative concerns, specifically in the areas of human resources and procurement.

The re-engineering of the NSPFootnote 9 has produced results above expectations. Canada surpassed its target of 624 negotiated settlements for 2012–2013 by 106, for a total of 730.

Sub-Program 2.4.3: Commemoration

Description

This component of the Indian Residential Schools Settlement Agreement will honour and pay tribute to former students, promote closure, healing and reconciliation, educate Canadians of the legacy of Indian Residential Schools, and signal a new relationship between Aboriginal Peoples and Canada. The initiative will be delivered through contribution agreements with communities, regional, and national Aboriginal organizations submitting detailed proposals for funding. Canada will fund recommended proposals up to $20 million.

2012–2013 Financial Resources ($ millions) 2012–2013 Human Resources (FTEs)
Planned Spending Actual Spending Difference Planned Actual Difference
Due to rounding, difference does not reflect figures shown.

AANDC is reviewing its current methodology for assigning FTEs and associated salary costs to the sub-program level to ensure greater accuracy in future years.

10.4 14.2 (3.9) 0.0 24.3 (24.3)
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Dispersal of $10 million in 2012–2013 to fund commemoration initiatives and monitoring of commemoration activities to ensure they are delivered on time Percentage of Commemoration funds committed to projects 100% by March 31, 2014 As of March 31, 2013, 99% of funding had been allocated
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

With funding received in 2012, the appropriate level of financial and human resources were in place to enable AANDC to fulfill its Commemoration objectives in 2012–2013.

The Truth and Reconciliation Commission provided AANDC with a total of 76 proposals recommended for Commemoration funding in 2012–2013. As of March 31, 2013, 75 contribution agreements were in place for a total of over $11 million. It is anticipated that all projects will be complete by March 31, 2014. Projects included the creation of plaques, gardens, totem poles and theatrical pieces, as well as the development of museum exhibitions and community gatherings.

Flexibility of Grants and Contributions funding arrangements has proven to be beneficial when dealing with multiple partners, as funding can be re-allocated from one year to another, contributing to the successful implementation of Commemoration.

Sub-Program 2.4.4: Support to the Truth and Reconciliation Commission

Description

This sub-program enables the Government of Canada (GoC) to meet its obligations under the Residential Schools Settlement Agreement to provide the Truth and Reconciliation Commission (TRC) with relevant documents, and to provide gestures of reconciliation. The Department has also agreed to provide some in-kind services to the Truth and Reconciliation Commission.

2012–2013 Financial Resources ($ millions) 2012–2013 Human Resources (FTEs)
Planned Spending Actual Spending Difference Planned Actual Difference
AANDC is reviewing its current methodology for assigning FTEs and associated salary costs to the sub-program level to ensure greater accuracy in future years.
0.0 0.6 (0.6) 0.0 5.5 (5.5)
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
To meet the Government of Canada's obligations towards the TRC, as per the Indian Residential Schools Settlement Agreement Number of Indian Residential School (IRS) relevant documents provided to the TRC

Note: AANDC is currently working with the TRC and the fifteen departments/ agencies that may be in possession of IRS relevant documents to define the term "relevant"

TRC is provided with all relevant IRS documents in the Government of Canada's holdings, in an organized manner by January 7, 2014 As of March 31, 2013, Canada had disclosed a total of 1.23 million active and semi-active documents to the TRC
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

On January 30, 2013, the Ontario Superior Court of Justice ruled that the Government of Canada is required to compile and organize its Indian residential schools-relevant documents held at Library and Archives Canada (LAC). This task was not originally anticipated by the Government. The identification and disclosure of relevant LAC documents will be a costly undertaking. Given the Government's original interpretation that its disclosure obligations for the documents held by LAC were limited to providing access to its archives, neither financial nor human resources were planned or in place to produce these documents. The Government will seek the necessary resources.

Following the court ruling, the Department began working with the Truth and Reconciliation Commission on a plan to identify and disclose all relevant documents held by LAC. As part of the plan, AANDC, LAC and the TRC have initiated a scoping exercise to determine the extent of research required to comply with the court's ruling. It is anticipated that this scoping exercise will significantly reduce the cost and timeline of the project.

In addition to the 1.2 million active and semi-active documents already provided by AANDC, LAC disclosed almost 2.3 million historical documents to the TRC, resulting in a total of approximately 3.5 million documents provided as of March 31, 2013.

The Minister participated in the TRC national events in Saskatoon and in Montreal.

Strategic Outcome 3: The Land and Economy

Full participation of First Nations, Inuit and Métis individuals and communities in the economy

The program descriptions in this report are those used in the 2012–2013 Report on Plans and Priorities (RPP). As part of the annual review of Departmental program structures and descriptions, some program titles and descriptions have been revised. New terminology will be used in the 2014–2015 RPP and the 2014–2015 Departmental Performance Report.

Program 3.1: Aboriginal Economic Development

Description

This program aims to build and promote viable Aboriginal businesses and opportunity ready communities. This program supports the vision of increasing participation of First Nation, Inuit and Métis individuals and communities in the Canadian economy and enables Aboriginal people to pursue the same opportunities for employment, income, and wealth creation as other Canadians by focusing on key areas of the Federal Framework for Aboriginal Economic Development: strengthening Aboriginal entrepreneurship; enhancing the value of Aboriginal assets; working with Employment and Social Development Canada in developing Aboriginal human capital; forging new and effective partnerships; and focusing the role of the federal government in the area of Aboriginal economic development. AANDC can ensure long term, sustainable economic development by promoting partnerships with provinces, territories and the private sector. Ultimately, viable Aboriginal businesses and opportunity-ready communities will strengthen the Canadian economy and benefit all Canadians.

2012–2013 Financial Resources ($ millions) 2012–2013 Human Resources (FTEs)
Total Expenditures (Main Estimates) Planned Spending Total Authorities (available for use) Actual Spending (authorities used) Difference (Planned vs. Actual Spending) Planned Actual Difference
The difference between Planned Spending and Total Authorities primarily reflects the carry-forward from previous years of funding for loans and guarantees of loans through the Indian Economic Development Account offset by reduced requirements for the development/activation of community assets.

The difference between Total Authorities and Actual Spending primarily reflects the carry-forward to future years of funding for loans and loan guarantees through the Indian Economic Development Account.

FTE variance is the result of the implementation of the Canada's Economic Action Plan 2012.

Total Authorities for 2012–2013 include Budgetary and Non-Budgetary amounts

264.9 264.9 321.1 238.1 26.8 463.3 439.1 24.2
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
*Data for this indicator is currently not available. Financial information published by First Nations does not distinguish between revenues generated through economic development and revenues generated by other means. The Department is currently revising this performance indicator to reflect information that is more readily available and attributable to the expected results
Viable Aboriginal businesses Survival rate for Aboriginal businesses after 3 years from receiving a financial contribution from Aboriginal Business Development Program 50% by March 31, 2013 54%
Percentage of Aboriginal procurement relative to total federal procurement spending 2% by March 31, 2013 5%
Opportunity ready communities Rate of growth for First Nation and Inuit communities revenues generated through economic development Rate of growth higher than the rate of inflation by March 31, 2013 Data not available*
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

Over $45 million was invested to support the viability of Aboriginal businesses, including investments in major business development opportunities. A new Program Delivery Partnership initiative was implemented with 14 qualified Aboriginal financial institutions across the country, to strengthen and streamline the delivery of capital and business support services to Aboriginal entrepreneurs.

An Aboriginal Participation Component was negotiated under the $1.17 billion contract for 5 Wing Goose Bay in Labrador, enabling access to over $100 million in procurement and employment opportunities for Aboriginal businesses. Federal funding of $12 million has been secured to support greater Aboriginal business participation as part of the $33 billion National Shipbuilding Procurement Strategy.

Six land use planning pilot projects, initiated in partnership with First Nations, have resulted in an increase in the effective coordination of housing, land, environment and economic development activities on-reserve. Data collection instruments, with respect to economic development programming, were reduced to 4 from 15, resulting in a significant reduction in the reporting burden faced by First Nations and Aboriginal organizations.

Regular discussions were held with the Assembly of First Nations to ensure that the launch of the Economic Task Force would take place in 2013. A new operational funding formula and prioritization methodology for the First Nations Land Management regime was implemented on April 1, 2012, as part of the First Nations Land Management initiative. Following the selection of 18 First Nations to enter the land management regime in 2012, the developmental phase of a 2-year community approval process has commenced and the final results are expected in 2013–2014.

Indian Oil and Gas Canada worked with the Indian Resource Council through a Joint Technical Committee to review and comment on policy approaches to modernize the regulations. They also provided information and held consultations with First Nations for their views on this subject.

Based on the challenges faced in implementing the Program Delivery Partnership initiative, future program plans will consider longer implementation and transition periods, to ensure partners have sufficient time to secure the skills and experience necessary when assuming additional responsibilities. This could involve implementation of a pilot project to identify and address issues in advance of a national program roll-out.

Sub-Program 3.1.1: Aboriginal Entrepreneurship

Description

A larger Aboriginal-owned private sector is key to improving income and employment outcomes for Aboriginal Canadians. Improving access to capital and strengthening other business development capacity tools, such as procurement, will encourage Aboriginal Canadians to start and/or expand their own businesses. This will increase and strengthen the Aboriginal private sector and contribute to the expected outcome, viable Aboriginal businesses. A strong private sector will also support the development of opportunity-ready communities.

2012–2013 Financial Resources ($ millions) 2012–2013 Human Resources (FTEs)
Planned Spending Actual Spending Difference Planned Actual Difference
56.6 57.6 (1.0) 81.1 72.3 8.8
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
*A reserve of $5.5 million was created in 2012–2013 for initial Program Delivery Partnership allocation purposes from AANDC's regional office budget allocations, normally used for business development project funding. Due to the reduction in regional allocations, fewer projects were funded internally in 2012–2013, in support of business creation, expansion, and business plan development projects.
Strengthened Entrepreneurship Number and value of Aboriginal business creation and expansion projects supported by Aboriginal Business Development Program (ABDP) 250 projects with $15 million in expenditures by March 31, 2013 170 projects, $12.3 million*
Number of business plans development projects supported by ABDP 150 by March 31, 2013 99*
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

A total of $12.3 million was provided to Aboriginal entrepreneurs in support of 170 business creation and expansion projects. In addition to business capitalization projects, $5.6 million was provided to support 99 business plan development projects and 91 business advisory service projects, of which $4.3 million was in support of 16 major resources and energy business projects.

A key service delivery gap was identified with respect to the business registration process under the federal Procurement Strategy for Aboriginal Businesses. In response, AANDC, in partnership with Industry Canada, launched an online business registry to enhance the ability of qualified businesses to win federal procurement contract opportunities and grow their businesses. In its first year of operation, this online registration process resulted in a 77% increase in registration levels over the previous fiscal year.

The second "Aboriginal Entrepreneur Conference and Trade Show" was supported by AANDC and hosted by Aboriginal Human Resource Council, showcasing Aboriginal entrepreneurs and businesses. As a result of increased promotional/outreach efforts, participation in the 2012 event surpassed the previous year's participation level by 60%.

Due to the implementation of the Program Delivery Partnership initiative and the need to re-allocate contributions budgets, fewer business creation, expansion, and business plan development projects were funded in 2012–2013. Going forward, more proactive approaches will be adopted to mitigate the need for internal budget re-allocations and ensure that contribution levels normally available for business creation, expansion, and business plan development projects can be maintained.

Sub-Program 3.1.2: Activation of Community Assets

Description

In the Aboriginal context, particularly on-reserve and in the North, major assets, such as land and surface and sub-surface resources, are frequently community owned, as opposed to individually owned. By building the value of their assets, communities can improve the well-being of their residents and generate income, thereby ensuring the maintenance and creation of wealth into the future. The systematic identification of economic opportunities, leveraging of partnerships, sound management of community assets, and modernization of the land management regime on-reserve all contribute to enhancing the value of community assets and enable communities to fully utilize them for economic development purposes. This sub-program will lead to enhanced value of Aboriginal assets, consistent with the Framework's Strategic Priorities.

2012–2013 Financial Resources ($ millions) 2012–2013 Human Resources (FTEs)
Planned Spending Actual Spending Difference Planned Actual Difference
182.9 155.3 27.6 311.4 297.2 14.2
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Enhanced value of Aboriginal assets Number and value of new commercial and industrial projects 3 projects — March 31, 2013 2 First Nations Commercial and Industrial Development Act (FNCIDA) projects with values estimated in the billions of dollars
Number of First Nations opting into alternative legislative, regulatory, and land and resource management regimes 10 by March 31, 2013 30 First Nations opted into First Nations Land Management Regime, FNCIDA, and/or First Nations Oil and Gas and Moneys Management Act
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

The Haisla Nation Liquefied Natural Gas Facility Regulations were completed under the First Nations Commercial and Industrial Development Act. The total benefit is estimated to be $24.5 billion in sales revenues over 10 years, with the net benefit of $16 billion. The Regulations address the regulatory gap that exists between on- and off-reserve laws by reproducing provincial rules and regulations that apply to similar projects. FNCIDA provides First Nations with the ability to attract major capital investments and increase opportunities for employment and capacity development. Major commercial and industrial projects contribute to the regional economy and increase employment, generating tax revenue benefiting all Canadians.

An internal re-allocation of up to $20 million over 2 years for First Nations Land Management (FNLM), announced in Canada Economic Action Plan 2011, allowed the implementation of a new operational funding formula and prioritized entry process resulting in 18 new entrants, paving the way for a multi-year expansion strategy.

Indian Oil and Gas Canada collaborated with the Indian Resource Council and First Nations in the development of oil and gas policy to modernize the Indian Oil and Gas Regulations, 1995. Opportunities were also leveraged with industry and First Nations to develop oil and gas assets on reserve lands. During 2012–2013, Indian Oil and Gas Canada collected $176.7 million (including $19.0 million collected pursuant to clause 5.08 of the Saskatchewan Treaty Land Entitlement Agreement) on behalf of First Nations as a result of these operations.

Through the Community Economic Opportunities Program, over $16 million was invested in 218 projects across Canada, providing more community employment and revenues, greater utilization of lands and resources, enhanced community economic infrastructure, more contracts and sales from community businesses and enhanced capacity within communities to address future economic opportunities.

Following the 2012 expansionFootnote 10, feedback suggested there was not sufficient time and a lack of support material to assist with the completion of the FNLM application for entry. The Department developed a FNLM Readiness Guide, which has been posted on the AANDC website, to assist First Nations and orientation has been provided to FNLM regional staff. For future expansion, an increase in time for the First Nations to complete their application will be provided. FNLM headquarters will ensure regional and Resource Centre engagement as early as possible to complete preparatory work.

Sub-Program 3.1.3: Strategic Federal Investments and Partnerships

Description

This sub-program refers to the building of relationships and partnerships that will enable Aboriginal economic development. For the government to increase the participation of Aboriginal Canadians in the economy it is necessary to forge partnerships with the provinces and territories, the private sector, and Aboriginal organizations and institutions. This sub-program will contribute to opportunity-ready communities, viable Aboriginal businesses, and a skilled Aboriginal labour force. It will identify all existing programming and services related to Aboriginal economic development and align federal investments under them. It will also identify and address gaps in the current suite of programming by leveraging funds that will enable Aboriginal Canadians to act on a specific and sectoral economic opportunity that currently falls outside the scope of existing federal programs. Key sectors of interest in 2012–2013 are: agriculture, energy, fisheries, forestry, and mining. This sub-program will ensure a partnership-based and whole-of-government approach to federal efforts on Aboriginal economic development by establishing a Federal Coordinating Committee to oversee the implementation of the federal framework for Aboriginal economic development; strengthening the National Aboriginal Economic Development Board; undertaking economic research; and conducting ongoing engagement with stakeholders and Aboriginal Canadians. It will contribute directly to the outcome, strategic federal investments.

