ARCHIVED - 2013–14 Report on Plans and Priorities - Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Canada and Canadian Polar Commission

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Table of Contents




Minister's Message

The Honourable Bernard Valcourt, Minister of Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development

On behalf of Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Canada (AANDC) and the Canadian Polar Commission (CPC), I am pleased to present to Parliament and Canadians the 2013–14 Report on Plans and Priorities.

AANDC continues to pursue its mandate to support and partner with Aboriginal peoples and Northerners in their efforts to improve their economic prosperity, develop healthier and more self-sufficient communities, and to participate more fully in a strong Canadian economy to the benefit of all Canadians.

Ensuring that First Nation students receive a quality education that provides them with the same opportunities as all other Canadians and the tools to enter into the labour market and be full participants in a strong Canadian economy continues to be a key priority for the coming year.

To improve First Nation students' graduation rates our Government is undertaking important reforms, including the development of a First Nation Education Act. This will include intensive consultations to gather feedback in advance of drafting the First Nation Education Act, sharing draft legislation, exploring new funding mechanisms to ensure stable, predictable funding, and enhancing education programming.

Creating and maintaining partnerships that honour historic and modern treaties contributes to healthy and sustainable First Nations and Inuit communities, creating economic development opportunities as well as jobs. AANDC will continue to work with willing partners in 2013–2014 to accelerate progress in negotiations.

Innovative approaches and solutions are required to achieve improved and tangible results for Aboriginal people and communities. Continued implementation of the Federal Framework for Aboriginal Economic Development and a new results-based approach to Canada's participation in comprehensive land claim and self-government negotiations will be instrumental in achieving this goal.

In 2013–2014, AANDC will continue to implement the departmental priority of supporting community development and governance capacity, including development of tools to enhance accountability and transparency of First Nation governments and reduce the reporting burden on First Nations communities.

Greater self-reliance and the well-being of northern communities remain a priority for our Government, and we will keep on working on initiatives that will contribute to the North's prosperity, including continuing to focus on the objectives outlined in our Northern Strategy.

There is much work ahead and I am very proud of the collaborative efforts being made to find solutions for the individuals and communities we serve. Concerted action and collaborative efforts between our Government and First Nations, Métis, Inuit and northern communities, as well as provinces and territories will be vital in the year to come.

I look forward to reporting on these initiatives in future reports to Parliament.

Original signed by

______________________________
Hon. Bernard Valcourt, PC, QC, MP

Minister of Aboriginal Affairs and
Northern Development

Return to Table of Contents

Section I: Organizational Overview

Raison d'être

Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Canada (AANDC) supports Aboriginal people (First Nations, Inuit and Métis) and Northerners in their efforts to:

Responsibilities

The Department is responsible for two mandates, Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development, which together support Canada's Aboriginal and northern peoples in the pursuit of healthy and self-sufficient communities and broader economic and social development objectives.

The Aboriginal Affairs mandate is derived from a number of sources that include, among others, the Canadian Constitution, the Department of Indian Affairs and Northern Development Act, the Indian Act and its amendments over the years, statutes dealing with resource management, specific statutes enabling modern treaties, such as the Nisga'a Final Agreement Act, the Tsawwassen First Nation Final Agreement Act, the Maa-nulth First Nations Final Agreement Act and the Labrador Inuit Land Claims Agreement Act, and more recently enacted statutes like the First Nations Fiscal and Statistical Management Act and the First Nations Jurisdiction Over Education in British Columbia Act, designed to provide First Nations with jurisdictional powers beyond the Indian Act. A significant amount of the Department's mandate is also derived from policy decisions and program practices that have been developed over the years; it is framed by judicial decisions with direct policy implications for the Department; and it is structured by funding arrangements or formal agreements with First Nations and/or provincial or territorial governments.

AANDC negotiates and implements comprehensive and specific claims and self-government agreements on behalf of the Government of Canada; oversees implementation of claim settlements; supports services on reserve such as education, economic development, housing, community infrastructure and social support to Status Indians on reserves; administers the land management component of the Indian Act; and executes other regulatory duties under the Indian Act.

The Minister also acts as the government's primary interlocutor for Métis, Non-Status Indians and urban Aboriginal people. The responsibilities included within this role are to maintain and strengthen the Government of Canada's relations with organizations that represent Métis, Non-Status Indians and urban Aboriginal people; participate in negotiation processes with representative organizations and the provinces; and coordinate the government's Urban Aboriginal Strategy — an approach based on problem solving partnerships with provincial governments, urban Aboriginal organizations, municipalities and other federal departments.

The Department also serves as a focal point for Inuit issues to support the inclusion of Inuit-specific concerns in federal program and policy development and is the principal liaison with national and regional Inuit organizations and governments.

The Northern Development mandate also derives from the Canadian Constitution and from statutes enacted in the late 1960s and early 1970s, including the Department of Indian Affairs and Northern Development Act; from statutes enacting modern treaties North of 60°, such as the Nunavut Land Claims Agreement Act, or self-government agreements, such as the Yukon First Nations Self-Government Act; and from statutes dealing with environmental or resource management, and is framed by statutes that enact the devolution of services and responsibilities from AANDC to territorial governments, such as the Canada–Yukon Oil and Gas Accord Implementation Act.

AANDC is the lead federal department for two-fifths of Canada's land mass, with a direct role in the political and economic development of the territories, and significant responsibilities for resource, land and environmental management. In the North, the territorial governments generally provide the majority of programs and services to all Northerners, including Aboriginal people.

The Canadian Polar Commission, a separate agency, also supports polar research through its broad mandate relating to the development, promotion and dissemination of knowledge of the Polar Regions. It carries out this mandate by co-operating with organizations, institutions and associations, in Canada and elsewhere, to undertake, support and publish studies, recognize achievements and promote polar research and its application in Canada, report on polar issues and the state of polar knowledge and initiate and support conferences, seminars and meetings.

Strategic Outcomes and Program Alignment Architecture

Program Alignment Architecture

AANDC's Program Alignment Architecture Cross-walk from 2012–2013 to 2013–2014

The cross-walk highlights the changes made to program areas from 2012-2013 to 2013-2014 as depicted in the PAA. As a result of recent AANDC organizational realignment and the transfer of Canadian Heritage programs, the following changes were made to better integrate Métis, Non-status Indian and urban Aboriginal programs into the Department's Program Alignment Architecture:

The Government: A new Métis and Non-Status Indian Relations and Métis Rights Management sub-program (SP 1.2.5) has been added under the Co-operative Relationships program (P 1.2). This new SP is a combination of the former Office of the Federal Interlocutor's (OFI) Métis Rights Management program and the Relationship component of the Métis and Non-Status Indian Organizational Capacity Development program. Additionally, the Capacity Building component of the Métis and Non-Status Indian Organizational Capacity Development program has been integrated into the Institutions and Organizations SP (SP 1.1.2) under the Governance and Institutions of Government program (P 1.1). The integration of the OFI programs resulted in an adjustment to the Strategic Outcome statement to include the client groups of Métis and Non-Status Indians.

The Land and Economy: OFI's former Urban Aboriginal Strategy program and the programs transferred from Canadian Heritage — Aboriginal Friendship Centres, Cultural Connections for Aboriginal Youth, and Young Canada Works for Aboriginal Urban Youth — have been combined to create the new Urban Aboriginal Participation program (P 3.4). As a result, the Strategic Outcome statement has been adjusted to reflect the inclusion of Métis and Non-Status Indians.

Organizational Priorities

The Department has three ongoing priorities for the 2013–2014 planning period:

  1. Transforming for Improved Results;
  2. Improving Partnerships and Relationships; and
  3. Managing Resources Effectively.

This section describes the priorities and the plans AANDC will focus on for the coming year and beyond.


Priority: Transforming for Improved Results
Type: Ongoing
Strategic Outcomes: The People, The Government, The Land and Economy, The North


Description

Why is this a priority?

Innovative approaches and solutions are required to achieve improved and tangible results for Aboriginal people and their communities.

Plans for meeting the priority

To Strengthen and Reform Education, AANDC will encourage Aboriginal students to graduate and acquire the skills they need to enter the labour market.

Key initiatives:

To Empower Citizens, AANDC will:

To Improve Economic Development and Job Creation, AANDC will:

To Sustain the Momentum of the Northern Strategy, AANDC will:


Priority: Improving Partnerships and Relationships
Type: Ongoing
Strategic Outcomes: The People, The Government, The Land and Economy, The North


Description

Why is this a priority?

Better results can be achieved through strong relationships and work with willing partners such as Aboriginal communities, provincial/territorial partners, representative organizations, industry and other stakeholders.

Plans for meeting the priority

To Implement Reconciliation, AANDC will:

To Facilitate Community Development and Capacity, AANDC will:

To Increase Partnering to Ensure Programs are More Responsive, AANDC will:

To Negotiate and Implement Claims and Self-Government Agreements, AANDC will:

Key initiatives:


Priority: Managing Resources Effectively
Type: Ongoing
Strategic Outcomes: The People, The Government, The Land and Economy, The North, Internal Services


Description

Why is this a priority?

AANDC will focus its resources on achieving better results for Canadians and more efficient and effective services and business processes.

Plans for meeting the priority

To Further Improve the Management of Funding Relationships by Maximizing the use of the Policy on Transfer Payments, [Note 1] AANDC will:

To Implement the Results of the Administrative Shared Services Review, AANDC will support the continuous transition to Shared Services Canada and streamline enabling infrastructure through the consolidation of government networks, data centres and email systems.

