ARCHIVED - Departmental Sustainable Development Strategy - 2013-2014 update

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Section I: Sustainable Development

Federal Sustainable Development Strategy

The 2010–2013 Federal Sustainable Development Strategy (FSDS) continues to guide the Government of Canada’s sustainable development activities. During 2013–2014, the government will be consulting the public regarding the second three-year cycle of the FSDS (2013–2016). This FSDS will then be finalized to provide the basis for the 2013–2014 year-end performance reporting.

Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Canada (AANDC) Vision

Canada’s economic and social well-being benefits from strong, self-sufficient Aboriginal and northern people and communities.

Our vision is a future in which First Nations, Inuit, Métis and northern communities are healthy, safe, self-sufficient and prosperous — a Canada where people make their own decisions, manage their own affairs and make strong contributions to the country as a whole.

Decision making under the Federal Sustainable Development Act

The Federal Sustainable Development Strategy situates the Government of Canada’s environmental priorities within the broader context of social and economic priorities by recognizing the linkages to environmental concerns when economic and social decisions are being made. Its strength lies in making the outcomes of decision making more transparent. The FSDS also establishes a framework for sustainable development planning and reporting with three key elements:

The development and implementation of the FSDS is a collaborative process across the Government of Canada. The Minister of Environment Canada has overall responsibility for the development of the FSDS.

The Minister of Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Canada and other ministers presiding over departments and agencies identified in the Act are responsible for preparing and tabling in Parliament Departmental Sustainable Development Strategies that comply with and contribute to the FSDS. The government has chosen to utilize the Report on Plans and Priorities as a means of fulfilling this requirement.

In addition, Environment Canada, Treasury Board Secretariat and Public Works and Government Services Canada (PWGSC) also play key management roles through the preparation of common guidelines, assessment tools and data collection and dissemination across government.

Departmental Sustainable Development Practices

Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Canada commits to:

AANDC is also actively engaged in several interdepartmental working groups to advance sustainable development. AANDC is a member of the following interdepartmental working groups:

Strategic Environmental Assessments at AANDC

Strategic Environmental Assessment (SEA) is a key analytical tool used by the federal government to support environmentally sustainable decision making. It evaluates the environmental effects of a proposed policy, plan, or program and its alternatives, and informs strategic decision making through a careful analysis of environmental risks and opportunities. AANDC continues to consider the environmental effects of initiatives subject to the Cabinet Directive on the Environmental Assessment of Policy, Plan and Program Proposals. For more information on SEAs visit the Canadian Environmental Assessment Agency website.

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Section II: Information on Departmental Implementation Strategies in FSDS Themes I and II

This section contains Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Canada’s implementation strategies from the 2010–2013 FSDS. For more detailed information about the Departmental contributions to FSDS 2010–2013 see the Departmental Sustainable Development Strategy 2012–2013.

FSDS Theme I: Climate Change and Air Quality

Goal 1: Climate Change

Reduce greenhouse gas emission levels to mitigate the severity and unavoidable impacts of climate change.

Target 1.1: Climate Change Mitigation — Relative to 2005 emission levels, reduce Canada’s total greenhouse gas emissions (GHG) 17 percent by 2020 (Lead Environment Canada).

Implementation Strategy 1.1.31 — Work with Aboriginal and northern communities, organizations and governments on climate change issues, through the development of sustainable energy initiatives and support them in managing vulnerabilities and opportunities created by a changing climate. (AANDC, Natural Resources Canada (NRCan))

Goal 2: Air Pollution

Minimize the threats to air quality so that the air Canadians breathe is clean and supports healthy ecosystems.

Target 2.1: Air Pollutants — Reduce air pollutants in order to maintain or improve air quality across the country and achieve the emission targets which are currently under development in consultation with provinces and stakeholders. (Lead Environment Canada and Health Canada)

Implementation Strategy 2.1.16 — ecoACTION programs reduce greenhouse gas emissions and can directly or indirectly contribute to air pollutant emission reduction. (NRCan, Transport Canada, AANDC)

Target 2.3: Chemicals Management — Reduce risks to Canadians and impacts on the environment posed by harmful substances as a result of decreased environmental concentrations and human exposure to such substances. (Lead Environment Canada and Health Canada)

Implementation Strategy 2.3.7 and 3.12.6 — The Northern Contaminants Program will continue monitoring contaminant levels in wildlife and people in the Canadian North.

FSDS Theme II: Maintaining Water Quality and Availability

Goal 3: Water Quality

Protect and enhance water so that it is clean, safe and secure for all Canadians and supports healthy ecosystems

Target 3.10: Drinking Water Quality — Increase the percentage of First Nation communities with acceptable water and wastewater facility risk ratings by 2013. (This target is co-lead Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Canada and Health Canada.)