2012–2013 Financial Resources ($ millions) 2012–2013 Human Resources (FTEs)
Planned Spending Actual Spending Difference Planned Actual Difference
Due to rounding, difference does not reflect figures shown.
25.4 25.3 0.2 70.7 69.6 1.1
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Enhanced cooperation and collaboration with internal partners, Aboriginal stakeholders and other federal departments Number of meetings held with Aboriginal stakeholders and/or federal partners on the implementation of the Framework (e.g., National Economic Development Committee for Inuit Nunangat, National Aboriginal Economic Development Board, Federal Coordination Committee for Aboriginal Economic Development) per year 10 by March 31, 2013 10
Strategic investments in Aboriginal economic opportunities Dollar value of non federal funds leveraged partners under the Strategic Partnerships Initiative $5 million by March 31, 2013 $16,369,292
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

With 13 partnering federal departments and agencies, the Strategic Partnership Initiative is an innovative, horizontal program intended to coordinate federal efforts with respect to supporting Aboriginal participation in complex resource development opportunities.

As a result of the program, federal partners have a mechanism to collectively identify opportunities for investment, assess and make project approvals, leverage non-federal sources of funding, monitor progress and report on outcomes. In addition, the umbrella terms and conditions of the program enable federal partners to flow funding to recipients through a single contribution agreement.

In 2012–2013, over $14 million was invested for twelve major initiatives under the Strategic Partnership Initiative. This resulted in 40 formal partnerships being established, leveraging an additional $26 million from other sources in support of these plans. In total, 157 Aboriginal communities participated in projects under this program this year.

The 2012 governance review of the Strategic Partnership Initiative recognized opportunities for greater transparency in decision-making, better consistency in investments aligned with government priorities, and improved results. As a result, an Investment Committee was established to determine priority areas for funding, placing greater focus on opportunity-driven initiatives, particularly large resource developments, and related activities that will increase community readiness to participate at all stages of development.

In February 2013, a number of opportunities were presented by partners to the Investment Committee for consideration and it was determined that 13 proposals aligned well with the direction of the program — these were given final approval by the Federal Coordination Committee on April 12, 2013. Supported initiatives include mining in the Labrador Trough, British Columbia Tourism, activities associated with the National Shipbuilding Procurement Strategy in the Atlantic and British Columbia Regions, and support of an Aboriginal Aquaculture Initiative. Two other enterprises in the agriculture and forestry sectors continue to receive support as a result of previous funding decisions.

Program 3.2: Federal Administration of Reserve Land

Description

This program aims to ensure that the Crown fulfills its statutory and fiduciary obligations as the administrator of reserve lands held in trust for the use and benefit of the First Nation for whom the land was set aside. This is achieved through the timely response to requests for land transactions, the additions to reserve, the clarity of reserve boundaries, the designation of land for economic development purposes, and environmental management, all of which preserve the principles of communal use and benefit. Economic benefits accrue to Aboriginal communities, and ultimately enhance the Canadian economy, through the activation of reserve lands and the honouring of treaty obligations.

2012–2013 Financial Resources ($ millions) 2012–2013 Human Resources (FTEs)
Total Expenditures (Main Estimates) Planned Spending Total Authorities (available for use) Actual Spending (authorities used) Difference (Planned vs. Actual Spending) Planned Actual Difference
Due to rounding, difference does not reflect figures shown.

The difference between Planned Spending and Total Authorities primarily reflects: additional funding provided through Supplementary Estimates or re-allocated internally for on-reserve costs incurred by provincial/territorial or other emergency management organizations as required under the Emergency Management Assistance Program; funding provided for the assessment, management and remediation of federal contaminated sites; and, reduced funding requirement reflecting the deferral of activities associated with the implementation of treaty land entitlement in Saskatchewan. Specifically, payments to the Saskatchewan Association of Rural Municipalities and to the Province of Saskatchewan for compensation for the loss of their tax base as a result of the settlement of treaty land are not required in 2012–2013 due to delays in the transfer of lands to reserve status; this deferred funding that was not required in 2012–2013 has been reprofiled to 2013–2014 when it will be available for the intended purpose.

FTE variance is the result of the implementation of the Canada's Economic Action Plan 2012.

53.0 53.0 113.5 112.4 (59.5) 154.9 138.0 16.9
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Timely administration of reserve land, and resource activities Service standards met (10 days for registration at HQ) 90% by March 31, 2013 46% of instruments were registered in 10 business days
Percentage of leases and permits managed in NetLands (i.e., number of new leases and permits registered in the Indian Land Registry compared to number tracked in the NetLands monitoring system) 70% by March 31, 2013 61% of new leases and permits registered in ILRS were tracked in NetLands
On-reserve contaminated sites are remediated to ensure the protection of human health and the safety of the environment Number of contaminated sites remediated 6 by March 31, 2013 7 contaminated sites were remediated and closed
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

Last year, AANDC undertook a significant shift in devolving land registration functions to regions, and eliminating duplicative functions previously performed by personnel in the National Capital Region. This was done in order to streamline the land registration process, reduce administrative barriers and enable First Nations to leverage the equity in their lands at the pace of business or as opportunities arise. These changes had a short term impact on meeting targets associated with registration and tracking in the Netlands monitoring system. However, training and outreach over the fall of 2012 and the creation of a regional support centre has better positioned AANDC to meet its registration service standards in the years ahead.

An Internal Audit of Land Management noted that the there is no integration between the Indian Land Registry System and Netlands that allows for the direct transfer of data, and recommended conducting a feasibility study to determine whether alternative systems or methods for tracking leases and permits could be introduced to eliminate this inefficiency. AANDC will explore the potential to employ other, more efficient methods.

The Contaminated Sites Management Program supported activities for 61 environmental site assessments and remedial activities on 54 high priority sites, successfully meeting its target. As of March 31, 2013, AANDC was managing 2,392 active contaminated sites, of which 293 are high risk contaminated sites south of 60°.

Surpassing the number of contaminated sites remediated is largely attributable to increased internal communication and coordination, which provided a foundation for developing streamlined project management processes to effectively manage the budget allocations of the Contaminated Sites Management Program. For example, an increased understanding of regional departmental needs and capacity for program delivery better positioned this program to successfully seek and deploy additional funds from other sectors and federal departments.

Sub-Program 3.2.1: Additions to Reserve

Description

This sub-program involves adding land to existing reserves and creating new reserves. These activities fall under three broad categories: Legal Obligations, Community Expansion and New Reserves/Other. The bulk of this work contributes to the implementation of Treaty Land Entitlement and other specific claim settlement agreements, and thereby to reconciliation between First Nations and the Crown. The land transfer process requires AANDC to exercise due diligence through environment assessments, land appraisals, land survey, consultations and resolution of third party interests.

2012–2013 Financial Resources ($ millions) 2012–2013 Human Resources (FTEs)
Planned Spending Actual Spending Difference Planned Actual Difference
Due to rounding, difference does not reflect figures shown.
13.8 9.5 4.4 51.6 39.2 12.4
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
*The program is not reporting performance information for the 'legal and political obligations met' expected result, as the indicator was intended to measure the timeliness of the processing function that occurred at headquarters. This indicator is no longer relevant, as this function was eliminated as one measure to streamline the processing of Ministerial orders.
Legal and political obligations met Percentage of Ministerial orders processed within service standard (100 business days for Treaty Land Entitlement obligations in Manitoba and 75 business days for Treaty Land Entitlement obligations in Saskatchewan) 100% by March 31, 2013 N/A*
First Nation land identified for economic development opportunities Number of ATR submissions with economic development component 10 by March 31, 2013 17
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

Additions to reserve (ATR) play an important role in supporting economic development both on- and off-reserve. In 2012–2013, land that was set apart as reserve supported commercial development, new revenue from agricultural activities, and a range of commercial activity, such as gas stations, convenience and grocery stores.

A November 2012 Standing Senate Committee on the Aboriginal Peoples Report noted that the Additions to Reserve process is challenged by high costs, lengthy timelines and difficult negotiations with third parties. In the period 2012–2013, the Department participated in a Joint Working Group with the Assembly of First Nations to examine opportunities to improve the Additions to Reserve policy and process and to examine opportunities to address these issues. The Joint Working Group explored a number of options to improve the policy, including streamlining the Additions to Reserve proposal, clarifying roles and responsibilities and facilitating economic development.

Additionally, AANDC undertook immediate steps to streamline the internal review and processing steps in the process. As a result of these changes, the approval process has been reduced by several months.

Sub-Program 3.2.2: Registration of Rights and Interests in Reserve Lands

Description

This sub-program fulfills statutory requirements for the Department to maintain land registries: Indian Lands Registry, First Nations Land Registry and Self Governing First Nations Land Registry. The operation of the lands registries involves examining, registering and maintaining documents related to such rights and interests (i.e., leases, permits, easements, licences and Certificates of Possession). This sub-program includes the internal survey program which defines the extent of these registered rights and interests. The statutory duties for the establishment of Rights and Interests in reserve land are carried out in accordance with the Indian Act and the Canada Lands Surveys Act.

2012–2013 Financial Resources ($ millions) 2012–2013 Human Resources (FTEs)
Planned Spending Actual Spending Difference Planned Actual Difference
0.0 3.2 (3.2) 17.2 15.1 2.1
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Individual and Third party interests are legally supported by Indian Act land tenure Number of registered instruments 10,000 by March 31, 2013 8,974 instruments
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

A shortfall in achieving the annual target reflects a decrease in the demand for the granting of individual and third party interests under the Indian Act land management provisions, in comparison to the level experienced in the past three years. It can also be attributed to several other factors, including fewer requests to register permits, leases and lease renewals in comparison to the two previous years, including a decline in residential leases, and communication and grazing permits.

The Jobs and Growth Act, 2012Footnote 11, which received Royal Assent on December 14, 2012, streamlined the land designation process that permits leasing on-reserve for First Nations operating under the Indian Act. It is anticipated that there will now be an increase in the number of designations and resulting leases.

Sub-Program 3.2.3: Clarity of Reserve Boundaries

Description

This sub-program is related to the statutory requirement to maintain a surrendered land registry which is now part of the Indian Lands Registry. This sub-program clarifies title through historical research, returns land to reserve that has been expropriated or surrendered without sale as well as processes section 35 expropriations. It also includes the Reserve Boundary Program which provides proper demarcation of external reserve boundaries which define the extent of both the federal jurisdiction and the extent of the land set aside for the individual band in accordance with section 18 of the Indian Act. These boundaries must be maintained on a cyclical basis to prevent encroachment and to correct for natural erosion and accretion.

2012–2013 Financial Resources ($ millions) 2012–2013 Human Resources (FTEs)
Planned Spending Actual Spending Difference Planned Actual Difference
0.0 0.8 (0.8) 1.2 0.7 0.5
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Certainty of the extent of reserve boundaries and federal jurisdiction Number of km of reserve boundary reviewed (upon receipt of $2.6 million survey funding proposal) 225 by March 31, 2013 336
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

AANDC increased the certainty of the extent of 336 km of reserve boundaries with the exploration of innovative ways of delivering survey services. For example, in 2012–2013 the National Aboriginal Land Management Association piloted survey delivery in Ontario, British Columbia and the Northwest Territories, in order to build capacity within the Aboriginal sector and test more efficient delivery models.

Additionally, work continued on the Parcel Fabric Renewal Pilot (PFRP) to stimulate investment in communities such as Innu Takuaikan Uashat Mak Mani-Utenam First Nation is substantially completed. Findings and recommendations were developed in partnership with Natural Resources Canada and proposed integrating land management, including the development of community parcel planning, land use planning, bylaw and governance and community capacity building. The Parcel Fabric Renewal Pilot has demonstrated that an integrated land management approach is critical in providing Aboriginal communities with a solid foundation for community and economic development. Three of the five communities that were part of the pilot project were able to resolve long standing land issues and are consequently in the process of entering the First Nations Land Management Program.

Sub-Program 3.2.4: Environmental Management

Description

This sub-program supports compliance with federal environmental legislation, regulations and policies, the reduction of environmental liabilities, and the development of environmental and sustainable development. As outlined in the Environmental Stewardship Strategy, it facilitates the implementation of an integrated approach to environmental and natural resource management for reserve lands in order to protect the health and safety of communities, as well as the integrity of the environment while promoting economic and social development opportunities. Working in partnership with First Nations, this sub-program contributes to sustainable development on-reserve.

2012–2013 Financial Resources ($ millions) 2012–2013 Human Resources (FTEs)
Planned Spending Actual Spending Difference Planned Actual Difference
39.2 99.0 (59.8) 85.0 83.0 2.0
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
*Due to significant changes to the Canadian Environmental Assessment Act, 2012, and new requirements to have a process to mitigate environmental impacts for non-designated projects, efforts were redirected to developing an Environmental Management Approach (EMA) to respond to these changes and assess environmental impacts of projects.
Departmental systems and tools are in place to ensure AANDC is meeting its environmental obligations Percentage of existing environmental policies and directives updated 100% by March 31, 2013 N/A*
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

In 2012–2013, AANDC initiated the development of a departmental Environmental Management System. A draft Environmental Management System engagement framework was developed, a gap analysis was conducted and environmental components were identified in preparation to begin updating and modernizing its environmental policy framework.

As a result of significant changes to the Canadian Environmental Assessment Act, 2012, and the requirements to have a process in place to mitigate environmental impacts for non-designated projects, efforts were redirected to developing an Environmental Management Approach to respond to these changes and assess environmental impacts of projects. AANDC has worked closely with other federal authorities and key environmental regulators on the development of the Environmental Management Approach and supporting tools, and other federal lands holders have identified AANDC as a leader in this area.

A review was conducted of the performance of the Emergency Management Program Assistance during the 2011–2012 Manitoba Floods. The review suggests that AANDC more clearly define its relationships with all external stakeholders and put in place appropriate governance structures, protocols and agreements to ensure fulfillment of its responsibilities. In response to the review's findings, Emergency Management Program Assistance will: further leverage existing capital facilities and maintenance programming and develop options to reinforce emergency mitigation activities including those underway within Public Safety Canada; develop a national First Nations Emergency Management Manual on roles, responsibilities, protocols and guidelines; develop a formalized structure which will clarify the roles and responsibilities of AANDC headquarters in the decision making process during an event; coordinate the efforts of agencies and resources as they work together toward safely responding, controlling and mitigating an emergency incident; and develop a risk-based model that will support the Department and First Nations in implementing appropriate mitigation activities.

Program 3.3: Community Infrastructure Theme I: Addressing Climate Change and Air Quality Theme II: Maintaining Water Quality and Availability

Description

This program supports First Nation communities in acquiring, constructing, owning, operating and maintaining a base of infrastructure that protects their health and safety and enables their engagement in the economy. This program provides funding and advice to support housing, capacity building and community infrastructure, including water and wastewater systems, education facilities, roads and bridges, electrification, and community buildings. Ultimately, this program enables First Nations to participate more fully in the Canadian economy by establishing a base of safe infrastructure that meets established standards, and a housing infrastructure that meets the needs of First Nation communities.