To Implement Public Service Renewal and Support the Excellence Agenda, AANDC will:

Risk Analysis

AANDC funds or delivers programs and services to a variety of groups (First Nations, Inuit, Métis and Northerners) and whose members live in a range of communities from coast to coast to coast — from remote northern settlements with severe climates, to urban metropolitan areas.

The funding and delivery of province–like services such as education, housing, community infrastructure, and income assistance to Aboriginal peoples and communities, particularly First Nations on reserves, is a significant business line for the Department. The majority of programs and services funded by AANDC are delivered by Aboriginal communities or through partnerships with provincial and territorial governments and with Aboriginal and Northern organizations. Accordingly, achieving successful outcomes often depends on all partners working together to address the challenges facing First Nations, Inuit and Métis communities.

A significant quantity of case law and the ongoing refinement of constitutional concepts resulting from court decisions with respect to Aboriginal and treaty rights can create significant financial liabilities for the Government of Canada and continue to have an impact on AANDC's mandate and approaches to fulfilling the Crown's legal obligations.

The Department conducts an annual assessment of its risks as a part of the AANDC Corporate Risk Profile (CRP). The CRP is a point-in-time overview and assessment of the most significant risks which threaten achievement of the Department's mandate. The CRP was updated in August 2012. The process included a review of previously completed regional, program and sector risk assessments, audits, evaluations and control self-assessments as well as targeted interviews with senior management in those areas experiencing significant change or that play key roles on horizontal files.

AANDC senior management were actively involved in defining the risks, risk drivers and consequences to ensure the current realities of AANDC's internal and external operating environment are well reflected. Each risk has been assigned to risk leads. Strategies to mitigate each risk are being developed and integrated into the Corporate Business Plan.

2012 Corporate Risk Profile Assessment

Aboriginal Relationship Risk was the only risk area assessed as very high by the Department. While the potential consequences are significant, several mitigation strategies are being proposed for the coming year. Program renovation initiatives (including revamping funding mechanisms), the streamlining of departmental processes as a result of Expenditure Management activities, and the implementation of risk-based approaches to recipient monitoring and reporting should help the Department conduct business more efficiently and effectively. This streamlining will mean less frustration for clients, reduced administrative burden and a reduction in the duplication of effort to access program funding.

Four risk areas were assessed as high. The proposed mitigation strategies for Human Resources Capacity and Capabilities Risk include the development and implementation of workplace wellness initiatives, implementation of the AANDC Learning and Training Strategy and the development of inter-departmental staff exchanges. Information for Decision Making Risk deals with the possibility that the Department might not have the information it needs in order to fulfill its obligations. To this end, efforts on reducing and streamlining recipient reporting will continue where possible. This includes plans to work with Health Canada on the integration of key data systems including financial reporting. Environmental Risk relates to the possibility that the Department may not be able to manage environmental issues and liabilities in a timely and cost-effective manner. Mitigation strategies for this risk include ongoing support for northern environmental monitoring programs and the Nunavut General Monitoring Plan. The Department is also proposing additional governance processes for major northern projects. The Department plans to pilot Community Land Use Planning which should increase attention to infrastructure and environmental issues in the North.

The last assessed as high is Legal Risk. The Department leads on a number of policies and programs that have been established as a matter of social or economic policy and may accordingly be exposed to more complex legal risk than those defined by statute. The Department has undertaken work to ensure that risks and potential impacts of litigation are better mitigated, including a proactive outreach initiative that advises senior management about upcoming litigation so that potential effects on Departmental programs are given full consideration. The Department will also continue to work regularly with the Department of Justice in order to better manage emerging legal issues.

The remaining four risks were assessed as moderate: Transformation and Implementation, Government Partnership, External Partnership and Resource Alignment. While these risks may not have the same likelihood of occurrence or impact on the Department, it is acknowledged that they have the potential to drive other risks. As such, the mitigation listed in these four areas can be implemented in conjunction with and in support of strategies tied to other risk areas. For example, Transformation and Implementation Risk mitigation strategies — like improving upon existing governance structures and oversight regimes — will benefit from the proposed mitigation for the Human Resources Capacity and Capabilities Risk. In addition, working with Health Canada on shared IT needs for Information for Decision Making Risk supports other efforts on Government Partnership Risk.

Corporate risk mitigation strategies are reflected in the Corporate Business Plan. Risk mitigation activities are monitored by senior management on a quarterly basis and modified as required. In addition to corporate risk profiling, individual risk assessments are regularly conducted at the sector, program, regional and project level in order to mitigate their residual risks.

Planning Summary

Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Canada

Total Budgetary Expenditures
(Main Estimates)
2013–2014
Planned Spending
2013–2014
Planned Spending
2014–2015
Planned Spending
2015–2016
7,905.0 7,905.0 6,909.5 6,753.9

2013–20142014–20152015–2016

FTE or Full-Time Equivalent is a measurement equal to a person working a full-time schedule for one year which includes the combined hours (excluding overtime) of all individuals who have — or are — working in the organization within the fiscal year. This includes indeterminate, term, casual and seasonal employees but excludes students.

4,997 4,456 4,259

Program($ millions)Alignment to Government of Canada Outcomes**
Actual Spending 2010–2011*Actual Spending 2011–2012*Forecast Spending 2012–2013Planned Spending
2013–20142014–20152015–2016

Due to rounding, figures may not add to totals shown.

* Actual Spending for 2010–2011 and 2011–2012 reflects budgetary expenditure figures included in the 2011–2012 Performance Report. It should be noted that in order to allow comparability with 2011–2012 expenditures, expenditures for 2010–2011 were restated, reflecting the revised Program Alignment Architecture for 2011–2012.

** Information on departmental alignment to Government of Canada outcomes is available on the Treasury Board Secretariat's website.

Governance and Institutions of Government 476.3 495.9 498.5 456.7 415.6 416.1 A diverse society that promotes linguistic duality and social inclusion
Co-operative Relationships 758.7 423.4 868.1 396.5 333.2 322.6
Treaty Management 626.2 735.7 714.5 713.6 702.0 678.0 Strong economic growth
Sub-Total 1,861.2 1,655.0 2,081.1 1,566.8 1,450.8 1,416.7  

Governance and Institutions of Government: Actual spending and the 2012–2013 forecast includes additional resources reallocated during the year for Indian government support activities and the basic organizational capacity of Aboriginal organizations; future-year planned spending does not reflect these in-year reallocations.

Co-operative Relationships: The year-over-year differences from 2010–2011 to 2012–2013 primarily reflect changes in the approved funding for the settlement of specific claims. The additional funding provided for specific claims in 2012–2013 (notably for the Coldwater–Narrows specific claim) as well as certain program components of Canada's Action Plan on accelerating the resolution of specific claims, sunsets in 2013–2014. These decreases in 2013–2014 are partially offset by funding realigned from the Métis and Non-Status Indian Organizational Capacity Development program and the Métis Rights Management program pursuant to the revised Program Alignment Architecture for 2013–2014. The decrease in 2014–2015 primarily reflects the sunset of funding for negotiations of comprehensive land claims outside British Columbia as well as for the negotiation of treaties and other agreements in British Columbia. Changes also reflect government-wide efforts to identify efficiencies and streamline departmental operations, while protecting delivery of programs to First Nations. The reduction in 2015–2016 primarily reflects the sunset of funding for the reconciliation and management of Métis Aboriginal rights.

Treaty Management: The year-over-year differences primarily reflect changes in the approved funding profiles for the implementation of land claims and self-government agreements for the Maa-nulth First Nations, Yukon First Nations, the Nisga'a Nation, Labrador Inuit, as well as education services and school infrastructure resources provided to the Mi'kmaw Kina'matnewey in Nova Scotia and to the Cree, Inuit and Naskapi in Quebec pursuant to the James Bay and Northern Quebec Agreement and the Northeastern Quebec Agreement. Changes also reflect government-wide efforts to identify efficiencies and streamline departmental operations, while protecting delivery of programs to First Nations.

Program($ millions)Alignment to Government of Canada Outcomes**
Actual Spending 2010–2011*Actual Spending 2011–2012*Forecast Spending 2012–2013Planned Spending
2013–20142014–20152015–2016

Due to rounding, figures may not add to totals shown.

* Actual Spending for 2010–2011 and 2011–2012 reflects budgetary expenditure figures included in the 2011–2012 Performance Report. It should be noted that in order to allow comparability with 2011–2012 expenditures, expenditures for 2010–2011 were restated, reflecting the revised Program Alignment Architecture for 2011–2012.

** Information on departmental alignment to Government of Canada outcomes is available on the Treasury Board Secretariat's website.

Education 1,628.3 1,675.0 1,754.6 1,761.1 1,789.9 1,783.4 A diverse society that promotes linguistic duality and social inclusion
Social Development 1,610.9 1,678.0 1,724.0 1,615.0 1,626.6 1,670.7
Managing Individual Affairs 40.6 43.3 36.0 28.8 28.2 28.2
Residential Schools Resolution 516.8 560.3 731.0 696.0 105.0 70.3
Sub-Total 3,796.7 3,956.7 4,245.6 4,101.0 3,549.7 3,552.7  

Education: The year-over-year differences from 2010–2011 to 2012–2013 primarily reflect ongoing investments for education programs. In addition, the 2012–2013 forecast includes funding provided in Economic Action Plan 2012 to improve First Nations education. The future-year funding profile primarily reflects continued increased investment in education programs, as well as changes in the approved funding for the Education Information System, support for tripartite education agreements with First Nations in British Columbia and to advance readiness for education comparability in other provinces through the Education Partnerships Program.