2012–2013 Financial Resources ($ millions) 2012–2013 Human Resources (FTEs)
Total Expenditures (Main Estimates) Planned Spending Total Authorities (available for use) Actual Spending (authorities used) Difference (Planned vs. Actual Spending) Planned Actual Difference
The difference between Planned Spending and Total Authorities primarily reflects reallocations to address pressures in other programs, notably Education and Social Development, partially offset by incremental funding provided through Supplementary Estimates to support the implementation of the First Nations Water and Wastewater Action Plan and the construction and/or renovation of schools on reserves.

FTE variance is the result of the renewal of the First Nations Water and Wastewater Action Plan (FNWWAP) which had originally been scheduled to sunset in 2012–2013. This amount is also partially offset by the implementation of the Canada's Economic Action Plan 2012.

1,045.4 1,045.4 1,075.8 1,073.4 (28.0) 215.5 248.5 (33.0)
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
*Community Well-Being Index from Census 2011 not currently available
First Nation communities have a base of infrastructure that protects the health and safety and enables engagement in the economy Positive change in rating in the Community Well-Being Index (employment, income, education and housing sub-indices) Greater than 57 by March 31, 2016 Baseline for 2006*
57 on-reserve
77 off-reserve
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

As of March 31, 2013, Bill S-8, the Safe Drinking Water for First Nations Act, was in Second Reading in Parliament. Bill S-8 received Royal Assent in June 2013. The Atlantic Policy Congress is developing proposed technical benchmarks which could be used as a model by other Regions to develop regulatory regimes for water and wastewater. AANDC continues to build and maintain strong relationships with partners and key stakeholders.

AANDC is delivering on Canada's Economic Action Plan 2012 announcement to invest $175 million over three years to improve access to quality education facilities for First Nations. To date, these funds have supported 12 school projects and a Public Private Partnership business case.

To reduce the burden of First Nation recipient reporting, AANDC has reduced the number of data collection instruments for the Capital Facilities and Maintenance Program from 17 to five. In response to the Internal Audit Report of Water and Wastewater Infrastructure, AANDC has improved Annual Performance Inspection guidelines towards standardizing inspection processes, producing consistent data, and strategically targeting funding. AANDC has also refined school inspection processes, and produced new School Design Standards and Guide. The resulting School Assessment Module is being integrated into the existing Asset Condition Reporting System.

Current procurement guidance documentation for First Nations provides only one example of a procurement model, which may have impaired the use of alternative servicing solutions in broader segments of the industry. The Canada-Ontario Drinking Water Initiative offered an opportunity to explore other models. Preliminary results suggest the projects carried out under such models incur significantly lower initial capital costs than traditional procurement. AANDC will revise its procurement guidance documents to provide broader options to First Nations.

Sub-Program 3.3.1: Water and Wastewater Infrastructure Theme II: Maintaining Water Quality and Availability

Description

This sub-program supports the provision of funding for the planning, design, construction, acquisition, operation and maintenance of infrastructure facilities, including: community water supply, treatment and distribution systems; and community wastewater collection, treatment and disposal systems. It includes the provision of funding for: coordination, training and capacity building for activities related to water and wastewater facilities; identification of on-reserve water and wastewater infrastructure needs; development of water and wastewater infrastructure capital plans; and the design, and ongoing implementation of water and wastewater facilities maintenance management practices. The goal is to support First Nations in meeting health and safety standards and providing their residents with similar levels of service to off-reserve communities. First Nations identify their priorities and needs and present project proposals to the Department. Grants and contribution funding is provided for projects based on a priority assessment.

2012–2013 Financial Resources ($ millions) 2012–2013 Human Resources (FTEs)
Planned Spending Actual Spending Difference Planned Actual Difference
193.7 302.5 (108.8) 20.2 77.0 (56.9)
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
*These performance indicators support the FSDS target 3.10 Increase the percentage of First Nation communities with acceptable (defined as low) water and wastewater facility risk ratings by 2013. For more information see the DSDS website.

A total of 1140 funded water and wastewater treatment systems were inspected in the 2012–2013 Annual Performance Inspection. Out of 691 inspected water treatment systems, 38% were low risk, 43% were medium risk and 19% were high risk. Out of 449 inspected wastewater treatment systems, 43% were low risk, 46% were medium risk and 10% were high risk.

First Nation communities have a base of safe water and wastewater that meets established standards Percentage of First Nations drinking water systems that have LOW risk ratings* 35% by March 31, 2013
50% by March 31, 2015
38% of First Nations drinking water systems have LOW risk ratings, exceeding the 2012–2013 target of 35%
Percentage of First Nations wastewater systems that have LOW risk ratings* 50% by March 31, 2013
70% by March 31, 2015
43% of First Nations wastewater systems have LOW risk ratings, which does not meet the 2012–2013 target of 50%
Percentage of First Nations drinking water systems with treated water that meets prescribed standards in the Guidelines for Canadian Drinking Water Quality 60% by March 31, 2013
85% by March 31, 2015
69% of First Nations drinking water systems with treated water meet prescribed standards in the Guidelines for Canadian Drinking Water Quality, exceeding the 2012-2013 target of 60%
Percentage of First Nations wastewater systems producing treated water that meet the requirements specified in the Wastewater Systems Effluent Regulations 80% of systems included under the Wastewater Systems Effluent Regulations by March 31, 2013

100% of systems included under the Wastewater Systems Effluent Regulations by March 31, 2016
68% of First Nations wastewater systems producing treated water meet the requirements specified in the Wastewater Systems Effluent Regulation, which does not meet the 2012–2013 target of 80%
Percentage of First Nation communities that have primary operators certified to the level of the wastewater systems* 47% by March 31, 2013 61% of primary operators are certified to level of wastewater systems, exceeding the 2012–2013 target of 47%
Percentage of First Nation communities that have primary operators certified to the level of the drinking water systems* 55% by March 31, 2013 64% of primary operators are certified to level of drinking water systems, exceeding the 2012–2013 target of 55%
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

In 2012–2013, AANDC invested $302.5 million to support water and wastewater infrastructure on reserve through: enhanced capacity building and operator training, enforceable standards and protocols, and infrastructure investments. Although risk levels have improved since the 2009–2011 National Assessment of First Nations Water and Wastewater Systems, more needs to be done.

In 2012–2013, new Minimum Program Requirements for the Circuit Rider Training Program (CRTP) were developed to standardize the delivery of on-site, hands-on training and mentoring for on-reserve water and wastewater system operators. AANDC invests approximately $10 million annually to support the CRTP.

As of March 31, 2013, Bill S-8, the Safe Drinking Water for First Nations Act, was in Second Reading in Parliament. Bill S-8 received Royal Assent in June 2013. The Government of Canada will now work together with First Nations to develop proposals for regulations. With support from AANDC, the Atlantic Policy Congress has been developing an Atlantic Protocol with proposed technical benchmarks based on existing regulations governing drinking water, wastewater, and protection of sources of drinking water in the Atlantic Provinces, which could form the basis for regulatory regimes in other Regions.

Procurement and construction was initiated for four systems under the five-year Canada-Ontario First Nations Drinking Water Initiative in fiscal 2012–2013. The use of alternative procurement methods and of a collaborative project management governance model has resulted in greater competitiveness, lowers costs and a wider range of technologies available to First Nations.

The Internal Audit Report of Water and Wastewater Infrastructure conducted in 2012–2013 found inconsistencies in the annual inspection process carried out on First Nation water and wastewater systems. In response, AANDC issued new Annual Performance Inspections guidelines to improve consistency in data collection and reporting.

Sub-Program 3.3.2: Education Facilities

Description

This sub-program supports the provision of funding for the planning, design, construction/ acquisition, renovation, repair, replacement, operation and maintenance of federally- or band-operated elementary/secondary education facilities (including school buildings, teacheragesFootnote 12 and student residences), and any related facility services. This includes the identification and acquisition of necessary land rights. This sub-program supports the provision of funding for the acquisition, replacement, and repair of furniture, equipment and furnishing for federally- and band-operated schools, teacherages and student residences and for the identification of education facility needs, the development of education facility plans and the design and ongoing implementation of maintenance management practices. It also supports the provision of funding for agreements with provincial school boards for the planning, design, construction and acquisition of facilities, for the elementary/secondary education of Indian children.

2012–2013 Financial Resources ($ millions) 2012–2013 Human Resources (FTEs)
Planned Spending Actual Spending Difference Planned Actual Difference
225.5 225.6 (0.1) 0.0 0.0 0.0
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
*63% of schools are deemed to be "in greater than fair condition", which does not meet the 2012–2013 target of 70%. Results are affected by data availability. There are many assets with unknown condition ratings, either because no information is available or the information available is not valid or is outdated. The School Assessment Module with refined inspection questions will set a new standard for data management so that results for 2013–2014 should be more consistent.
First Nation communities have a base of education facilities that meet established standards Percentage of First Nations schools with a greater than "fair" condition rating (based on physical/ structural conditions) as assessed through Asset Condition Report inspections 70% by March 31, 2013 63%*
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

To improve First Nations' access to quality education facilities, AANDC has delivered the first year of a three year commitment, announced as part of Canada's Economic Action Plan 2012, to invest $175 million for this objective by building and renovating schools on-reserve, and by exploring new ways to deliver infrastructure. Approximately $25 million was expended in 2012–2013 to support 12 school projects and to evaluate a Public Private Partnership project. As of March 31, 2013, one new school is open, and another has begun construction. Two more are preparing for construction in 2013–2014, and four school projects will enter the design phase. Four additional school projects were selected for funding under the innovation envelope.

The School Assessment Module is being integrated into the existing Asset Condition Reporting System and will standardize inspection processes. New AANDC School Design Standards and Guide will streamline project management and funding for education facilities to reduce the costs of constructing new schools, and will help the Department and First Nations improve education outcomes.

Canada's Economic Action Plan 2012 has enabled the Department to further explore Public Private Partnerships and alternative approaches to constructing schools on-reserve. The development and implementation of the innovation envelope has received encouraging interest from First Nation communities to use innovative mechanisms to finance, procure, design and construct school projects.

The process to develop a Public Private Partnership project differs from traditional procurement and requires a significant amount of preparatory work. Communities must be made aware of these additional steps so that they are not viewed as unnecessary delays. Accordingly, additional resources were used to inform community decision makers on the Public Private Partnership procurement process. When developing future Public Private Partnership projects, community information sessions will be held earlier in the process.

Sub-Program 3.3.3: Housing

Description

This sub-program supports the provision of funding for the planning, design, construction and acquisition of new housing units and renovation of existing housing units. Housing units include single units, multi-units, mobile homes, as well as "special needs" housing such as homes for the elderly, group homes, and homes for people who require assisted living but not medical care. This sub-program also supports the provision of funding for housing related activities such as operation and maintenance, inspection, and management of housing programs.

2012–2013 Financial Resources ($ millions) 2012–2013 Human Resources (FTEs)
Planned Spending Actual Spending Difference Planned Actual Difference
145.6 120.5 25.1 15.5 4.2 11.3
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
*"Adequate" is defined in the Year-end Reporting Handbook for the Housing Data Collection Instrument (DCI)

**82% of First Nations housing is deemed "adequate" as assessed and reported annually by First Nations, exceeding the 2012–2013 target of 72%. Housing results are based on data self-reported by First Nations in the Housing DCI. Since Housing results are self-reported and cannot be independently verified, they may fluctuate significantly year-over-year; therefore, caution should be used in relying on these results, which form only one element of program analysis.

Housing infrastructure meets the needs of First Nation communities Percentage of First Nations housing that is "adequate" as assessed and reported annually by First Nations* 72% by March 31, 2013 82%**
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

While the provision and management of housing on reserve lands is the responsibility of First Nations, the Government of Canada invests an average of $290 million in on-reserve housing each year: $155 million from Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Canada and $135 million from Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation (CMHC). In 2012–2013, AANDC funded several research papers and information sessions. AANDC and First Nations members and organizations collaborated and worked in partnership towards the common goal of improving housing outcomes on-reserve.

In May 2012, AANDC hired a research group to identify strategies to enable First Nations to achieve better housing outcomes. A two day workshop was held in Ottawa with a panel of twelve First Nations housing experts from First Nation communities and organizations. The $94,522 contract covered the cost of the session, and a report which identifies factors impacting the state of First Nations housing.

On January 22–23, 2013, fourteen First Nations and housing subject matter experts gathered for a session facilitated by the First Nations Building Officers Association to identify concrete actions to obtain better housing outcomes.

An audit of AANDC Housing program in June 2012, identified areas where management controls, practices and processes could be improved. One area noted was the Ministerial Loan Guarantee program in consultation with Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation. As a result of these recommendations, AANDC and the Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation recently signed an information-sharing Memorandum of Understanding. They will utilize the information to more effectively align program activities with community needs, management controls, and support First Nations in areas where they require greater capacity building assistance.

Sub-Program 3.3.4: Community Infrastructure Assets and Facilities

Description

This sub-program supports the provision of funding for the planning, design, construction, acquisition, operation and maintenance of community infrastructure assets and facilities. It also supports the provision of funding for coordination, training and capacity building for activities related to community infrastructure assets and facilities. The goal is to support First Nations in meeting health and safety standards and providing their residents with similar levels of service to off-reserve communities. Delivery of the sub-program is devolved to First Nations, in support of AANDC's policy of devolution of responsibilities to First Nations. First Nations identify their priorities and needs and present project proposals to the Department. Grants and contributions funding is provided for projects based on a priority assessment.

2012–2013 Financial Resources ($ millions) 2012–2013 Human Resources (FTEs)
Planned Spending Actual Spending Difference Planned Actual Difference
476.8 420.9 55.9 172.3 158.9 13.4
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
*86% of First Nation communities have access to broadband connectivity at a minimum of 1.5 mbps per household, per Industry Canada National Standards, exceeding the 2012–2013 target of 50%. When the target was established in 2010, information on connectivity in First Nation communities was incomplete; a conservative target was set pending more fulsome data. The target for 2015 will be revised to reflect the current information.

**54% of bridges have a greater than "fair" condition rating, which does not meet the 2012–2013 target of 70%. The results are affected by data availability. There are many assets with unknown condition ratings; unavailable data can impact results. The data set must be validated to confirm whether these assets are in use and whether they should continue to be measured.

***41% of roads have a greater than "fair" condition rating, which does not meet the 2012–2013 target of 45%. The results are affected by data availability. There are many assets with unknown condition ratings; unavailable data can impact results. The data set must be validated to confirm whether these assets are in use and whether they should continue to be measured.

First Nation communities have a base of safe infrastructure that meets established standards (e.g., fire protection, electricity, safe roads and bridges, and telecommunications) Percentage of First Nation communities with access to broadband connectivity 50% by March 31, 2013
70% by March 31, 2015
86%*
Percentage of bridges with greater than "fair" condition rating 70% by March 31, 2013
75% by March 31, 2015
54%**
Percentage of roads with greater than "fair" condition rating 45% by March 31, 2013 41%**
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

Under the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999, the Storage Tank Systems for Petroleum Products and Allied Petroleum Products Regulations require the immediate temporary removal from service of any leaking tanks. While First Nations are responsible for the compliance of their fuel tanks, AANDC offers financial assistance to bring into compliance fuel tanks associated with community infrastructure. Since April 2011, $39.6 million has been invested and 354 tanks have been made compliance-ready. The program is on track for all 750 high-priority tanks to be compliant by 2016.

AANDC's annual investments in fire protection help support healthy and safe First Nation communities, while helping to protect federal investments in First Nations infrastructure. In 2012–2013, AANDC examined First Nations' use of insurance, partnered with Kidde Canada for a smoke detector distribution campaign, and changed its method of collecting fire loss data to reduce the reporting burden for First Nations. AANDC contributed $30.6 million in 2012–2013 towards fire protection in First Nation communities for the operation and maintenance of fire departments, acquisition of firefighting equipment, firefighter training, and fire education initiatives.

Connectivity is essential to support Aboriginal online services such as e-commerce, e-learning, remote banking, e-health and online program reporting. From 2009 to 2013, AANDC has invested approximately $45 million, leveraging approximately $150 million with other federal departments, provinces, private sectors and First Nations organizations, resulting in 274 First Nation communities receiving improved services.

Sound roads and bridges are essential elements of community infrastructure. In 2012–2013, AANDC invested over $72 million in building and maintaining roads and bridges in First Nation communities, including $21.1 million for projects funded through the First Nations Infrastructure Fund (FNIF).

Connectivity projects are complex, and AANDC needs to continue supporting stronger First Nations proposals for rural broadband programs. The Department must continue to increase First Nations capacity, by continuing to work with National and Regional First Nations Organizations, to produce connectivity studies and to organize national workshops.

Sub-Program 3.3.5: Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency Theme I: Addressing Climate Change and Air Quality

Description

The ecoENERGY for Aboriginal and Northern Communities Program supports Aboriginal and northern communities, including off-grid communities, to reduce greenhouse gas emissions through the integration of proven renewable energy technologies such as residual heat recovery, biomass, geothermal, wind, solar and small hydro. The program provides funding support for the design and construction of renewable energy projects integrated with community buildings, and for the feasibility stages of larger renewable energy projects.

2012–2013 Financial Resources ($ millions) 2012–2013 Human Resources (FTEs)
Planned Spending Actual Spending Difference Planned Actual Difference
3.9 4.0 (0.1) 7.5 8.4 (0.9)
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
*These results feed into the Departmental Sustainable Development Strategy Performance Report
Reduced greenhouse gas emissions in Aboriginal and northern communities Projected Reductions in GHG Emissions resulting from all projects funded by the ecoEnergy for Aboriginal and Northern Communities Program (2011–2016) Projected 1.5 Megatonnes (Mt) by March 31, 2016 Projects funded in 2011–2012 and 2012–2013 are expected to result in a projected 2.4 Mt reduction of GHG emissions over the course of their lifespan*
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

In 2012–2013, the ecoENERGY for Aboriginal and Northern Communities Program (EANCP) utilized its financial and non-financial resources to deliver the following highlights.

The program received 110 proposals in 2012–2013, of which 39 were provided funding support. These projects were located in 39 different communities, 13 of which were off-grid communities and 20 communities that had not previously received funding from the EANCP. Projects funded in 2011–2012 and 2012–2013 are expected to result in a 2.4 megatonne reduction of greenhouse gas emissions over the course of the projects.

Included in the 39 proposals selected were five community projects in the Northwest Territories (NWT) (four biomass and one solar PV), which are expected to eliminate 103 kilotonnes of greenhouse gas emissions over the course of their lifetimes. The projects funded in the NWT are an example of how the Program collaborates with territorial governments to increase the uptake of renewable energy technologies in the North. Enhanced collaboration within the Department has allowed proposed projects to access the most appropriate AANDC funding sources. External collaboration led to the identification of new projects, better alignment of deliverables and multi-stakeholder discussions in Nunavut.

A key challenge facing the program is over-subscription. As a result, the program worked to support projects that will have the greatest impact on the community, in terms of project viability, relative levels of green house gas reductions and in fostering future reduction efforts.

In previous years, funds flowed to communities late in the year despite efficient proposal management processes. For 2012–2013, the program moved forward its application window, in order to provide funds to communities earlier in the fiscal year. Further adjustments in 2013–2014 are expected to enable communities to spend program funds more efficiently, achieving better project and overall program results.

Strategic Outcome 4: The North

Self-reliance, prosperity and well-being for the people and communities of the North

The program descriptions in this report are those used in the 2012–2013 Report on Plans and Priorities (RPP). As part of the annual review of Departmental program structures and descriptions, some program titles and descriptions have been revised. New terminology will be used in the 2014–2015 RPP and the 2014–2015 Departmental Performance Report.

Program 4.1: Northern Governance and People Theme I: Addressing Climate Change and Air Quality

Description

This program strengthens the North's communities and people by devolving to the governments of the North, province-like responsibilities for land and natural resources; by fostering effective intergovernmental relations with territorial governments and providing support to Territorial Commissioners; by reducing the costs of nutritious perishable foods and other essential items in isolated Northern communities; by providing grants for hospital and physician services in Nunavut and the Northwest Territories; by working with Northern communities to identify the risks and challenges posed by climate change and by advancing interests of Canadians and Northerners through circumpolar forums. Canadians and Northerners will benefit with territorial governments ultimately having more control over their own affairs.

2012–2013 Financial Resources ($ millions) 2012–2013 Human Resources (FTEs)
Total Expenditures (Main Estimates) Planned Spending Total Authorities (available for use) Actual Spending (authorities used) Difference (Planned vs. Actual Spending) Planned Actual Difference
The difference between Planned Spending and Total Authorities primarily reflects the carry-forward from previous years of funding for loan authorities as well as additional funding provided through Supplementary Estimates or re-allocated internally to support the operation of the Nutrition North Canada program.

The difference between Total Authorities and Actual Spending primarily reflects the carry-forward to future years of funding for these loan guarantees as well as the deferral of funding for implementation of the Agreement-in-Principle for Northwest Territories land and resources devolution; this deferred funding that was not required in 2012–2013 has been reprofiled to 2013–2014 when it will be available for the intended purpose.

Total Authorities for 2012–2013 include Budgetary and Non-Budgetary amounts

132.1 132.1 150.8 136.5 (4.4) 70.8 69.3 1.5
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
The people of the Northwest Territories and Nunavut are responsible for the governance of Northern land and resources Completion of devolution phases in NWT and Nunavut against the 5 phases devolution process (protocol, Agreement-in-Principle, final agreement, legislation and implementation) NWT: Complete Phase 3

Nunavut: Commence Phase 2 by March 31, 2013

NWT: Phase 3 of the devolution process completed with consensus of all parties on a final draft devolution agreement

Nunavut: Discussions preparatory to Phase 2 ongoing

Consumption of nutritious food in eligible communities Estimated weight of eligible food purchased per capita Increasing annually per capita by March 31, 2013 267 kg per capita of Subsidized Foods (streamlined food eligibility list). This represents a 5.5% increase over the volume of the same food items purchased in 2011–2012
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

AANDC continued to advance devolution of land and resource management in the Northwest Territories and in Nunavut.

Building on the signing of the 2011 Northwest Territories Lands and Resources Devolution Agreement-in-Principle, negotiations continued towards concluding a Final Devolution Agreement. Consensus of all parties on a final draft agreement was reached in March 2013, and the agreement was made available to the public and Aboriginal groups as part of both public and section 35 consultation efforts.

In May 2012, a Chief Federal Negotiator for Nunavut devolution was appointed. During 2012–2013, he met with the Government of Nunavut and Nunavut Tunngavik Incorporated, as well as other territorial stakeholders to identify the next steps required to advance negotiations.

Yukon devolution was completed in 2003 and has helped inform and guide the Department for similar processes in the Northwest Territories and in Nunavut. Negotiations to transfer "provincial-like" responsibility for land and resource management has been conducted according to a five-phase process in the Northwest Territories and it can be anticipated that a similar process will be followed in Nunavut (protocol, agreement in principle, final agreement, legislation and implementation).

The Department supported northern communities as well as food suppliers and retailers to carry out the transition of Nutrition North Canada — the Government's food subsidy program for isolated northern communities. Nutrition North Canada enabled supply chain efficiencies that contributed to an 8% decrease of the cost of the Revised Northern Food Basket in fully eligible communities. As a result, healthy food purchased in these communities increased to 311 kg per capita in 2012–2013.

AANDC worked closely with the Nutrition North Canada Advisory Board, which represents the perspectives and interests of northern residents and communities and provides advice to the Minister on the management of the Program. In 2012–2013, three successful Advisory Board meetings, including two public sessions were held and the First Report of the Board26 for the period February 2011 to March 2012 was released in both official languages.

Sub-Program 4.1.1: Political Development and Intergovernmental Relations

Description

This sub-program facilitates the growth of strong, effective and efficient government structures in the North. The devolution of province-like responsibilities for land and resource management will strengthen northern governance. Support for legislation and policy initiatives, the advancement of intergovernmental processes, the appointment of Territorial Commissioners and general federal–territorial relationships are also supported by this sub-program. Additionally, the interests of Canadians are reflected in circumpolar cooperation activities. Also, grants are provided to Territorial Governments for hospital and physician services.

2012–2013 Financial Resources ($ millions) 2012–2013 Human Resources (FTEs)
Planned Spending Actual Spending Difference Planned Actual Difference
The difference between Planned Spending and Actual Spending primarily reflects reduced/deferral of funding for implementation of the Agreement-in-Principle for Northwest Territories land and resources devolution; this deferred funding that was not required in 2012–2013 has been reprofiled to 2013–2014 when it will be available for the intended purpose.
70.2 66.8 3.4 55.0 52.9 2.1
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Devolution of land and resource management to Government of Northwest Territories Completion of devolution phases in NWT against the 5 phases devolution process (5-phases process: protocol, AIP, final agreement, legislation and implementation) Complete Phase 3 by March 31, 2013 NWT: Phase 3 of the devolution process completed with consensus of all parties on a final draft devolution agreement
Devolution of land and resource management to Government of Nunavut Completion of devolution phases in Nunavut against the 5 phases devolution process (5-phases process: protocol, AIP, final agreement, legislation and implementation) Commence Phase 2 by March 31, 2013 Nunavut: Discussions preparatory to Phase 2 ongoing
Canadian interests are reflected in national and international Circumpolar cooperation activities Percentage of Canadian priorities actioned through activities under Arctic Council and Canada–Russia cooperation 80% by March 31, 2013 80%, which represents all priorities within AANDC's sphere of influence
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

Negotiations continued for a Final Devolution Agreement after the signing of the 2011 Northwest Territories Lands and Resources Devolution Agreement-in-Principle. Consensus of all parties on a final draft agreement was reached in March 2013, and the agreement was made available to the public and Aboriginal groups as part of both public and section 35 consultation efforts.

Based on experience from the Yukon, the Department has developed a rigorous implementation plan necessary to advance to phases four and five in the Northwest Territories. The legal obligation for the Crown to undertake section 35 consultations emerged after Yukon Devolution was completed and the Department has implemented an approach to meet this obligation by completing section 35 consultations prior to a Final Devolution Agreement.

In May 2012, a Chief Federal Negotiator for Nunavut devolution was appointed. During 2012–2013, he met with the Government of Nunavut and Nunavut Tunngavik Incorporated, as well as other territorial stakeholders to identify the next steps required to advance negotiations and to examine how land and resource management capacity can be improved in Nunavut.

In 2012–2013, AANDC provided policy advice and organizational support to Canada's senior arctic officials for two meetings in Sweden in November 2012, and in March 2013. In collaboration with the Department of Foreign Affairs and International Trade, AANDC participated in the consultative process and planning for Canada's Arctic Council Chairmanship, and the preparation for the May 2013 Ministerial meeting in Kiruna, Sweden. The Department also led Canada's delegation to the March 17th Arctic Council Sustainable Development Working Group to finalize deliverables for Sweden's chairmanship.

Under the AANDC's Memorandum of Understanding with the Ministry of Regional Development of the Russian Federation, the Department contributed to the strengthening of cultural and linguistic ties between the Arctic Athabaskan Council and the Ket of Krasnoyarsk, as well as between Nunavut Artists and the Indigenous Artists of Yamal-Nenets Autonomous District of Russia. A Northern Panel was organized at the Canada-Russia Construction Conference in Toronto in November 2012, which served to showcase northern expertise in cold climate construction. Another roundtable was held in Toronto in March 2013, to share Canada's northern innovative, consultative and regulatory approaches on Corporate Social Responsibility.

Sub-Program 4.1.2: Nutrition North

Description

This sub-program provides increased access to perishable nutritious food in isolated northern communities through a retail subsidy. It is supported by an Advisory Board that ensures that Northerners have a direct voice in the program. Eligible northern communities will benefit from improved access to healthy food.

2012–2013 Financial Resources ($ millions) 2012–2013 Human Resources (FTEs)
Planned Spending Actual Spending Difference Planned Actual Difference
Due to rounding, difference does not reflect figures shown.

The difference between Planned Spending and Actual Spending primarily reflects additional funding provided through Supplementary Estimates or re-allocated internally to support the operation of the Nutrition North Canada program.

57.5 65.1 (7.7) 8.4 9.0 (0.6)
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Subsidized food available in eligible communities Weight of eligible food shipped Kg per capita is stable or increasing annually by March 31, 2013 267 kg per capita of Subsidized Foods (streamlined food eligibility list). This represents a 5.5% increase over the volume of the same food items purchased in 2011–2012
Food basket prices Real price trend in acceptable range by March 31, 2013 8% decrease in prices for eligible foods since program implementation
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

The Department implemented the streamlined Subsidized Foods list, which focuses on perishable healthy foods. Nutrition North Canada subsidized 23.5 million kilograms of nutritious food shipped to isolated northern communities. Approximately 25% of this volume consisted of perishable vegetables and fruits, 21% was milk and other dairy products, 17% was fresh and frozen meat, poultry, and fish, and 11% was perishable grain products.

The program follows a market-driven model which is a sustainable, efficient, cost-effective and transparent means of helping Northerners access nutritious perishable food. Ongoing supply chain efficiency gains by retailers have enabled program dollars to go further. As a result, the cost of a healthy food basket in eligible communities has dropped an average of 8% since the implementation of Nutrition North Canada.

With the implementation of the Subsidized Foods list October 1, 2012, the Department completed an 18-month transition period from the Food Mail program. One of the lessons learned during that change period was the critical importance of public engagement and data access.

Insufficient data collection, transparency, communication and stakeholder relations were some of the issues associated with the former Food Mail program that the Department needed to address while moving forward. Active engagement between Nutrition North Canada and clients/stakeholders enhanced both the design and the delivery of the program. Notably, the creation of the northern-based Nutrition North Canada Advisory Board has provided an ongoing engagement vehicle for Northerners, stakeholders and experts. In 2012–2013, three Advisory Board meetings, including two public sessions in eligible Nutrition North Canada communities, were held in Norman Wells, NWT (June 2012), in Goose Bay–Happy Valley and Nain, Labrador (November 2012) and in Winnipeg (February 2013). The First Report of the Advisory Board for the period February 2011 to March 2012 was released in May 2013 on the Nutrition North Canada website in both official languages.

In 2012–2013, the Department launched the Nutrition North Canada Facebook page, providing a direct link between the program and the public.

Sub-Program 4.1.3: Climate Change Adaptation Theme I: Addressing Climate Change and Air Quality

Description

This sub-program provides funding support to Aboriginal and northern communities, governments and organizations to assess vulnerabilities to climate change, develop adaptation plans, and develop related information and tools. The program builds capacity at the community level and develops partnerships with territorial governments to address broad northern issues. The assessment of climate change impacts and adaptation planning enhances community resilience and facilitates the integration of climate change considerations into decision making.