Social Development: The year-over-year differences from 2010–2011 to 2012–2013 primarily reflect ongoing increased demand for social development programming; future-year planned spending does not reflect these in-year reallocations. In addition, the 2012–2013 forecast includes funding provided in Economic Action Plan 2012 for the Family Violence Prevention Program. The future-year funding profile primarily reflects continued increased demand for social development programs.

Managing Individual Affairs: The year-over-year differences primarily reflect changes in the approved funding profile for Indian registration administration mainly related to applicants under the Gender Equity in Indian Registration Act. Changes also reflect government-wide efforts to identify efficiencies and streamline departmental operations, while protecting delivery of programs to First Nations.

Residential Schools Resolution: The year-over-year differences primarily reflect changes in the approved funding profile to support the federal government's obligations resulting from the Indian Residential Schools Settlement Agreement.

Program($ millions)Alignment to Government of Canada Outcomes**
Actual Spending 2010–2011*Actual Spending 2011–2012*Forecast Spending 2012–2013Planned Spending
2013–20142014–20152015–2016

Due to rounding, figures may not add to totals shown.

* Actual Spending for 2010–2011 and 2011–2012 reflects budgetary expenditure figures included in the 2011–2012 Performance Report. It should be noted that in order to allow comparability with 2011–2012 expenditures, expenditures for 2010–2011 were restated, reflecting the revised Program Alignment Architecture for 2011–2012.

** Information on departmental alignment to Government of Canada outcomes is available on the Treasury Board Secretariat's website.

*** Reflects programming transfered from Canadian Heritage.

Aboriginal Economic Development 227.4 239.2 258.9 254.1 244.7 244.4 Strong economic growth
Federal Administration of Reserve Land 125.4 207.3 81.6 52.6 36.7 35.4 A clean and healthy environment
Community Infrastructure 1,300.4 1,096.9 1,037.6 1,221.3 1,089.3 1,024.0 Strong economic growth
Urban Aboriginal Participation*** n/a n/a n/a 41.0 40.9 39.9 Increase security and employment for Canadians
Sub-Total 1,653.2 1,543.4 1,378.1 1,569.0 1,411.6 1,343.6  

Aboriginal Economic Development: The year-over-year differences primarily reflect reallocations during the year to address pressures in other programs. Changes also reflect government-wide efforts to identify efficiencies and streamline departmental operations, while protecting delivery of programs to First Nations.

Federal Administration of Reserve Land: The year-over-year differences from 2010–2011 to 2012–2013 primarily reflect changes in the approved funding provided for the Federal Contaminated Sites Action Plan as well as the funding provided through Supplementary Estimates for on-reserve costs incurred by provincial/territorial or other emergency management organizations as required under the Emergency Management Assistance Program. The future-year funding profile reflects changes in the approved funding profile for the implementation of treaty land entitlement claims in Saskatchewan and the sunset (in 2014–2015) of contribution funding for the Federal Contaminated Sites Action Plan.

Community Infrastructure: The year-over-year differences from 2010–2011 to 2012–2013 primarily reflect changes in the approved funding provided pursuant to Canada's Economic Action Plan (Budget 2009) for water and wastewater projects, school construction and housing (sunset in 2011–2012) and for the First Nations Infrastructure Fund and First Nations education facilities, as well as reallocations to address pressures in other programs (notably Education and Social Development); future-year planned spending does not reflect these in-year reallocations. The future-year funding profile primarily reflects changes in the approved funding for the First Nations Infrastructure Fund (sunset in 2013–2014), the First Nations Water and Wastewater Action Plan approved in Budget 2012 (sunset in 2014–2015), and to support the construction and/or renovation of schools on-reserve approved in Budget 2012 (sunset in 2015–2016). In addition, funding provided in Budget 2011 for the upgrade, repair or replacement of essential fuel storage tanks in First Nations communities will sunset in 2015–2016.

Urban Aboriginal Participation: This program was given a new title to reflect the transfer to the department of three elements of Canadian Heritage's Aboriginal Peoples' Program, namely the Aboriginal Friendship Centre Program, Cultural Connections for Aboriginal Youth and Young Canada Works for Aboriginal Urban Youth.

Program($ millions)Alignment to Government of Canada Outcomes**
Actual Spending 2010–2011*Actual Spending 2011–2012*Forecast Spending 2012–2013Planned Spending
2013–20142014–20152015–2016

Due to rounding, figures may not add to totals shown.

* Actual Spending for 2010–2011 and 2011–2012 reflects budgetary expenditure figures included in the 2011–2012 Performance Report. It should be noted that in order to allow comparability with 2011–2012 expenditures, expenditures for 2010–2011 were restated, reflecting the revised Program Alignment Architecture for 2011–2012.

** Information on departmental alignment to Government of Canada outcomes is available on the Treasury Board Secretariat's website.

Northern Governance and People 135.9 126.6 138.9 136.9 145.1 129.4 Healthy Canadians
Northern Science and Technology 64.4 16.0 14.0 12.9 7.4 6.0 An innovative and knowledge-based economy
Northern Land, Resources and Environmental Management 218.8 179.9 187.5 260.0 99.0 66.0 A clean and healthy environment
Sub-Total 419.1 322.4 340.4 409.8 251.4 201.4  

Northern Governance and People: The year-over-year differences primarily reflect changes in the approved funding for: the Nutrition North Canada program; the implementation of the Agreement-in-Principle for Northwest Territories land and resources devolution, including activities associated with the negotiation and implementation of a final Devolution Agreement; and, grants to territorial governments for the health care of Indians and Inuit. Changes also reflect government-wide efforts to identify efficiencies and streamline departmental operations, while protecting delivery of programs to Aboriginal people and Northerners.

Northern Science and Technology: The year-over-year differences primarily reflect changes in the approved funding provided pursuant to Canada's Economic Action Plan (Budget 2009) for Arctic research infrastructure (sunset in 2011–2012) and the approved funding provided in Budget 2010 for the pre-construction design phase of the Canadian High Arctic Research Station (sunset in 2015–2016).

Northern Land, Resources and Environmental Management: The year-over-year differences primarily reflect changes in the approved funding profile for: the Federal Contaminated Sites Action Plan; legislative and regulatory changes to improve the northern regulatory system and to implement the Cumulative Impact Monitoring Program in the Northwest Territories and Nunavut; the implementation of the Beaufort Regional Environmental Assessment. Changes also reflect government-wide efforts to identify efficiencies and streamline departmental operations, while protecting delivery of programs to Aboriginal people and Northerners.

Pursuant to the revised Program Alignment Architecture for 2013–2014, the Office of the Federal Interlocutor Strategic Outcome is not required in 2013–2014 and future years. The following table illustrates the funding profile for previous years.

Program($ millions)
Actual Spending 2010–2011Actual Spending 2011–2012Forecast Spending 2012–2013Planned Spending
2013–20142014–20152015–2016

Due to rounding, figures may not add to totals shown.

Urban Aboriginal Strategy 14.5 14.9 54.3 n/a n/a n/a
Métis and Non-Status Indian Organizational Capacity Development 15.9 16.3 15.2 n/a n/a n/a
Métis Rights Management 8.8 9.5 10.9 n/a n/a n/a
Sub-Total 39.2 40.7 80.3 n/a n/a n/a

Urban Aboriginal Strategy: The increase in funding in 2012–2013 primarily reflects the transfer to the Department of three elements of Canadian Heritage's Aboriginal Peoples' Program, namely the Aboriginal Friendship Centre Program, Cultural Connections for Aboriginal Youth and Young Canada Works for Aboriginal Urban Youth.

Métis and Non-Status Indian Organizational Capacity Development: Funding for the planning period has been realigned to the Governance and Institutions of Government and Co-operative Relationships programs pursuant to the revised Program Alignment Architecture for 2013–2014.

Métis Rights Management: Funding for the planning period has been realigned to the Co-operative Relationships program pursuant to the revised Program Alignment Architecture for 2013–2014.

Program($ millions)
Actual Spending 2010–2011Actual Spending 2011–2012Forecast Spending 2012–2013Planned Spending
2013–20142014–20152015–2016
Internal Services 407.6 362.7 296.8 258.4 245.9 239.5
Sub-Total 407.6 362.7 296.8 258.4 245.9 239.5

Internal Services: The year-over-year differences primarily reflect changes in the approved funding profile for: the federal government's obligations resulting from the Indian Residential Schools Settlement Agreement; out-of-court settlements; and, management of Métis and Non-Status Indian litigation (sunset in 2015–2016). Changes also reflect government-wide efforts to identify efficiencies and streamline departmental operations, while protecting delivery of programs to First Nations. In addition, actual and forecast spending includes funding provided for the operating budget carry-forward; future years do not include this funding.

Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Canada($ millions)
Actual Spending 2010–2011Actual Spending 2011–2012Forecast Spending 2012–2013Planned Spending
2013–20142014–20152015–2016
Total 8,177.0 7,880.9 8,422.2 7,905.0 6,909.5 6,753.9



Canadian Polar Commission

Total Budgetary Expenditures
(Main Estimates)
2013–2014
Planned Spending
2013–2014
Planned Spending
2014–2015
Planned Spending
2015–2016
2.6 2.6 2.6 2.6

2013–20142014–20152015–2016

FTE or Full-Time Equivalent is a measurement equal to a person working a full-time schedule for one year which includes the combined hours (excluding overtime) of all individuals who have — or are — working in the organization within the fiscal year. This includes indeterminate, term, casual and seasonal employees but excludes students.