2012–2013 Financial Resources ($ millions) 2012–2013 Human Resources (FTEs)
Planned Spending Actual Spending Difference Planned Actual Difference
4.4 4.5 (0.1) 7.5 7.3 0.2
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
*Target has been modified from the 2012–2013 Performance Measurement Framework of record as the program has been renewed.

**These results feed into the Departmental Sustainable Development Strategy Performance Report

Aboriginal and northern communities implement adaptation measures and decisions to protect community health and safety Number of communities implementing adaptation plans and measures 10 Communities over 5 years by March 31, 2016* Measurement of this indicator is expected to begin in 2013–2014**
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

The program supports Aboriginal and northern partners to build awareness of climate change impacts and develop adaptation measures. The Climate Change Adaptation Program (CCAP) funded 43 community and regional projects supporting development of vulnerability assessments, adaptation planning, tools/methods and best practices for assessment and planning, and knowledge dissemination. Nineteen of the projects involved 45 Aboriginal and northern communities and two projects addressed climate change at a regional scale.

The program provides up to $500,000 per year to each territorial government over 4 years. This funding will support communities to manage climate change related risks including territory specific and pan-arctic impacts, such as terrain mapping, pine beetle outbreak, and permafrost degradation. In 2012–2013, 22 of the 43 projects were completed under these funding agreements.

Through the Northern Infrastructure Standardization Initiative, CCAP supported pan-Northern consultation, decision making and technical expert committees engaged in the development of infrastructure standards which consider impacts on thermosyphonsFootnote 13, community drainage, permafrost on existing foundations and snow loading on roofs. The standards are expected to be completed in 2015–2016.

A key challenge for CCAP in 2012–2013 was oversubscription. It received 152 letters of interest and funded 21 community projects. This reflects a growing interest in addressing climate change impacts, however, it also presents a challenge to clearly identify communities that are particularly vulnerable to climate change, effectively build capacity, engage the community and provide meaningful information for decision makers. To better manage expectations, the program further defined project eligibility criteria to align with departmental mandates for the 2013–2014 funding year. CCAP is also testing climate impact costing methodologies and mapping climate risks in an effort to better understand regional and community level vulnerabilities.

Program 4.2: Northern Science and Technology Theme I: Addressing Climate Change and Air Quality Theme II: Maintaining Water Quality and Availability

Description

This program aims to support scientific research and technology in the North. Such support will aid researchers and scientists with increased access to programs and infrastructure to further research science and technology. The focus of this program is: researching and monitoring contaminants and their impacts on the ecosystem as carried out through the Northern Contaminants Program; supporting initiatives including the creation, management and dissemination of scientific data and results that contribute to informed public policy making; and supporting the work to establish the Canadian High Arctic Research Station (CHARS). Northerners and all Canadians will benefit from a knowledge base that supports health and sustainable development, and the positioning of Canada as an international leader in arctic science and technology.

2012–2013 Financial Resources ($ millions) 2012–2013 Human Resources (FTEs)
Total Expenditures (Main Estimates) Planned Spending Total Authorities (available for use) Actual Spending (authorities used) Difference (Planned vs. Actual Spending) Planned Actual Difference
The difference between Planned Spending and Total Authorities primarily reflects additional funding provided through the capital budget carry-forward for the Canadian High Arctic Research Station.
13.0 13.0 15.2 12.9 0.1 44.4 43.3 1.1
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
*These results feed into the Departmental Sustainable Development Strategy Performance Report
Northerners and all Canadians benefit from a knowledge base that supports health and sustainable development Percentage decrease in concentration of contaminants in the North 5% decrease in concentration over 1990 levels by March 31, 2014 Exceeded target for certain contaminants and target not met for mercury, as of March 31, 2013*
Canada is positioned as an international leader in arctic science and technology Launch of the Canadian High Arctic Research Station Completion of design concept for CHARS facility by March 31, 2013 Pre-design phase completed in December 2012. Schematic design in progress. Expected in May-June, 2013
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

The Northern Contaminants Program continued to monitor contaminant levels in wildlife and people in the Canadian North, contributing data, information and expertise to Canadian and international assessments of mercury and persistent organic pollutants, as well as to the Arctic Council's Arctic Monitoring and Assessment Programme (AMAP) and the Stockholm Convention's Global Monitoring Plan. The Northern Contaminants Program results provided the foundational science that informed the January 2013 global legally-binding treaty on Mercury, which will improve the health of arctic people and wildlife over the long-term. Nationally, the Northern Contaminants Program released a five-year assessment on mercury pollutants in the North.

The Government of Canada International Polar Year (IPY) Program concluded with the hosting of the final International IPY conference entitled "From Knowledge to Action". The conference was held in Montreal from April 22–27, 2012 and attendance exceeded expectations with over 3000 delegates from 42 countries. The final "IPY Canada Science Report", was also released at the conference. This report provides a synthesis of scientific results from over 100 authors that contributed to Canada's IPY Program. The conference and release of the synthesis report were the final deliverables from the International Polar Year Program and ensures that Canadians and Northerners benefit from the program's findings.

During the period 2012–2013, AANDC's project team for the Canadian High Arctic Research Station has been developing the Science and Technology program as well as the infrastructure requirements for the Station. This was done in consultation with stakeholders including the Cambridge Bay community, in order to create opportunities for greater prosperity and well-being of the people and communities of the North.

Sub-Program 4.2.1: Northern Contaminants Theme I: Addressing Climate Change and Air Quality Theme II: Maintaining Water Quality and Availability

Description

This sub-program engages Northerners and world-class Canadian scientists in research and monitoring of long-range contaminants in the Canadian Arctic. The health and well-being of all Northerners is augmented as northern people consume traditional/country foods based in part on information and advice made possible by this sub-program. The sub-program has international influence as a leader in the Arctic Council — Arctic Monitoring and Assessment Programme, and is a key contributor of scientific data to international agreements, such as the United Nations Environment Program Stockholm Convention, and helps to position Canada as an international leader in arctic science. The Northern Contaminants sub-program generated data is used to assess ecosystem and human health, and the results of these assessments are used to influence policy that results in action to eliminate contaminants from long-range sources. This action ensures the safety and security of traditional country foods that are important to the health of Northerners and Northern communities.

2012–2013 Financial Resources ($ millions) 2012–2013 Human Resources (FTEs)
Planned Spending Actual Spending Difference Planned Actual Difference
Due to rounding, difference does not reflect figures shown.
5.0 4.4 0.5 5.7 7.6 (1.9)
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
*These results feed into the Departmental Sustainable Development Strategy Performance Report

**The value of 4,000 represents a "one-off" year due to a large project called the Inuit Health Survey that took place prior to 2012–2013. Normally, NCP northern engagement varies between 300 and 600 Northerners per year.

Reduced contaminant related risk to ecosystem and human health Percentage decrease in concentrations of previously identified contaminants in northern wildlife 5% decrease in concentration over 1990 levels by March 31, 2014 Exceeded targets for legacy Persistent Organic Pollutants, but not for mercury, as of March 31, 2013

These results contribute to target 2.3 of the DSDS*

Percentage decrease in concentrations of previously identified contaminants among northern populations 5% decrease in concentration over 1990 levels by March 31, 2014 Exceeded targets for most contaminants of concern, as of March 31, 2013*
Northerners are able to participate in contaminants research Number of Northerners engaged in NCP activities (number of individuals and number of person days) 4,000** Northerners engaged by March 31, 2013 1,075 Northerners engaged in NCP activities this year
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

The Northern Contaminants Program continued to make significant progress towards achieving its targets in 2012–2013. Concentrations of the original 12 persistent organic pollutants listed in the Stockholm Convention have decreased in arctic wildlife between 5% and 90% since 1990. Ten new pollutants were added to the Stockholm Convention since 2009 and some are starting to stabilize in recent years. Mercury concentrations have been highly variable, most showing an increasing trend since 1990. The Northern Contaminants Program released a five-year assessment on mercury pollutants in Canada's North.

The program's results provided the foundational science that informed the January 2013 global legally-binding treaty on Mercury, which will lead to decreasing levels of mercury and improve the health of arctic people and wildlife over the long-term.

This program underwent an evaluation by the Department in 2012–2013. The evaluation concluded that the program is recognized in Canada and internationally for its emphasis on strong partnerships, involving Northerners in research, for integrating traditional knowledge and for its emphasis on providing clear and consistent direction over the past 20 years. The evaluation recommended that the program needed to improve some elements of its communication plan to further engage with Northerners. In response to these recommendations, the program completed a Communications Strategy, established a Risk Communications Subcommittee that will determine best practises for communicating northern health advisories in a clear and culturally sensitive way, and is in the process of enhancing its web presence to foster better information sharing and collaboration with the public and program partners.

Sub-Program 4.2.2: Science Initiatives

Description

This sub-program works to position Canada as a leader in arctic science. These initiatives work to: increase the capacity of Northerners and Canadians to engage in, direct, undertake and use arctic science and technology; provide improved research facilities for the North, including a High Arctic Research Station; and the conclusion of Canada's prominent role in International Polar Year.

2012–2013 Financial Resources ($ millions) 2012–2013 Human Resources (FTEs)
Planned Spending Actual Spending Difference Planned Actual Difference
8.0 8.4 (0.4) 38.7 35.7 3.0
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Researchers have access to world-class arctic infrastructure in the Canadian North Launch of the Canadian High Arctic Research Station Completion of design for CHARS facility by March 31, 2013 Pre-design phase completed in December 2012. Schematic design in progress. Expected in May-June 2013
International Polar Year Canadian research findings disseminated Number/percentage of Canadian IPY research projects included in the IPY Science Report 42 projects corresponding to 80% by April 27, 2012 Results from more than 42 projects (over 80%) were included in the IPY Canada Science Report released as a special issue of the journal Climatic Change (vol. 115, No. 1, Nov. 2012), electronic supplementary material available as part of the online version of the journal
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

There were a number of significant advancements in the Canadian High Arctic Research Station. In 2012, the Prime Minister announced a new investment in the next phases of CHARS. The winning bidder for the design of the station was also announced. In early 2013, it was announced that the Canadian High Arctic Research Station will be built on the plateau site in Cambridge Bay, Nunavut. Advice was sought from the CHARS' Advisory Panel on the proposed CHARS' Science and Technology program. Work was undertaken to define the infrastructure requirements to influence design, including consultations with the community of Cambridge Bay and other stakeholders. Partnerships continued to be developed with key national and international stakeholders from Aboriginal organizations, academia, government and industry. These will inform the development of terms and conditions for partnerships for the use of the CHARS facility and for services to be provided by key stakeholders.

The International Polar Year Conference, entitled "From Knowledge to Action" was held April 22–27, 2012. The goal of the conference was to present IPY findings and encourage discussions on how this new knowledge can be used to advance arctic issues, such as northern Aboriginal health, reduction in sea-ice and marine safety, permafrost and northern infrastructure, and climate change impacts and adaptation. This conference exceeded expectations with over 3000 delegates in attendance from 42 countries. The International Polar Year Canada Science Report, a synthesis of scientific results from over 100 authors, was released as a special issue of the journal Climatic Change (vol. 115, No. 1, Nov. 2012).

Although the IPY Program has concluded, the recommendations of the evaluation conducted in 2012 will help guide the Government of Canada's development of future science programs. The Department will take into consideration: the IPY research findings to inform the development of the science and technology program at CHARS; build on successful northern engagement initiatives developed during IPY and through the Northern Contaminants Program; take into account challenges expressed by Northerners regarding the accessibility of IPY funding; and maintain a role in the governance of the Canadian Polar Data Network (formerly the IPY Data Assembly Network), as appropriate, to support CHARS over the long-term.

Program 4.3: Northern Land, Resources and Environmental Management

Description

This program focuses on the management, sustainable development and regulatory oversight of the land, water, natural resources, and environment of the North, delivering on the Department's role as the Government of Canada's natural resource manager north of 60°. This program involves: managing oil and gas resources development; supporting the sustainable management of active mineral exploration and development; supporting the sound management of contaminated sites and of land and water in the North; and ensuring the identification of territorial land use zones for conservation, development and other uses. Northerners and Canadians will benefit from economic opportunities and sustainable development.

2012–2013 Financial Resources ($ millions) 2012–2013 Human Resources (FTEs)
Total Expenditures (Main Estimates) Planned Spending Total Authorities (available for use) Actual Spending (authorities used) Difference (Planned vs. Actual Spending) Planned Actual Difference
The difference between Planned Spending and Total Authorities primarily reflects additional funding provided through Supplementary Estimates for diamond valuations and mining royalty assessment activities in the Northwest Territories and Nunavut, offset by the deferral of activities associated with the assessment, management and remediation of federal contaminated sites under the Federal Contaminated Sites Action Plan. This deferred funding that was not required in 2012–2013 has been reprofiled to future years when it will be available for the intended purpose.

The difference between Total Authorities and Actual Spending primarily reflects the deferral of projects under the Federal Contaminated Sites Action Plan; this deferred funding that was not required in 2012–2013 has been reprofiled to 2013–2014 when it will be available for the intended purpose.

FTE variance is the result of the implementation of the Canada's Economic Action Plan 2012.

203.9 203.9 182.6 176.8 27.1 384.9 354.6 30.3
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
A more predictable and timely regulatory regime in the North Improved Fraser Institute rating Improve Fraser Institute rating by 10 positions by March 31, 2014Footnote 14 NWT: Improved from 48 to 29

Nunavut: Declined from 36 to 37

Yukon: Improved from 10 to 8

Percentage of projects approved within regulated time lines 100% by March 31, 2014 Environmental assessment timelines still require legislative approval and are not yet in effect
Environmental assessment processes are effective in identifying potential impacts and mitigation measures Decisions on a course of action are issued within 6 months of receiving a recommendation from an environmental assessment body 75% by March 31, 2013 100%

Mary River Project (NU) — 2.5 months

Back River Project (NU) — 2.5 months

Hope Bay Project (NU) — 3 months

Canadian Zinc Project (NWT) — 6 months

Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

In November 2012, Bill C-47, the Northern Jobs and Growth Act was introduced in Parliament. This Bill establishes the Northwest Territories Surface Rights Board, providing a single process for dispute resolution between land owners who have not been able to reach a negotiated access agreement; establishes the Nunavut Planning and Project Assessment Act, defining land use planning and project assessment processes in Nunavut; and amends the Yukon Surface Rights Board Act. The Bill was developed with significant input from Aboriginal groups, territorial governments, and institutes of public government.

In regards to increasing certainty and predictability in the North, to facilitate increased investment in resource development projects, Canada's proposal for further legislative changes to improve the regulatory system in the North was announced on November 2, 2012. Further improvements are contemplated for the Mackenzie Valley Resource Management Act, the Territorial Lands Act, the Northwest Territories Waters Act, the Yukon Environmental and Socio-economic Assessment Act, and the Nunavut Waters and Nunavut Surface Rights Tribunal Act.

The Department continued to improve environmental assessment timelines. Through policy and procedural improvements, AANDC was successful in meeting or exceeding Ministerial decision time targets for the Back River, Hope Bay, and Mary River projects in Nunavut, and the Canadian Zinc Project in the Northwest Territories.

AANDC continued to work with its partners to implement the Northwest Territories Cumulative Impact Monitoring Program and the Nunavut General Monitoring Plan to improve the level of understanding of environmental and socio-economic change in the North. This improved understanding will ultimately lead to more informed decisions about resource management, development activities, and sustainable development.