9 9 9

Program($ millions)Alignment to Government of Canada Outcomes*
Actual Spending 2010–2011Actual Spending 2011–2012Forecast Spending 2012–2013Planned Spending
2013–20142014–20152015–2016

* Information on departmental alignment to Government of Canada outcomes is available on the Treasury Board Secretariat's website.

Knowledge Management and Communication 0.8 1.0 0.9 2.1 2.1 2.1 A clean and healthy environment
Sub-Total 0.8 1.0 0.9 2.1 2.1 2.1  

Program($ millions)
Actual Spending 2010–2011Actual Spending 2011–2012Forecast Spending 2012–2013Planned Spending
2013–20142014–20152015–2016
Internal Services 0.2 0.3 0.4 0.5 0.5 0.5
Sub-Total 0.2 0.3 0.4 0.5 0.5 0.5

Canadian Polar Commission($ millions)
Actual Spending 2010–2011Actual Spending 2011–2012Forecast Spending 2012–2013Planned Spending
2013–20142014–20152015–2016
Total 1.0 1.3 1.3 2.6 2.6 2.6

Contribution to the Federal Sustainable Development Strategy

The Federal Sustainable Development Strategy (FSDS) outlines the Government of Canada's commitment to improving the transparency of environmental decision-making by articulating its key strategic environmental goals and targets. The government will be consulting the public in 2013–2014 regarding the second three-year cycle of the FSDS (2013–2016). The 2013–2016 FSDS will be finalized in 2013–2014. It will be presented as part of year-end performance reporting for 2013–2014.

Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Canada (AANDC) ensures that consideration of these outcomes is an integral part of its decision-making processes. In particular, through the federal Strategic Environmental Assessment (SEA) process, any new policy, plan, or program initiative includes an analysis of its impact on attaining the FSDS goals and targets. The results of SEAs are made public when an initiative is announced, demonstrating the Department's commitment to achieving the FSDS goals and targets.

Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Canada contributes to Themes I: Addressing Climate Change and Air Quality; II: Maintaining Water Quality and Availability; and IV: Shrinking the Environmental Footprint — Beginning with Government as denoted by the visual identifier(s) below:

Theme I: Addressing Climate Change and Air Quality Theme I: Addressing Climate Change and Air Quality

Theme II: Maintaining Water Quality and Availability Theme II: Maintaining Water Quality and Availability

Theme IV: Shrinking the Environmental Footprint — Beginning with Government Theme IV: Shrinking the Environmental Footprint — Beginning with Government

These contributions are components of the following programs and are further explained in Section II:

Program 3.3: Community Infrastructure
Program 4.1: Northern Governance and People
Program 4.2: Northern Science and Technology
Program 6.1: Internal Services

For additional details on Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Canada's activities to support sustainable development please see Section II of this report and the AANDC Departmental Sustainable Development Strategy website. For complete details on the Strategy, please see the Federal Sustainable Development Strategy website.

Expenditure Profile

Planned Spending Breakdown

The Department's 2013–2014 budgetary planned spending is $7.9 billion, of which $7.6 billion is captured by four strategic outcomes (covering 14 programs), with the remaining funding ($258 million) for the Internal Services program which supports all the strategic outcomes. It should be noted that The People Strategic Outcome makes up the largest portion of the funding ($4.1 billion or 52%) and includes the two largest programs, Education and Social Development with funding at $1.8 billion and $1.6 billion, respectively. The Government Strategic Outcome accounts for a further 20% (or $1.6 billion), the same as The Land and Economy Strategic Outcome (20% and $1.6 billion). The remaining funding is allocated to The North ($410 million). Refer to the pie chart for the departmental 2013–2014 budgetary planned spending by strategic outcome and program.

2013-2014 Planned Spending

Over the period 2009–2010 to 2013–2014, planned spending will increase by about $500 million (from about $7.4 billion in 2009–2010 to $7.9 billion in 2013–2014), reflecting the following major items:

Planned spending over the period from 2013–2014 to 2015–2016 diminishes primarily because of reductions related to the sunsetting of targeted funding. This includes funding for the implementation of the Indian Residential Schools Settlement Agreement, the Federal Contaminated Sites Action Plan, and investments provided in Budget 2012 to improve First Nations education and water infrastructure. Spending decreases also reflect changes in the approved funding profile for the negotiation, settlement and implementation of specific and comprehensive claims as well as the implementation of the savings identified as part of Budget 2012.

Budgetary Expenditure Trend

Fiscal Cycle

Variances between Main Estimates, Planned Spending (as per the Report on Plans and Priorities) and Actual Expenditures are largely attributable to the timing of key elements in the fiscal cycle. The Main Estimates is the first step in the fiscal cycle. Additional funding for initiatives that were not ready in time to be included in the Main Estimates is provided through Supplementary Estimates. It should be noted that over the past four years (2009–2010 through 2012–2013), significant funding has been accessed through Supplementary Estimates beyond what had been identified in the Report on Plans and Priorities (primarily related to Budget announcements, claims settlements, as well as obligations stemming from the Indian Residential Schools Settlement Agreement).

Fiscal Cycle - Budgetary Expenditures

Estimates by Vote

For information on organizational appropriations, please see the 2013–2014 Main Estimates  .

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Section II: Analysis of Programs by Strategic Outcomes


Strategic Outcome: The Government

Good governance and co-operative relationships for First Nations, Métis, Non-Status Indians, Inuit and Northerners


Program 1.1: Governance and Institutions of Government

Description

The Governance and Institutions of Government Program contributes to The Government Strategic Outcome. This Program provides frameworks (legislative and non-legislative) which are consistent with the legal, collective, human, and democratic rights and freedoms of Aboriginal people in Canada, and, where possible, enables and supports First Nation development of policies and programs that embrace these values. It provides funds, legislation and guidelines, certifications, education and training, advice, policies and plans, and implemented changes to support, condition and build capacity for Aboriginal governance. Typical activities include but are not limited to providing assistance to establish governance and associated capacities, processes and mechanisms (such as by-law making authority, election processes). Support is provided to First Nation and Inuit governments as well as First Nation institutions. Ultimately, good governance practices are essential for active Aboriginal participation in Canadian society and the economy.

Total Budgetary Expenditures
(Main Estimates)
2013–2014
Planned Spending
2013–2014
Planned Spending
2014–2015
Planned Spending
2015–2016

Changes reflect government-wide efforts to identify efficiencies and streamline departmental operations, while protecting delivery of programs to First Nations.

456.7 456.7 415.6 416.1

2013–20142014–20152015–2016
470 417 417

Expected ResultsPerformance IndicatorsTargets
Transparent and accountable First Nation governments and institutions Percentage of First Nations operating with a plan to develop governance capacity 80% by March 31, 2014
Percentage of First Nations free of financial intervention as defined by the Department's Default Prevention Management Policy 70% by March 31, 2014

Planning Highlights

Good governance and co-operative relationships with Aboriginal people are built on transparent and accountable Aboriginal governments and institutions.

The specific ways in which the Department will align its actions with the expected result — Transparent and accountable First Nation governments and institutions — in 2013–2014 include the following:

Program 1.2: Co-operative Relationships

Description

The Co-operative Relationships Program contributes to The Government Strategic Outcome. It seeks reconciliation and the strengthening of the relationship between governments and Aboriginal groups through mutual respect, trust, understanding, shared responsibilities, accountability and dialogue. This Program addresses constitutional and historic obligations, as well as good public policy by: negotiating and implementing agreements which achieve clarity with respect to law-making authority and the ownership, use and control of lands and resources; addressing specific claims; developing multi-partner processes in areas jointly identified by Aboriginal groups and the federal government; supporting effective and meaningful consultation with Aboriginal groups and their representation in federal policy and program development. Through relationships built on trust, respectful partnerships will be established which may ultimately help to contribute to the strengthening of the social, economic and cultural well-being of Aboriginal communities and ultimately more active participation and engagement in the broader Canadian society.

Total Budgetary Expenditures
(Main Estimates)
2013–2014
Planned Spending
2013–2014
Planned Spending
2014–2015
Planned Spending
2015–2016

The decrease in 2014–2015 primarily reflects the sunset of funding for negotiations of comprehensive land claims outside British Columbia as well as for the negotiation of treaties and other agreements in British Columbia. Changes also reflect government-wide efforts to identify efficiencies and streamline departmental operations, while protecting delivery of programs to First Nations. The reduction in 2015–2016 primarily reflects the sunset of funding for the reconciliation and management of Métis Aboriginal rights.

396.5 396.5 333.2 322.6

2013–20142014–20152015–2016
358 221 211

Expected ResultsPerformance IndicatorsTargets
Relationships between parties based on trust, respect, understanding, shared responsibilities, accountability, rights and dialogue Percentage of active negotiation tables 90% of active tables [Note 2] by March 31, 2014

Planning Highlights

The federal government seeks to improve Aboriginal-Crown relations and provide Aboriginal groups with the opportunity to make meaningful changes in their communities through negotiating and implementing specific claims, comprehensive land claims and self-government agreements.

The specific ways in which the Department will align its actions with the expected result — Relationships between parties based on trust, respect, understanding, shared responsibilities, accountability, rights and dialogue — in 2013–2014 include the following:

Program 1.3: Treaty Management

Description

The Treaty Management Program contributes to The Government Strategic Outcome. This Program aims to create and maintain ongoing partnerships to support both historic and modern-treaties to fulfill Canada's legal obligations. This program supports First Nation and Inuit communities in articulating their interests, participating in land and resource development and management, where applicable, and demonstrating the importance of treaties and the treaty relationship between the Crown and Aboriginal people. This is achieved by honouring Canada's obligations as set out in final agreements, improving relationships between Canada and Aboriginal peoples, and improving the relationships between Canada and Historic Treaties First Nations. Creating and maintaining partnerships that honour historic and modern treaties contributes to the strengthened, healthy and sustainable First Nations and Inuit communities and ultimately supports them to optimize their participation in the broader Canadian society, thus benefitting all Canadians.

Total Budgetary Expenditures
(Main Estimates)
2013–2014
Planned Spending
2013–2014
Planned Spending
2014–2015
Planned Spending
2015–2016

The year-over-year differences primarily reflect changes in the approved funding profiles for the implementation of land claims and self-government agreements for the Maa–nulth First Nations, Yukon First Nations, the Nisga'a Nation, Labrador Inuit, as well as education services and school infrastructure resources provided to the Mi'kmaw Kina'matnewey in Nova Scotia and to the Cree, Inuit and Naskapi in Quebec pursuant to the James Bay and Northern Quebec Agreement and the Northeastern Quebec Agreement. Changes also reflect government-wide efforts to identify efficiencies and streamline departmental operations, while protecting delivery of programs to First Nations.

713.6 713.6 702.0 678.0

2013–20142014–20152015–2016
78 69 69

Expected ResultsPerformance IndicatorsTargets
Creation and Maintenance of ongoing partnerships to support historic and modern-treaty structures Historic Treaties
Increased percentage of public understanding of identified Historic Treaties in Manitoba and Saskatchewan
Historic Treaties
Increase in general knowledge in comparison to the previous survey
Modern Treaties
Annual reports, tripartite committee and Board meetings to implement the treaties
Modern Treaties
1 annual report and 3 tripartite treaty implementation committee meetings for each modern-treaty per year by March 31, 2014.

Board meetings as requested or required by the treaty

Board support funding provided

Planning Highlights

AANDC will continue to renew and update mandates and fiscal arrangements, and implement new treaties and self-government agreements, as well as develop supporting policy tools and guidelines for treaty management activities with Aboriginal groups.

The specific ways in which the Department will align its actions with the expected result — Creation and Maintenance of ongoing partnerships to support historic and modern-treaty structures — in 2013–2014 include the following:


Strategic Outcome: The People

Individual, family and community well-being for First Nations and Inuit


Program 2.1: Education

Description

The Education Program contributes to The People Strategic Outcome. It aims to support First Nation and Inuit students in the achievement of education outcomes that are comparable to other Canadians. Such achievement is key to enhancing their participation in the labour market and their future success. AANDC has the principal role for elementary and secondary education for First Nations students ordinarily resident on-reserve. It also provides financial supports to eligible First Nations and Inuit students in Post-Secondary education. The focus of these programming efforts is to support students in their academic progression through elementary and secondary school, to provide appropriate learning environments with culturally relevant education programs and services; and to increase their participation in the labour market. Better outcomes and increased participation in the economy benefits all Canadians.

Total Budgetary Expenditures
(Main Estimates)
2013–2014
Planned Spending
2013–2014
Planned Spending
2014–2015
Planned Spending
2015–2016

The year-over-year differences primarily reflect ongoing increased demand for education programs, as well as the sunset (in 2015-2016) of funding provided to improve First Nation education.

1,761.1 1,761.1 1,789.9 1,783.4

2013–20142014–20152015–2016
269 267 267

Expected ResultsPerformance IndicatorsTargets
First Nations and Inuit students achieve levels of education comparable to other Canadians Percentage of First Nation students ordinarily resident on-reserve who graduated from high school Increase year-after-year
Number of First Nations and Inuit students funded through the Post-Secondary Student Support Program (PSSSP) and number of First Nations and Inuit PSSSP students who graduate with a post-secondary degree/diploma/certificate (by age-group, gender and region) Data for this indicator will begin to be collected in 2012–2013

Planning Highlights

AANDC is working to improve educational outcomes for First Nation students living on reserves by strengthening and reforming First Nation education as part of the Strong Schools, Successful Students Initiative.

To pursue the expected result — First Nations and Inuit students achieve levels of education comparable to other Canadians — in 2013–2014, AANDC will:

Program 2.2: Social Development

Description

The Social Development Program contributes to The People Strategic Outcome. Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Canada funds five social programs that aim to assist First Nation individuals and communities to become more self-sufficient; protect individuals and families at risk of violence; provide prevention supports that allow individuals and families to better care for their children; and support greater participation in the labour market. This program assists First Nations men, women and children in achieving greater independence and self-sufficiency in First Nations communities across Canada. It does so by flowing funds to First Nations, provincial representatives and others who provide on-reserve residents and Yukon First Nations with individual and family services that are developed and implemented in collaboration with partners. These services help First Nation communities meet basic and special needs; support employability and attachment to the workforce; and ensure that individuals and families are safe. First Nations that are engaged in advancing their own development are better equipped to leverage opportunities made available by their communities and actively contribute to the broader Canadian economy and society.

Total Budgetary Expenditures
(Main Estimates)
2013–2014
Planned Spending
2013–2014
Planned Spending
2014–2015
Planned Spending
2015–2016

The year over year differences primarily reflect ongoing increased demand for social development programs, as well as improving the incentives in the on-reserve Income Assistance Program and encouraging those who can work to access training so they are better equipped for employment.

1,615.0 1,615.0 1,626.6 1,670.7

2013–20142014–20152015–2016
133 132 132

Expected ResultsPerformance IndicatorsTargets
First Nations men, women and children are engaged in advancing their participation in the labour market and take advantage of available opportunities Percentage of communities using innovative community-driven approaches to program delivery Year-over-year increasing trend in number of communities with innovative community-driven approaches to program delivery

Planning Highlights

AANDC will continue to collaboratively pursue the reform of social development programs and policies in 2013–2014 to help First Nation individuals and their families in First Nation communities become self-reliant.

The specific ways in which the Department will align its actions with the expected result — First Nations men, women and children take advantage of available opportunities, with an emphasis on increasing their labour market participation — in 2013–2014 include the following:

Program 2.3: Managing Individual Affairs

Description

The Managing Individual Affairs Program contributes to The People Strategic Outcome by ensuring responsible federal stewardship of the legislative, administrative and treaty obligations of the Federal Government to First Nations that pertain to Estates, Indian Moneys, Registration, Band Membership and Treaty Annuities. This program administers the portions of the First Nations Oil and Gas and Moneys Management Act that relate to Indian Moneys and is critical to ensuring that the provisions of the Indian Act and other statutory obligations are fulfilled. Results are achieved through direct client-services and through partnerships with First Nations directed to: determine eligibility for registration under the Indian Act; issue the Secure Certificate of Indian Status (SCIS); ensure responsibility for management of Indian monies and estates under the Indian Act; and, to honour treaty annuity obligations to First Nations. In supporting responsible federal stewardship of historic treaties and Acts, a more respectful and productive relationship is achieved between First Nations, the Federal Government and Canada. A sound administration of individual affairs and moneys contributes to the well-being of First Nation individuals, families and communities, and facilitates their participation in the Canadian society.

Total Budgetary Expenditures
(Main Estimates)
2013–2014
Planned Spending
2013–2014
Planned Spending
2014–2015
Planned Spending
2015–2016

Changes also reflect government-wide efforts to identify efficiencies and streamline departmental operations, while protecting delivery of programs to First Nations.

28.8 28.8 28.2 28.2

2013–20142014–20152015–2016
218 213 213

Expected ResultsPerformance IndicatorsTargets
Legislative, administrative and treaty obligations for which AANDC is responsible are fulfilled Delivery of services within established service standards related to registration, membership, estates, treaty annuities and moneys as per the Indian Act and other related acts and regulations as demonstrated by the results in the sub-programs Deliver services as demonstrated in the sub-programs

Planning Highlights

Sound federal stewardship of AANDC's legislative, administrative and treaty obligations supports a positive relationship amongst First Nations, the Government of Canada, and Canadians which contributes to the well-being of First Nation individuals and communities.

The specific ways in which the Department will align its actions with the expected result — Federal stewardship of the legislative, administrative and treaty obligations for which AANDC is responsible — in 2013–2014 include the following:

Program 2.4: Residential Schools Resolution

Description

The Residential Schools Resolution Program contributes to The People Strategic Outcome and aims to support a fair and lasting resolution to the legacy of Indian Residential Schools and to promote reconciliation with former students, their families and communities. In this program, AANDC ensures the successful implementation of the Indian Residential Schools Settlement Agreement (IRSSA) by finalizing the Common Experience Payment (CEP) and implementing the Personal Credits strategy; resolving claims of abuse under the Independent Assessment Process (IAP), as per its obligations under the IRSSA; funding and monitoring Commemoration initiatives; and meeting the Government of Canada's obligations vis-à-vis the Truth and Reconciliation Commission (TRC). Additionally, AANDC supports complementary initiatives to further reconciliation such as funding and monitoring of the Advocacy and Public Information Program and promoting reconciliation between the Government of Canada and Aboriginal people, as well as between Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal people through specific reconciliation initiatives. Resolution to Indian Residential Schools ultimately contributes to improved relationships between Aboriginal people and the rest of Canada, and strengthens Aboriginal communities.