To support improved sustainable development and regulatory oversight in the North, the Department provides contribution funding to assist Aboriginal governments and organizational participation in consultation processes. In the past, separate contribution agreements were developed for each consultation process. This created overlap and duplication for the Department and for Aboriginal organizations. For 2013–2014, funding assistance for consultation processes will be bundled, requiring fewer agreements, resulting in less of a reporting burden for Aboriginal groups.

Sub-Program 4.3.1: Oil and Gas

Description

This sub-program manages the oil and gas resource interests of Northerners, Aboriginals and Canadians generally on federal lands in the Northwest Territories, Nunavut and in the northern offshore. This is accomplished through the issuance of Calls for Nominations and Calls for Bids for new exploration rights and the establishment and administration of the terms and conditions of exploration, significant discovery and production licences. Additionally the sub-program reviews and approves benefits plans, collects royalties, and maintains a rights registry that is open to the public. Among the projects pertaining to this sub-program, the program also manages the Department's federal lead responsibility for the Mackenzie Gas Project.

2012–2013 Financial Resources ($ millions) 2012–2013 Human Resources (FTEs)
Planned Spending Actual Spending Difference Planned Actual Difference
9.5 9.8 (0.3) 30.4 28.9 1.5
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Management of oil and gas resource development benefits Northerners and all Canadians The number of hectares licenced for oil and gas exploration (based on a five-year moving average) as a reflection of the amount of work conducted in the region with an opportunity to generate benefits to Northerners and all Canadians 3 million hectares by March 31, 2013 3,862,585 hectares
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

At the end of 2012, the five-year rolling average of hectares under licence for oil and gas exploration in the Canadian North was 3,862,585. This past year saw further acquisition of exploration licences in the central Mackenzie Valley. Further north, the recognized potential for additional discoveries of petroleum in the Mackenzie Delta and the Beaufort Sea continued to attract interest. Companies acquired several new exploration licences and some companies entered into partnerships with others that already hold licences in the Beaufort Sea. New exploration interest was expressed for the first time in an area west of Banks Island, northeast of the focus of current Beaufort Sea activity. In the central Mackenzie Valley, two new exploration licences were issued, covering more than 150,000 hectares for a total work commitment of $92 million. In the Beaufort Sea, six offshore exploration licences covering more than 900,000 hectares were awarded, for a total work commitment expenditure of $7.5 million.

Supporting knowledge-based regulatory decisions for oil and gas activities, AANDC successfully implemented the second year of the Beaufort Regional Environmental Assessment initiative: 23 research projects have been funded ($5.3 million). A Beaufort Regional Environmental Assessment Results Forum was held in Inuvik, demonstrating Inuvialuit engagement and support.

AANDC has played an important role in the Arctic Council Task Force which developed an Agreement on Cooperation on Marine Pollution Preparedness and Response in the Arctic, providing for mutual aid by Arctic States in the event of an oil pollution incident that exceeds one nation's capacity to respond.

The program identified a need for pro-active preparation of stakeholders to increase their confidence in the regulatory regime in the North. This led to an increased emphasis on planning, applied research and analysis, consultation, and awareness building to ensure due consideration of environmental, socio-cultural and economic issues in all regions subject to rights issuance.

Sub-Program 4.3.2: Mines and Minerals

Description

This sub-program manages the mines and mineral resource interests of Northerners, Aboriginals and Canadians generally on federal lands in the Northwest Territories, Nunavut and in the northern offshore. This is accomplished through the administration of a mineral tenure system, the assessment and collection of Crown royalties, participation in environmental assessment of northern mining projects, mineral resource assessment and land use planning, and the promotion of Aboriginal participation in mining.

2012–2013 Financial Resources ($ millions) 2012–2013 Human Resources (FTEs)
Planned Spending Actual Spending Difference Planned Actual Difference
7.3 14.1 (6.8) 32.3 35.3 (3.0)
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Active mineral exploration and development is supported by a mineral tenure system that provides security to tenure holders while providing a fair return for the use of a public resource The percentage of total Canadian mineral exploration and deposit appraisal expenditures made in the NWT and Nunavut 15% by March 31, 2013 14.3%
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

This program utilized the same levels of financial and human resources as in the previous fiscal year. The small variances are primarily due to unforeseeable operational needs such as coordination and assistance in the transfer of ownership of diamond mines, associated regulatory instruments, environmental agreements and securities.

Despite falling commodity prices and a slowdown in global exploration activity, prospection activities continued in the Northwest Territories and Nunavut and represented 14.3% of the national total.

The implementation of the online map selection system for mineral claims in Nunavut progressed through standard system development stages, including the successful installation of the MINERS database and the completion of the first trial of data migration to the new system. With the implementation of this on-line project, AANDC is modernizing the way that mineral claims are acquired in Nunavut, allowing licence holders to acquire mineral rights using a web-based system.

The federal diamond valuation process and royalty audit function completed 10 diamond valuations and 5 audits in order to ensure that the $67 million in Crown royalties collected by AANDC represented the full amount due.

A draft of the regulatory submission was finalized for the modernization and separation of the Northwest Territories and Nunavut Mining Regulations. The Regulatory Impact Analysis Statement and corresponding Regulatory Cost Calculator were completed. This, along with a detailed identification of all proposed changes and their impact to stakeholders represents a major milestone for this regulatory project.

As the program progressed through the various stages of the regulatory modernization project, it was determined that it would be timelier and more cost efficient to run the Regulatory Impact Analysis Statement and Regulatory Cost Calculator earlier in the regulatory amendment process. This lesson will be applied to the upcoming amendments needed for the Northwest Territories and Nunavut Mining Regulations that will introduce online mineral claim staking.

Sub-Program 4.3.3: Contaminated Sites

Description

This sub-program ensures that contaminated sites are managed to ensure the protection of human health and safety as well as the environment for all Northerners by assessing and remediating contaminated sites and supporting the employment and training of Northerners, particularly Aboriginals.

2012–2013 Financial Resources ($ millions) 2012–2013 Human Resources (FTEs)
Planned Spending Actual Spending Difference Planned Actual Difference
Due to rounding, difference does not reflect figures shown.

The difference between Total Authorities and Actual Spending primarily reflects the deferral of projects under the Federal Contaminated Sites Action Plan; the deferred funding that was not required in 2012–2013 has been reprofiled to 2014–2015 when it will be available for the intended purpose. Due to higher than anticipated staff turnover, particularly in the Northwest Territories region, some positions were vacant in 2012–2013. However, work is underway to staff these positions to ensure that there is no ongoing impact to the delivery of the program.

144.9 111.4 33.4 77.9 64.4 13.5
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
*These results feed into the Departmental Sustainable Development Strategy Performance Report
Contaminated sites are managed to ensure the protection of human health and the safety of the environment while bringing economic benefit to the North Number of suspected contaminated sites assessed 890 by March 31, 2013 2,021 suspected sites were assessed in total. The Northern Contaminated Sites Program no longer has any suspected sites*
Number of sites in Step 8 (implementation) through Step 10 (monitoring) of the Federal Contaminated Sites Action Plan 10-step process 40 by March 31, 2013 41*
Level (%) of Northerners and Aboriginal peoples employed within Contaminated Sites projects 60% by March 31, 2013 60%*
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

The Northern Contaminated Sites Program completed work on over 75 sites across the three territories. Of the 75 sites, over 45% of them were in step 8 (implementation) through step 10 (monitoring) of the Federal Contaminated Sites Action Plan 10-step process. Two Distant Early Warning sites in Nunavut were remediated in 2012–2013, PIN-D Ross Point and PIN-E Cape Peel, bringing the overall total of remediated contaminated sites to 32. The program also completed the assessment of all 2,021 suspected sites one year ahead of schedule, in large part to meet obligations for the advancement of the devolution of lands and resources in the Northwest Territories.

In January 2012, AANDC entered into an agreement with Merc International Minerals Inc. whereby AANDC provided the mineral claims and leases to them in exchange for undertaking the remediation of three contaminated sites in the area for which AANDC was responsible. One of these sites, Chalco Lake, was remediated in 2012.

The Faro Mine Remediation Project developed a five-year plan which includes early remediation activities to protect human health and safety and environment at the site. Implementation of the plan will begin in 2013–2014. The project continued to advance planning for long-term remediation including engineering and regulatory preparations.

The Giant Mine Remediation Project has addressed high-risk site elements, including the deconstruction of the conveyor gallery, and completed preparations to implement plans to deconstruct the Roaster complex and stabilize the underground. Efforts also continued to improve governance of the project, including the approval of the Giant Mine Project Charter which sets out specific roles and responsibilities. Lastly, the project continued to make progress in the ongoing environmental assessment process that included public hearings in September 2012.

As part of the management of projects, AANDC conducts risk assessments annually to inform management approaches and priorities. This process has been expanded to consider broader strategic project risks for major projects in order to account for the high level of complexity, stakeholder considerations and the long duration of the projects. This approach will continue to be applied at the Giant Mine Remediation Project and will be implemented for other large scale remediation projects.

Sub-Program 4.3.4: Land and Water Management

Description

This sub-program manages the land and water interests of Northerners, Aboriginal peoples and Canadians in the Yukon, Northwest Territories and Nunavut. This is achieved through the administration of land rights, inspection and investigation services for land use permits and water licence, and the management of their securities.

2012–2013 Financial Resources ($ millions) 2012–2013 Human Resources (FTEs)
Planned Spending Actual Spending Difference Planned Actual Difference
Due to rounding, difference does not reflect figures shown.
32.4 32.0 0.3 213.4 193.2 20.2
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Management of land and water in the North as required under policy, legislation, and comprehensive land claim agreements Number and percentage of land and water authorizations (risk based approach) that the Department is responsible for inspected NWT = 15% by March 31, 2013

Nunavut = 25% by March 31, 2013

NWT = 40%

Nunavut = 80%

Crown's liability secured through appropriate security deposits 100% by March 31, 2013 97%
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

The management of land and water in the North as required under policy, legislation and comprehensive land claim agreements is complex and demands a sound understanding of the operating environment. The geography of the North also plays a very large role in the way that AANDC approaches its management responsibilities. The inspection of authorizations is one of the areas where the various factors intersect, and the logistical difficulties in the North in terms of distance, weather and cost, make the inspection of all authorizations next to impossible. Therefore AANDC has adopted a risk-management approach to the inspection of authorizations that are relevant, effective and efficient in order to ensure sound management of land and water. In 2012–2013, the rate of inspections exceeded the targets set at the beginning of the planning cycle because of operational concerns that needed to be addressed during the operational phase.

Continued refinement of the risk management tool is necessary to reflect the concerns of the Department while simultaneously accounting for the changing operating environment. In order to generate more accurate inspection plans, greater attention needs to be paid to the use of the information being entered into the Risk Assessment Model.

The Department safeguards the Crown's liability through appropriate security deposits in order to respond to unforeseen environmental events. AANDC currently holds security deposits for approximately 97% of the total security requirements. The remaining amount is due to outstanding amounts owed by companies in periods of transition (between licences or activities).

The development of processes to reach decisions on the amount of security deposits to be taken by the Department needs to continue in order to ensure consistency and predictability for proponents. To ensure that the correct amount of security is obtained, AANDC needs to continually monitor the issue and is working to continually improve the internal management of securities so that it is able to respond quickly and accurately to changes in the operating environment.

Sub-Program 4.3.5: Environmental Management

Description

This sub-program manages environmental interests of Northerners, Aboriginal Peoples and Canadians in the Yukon, Northwest Territories and Nunavut. Protected areas, land use planning, environmental assessments and environmental monitoring are important and complementary pieces of AANDC's environmental management responsibilities as required by policy, legislation, and comprehensive land claims agreement obligations.

2012–2013 Financial Resources ($ millions) 2012–2013 Human Resources (FTEs)
Planned Spending Actual Spending Difference Planned Actual Difference
Due to rounding, difference does not reflect figures shown.
9.8 9.4 0.3 31.0 32.8 (1.8)
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Territorial land use zones for conservation, development and other uses are identified Percentage of land in NWT and Nunavut with a designated use 100% by March 2015 The Sahtu Land Use Plan is now final and awaiting approval. An approved Sahtu Land Use Plan would contribute 24% of additional designated lands in the NWT, and bring the total to 28.8%. The approved Gwich'in Land Use Plan defines land uses in 4.8% of the Northwest Territories.
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

Land use plans support regulatory improvement, responsible resource development, and sound environmental management by providing certainty as to where resource development may take place and under what conditions. This improved certainty supports informed decision making, streamlines environmental assessment and regulatory permitting, and supports section 35 Aboriginal consultation requirements. In 2012–2013, AANDC advanced the completion, implementation, and periodic revision of these plans by coordinating federal analysis and input to the designated planning bodies (the Sahtu Land Use Planning Board, the Gwich'in Land Use Planning Board and the Nunavut Planning Commission).

The fiscal 2012–2013 period represented the last year of dedicated funding for AANDC (and Environment Canada) to assist with the finalization of candidate areas' assessment work and working groups' recommendation reports under the Northwest Territories Protected Areas Strategy. The assessment work, including mineral fieldwork and analysis for all five sites (Edéhzhíe, Ramparts, Sambaa K'e, Ka'a'gee Tu and Kwets'ootl'aa candidate areas) is complete and recommendation reports for boundary and subsurface disposition have been completed for the Edéhzhíe and Ramparts sites. Limited investments in the next year or two should deliver additional results such as the finalization of all working group recommendation reports for all candidate areas and the establishment of some sites as National Wildlife Areas.

One of the six candidate National Wildlife Areas, Shùhtagot'ine Néné, is no longer a candidate site under the Northwest Territories Protected Areas Strategy. Environment Canada officially withdrew its sponsorship based upon a request from the community.

The Northwest Territories Cumulative Impact Monitoring Program and the Nunavut General Monitoring Plan continued to be fully implemented through established governance structures and collaborative arrangements with key monitoring partners. Monitoring projects are guided by established priorities and results are designed to meet the needs of resource decision makers. Since funding began in 2010, 86 projects have been funded by the Cumulative Impact Monitoring Program (11 projects in 2010–2011, 44 projects in 2011–2012, and 31 projects in 2012–2013) and 38 by the Nunavut General Monitoring Plan (4 projects in 2010–2011, 19 projects in 2011–2012, and 15 projects in 2012–2013).

Strategic Outcome 5: Office of the Federal Interlocutor

Socio-economic well-being of Métis, Non-Status Indians and urban Aboriginal people

The program descriptions in this report are those used in the 2012–2013 Report on Plans and Priorities (RPP). As part of the annual review of Departmental program structures and descriptions, some program titles and descriptions have been revised. New terminology will be used in the 2014–2015 RPP and the 2014–2015 Departmental Performance Report.

Program 5.1: Urban Aboriginal Strategy

Description

This program supports the self-reliance of urban Aboriginal people, and their participation in the economy. It aims to enhance the knowledge, skills and capacity of urban Aboriginal people to pursue social and economic opportunities; and it provides a vehicle by which the federal government can work with other governments, community organizations and Aboriginal people to support (financially and through other means) projects that respond to local priorities. The Strategy enhances the federal government's ability to align expenditures directed toward urban Aboriginal people in key centres. Ultimately, the self-reliance of urban Aboriginal people, and their participation in the economy, will help strengthen Canada's economy as a whole.

2012–2013 Financial Resources ($ millions) 2012–2013 Human Resources (FTEs)
Total Expenditures (Main Estimates) Planned Spending Total Authorities (available for use) Actual Spending (authorities used) Difference (Planned vs. Actual Spending) Planned Actual Difference
The difference between Planned Spending and Total Authorities primarily reflects the deemed appropriation for the transfer of funding from Canadian Heritage (pursuant to s. 31.1 of the Financial Administration Act and order in council P.C. 2012-0286 effective April 1, 2012), as well as funding provided in Supplementary Estimates for the Urban Aboriginal Strategy to reduce the barriers to urban Aboriginal peoples' participation in the economy.