Total Budgetary Expenditures
(Main Estimates)
2013–2014
Planned Spending
2013–2014
Planned Spending
2014–2015
Planned Spending
2015–2016

Future-year planned spending primarily reflects changes in the approved funding profile to support the federal government's obligations resulting from the Indian Residential Schools Settlement Agreement.

696.0 696.0 105.0 70.3

2013–20142014–20152015–2016
625 511 353

Expected ResultsPerformance IndicatorsTargets
A fair resolution to the legacy of Indian Residential Schools is supported Percentage of applications/claims responded to within the IRSSA service standards Targets established under each sub-program

Planning Highlights

A fair resolution to the legacy of Indian Residential Schools will empower Aboriginal individuals, strengthen their communities and improve the relationship between Aboriginal people and other Canadians.

The specific ways in which the Department will align its actions with the expected result — A fair resolution to the legacy of Indian Residential Schools is supported — in 2013–2014 include the following:


Strategic Outcome: The Land and Economy

Full participation of First Nations, Inuit and Métis individuals and communities in the economy


Program 3.1: Aboriginal Economic Development

Description

The Aboriginal Economic Development programs contribute to The Land and Economy Strategic Outcome by aiming to build and promote viable Aboriginal businesses and opportunity-ready communities. This program supports the vision of increasing the participation of First Nation, Inuit and Métis individuals and communities in the Canadian economy and enables Aboriginal people to pursue the same opportunities for employment, income and wealth creation as other Canadians. These opportunities are initiated by focusing on key areas of the Federal Framework for Aboriginal Economic Development: strengthening Aboriginal entrepreneurship; enhancing the value of Aboriginal assets; working with HRSDC in developing Aboriginal human capital; forging new and effective partnerships; and focusing the role of the federal government in the area of Aboriginal economic development. AANDC can ensure long-term, sustainable economic development by promoting partnerships with provinces and territories and the private sector. Viable Aboriginal businesses and opportunity-ready communities will strengthen and benefit the Canadian economy.

Total Budgetary Expenditures
(Main Estimates)
2013–2014
Planned Spending
2013–2014
Planned Spending
2014–2015
Planned Spending
2015–2016

Changes reflect government-wide efforts to identify efficiencies and streamline departmental operations, while protecting delivery of programs to First Nations.

254.1 254.1 244.7 244.4

2013–20142014–20152015–2016
450 386 386

Expected ResultsPerformance IndicatorsTargets
Viable Aboriginal businesses Survival rate for Aboriginal businesses after 3 years of receiving a financial contribution 50% by March 31, 2014
Percentage of Aboriginal procurement relative to total federal procurement spending 2% by March 31, 2014
Opportunity ready First Nations and Inuit communities Number of First Nations and Inuit communities providing public services in economic development to their community members 475 by March 31, 2014

Planning Highlights

Viable Aboriginal businesses and opportunity-ready communities will increase the participation of First Nation, Inuit and Métis individuals and communities in the Canadian economy and enable Aboriginal people to pursue the equivalent opportunities for employment, income, and wealth creation as other Canadians.

The specific ways in which the Department will align its actions with the expected result — Viable Aboriginal businesses — in 2013–2014 include the following:

The specific ways in which the Department will align its actions with the expected result — Opportunity ready First Nations and Inuit communities — in 2013–2014 include the following:

First Nations Land Management Act

Lands Modernization

Economic Development

Program 3.2: Federal Administration of Reserve Land

Description

The Federal Administration of Reserve Land program contributes to The Land and Economy Strategic Outcome by aiming to ensure that the Crown fulfills its statutory and fiduciary obligations as the administrator of reserve lands held in trust for the use and benefit of the First Nation for whom the land was set aside. These obligations are achieved through the timely response to requests for land transactions, the additions to reserve, the clarity of reserve boundaries, the designation of land for economic development purposes and environmental management. Economic benefits accrue to Aboriginal communities and ultimately enhance the Canadian economy, through the activation of reserve lands and the honouring of treaty obligations.

Total Budgetary Expenditures
(Main Estimates)
2013–2014
Planned Spending
2013–2014
Planned Spending
2014–2015
Planned Spending
2015–2016

The year-over-year differences primarily reflect changes in the approved contribution funding provided for the Federal Contaminated Sites Action Plan and for the implementation of treaty land entitlement claims in Saskatchewan.

52.6 52.6 36.7 35.4

2013–20142014–20152015–2016
139 139 133

Expected ResultsPerformance IndicatorsTargets
Timely administration of reserve land for First Nations Percentage of instruments registered within service standard of 10 days on average 90% by March 31, 2014
100% by March 31, 2016
Percentage of leases and permits managed in Netlands (i.e. number of new leases and permits registered in the Indian Land Registry compared to number tracked in the NetLands monitoring system) 70% by March 31, 2014
100% by March 31, 2016
Contaminated Sites are remediated to ensure the protection of human health and the safety of the environment Number of contaminated sites remediated 5 by March 31, 2014

Planning Highlights

The timely administration of reserve land and resource activities and remediated contaminated sites are critical to economic development through the effective and diligent federal administration of reserve land. These expected results will bring economic benefits to First Nation communities and address barriers to their full participation in the Canadian economy.

The specific ways in which the Department will align its actions with the expected result — Timely administration of reserve land, and resource activities — in 2013–2014 include the following:

The specific ways in which the Department will align its actions with the expected result — Contaminated Sites are remediated to ensure the protection of human health and the safety of the environment — in 2013–2014 include the following:

Program 3.3: Community Infrastructure

Description

This program contributes to The Land and Economy Strategic Outcome by supporting First Nation communities in acquiring, constructing, owning, operating and maintaining a base infrastructure that protects their health and safety and enables their engagement in the economy. This program provides funding and advice to support housing, capacity building and community infrastructure, including water and wastewater systems, education facilities, roads and bridges, electrification, and community buildings. Ultimately, this program enables First Nations to participate more fully in the Canadian economy by establishing a base of safe infrastructure that meets established standards, and a housing infrastructure that meets the needs of First Nations communities.

Total Budgetary Expenditures
(Main Estimates)
2013–2014
Planned Spending
2013–2014
Planned Spending
2014–2015
Planned Spending
2015–2016

The year-after-year differences primarily reflect the sunset of additional funding to improve First Nations water infrastructure (sunset 2014-2015) and to support the construction and/or renovation of schools on reserve (sunset in 2015-2016).

1,221.3 1,221.3 1,089.3 1,024.0

2013–20142014–20152015–2016
251 195 195

Expected ResultsPerformance IndicatorsTargets
First Nations communities have a base of infrastructure that protects the health and safety and enables engagement in the economy Positive change in rating in the Community Well-Being Index (employment, income, education and housing sub-indices) Achieve Index rating greater than 57 by 2016
First Nations communities have a base of safe water and wastewater that meets established standards Percentage of First Nations drinking water systems that have LOW risk ratings

Percentage of First Nations wastewater systems that have LOW risk ratings
FSDS target [Note 7]
Increase in the percentage of First Nation communities with low risk water and wastewater facility ratings by March 31, 2016

Planning Highlights Theme I: Addressing Climate Change and Air Quality Theme II: Maintaining Water Quality and Availability

First Nation communities need infrastructure that protects health and safety and supports participation in the economy. Under the community infrastructure program, AANDC will continue to strive to improve and maintain a base of infrastructure that meets the needs of First Nations.

The specific ways in which the Department will align its actions with the expected result — First Nations communities have a base of infrastructure that protects the health and safety and enables engagement in the economy — in 2013–2014 include the following:

The specific ways in which the Department will align its actions with the expected result — First Nations communities have a base of safe water and wastewater that meets established standards — in 2013–2014 include the following:

Program 3.4: Urban Aboriginal Participation

Description

Urban Aboriginal programming contributes to the Land and Economy Strategic Outcome, supporting the participation of urban Aboriginal individuals and communities in the economy. Through programs such as the Urban Aboriginal Strategy, the Aboriginal Friendship Centers Program, the Cultural Connections for Aboriginal Youth, and Young Canada Works, it provides a vehicle by which the Federal Government can work with other governments, the urban Aboriginal community, and other stakeholders to reduce or remove barriers, and enhance the life skills and knowledge of urban Aboriginal individuals and communities. These enhancements allow them to access economic opportunities. The program allows the Federal Government to facilitate partnerships with all levels of government to align expenditures directed toward urban Aboriginal individuals and communities in key centres, achieving more substantive outcomes resulting from strength in numbers. The program will expand local labour market pools, allowing for increased economic development, and assist in moving urban Aboriginal communities towards self-reliance and a reduced dependency on government, thus helping to strengthen Canada's economy as a whole.

Total Budgetary Expenditures
(Main Estimates)
2013–2014
Planned Spending
2013–2014
Planned Spending
2014–2015
Planned Spending
2015–2016

The Program Alignment Architecture for 2013–2014 combines the previous Urban Aboriginal Strategy program with the programs transferred from Canadian Heritage (Aboriginal Friendship Centres, Cultural Connections for Aboriginal Youth, and Young Canada Works for Aboriginal Urban Youth). The higher funding in 2013–2014 versus future years reflects the start up and transition costs related to the development of an appropriate organizational footprint for this new program.