FTE increase is attributed to the transfer of employees from Canadian Heritage as well as the renewal of Urban Aboriginal Strategy program which had originally been scheduled to sunset in 2012–2013.

0.0 0.0 52.6 52.3 (52.3) 0.0 42.8 (42.8)
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
*Source: 2006 Census and 2011 National Household Survey. Measure is an aggregate from all urban areas (2006) and all population centres (2011). Urban Aboriginal people, refers to Aboriginal people living in "population centres" which are centres with more than 1000 people or more than 400 people per square kilometre.
Urban Aboriginal people have the knowledge, skills and support to pursue social and economic opportunities Percentage change in labour participation Increased employment in 2011 census The employment rate for urban Aboriginal people decreased from 59.8% in 2006 to 57.6% in 2011*.
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

Working in partnership with all levels of government and urban Aboriginal communities at the local, regional and national level $9.48 million was invested by AANDC and $15.9 million was attracted from other federal, provincial, municipal, private and other sponsors for 148 community driven projects. These projects were aimed at increasing economic participation of urban Aboriginal people by supporting local priorities such as Aboriginal youth, transitional support services, educational and wrap-around supports. A key lesson learned is that flexibility to tailor partnerships with provinces at the regional level (while maintaining local priority setting and planning) creates opportunities for policy, program and resource alignment that are more effective in the urban context in that respective region, thereby improving outcomes.

While AANDC continued to partner horizontally with other federal departments, a key lesson learned was that aligning investments in funding specific initiatives is helpful to communities, however better outcomes can be achieved when federal departments across the government focus on collaborative program implementation plans.

Exploring additional opportunities for partnerships with provinces at the regional level also assisted in building the capacity of urban Aboriginal communities. It advanced the community committee process from local calls for proposals to the consideration of targeted initiatives that include increased investment from other levels of government. For example, in British Columbia, AANDC in conjunction with the province is supporting the British Columbia Off-Reserve Aboriginal Action Plan, which involved community engagement activities of urban Aboriginal communities in Vancouver, Surrey, Kelowna, Prince George and Duncan. These urban Aboriginal communities established community networks that are better able to build partnerships with various stakeholders to increase the economic participation of urban Aboriginal people.

Combined with the transfer of three urban Aboriginal programming streams to AANDC from Canadian Heritage and the lessons learned, the Department is proceeding with a review of its suite of urban programming. That review will include an engagement of stakeholders, consideration of policy approaches for addressing matters in the urban setting, potential consolidation of current urban programming and a consolidated Performance Measurement Strategy.

Program 5.2: Métis and Non-Status Indian Organizational Capacity Development

Description

This program aims to enhance the capacity, legitimacy, stability and democratic accountability of Métis and Non-Status Indian organizations (MNSI) to: represent their members; advocate within government on their key issues; and to build and expand partnerships with federal and provincial governments and with the private sector. The objective is to enhance the capacity of these organizations to find practical ways to improve the self-reliance, and social and economic conditions of Métis, Non-Status Indians and off-reserve Aboriginal people so that ultimately they can better realize their full potential within Canadian society.

2012–2013 Financial Resources ($ millions) 2012–2013 Human Resources (FTEs)
Total Expenditures (Main Estimates) Planned Spending Total Authorities (available for use) Actual Spending (authorities used) Difference (Planned vs. Actual Spending) Planned Actual Difference
Due to rounding, difference does not reflect figures shown.

The difference between Planned Spending and Total Authorities primarily reflects re-allocations from within the Office of the Federal Interlocutor to address priority issues.

FTE variance is the result of the implementation of the Canada's Economic Action Plan 2012 as well as internal reorganization within the Department.

16.0 16.0 15.0 14.8 1.1 22.6 13.9 8.7
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
*Percentage of organizations that follow their own by-laws and constitutions (e.g., elections, annual general assemblies)
Métis National Council (MNC) and Congress of Aboriginal Peoples (CAP), and their representative provincial affiliates, are stable, democratically accountable and have the organizational capacity to represent their members' interests Proportion of MNSI organizations in compliance with the relevant provincial or federal society laws and their bylaws* 100% by March 31, 2013 100%
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

On September 4, 2012, this sub-program was moved from the Office of the Federal Interlocutor to the Aboriginal External Relations Branch in the Policy and Strategic Direction Sector, as a result of the Canada's Economic Action Plan. Its focus has shifted slightly, with a greater emphasis on policy and research.

Funding was provided to the Métis National Council and the Congress of Aboriginal Peoples to work with their affiliate organizations to undertake policy development work related to long-term planning and economic self-sufficiency.

The tripartite processes in British Columbia, Alberta, Saskatchewan, Manitoba, Ontario and Prince Edward Island along with representative off-reserve provincial and urban Aboriginal organizations are cost-shared with the provinces. A trilateral process is currently being developed in Nova Scotia. These processes provide a forum for these organizations to raise key issues, such as governance, participation in the economy, long term strategic planning, health, housing, child and family services and consultation. The forums also allow the organizations to explore collaborative and innovative ways to address those issues with both levels of government.

Program 5.3: Métis Rights Management

Description

This program aims to help reconcile Métis Aboriginal rights within the Canadian Federation in response to the 2003 Supreme Court Powley decision, which affirmed that Métis hold section 35 Aboriginal rights under the Constitution Act, 1982. The program works with representative Aboriginal organizations that have substantial Métis membership numbers to develop objectively verifiable membership systems for Métis members and harvesters in accordance with the Supreme Court's direction. Working with willing provinces and representative Métis organizations to build common understanding in respect of Métis Aboriginal rights, activities such as the support for Métis membership will assist in the reconciliation of Métis Aboriginal rights within the Canadian Federation in a collaborative and practical manner.

2012–2013 Financial Resources ($ millions) 2012–2013 Human Resources (FTEs)
Total Expenditures (Main Estimates) Planned Spending Total Authorities (available for use) Actual Spending (authorities used) Difference (Planned vs. Actual Spending) Planned Actual Difference
The difference between Planned Spending and Total Authorities primarily reflects re-allocations from within the former Office of the Federal Interlocutor to address priority issues.
11.9 11.9 7.9 7.9 4.0 10.1 7.3 2.8
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
*Target has now been established.
Métis Aboriginal rights are reconciled within the Canadian federation Number of membership cards issued by Métis organizations' membership systems The estimated target of membership cards issued for all 5 Métis organizations was 7,500* Actual Results for the 5 Métis organizations' membership systems: 10,934
Proportion of province-wide Métis organizations that have in place objectively verifiable membership systems 4 out of 5 by March 31, 2017 Work on-going
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

On September 4, 2012, this sub-program was moved from the Office of the Federal Interlocutor to the Aboriginal External Relations Branch in the Policy and Strategic Direction Sector.

The Department continued to support the development and maintenance of objectively verifiable membership systems for the Métis through work with provincial organizations and the Canadian Standards Association. The development of compatible and robust membership systems is a very complex process that requires sustained capacity and consistent application by Métis organizations in all relevant regions (Ontario, Manitoba, Saskatchewan, Alberta and British Columbia). The major focus of the work is to ensure regional organizations are building the capacity and systems in place for success.

The Department also worked with provinces to share information, lessons learned and approaches to the management of Métis rights, more specifically, with respect to the Interim Federal Guidelines, Approach to the Identification of Métis for the purposes of Federal Aboriginal Harvesting Policies.

As well, the Department collaborated with Métis organizations and provincial governments on research projects related to matters of mutual interest such as the existence of an historic Métis community in Mattawa, Ontario.

Program 6.1: Internal Services Theme IV: Shrinking the Environmental Footprint — Beginning with Government

Description

Internal Services are activities, services and resources that are administered to support the needs of programs and other corporate obligations: management and oversight services; communications services; legal services; human resources management services; financial management services; information management services; information technology services; real property services; material services; acquisition services; travel; and other administrative services. Internal Services include only those activities and resources that apply across an organization and not to those provided specifically to a program.

2012–2013 Financial Resources ($ millions) 2012–2013 Human Resources (FTEs)
Total Expenditures (Main Estimates) Planned Spending Total Authorities (available for use) Actual Spending (authorities used) Difference (Planned vs. Actual Spending) Planned Actual Difference
The difference between Planned Spending and Total Authorities primarily reflects: incremental funding for the operating budget carry-forward and paylist requirements; a decrease for the realignment of program-specific support funding from Internal Services to other program activities to more appropriately reflect the cost associated with delivering programs and services and achieving results in those activities; and a decrease reflecting the savings stemming from the Budget 2012 Spending Review.

The difference between Total Authorities and Actual Spending primarily reflects operating resources to be carried forward to 2013–2014 and the deferral of funding for an out-of-court settlement (this deferred funding that was not required in 2012–2013 has been reprofiled to future years when it will be available for the intended purpose).

FTE variance is the result of the implementation of the Canada's Economic Action Plan 2012. Additionally, there was a reduction in FTEs due to the planned Pay Consolidation relocation to Miramichi, New Brunswick.

293.5 293.5 369.7 318.8 (25.3) 1,711.2 1,561.6 149.6
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

In 2012–2013, AANDC focused on service improvement and transformation. The Department continued to advance the Public Service excellence agenda for the delivery of high quality, client-centered and results-focused services, while ensuring the efficient and effective management of public funds.

The most important internal priority for the Department in 2012–2013 was implementing Canada's Economic Action Plan 2012 to gain efficiencies within the organization. The following initiatives were realized in support of this priority:

  • AANDC reconfigured its corporate services in all sectors and regions and consolidated them to a smaller number of hubs to provide one service line and significantly reduce duplicate expenses. Three hubs for Human Resources services, two for Procurement and two for Accounting Operations have been created to enable better service delivery.
  • The Department was in Wave 1 of the Consolidation of Pay Services (i.e., Pay Modernization and centralizing of pay services to Miramichi). It is also at the forefront of national space modernization through development of a national accommodation plan that will guide AANDC through to 2020 and ensure a full compliance with Public Works and Government of Canada's space recapturing initiative, Workplace 2.0.
  • The Information Management/Information Technology Strategy (IM/IT) paves the way to implement Enterprise ArchitectureFootnote 15 (EA) in the Department; however further refinement will be made based on new direction from Shared Services Canada following the transition of IM/IT shared services. While there has been significant progress on the shift towards an EA by focussing on organizational needs, there is still work to be done to enable the Department to make more informed decisions related to IM/IT investments, resource allocations and divestments.
  • Improvements were realized to improve data integrity, accessibility, analysis and reporting including: updating and maintaining corporate systems such as Grants and Contribution Information Management Systems, Comprehensive Integrated Document Management, and Indian Registration System; centralizing Call Centres to increase efficiency of operations; ongoing compliance with regulatory requirements; and supporting business solutions while improving security of information systems.

In regards to the transformation of grants and contributions and advancing the objectives of the Policy on Transfer Payments, the Department:

  • The reporting burden was reduced by streamlining its data collection and reducing the frequency of reporting for some of its most significant programs (e.g., a simplified reporting framework for social programs based on financial risks). The Department has seen a reduction from 4800 ad-hoc reports requested in 2011–2012 to 800 in 2012–2013.
  • Health Canada officials were trained on AANDC's Default Prevention and Management Policy to adopt the approach to defaults of Funding Agreements.
  • Developed model consolidated audited financial statements for community members across Canada in response to the new financial reporting requirements for First Nations who have signed funding agreements with AANDC and Health Canada.
  • In addition to assessing the risks of those who receive government funds, the Department also assesses program risks on a systematic basis to determine the internal and external conditions that could put the programs at risk to achieving their objectives. With this information at hand, program managers put measures in place to reduce these risks and monitor them on a regular basis to ensure their efficacy.

In order to advance a culture and environment of high performance, in 2012–2013:

  • A long-term common vision was endorsed to achieve workplace wellbeing. The vision statement includes the creation of "a culture of empowerment, high performance and innovation, where leaders are trusted and trustworthy, and AANDC is considered the model in the Public Service for workplace well-being, free of harassment and discrimination." In addition, the department's Action Plan was developed in response to the Public Service Employee Survey 2011 results.
  • The Department launched its Values and Ethics Code in April 2012. Several related activities followed, including a department-wide exercise to remind employees of the importance of upholding values and ethics in their daily work life. Through its overall efforts related to Values and Ethics, the Department received a "strong" rating from Treasury Board in the Management Accountability Framework.
  • A financial strategy which led a clear set of priorities for the allocation of funds to Grants and Contributions was developed. The Department ensured an effective resource planning process which controlled, monitored, and provided management with timely budget allocations and clarity in regard to cost containment measures. It also ensured the management of human resources with respect to the savings measures of Canada's Economic Action Plan 2012.
  • Within the Public Service, AANDC is the leader on the Common Human Resource Business Process (CHRBP). When the CHRBP became mandatory for the public service in 2012, AANDC expertise was sought out by others and collaborated with 9 other departments.
  • AANDC became the Centre of Expertise in: comprehensive demographic and socio-economic statistical analysis; measurement advisory services to support evidence-based decision making; policy research in relevant priority areas; and providing innovative products and interactive forums to ensure effective dissemination of findings.
  • AANDC has steadily increased its oversight to ensure rigour and objectivity in audit and evaluation reports, through regular meetings and site visits. During 2012–2013, 9 evaluations and 1 special report were completed and approved by the Department's Evaluation, Performance Measurement and Review Committee and 18 audits were completed and approved at the Departmental Audit Committee. In February 2012, AANDC's Audit and Assurance Services Branch (AASB) presented to the Departmental Audit Committee the results of the practice inspection that concluded that AASB generally conforms to the Institute of Internal Auditors standards and to the Government of Canada internal audit requirements. In the last year, a Risk Community of Practice was created as a forum through which members can raise questions and issues related to risk and where best practices can be shared.

A review of the Management, Resources and Results Structure alongside the reporting burden drivers revealed the complexity of AANDC program authorities and the presence of hundreds of performance indicators for which the Department needs to collect data. Building on this finding, in addition to those of previous Strategic Review exercises, the Department is currently streamlining the number of authorities it manages; this in turn will allow streamlining in administration and in turn will facilitate the creation of opportunities for a reduction of reporting requirements for the recipients of AANDC transfer payments.

Federal Sustainable Development Strategy

Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Canada is a participant in the Federal Sustainable Development Strategy (FSDS) and contributes to the Greening Government Operations targets through the Internal Services program activity. The Department contributes to the following target areas of Theme IV (Shrinking the Environmental Footprint — Beginning with Government) of the FSDS: green buildings, greenhouse gas emissions, e-waste, managed print, paper consumption, green meetings, green procurement and the purchase of off-set credits.

For additional details on AANDC's Greening Government Operations activities, please see the Greening Government Operations table in Section III.

Canadian Polar Commission

Strategic Outcome: Increased Canadian Polar Knowledge

Program: Research Facilitation and Communication

Description

This strategic outcome creates the conditions for Canada to acquire the wide range of information needed for effective policy and research program development in the polar regions and to maintain Canada's position as a leading polar nation. The Canadian Polar Commission is Canada's national institution for furthering polar knowledge and awareness. It maintains and builds active knowledge networks, synthesizes polar knowledge to identify opportunities, issues and trends, and communicates polar knowledge.