41.0 41.0 40.9 39.9

2013–20142014–20152015–2016
13 10 10

Expected ResultsPerformance IndicatorsTargets
Urban Aboriginal people have the knowledge, skills and support to pursue social and economic opportunities Percent change in labour participation Increased employment rate in the Labor Force Survey by March 31, 2014
Increased employment rate in the National Household Survey by March 31, 2017

Planning Highlights

The specific ways in which the Department will align its actions with the expected result — Urban Aboriginal people have the knowledge, skills and support to pursue social and economic opportunities — in 2013–2014 include the following:


Strategic Outcome: The North

Self-reliance, prosperity and well-being for the people and communities of the North


Program 4.1: Northern Governance and People

Description

The Northern Governance and People Program contributes to The North Strategic Outcome. This program strengthens the North's communities and people by devolving to the governments of the North province-like responsibilities for land and natural resources; by fostering effective intergovernmental relations with territorial governments and providing support to Territorial Commissioners; by subsidizing the costs of nutritious perishable foods and other essential items in isolated Northern communities; by providing grants for hospital and physician services in Nunavut and the Northwest Territories; by working with Northern communities to identify the risks and challenges posed by climate change and by advancing interests of Canadians and Northerners through circumpolar forums. Canadians and Northerners will benefit with territorial governments ultimately having more control over their own affairs.

Total Budgetary Expenditures
(Main Estimates)
2013–2014
Planned Spending
2013–2014
Planned Spending
2014–2015
Planned Spending
2015–2016

The year-over-year differences primarily reflect changes in the approved funding for: the implementation of the Agreement-in-Principle for Northwest Territories land and resources devolution, including activities associated with the negotiation and implementation of a final Devolution Agreement; grants to territorial governments for the health care of Indians and Inuit. Changes also reflect government-wide efforts to identify efficiencies and streamline departmental operations, while protecting delivery of programs to Aboriginal people and Northerners.

136.9 136.9 145.1 129.4

2013–20142014–20152015–2016
69 60 58

Expected ResultsPerformance IndicatorsTargets
The people of the Northwest Territories and Nunavut are responsible for the governance of Northern land and resources Completion of devolution phases in Northwest Territories and Nunavut against the 5 phases devolution process (5-phases process: protocol, Agreement-in-Principle, final agreement, legislation and implementation) By March 31, 2014

Northwest Territories: Complete Phase 5

Nunavut: Commence Phase 2
Consumption of nutritious food in eligible communities Estimated weight of eligible food purchased per capita Increase annually

Planning HighlightsTheme I: Addressing Climate Change and Air Quality

AANDC is contributing to greater self-reliance and well-being for the people and communities of the North. To this end, the Department is focused on political and social development as well as responding to challenges unique to the North.

The specific ways in which the Department will align its actions with the expected result — The people of the Northwest Territories and Nunavut are responsible for the governance of Northern land and resources — in 2013–2014 include the following:

The specific ways in which the Department will align its actions with the expected result — Consumption of nutritious food in eligible communities — in 2013–2014 include the following:

In addition to the actions outlined above, AANDC will further support the overall strategic outcome — Self-reliance, prosperity and well-being for the people and communities of the North — by undertaking the following:

Program 4.2: Northern Science and Technology

Description

The Northern Science and Technology Program contributes to The North Strategic Outcome. It aims to support scientific research and technology in the North by providing researchers and scientists with increased access to programs and infrastructure to further research science and technology. The focus of this program is: researching and monitoring contaminants and their impacts on the ecosystem as carried out through the Northern Contaminants Program; supporting initiatives including the creation, management and dissemination of scientific data and results that contribute to informed public policy making; supporting the work to establish the Canadian High Arctic Research Station (CHARS). Northerners and all Canadians will benefit from a knowledge base that supports health and sustainable development, and the positioning of Canada as an international leader in Arctic science and technology.

Total Budgetary Expenditures
(Main Estimates)
2013–2014
Planned Spending
2013–2014
Planned Spending
2014–2015
Planned Spending
2015–2016

The year-over-year differences primarily reflect changes in the approved funding profile for the Project Definition Phase of the Canadian High Arctic Research Station.

12.9 12.9 7.4 6.0

2013–20142014–20152015–2016
43 39 36

Expected ResultsPerformance IndicatorsTargets
Northerners and all Canadians benefit from a knowledge base that supports health and sustainable development Percent decrease in concentration of contaminants in the North 5% decrease in concentration over 1990 levels by March 31, 2014
Canada is positioned as an international leader in Arctic science and technology Launch of the Canadian High Arctic Research Station Completion of construction of the research station by July 1, 2017

Planning Highlights Theme I: Addressing Climate Change and Air Quality Theme II: Maintaining Water Quality and Availability

By supporting science and technology initiatives in the Arctic, which ultimately leads to increased scientific knowledge of this region, AANDC contributes to the creation of opportunities for greater prosperity and well-being of the people and communities of the North.

The specific ways in which the Department will align its actions with the expected result — Northerners and all Canadians benefit from a knowledge base that supports health and sustainable development — in 2013–2014 include the following:

The specific ways in which the Department will align its actions with the expected result — Canada is positioned as an international leader in Arctic science and technology — in 2013–2014 include the following:

Program 4.3: Northern Land, Resources and Environmental Management

Description

The Northern Land, Resources and Environmental Management Program supports The North Strategic Outcome. It focuses on the management, sustainable development and regulatory oversight of the land, water, natural resources, and environment of the North, delivering on the Department's role as the Government of Canada's natural resource manager North of 60°. This program involves: managing oil and gas resources development; supporting the sustainable management of active mineral exploration and development; supporting the sound management of contaminated sites and of land and water in the North; and ensuring the identification of territorial land use zones for conservation, development and other uses. Northerners and Canadians will benefit from economic opportunities and sustainable development.

Total Budgetary Expenditures
(Main Estimates)
2013–2014
Planned Spending
2013–2014
Planned Spending
2014–2015
Planned Spending
2015–2016

The year-over-year differences primarily reflect changes in the approved funding profile for: the Federal Contaminated Sites Action Plan; legislative and regulatory changes to improve the northern regulatory system and to implement the Cumulative Impact Monitoring Program in the Northwest Territories and Nunavut; and the implementation of the Beaufort Regional Environmental Assessment. Changes also reflect government-wide efforts to identify efficiencies and streamline departmental operations, while protecting delivery of programs to Aboriginal people and Northerners.

260.0 260.0 99.0 66.0

2013–20142014–20152015–2016
339 336 329

Expected ResultsPerformance IndicatorsTargets
Effective regulatory regimes in each of the three territories, which provide certainty to project proponents, Aboriginal organizations and Northerners, are established Territorial ratings for three factors reported in the Fraser Institute Annual Survey of Mining Companies:

1) administration, interpretation, enforcement of regulations;

2) environmental regulations;

3) regulatory duplication and inconsistencies
The percentage of industry encouraged to invest, or not deterred by, the three factors shall increase by 10% for each territory by March 31, 2014
Percentage of projects approved within regulated time lines in process, including decisions on environmental assessments 75% by March 31, 2014

Planning Highlights

AANDC is working to improve prosperity and well-being for the people and communities of the North by supporting environmentally responsible and sustainable economic development of natural resources North of 60°.

The specific ways in which the Department will align its actions with the expected result — Effective regulatory regimes in each of the three territories, which provide certainty to project proponents, Aboriginal organizations and Northerners, are established — in 2013–2014 include the following:

In addition to the actions outlined above, AANDC will further support the overall strategic outcome — Self-reliance, prosperity and well-being for the people and communities of the North — by undertaking the following:

Program: Internal Services

Description

Internal Services are groups of related activities and resources that are administered to support the needs of programs and other corporate obligations of an organization. These groups are: Management and Oversight Services; Communications Services; Legal Services; Human Resources Management Services; Financial Management Services; Information Management Services; Information Technology Services; Real Property Services; Materiel Services; Acquisition Services; and Travel and Other Administrative Services. Internal Services include only those activities and resources that apply across an organization and not to those provided specifically to a program.

Total Budgetary Expenditures
(Main Estimates)
2013–2014
Planned Spending
2013–2014
Planned Spending
2014–2015
Planned Spending
2015–2016

The year-over-year differences primarily reflect changes in the approved funding profile for: the federal government's obligations resulting from the Indian Residential Schools Settlement Agreement; out-of-court settlements; and, management of litigation. Changes also reflect government-wide efforts to identify efficiencies and streamline departmental operations, while protecting delivery of programs to First Nations.

258.4 258.4 245.9 239.5

2013–20142014–20152015–2016
1,542 1,461 1,450

Planning Highlights Theme IV: Shrinking the Environmental Footprint - Beginning with Government

With a continued focus on service improvement and transformation, in 2013–2014 AANDC will continue to advance the Public Service Excellence Agenda toward the delivery of high quality, client-centered and results-focused services, while ensuring the efficient and effective management of public funds.

Service Improvement and Transformation — To improve and transform internal services in 2013–2014, the Department will:

Advancing the Excellence Agenda — To advance a culture and environment of high performance, in 2013–2014, AANDC will:

AANDC contribution to Federal Sustainable Development Strategy

Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Canada is a participant in the Federal Sustainable Development Strategy (FSDS  and contributes to the Greening Government Operations targets through the Internal Services program. The Department contributes to the following target areas of Theme IV of the FSDS:



Canadian Polar Commission


Strategic Outcome: Increased Canadian Polar Knowledge


Program: Knowledge Management and Communication

Description

The Canadian Polar Commission is Canada's national institution for furthering polar knowledge and awareness. It maintains and builds active knowledge networks, synthesizes polar knowledge to identify opportunities, issues and trends, and communicates polar knowledge, in the North and to all Canadians.