2012–2013 Financial Resources ($ millions) 2012–2013 Human Resources (FTEs)
Total Expenditures (Main Estimates) Planned Spending Total Authorities (available for use) Actual Spending (authorities used) Difference (Planned vs. Actual Spending) Planned Actual Difference
1.0 1.0 1.1 1.0 0.0 4 7 (3)
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
*This report will summarize major knowledge gains from 2007 to the present, highlight key knowledge gaps, and identify research opportunities.
The Commission assists Canada to fully embrace its place as a polar nation Engage and coordinate with partners to maintain, enhance, and further build polar knowledge network Create a national network for sharing of knowledge by working with partners and their networks The Canadian Polar Commission substantially expanded its national network by opening a northern office in Yellowknife and represented Canada at two international committees
Identify the top knowledge-based polar priorities of national interest With partners, commence a synthesis of the national perspective on polar information and knowledge The Commission began developing a report on the state of northern knowledge in Canada*
Integrate with partners to develop processes of national significance to disseminate polar knowledge to Canadians Disseminate polar knowledge information to Canadians and other interested persons The Commission launched International Polar Year Canadian Science Report: Highlights; the document was launched at the IPY 2012 "From Knowledge to Action" Conference, and wide distribution followed
Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

The Commission opened an office in Yellowknife to anchor its presence north of 60° and expand its national network, giving it ready and regular access to northern governments, research institutes, researchers, organizations, communities, and citizens. As for maintaining and strengthening international networks, the Commission represented Canada on the International Arctic Science Committee and the Scientific Committee on Antarctic Research. The Commission also recognized the need to reach out more effectively via electronic media rather than through paper-based publications. It has therefore begun publishing exclusively in electronic format, although paper copies are available upon request.

The Commission reached its goals in terms of synthesizing and disseminating polar knowledge through the IPY Highlights report, a summary for the general reader of the key findings extracted from the Canadian International Polar Year 2007–2008 projects. It also used the Canadian Polar Knowledge Information Network and its other publications to begin work on enhanced methods of communication that ensure the report is made available to the broadest audience possible. In collaboration with the Royal Canadian Geographical Society, copies of the IPY Highlights report were provided to high schools across the country. The Commission also successfully launched its new website which is compliant with the new government standards for accessibility and usability.

The groundwork that has been put in place for the seamless transfer from AANDC to the Canadian Polar Commission of the Northern Science Award and the Northern Scientific Training Program will bear fruit in 2013–2014, when the Commission takes over responsibility for these well-established programs.

The Commission supported the Sustaining Arctic Observing Networks Canada throughout the year and more specifically by developing a website for the group, whose goal is to enhance Arctic-wide observation activities by facilitating partnerships and synergies among existing observing and data networks, and promoting sharing of data and information. The Commission also continued to provide secretariat services for the Canadian Northern Network of Research Operators. Those services included organizing its annual meeting, developing its website and other logistical tasks.

Program: Internal Services

Description

Internal Services are activities, services and resources that are administered to support the needs of programs and other corporate obligations: management and oversight services; communications services; legal services; human resources management services; financial management services; information management services; information technology services; real property services; material services; acquisition services; travel; and other administrative services. Internal Services include only those activities and resources that apply across an organization and not to those provided specifically to a program.

2012–2013 Financial Resources ($ millions) 2012–2013 Human Resources (FTEs)
Total Expenditures (Main Estimates) Planned Spending Total Authorities (available for use) Actual Spending (authorities used) Difference (Planned vs. Actual Spending) Planned Actual Difference
0.2 0.2 0.2 0.3 (0.1) 1 2 (1)
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Section III: Supplementary Information

Financial Statements Highlights

Condensed Statement of Operations and Departmental Net Financial Position (Unaudited)
For the Year Ended March 31, 2013 ($ millions)

  2012–2013
Planned Results
2012–2013
Actual
2011–2012
Actual
$ Change
(2012–2013 Planned
vs. Actual)
$ Change
(2012–2013 Actual
vs. 2011–2012 Actual)
Total expenses 7,038 7,920 7,147 882 773
Total revenues 1 2 1 1 1
Net cost of operations before government funding and transfers 7,037 7,918 7,162 881 756
Departmental net financial position -12,724 -13,566 -13,816 -842 250

Expenses by Type

Total expenses were $7,920 million in 2012–2013, representing a 10.8% increase from the previous year's expenses of $7,147 million. Transfer payments, the majority to Aboriginal people and Aboriginal organizations, amounted to $6,215 million or 78.5% of total expenses. Other significant expenses included salaries and employee benefits totaling $532 million (6.7%) and court awards and other settlements totaling $474 million (6.0%).

Expenses by Type
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The pie chart breaks down the Department's total expenses by type into percentages.

Transfer payments: 78.5 percent
Salaries and employee benefits: 6.7 percent
Court awards and other settlement: 6.0 percent
Other: 8.8 percent

Revenues by Type

Total revenues for 2012–2013 amounted to $2.4 million, representing a 276.2% increase over the previous year's total revenues of $0.6 million. Respendable revenues from the provision of financial and administrative services represent $0.7 million or 30.7% of total revenues. Respendable revenues from the disposal of tangible capital assets, included in miscellaneous revenue, account for the remaining $1.7 million (69.3%).

Significant changes

The change in total expenses can be attributed mainly to the change in the provision for claims in litigation, resulting in a significantly lower year-end adjustment than in the prior year.

The change in total revenues can be attributed mainly to respendable revenue earned in 2012–2013 as a result of the disposal of tangible capital assets.

Revenues by Type
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The pie chart breaks down the Department's total revenues by type into percentages.

Financial and administrative services: 30.7
Tangible capital assets: 69.3

Condensed Statement of Financial Position (Unaudited)
As at March 31, 2013 ($ millions)

  $ Change 2012–2013 2011–2012
Total net liabilities -272 15,389 15,661
Total net financial assets -40 1,726 1,766
Departmental net debt -232 13,663 13,895
Total non-financial assets 18 97 79
Departmental net financial position 250 -13,566 -13,816

Liabilities by Type

Total net liabilities were $15,389 million at the end of 2012–2013, which was a decrease of $272 million (-1.7%) from the previous year's total net liabilities of $15,661 million. The provision for claims and litigation represents the largest portion of liabilities at $10,715 million or 69.6% of total liabilities. Other significant liabilities include environmental liabilities of $2,531 million (16.4%), trust accounts of $920 million (6.0%), accounts payable of $672 million (4.4%) and the liability for settled claims in the amount of $433 million (2.8%).

Liabilities by Type
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The pie chart breaks down the Department's total liabilities by type into percentages.

Claims and litigation: 69.6 percent
Environmental liabilities: 16.4 percent
Trust accounts: 6.0 percent
Accounts payable: 4.4 percent
Settled claims: 2.8 percent
Other: 0.8 percent

Net Financial Assets by Type

Total net financial assets were $1,726 million at the end of 2012–2013, which was a decrease of $40 million (-2.3%) from the previous year's total net financial assets of $1,766 million. The asset Due from the Consolidated Revenue Fund (CRF) accounted for 95.3% of total net financial assets at $1,645 million and accounts receivable accounted for the remaining 4.7% of net financial assets at $81 million.

Net Financial Assets by Type
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The pie chart breaks down the Department's Net financial assets by type into percentages.

Due from the Consolidated Revenue Fund: 95.3 percent
Accounts receivable: 4.7 percent

Non-Financial Assets by Type

Total non-financial assets were $97 million which was an increase of $18 million (23.5%) from the previous year's total non-financial assets of $79 million. Tangible capital assets represent 67.5% or $66 million of total non-financial assets while land held for future claims settlements represents the remaining 32.5% at $31 million.

Significant Changes

The change in total liabilities can be attributed mainly to a decrease in the provision for claims and litigation due to the settlement of many previously outstanding claims, a decrease in the liability for settled claims due to payments made on outstanding claims throughout the year and a decrease in accounts payable. These decreases were partially offset by an increase in the amount accrued for environmental liabilities due to the availability of more robust estimates for the cost of remediating contaminated sites.

The change in total net financial assets can be attributed mainly to a decrease in the asset Due from the CRF as a result of a decrease in accounts payable and a decrease in trust account liabilities.

The change in total non-financial assets can be attributed to an increase in tangible capital assets primarily due to the construction of the Canadian High Arctic Research Station and ongoing informatics software projects, as well as an increase in land held for future claims settlements.

Non-Financial Assets by Type
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The pie chart breaks down the Department's Non-financial assets by type into percentages.

Tangible capital assets: 67.5 percent
Land held for future claim settlements: 32.5 percent

Financial Statements

Please refer to the Financial Statements on AANDC's website for more information.

Supplementary Information Tables

All electronic supplementary information tables listed in the 2012–2013 Departmental Performance Report can be found on AANDC's website.

Tax Expenditures and Evaluations Report

The tax system can be used to achieve public policy objectives through the application of special measures such as low tax rates, exemptions, deductions, deferrals and credits. The Department of Finance publishes cost estimates and projections for these measures annually in the Tax Expenditures and Evaluations publication. The tax measures presented in the Tax Expenditures and Evaluations publication are the sole responsibility of the Minister of Finance.

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Section IV: Other Items of Interest

2012–2013 Full-Time Equivalent Variances by Program

Program Planned (a) Actual (b) Variances (a-b)
Due to rounding, figures may not add up to total shown.
Governance and Institutions of Government 494.4 462.3 32.1
Co-operative Relationships 409.6 368.9 40.7
Treaty Management 89.0 76.4 12.6
Education 279.6 276.7 2.9
Social Development 125.2 130.1 (4.9)
Managing Individual Affairs 303.7 259.7 44.0
Residential Schools Resolution 153.0 504.8 (351.8)
Aboriginal Economic Development 463.3 439.1 24.2
Federal Administration of Reserve Land 154.9 138.0 16.9
Community Infrastructure 215.5 248.5 (33.0)
Northern Governance and People 70.8 69.3 1.5
Northern Science and Technology 44.4 43.3 1.1
Northern Land, Resources and Environmental Management 384.9 354.6 30.3
Urban Aboriginal Strategy 0.0 42.8 (42.8)
Métis and Non-Status Indian Organizational Capacity Development 22.6 13.9 8.7
Métis Rights Management 10.1 7.3 2.8
Internal Services 1,711.2 1,561.6 149.6
Total 4,932.2 4,997.2 (65.1)

As depicted in the above chart, the total variance of planned to actual Full-Time Equivalents is (65.1) (1.3%). However, the chart also demonstrates significant reductions within departmental program activity areas. This is primarily due to adjustments made as a result of the implementation of the Canada's Economic Action Plan 2012 and Pay Consolidation.

The difference of 65.1 Full-Time Equivalents from 4,932.2 Planned to 4,997.2 Actual, is primarily a result of the renewal of a number of initiatives by Treasury Board Secretariat which had originally been planned to sunset as of 2012–2013. The programs which were renewed include:

  • Residential Schools Resolution — Indian Residential Schools Settlement Agreement;
  • Community Infrastructure — First Nations Water and Wastewater Action Plan;
  • Urban Aboriginal Strategy — renewed and also included a transfer of FTEs from Canadian Heritage.

Organizational Contact Information

Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Canada

Les Terrasses de la Chaudière
10 Wellington Street, North Tower
Gatineau, Quebec
Mailing Address: Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0H4
E-mail: webmaster@aadnc-aandc.gc.ca

General and statistical inquiries and publication distribution
Telephone (toll-free): 1-800-567-9604
TTY (toll-free): 1-866-553-0554
E-mail: InfoPubs@aadnc-aandc.gc.ca

Departmental Library
Telephone: 819-997-0811
E-mail: Reference@aadnc-aandc.gc.ca

Media Inquiries — Communications
Telephone: 819-953-1160

Canadian Polar Commission

Constitution Square
360 Albert Street, Suite 1710
Ottawa, Ontario K1R 7X7
Telephone: 613-943-8605 or (toll-free) 1-888-POLAR01 (1-888-765-2701)

Additional Information

A complete list of common terminology as well as descriptions of programs and projects included in this report can be found on AANDC's website.

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Footnotes

Footnote 1

On April 1, 2012 changes to the government-wide Policy on Management, Resources and Results Structure (MRRS) came into effect. The changes included the following revisions to the MRRS nomenclature: "Program Activity Architecture" became "Program Alignment Architecture"; "Program Activity" became "Program"; "Sub-Activity" became "Sub-Program"; and "Sub-Sub-Activity" became "Sub-Sub-Program". Please note these changes are not reflected in the 2012–2013 RPP.

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Footnote 2

The Exploratory Process was an Aboriginal-led initiative that aimed to identify, examine and discuss the broader issues relating to registration, membership and citizenship that go beyond the scope of Bill C-31, the Gender Equity in Indian Registration Act, amendments to the Indian Act.

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Footnote 3

The First Nations Statistical Institute was dissolved on April 1, 2013.

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Footnote 4

Tools and resources are the "Guide for Federal Implementers of Comprehensive Claims and Self-Government Agreements", "Instituting a federal Framework for the Management of Modern treaties", "Guide for the Management of Dispute Resolution Mechanisms in Modern Treaties", "A Federal Implementers Guide to reviews in Self-Government and Comprehensive Land Claim Agreements", and "Annual Report Guidelines"

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Footnote 5

CLCA.net is a database for federal procurement officers to report on contracting efforts in land claim areas.

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Footnote 6

Enhanced Prevention Focused Approach refocuses child and family services programming from protection to prevention. It allows First Nations Child and Family Service agencies to ensure that more First Nation children and parents get the help they need to prevent the types of crises that lead to intervention and family breakdown.

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Footnote 7

Directive 20-1 is a formula driven funding approach used for First Nations agencies that deliver child welfare and protection services on-reserve. It supports the costs of maintaining children placed out of the parental home for safety reasons, as well as operational costs of First Nations agencies, which include prevention services.

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Footnote 8

Pursuant to its commitment under the Settlement Agreement, AANDC provides funding and corporate services support to the Indian Residential Schools Adjudication Secretariat (IRSAS), the independent tribunal that administers the Independent Assessment Process under the direction of the Chief Adjudicator. The IRSAS reports to the Chief Adjudicator on all matters, except for financial and human resources authorities, which are delegated from the Deputy Minister.

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Footnote 9

NSP is the process in which Canada can settle IAP claims without a hearing, through negotiations with claimant counsel.

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Footnote 10

In 2012–2013 the FNLM regime was reopened and funding was provided for 18 new entrants. Prior to this, the FNLM program was only concentrating on assisting the existing developmental First Nations to become fully operational under their land code and assisting the operational First Nations with the transition from the Indian Act to the FNLMA.

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Footnote 11

C-45: A Second Act to Implement Certain Provisions of the Budget Tabled in Parliament on March 29, 2012 and Other Measures.

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Footnote 12

A house or lodging provided for a teacher.

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Footnote 13

A thermosyphon is a hollow pipe that is half buried near infrastructure to maintain the integrity of the temperature of the soil. It uses passive heat exchange, moving gas cooled by the outside air from the top of the pipe to the buried (bottom) portion, where warmer air is displaced. This process continues as long as the air temperature is colder than the ground temperature.

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Footnote 14

This refers to the Fraser Institute's annual rating, based on a survey of the mining exploration industry, of the overall policy attractiveness of jurisdictions for mining investment.

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Footnote 15

Enterprise Architecture is the foundation for core processes that facilitate the appropriate level of business integration in developing IM/IT solutions. EA builds better solutions, increases organizational agility, and leads to improved enterprise business results.

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