This strategic outcome creates the conditions for Canada to acquire the wide range of information needed for effective policy and research program development in the polar regions and to maintain Canada's position as a leading polar nation.

Total Budgetary Expenditures
(Main Estimates)
2013–2014
Planned Spending
2013–2014
Planned Spending
2014–2015
Planned Spending
2015–2016
2.1 2.1 2.1 2.1

2013–20142014–20152015–2016
7.5 7.5 7.5

Expected ResultsPerformance IndicatorsTargets
The Commission facilitates Canada fully embracing its place as a polar nation Polar knowledge networks are maintained and enhanced Knowledge content of the Canadian Polar Commission website is current and accessible
Synthesis and analysis of priority polar issues are published One major analysis published annually
Communications channels to disseminate polar knowledge to Canadians are strengthened Number of downloads of Canadian Polar Commission communications products doubles

Planning Highlights

To achieve its expected result — The Commission facilitates Canada fully embracing its place as a polar nation — the Commission will fulfill its legislative mandate by continuing to implement its three-year strategic plan (2012–2015). Part of this plan involves helping inform and inspire a new generation to carry on Canada's increasing activities in polar affairs.

The Commission's key priorities for the next two years will focus on: activating and building networks to discover and aggregate polar knowledge; synthesizing polar knowledge to identify opportunities, issues and trends; and, communicating polar knowledge and derived synthesis effectively. For 2013–2014, the Commission will focus its efforts on the following activities:

Program: Internal Services

Total Budgetary Expenditures
(Main Estimates)
2013–2014
Planned Spending
2013–2014
Planned Spending
2014–2015
Planned Spending
2015–2016
0.5 0.5 0.5 0.5

2013–20142014–20152015–2016
1.5 1.5 1.5
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Section III: Supplementary Information

Financial Highlights

The future-oriented financial highlights are intended to serve as a general overview of AANDC's financial position and operations. They are accrual-based forecasts prepared on the basis of the government priorities and the plans of the Department as described in this Report on Plans and Priorities. Actual results for both years will vary from the forecast information presented.

 Change $Forecast
2013–2014
Estimated Results
2012–2013
Total expenses −740 7,113 7,853
Total revenues 0.1 0.8 0.7
Net cost of operations before government funding and transfers −741 7,112 7,853
Departmental net financial position 813 −12,385 −13,198

Expenses

Total expenses for 2013–2014 are forecasted at $7,113 million, representing a $740 million decrease from the previous year's forecasted total expenses of $7,853 million. Transfer payments, the majority to Aboriginal people and Aboriginal organizations, are forecasted at $6,248 million or 87.8 percent of total expenses. Other significant expenses include court awards and other settlements totaling $543 million (7.6 percent) and other expenses totaling $322 million (4.6 percent).

Expenses

Revenues

Total revenues for 2013–2014 are forecasted at $0.8 million, representing a $0.1 million increase over the previous year's forecasted total revenues of $0.7 million. Respendable revenues from the provision of finance and administrative services account for 100 percent of total forecasted revenues.

Significant Changes

Total forecasted expenses for 2013–2014 are affected by the forecasted reduction in the provision for claims and litigation and environmental liabilities. New claims and litigation and new environmental liabilities cannot be reasonably foreseen or quantified and have therefore been excluded from the forecast.

 Change $Forecast
2013–2014
Estimated Results
2012–2013
Total net liabilities −855 14,120 14,975
Total net financial assets −63 1,617 1,680
Departmental net debt −794 12,502 13,296
Total non-financial assets 19 117 98
Departmental net financial position 813 −12,385 −13,198

Liabilities by Type

Total net liabilities are forecasted at $14,120 million at the end of 2013–2014, which is a decrease of $855 million from the previous year's forecasted total net liabilities of $14,975 million. The provision for claims and litigation represents the largest portion of liabilities at $9,976 million or 70.7 percent of total liabilities. Other significant liabilities include environmental liabilities of $2,176 million (15.4 percent), trust accounts of $980 million (6.9 percent), accounts payable and accrued liabilities of $507 million (3.6 percent) and the liability for settled claims in the amount of $349 million (2.5 percent). Additional liabilities total $132 million (0.9 percent).

Liabilities by Type

Assets by Type

Total net financial assets are forecasted at $1,617 million at the end of 2013–2014, which is a decrease of $63 million from the previous year's forecasted total net financial assets of $1,680 million. The asset Due from the Consolidated Revenue Fund totals $1,565 million or 96.8 percent of total net financial assets and accounts receivable totals $52 million (3.2 percent).

Net financial assets

Total non-financial assets are forecasted at $117 million at the end of 2013–2014, which is an increase of $19 million from the previous year's forecasted total non-financial assets of $98 million. Tangible capital assets amount to $79 million or 67.3 percent of total non-financial assets and land held for future claim settlements amounts to $38 million (32.7 percent).

Non-financial assets

Significant Changes

Total forecasted liabilities for 2013–2014 are affected by the forecasted reduction in the provision for claims and litigation and environmental liabilities. New claims and litigation and new environmental liabilities cannot be reasonably foreseen or quantified and have therefore been excluded from the forecast.

Total assets for 2013–2014 were affected by the forecasted reduction in the asset Due from the Consolidated Revenue Fund, as a result of the forecasted reduction of accounts payable and accrued liabilities (payables-at-year-end).

Future-Oriented Financial Statements

For the full set of future-oriented financial statements, visit the website.

List of Supplementary Information Tables

The following electronic supplementary information tables can be found on AANDC's website.

Tax Expenditures and Evaluations Report

The tax system can be used to achieve public policy objectives through the application of special measures such as low tax rates, exemptions, deductions, deferrals and credits. The Department of Finance publishes cost estimates and projections for these measures annually in the Tax Expenditures and Evaluations publication. The tax measures presented in the Tax Expenditures and Evaluations publication are the sole responsibility of the Minister of Finance.

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Section IV: Other Items of Interest

Organizational Contact Information

Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development
Les Terrasses de la Chaudière
10 Wellington Street, North Tower
Gatineau, Québec
Mailing Address: Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0H4
Internet: http://www.aadnc-aandc.gc.ca
E–mail: webmaster@aadnc-aandc.gc.ca

General and statistical inquiries, and publication distribution
Telephone (toll–free): 1-800-567-9604
TTY (toll–free): 1-866-553-0554
E–mail: InfoPubs@aadnc-aandc.gc.ca

Departmental Library
Telephone: 819-997-0811
E–mail: Reference@aadnc-aandc.gc.ca

Media Inquiries — Communications
Telephone: 819-953-1160

Canadian Polar Commission
Constitution Square
360 Albert Street, Suite 1710
Ottawa, Ontario K1R 7X7
Telephone: 613-943-8605 or (toll–free) 1888–POLAR01 (1-888-765-2701)

Additional Information

For a complete list of common terminology as well as descriptions of programs and projects included in this report visit the website.

Return to Table of Contents

Footnotes:

  1. The original priority wording has shifted from "implementing" to "maximizing the use of" the Policy on Transfer Payments, to better reflect where the department is at with regards to meeting this priority. (return to source paragraph)
  2. Active negotiation tables refer to instances where the Parties have concluded a major component and/or have met or surpassed Departmental negotiation objectives and where the negotiations continue to make steady progress to move in the direction of a successful conclusion. (return to source paragraph)
  3. The Aboriginal and Treaty Rights Information System is the web-based information system that provides the location of Aboriginal communities and provides information pertaining to their potential or established Aboriginal or treaty rights on a mapping system. The purpose of ATRIS is to help federal officials address their consultation obligations. (return to source paragraph)
  4. Harvesters is a term used in the context of those people who hunt, fish, trap and gather for personal use. (return to source paragraph)
  5. CLCA.net (Comprehensive Land Claim Agreement) is an online system that allows departments to record and track procurement in land claims areas. (return to source paragraph)
  6. Under the National Classification System sites are ranked into five classes: 1, 2, 3, N and I, based on the score of 37 factors from the following three categories of site characteristics: Contaminant Characteristics — the relative hazard of contaminants at a site; Exposure Pathway — surface water, ground water, soils, sediments and air; and Receptors — living beings/organisms and environmental resources. Site classification grouping are as follows: Class 1 (score 70–100) Action required; Class 2 (score 50–69.9) Action likely required; Class 3 (score 37–49.9) Action may be required; Class N (score < 37) Action not likely required; and Class I (score < 15) Insufficient information. (return to source paragraph)
  7. Note that Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Canada share responsibility for this target with Health Canada. In 2013–2014, the government will finalize the second three-year cycle of the FSDS (2013–2016) which will provide the basis for year-end performance reporting in 2013–2014. (return to source paragraph)
  8. The ecoENERGY for Aboriginal and Northern Communities Program is a program under the Government of Canada's Clean Air Agenda — Clean Energy Theme and supports the goals of both the Clean Air Agenda and the Federal Sustainable Development Strategy. (return to source paragraph)
  9. The Climate Change Adaptation Program is a program under the Government of Canada's Clean Air Agenda — Adaptation Theme and supports the goals of both the Clean Air Agenda and the Federal Sustainable Development Strategy. (return to source paragraph)
  10. The Northern Contaminants Program contributes to the Federal Sustainable Development Strategy. (return to source paragraph)
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