Implementation Strategy 3.10.1 — Undertake a National Assessment of First Nation communities to assess the current status and associated risk for all existing communal water and wastewater systems and analyze various options for community serviceability.

Implementation Strategy 3.10.4 — Ensure that training is available for all operators and that a regime is in place so that all water systems have oversight of a certified operator.

Implementation Strategy 3.10.5.1 — Enhance the Circuit Rider Training Program.

Implementation Strategy 3.10.5.2 — Increase the number of Circuit Rider trainers and operators.

Implementation Strategy 3.10.9 — Develop and continuously update technical guidance protocols, such as the Protocol for Safe Drinking Water in First Nations Communities and the Protocol for Wastewater Treatment and Disposal in First Nations Communities. (AANDC and Environment Canada are jointly responsible for this implementation strategy.)

Implementation Strategy 3.10.11 — Develop appropriate regulatory framework and legislation for safe drinking water and wastewater treatment in First Nation communities.

Target 3.12: Chemicals Management — Reduce risks to Canadians and impacts on the environment posed by harmful substances as a result of decreased environmental concentrations and human exposure to such substances. (Lead Environment Canada and Health Canada)

Implementation Strategy 2.3.7 and 3.12.6 — The Northern Contaminants Program will continue monitoring contaminant levels in wildlife and people in the Canadian North.

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Section III: Clean Air Agenda Programming

CAA Theme: Adaptation

CAA Program Name: Climate Adaptation and Resilience Program for Aboriginals and Northerners

Department: Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Canada

4 The North
4.1 Northern Governance and People
4.1.3 Climate Change Adaptation

Total CAA Approved Funding (excluding PWGSC accommodations): $19,717,100

2013–2014 Planned Spending: $4,729,420

CAA Program Expected Achievements for 2013–2014

AANDC’s Climate Change Adaptation Program addresses the Adaptation Theme’s goal of reducing vulnerability to climate change by supporting the assessment of, and adaptation to, climate change impacts in Aboriginal and northern communities.

AANDC’s overall expected results are as follows:

Expected Result: Aboriginal and northern communities implement adaptation measures and decisions to protect community health and safety
Indicator: Number of communities implementing adaptation plans and measures to protect community health and safety
Target: 10 communities/5 years
Data Source: Administrative data: program records, files and reports
Frequency of Data Collection: Annually

Output: Funded projects under 4 categories: vulnerability assessments; tools; adaptation plans; knowledge dissemination
Indicator: Number of funded projects under each category.
Target: 2012–2013: 20 projects; 90 projects/5-years
Data Source: Administrative data: program records, files and reports
Frequency of Data Collection: Annually

AANDC will work collaboratively with other government departments, Aboriginal organizations and communities to promote the program and build capacity within communities to carry out vulnerability assessments and adaptation planning exercises.

In 2013–2014, it is anticipated that the program will provide funding for 20 projects to be completed in approximately 10 communities. Projects will be funded in four categories: vulnerability assessments, tools, adaptation plans, and knowledge dissemination. Emphasis will be placed on communities that are considered particularly vulnerable to the impacts of climate change, due to geographic location or a reduced ability to adapt. Further details on the Climate Change Adaptation and Resilience Program for Aboriginals and Northerners can be found on the AANDC Climate Change website.

CAA Theme: Adaptation

CAA Program Name: Integrating Adaptation into Codes and Standards for Northern Infrastructure

Department: Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Canada (Partner: Standards Council of Canada)

4 The North
4.1 Northern Governance and People
4.1.3 Climate Change Adaptation

Total CAA Approved Funding (excluding PWGSC accommodations): $935,000

2013–2014 Planned Spending: $187,000

CAA Program Expected Achievements for 2013–2014

AANDC’s contribution to the Codes and Standards for Northern Infrastructure program addresses the Adaptation Theme’s goal of reducing vulnerability to climate change by developing codes, standards and guidelines that support more resilient infrastructure and reduce impacts from climate change at the community level.

AANDC’s overall expected results are as follows:

Expected Result: Aboriginal and northern communities implement adaptation measures and decisions to protect community health and safety.
Indicator: Number of new and revised codes and standards for infrastructure being adopted in the North; Number of new and revised guidelines for infrastructure being adopted in the North.
Target: 3 to 5 new and/or revised codes, standards, guidelines/5–10 years
Data Source: Administrative data: program records, files and reports
Frequency of Data Collection: Annually

The Northern Infrastructure Standardization Initiative is a joint collaboration between Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Canada and the Standards Council of Canada to support Aboriginal and northern communities in building and designing safer and more resilient infrastructure. The Initiative is working towards the development of codes, standards and guidelines for northern infrastructure that consider climate change impacts. In 2013–2014, AANDC will continue to support the facilitation of the Initiative’s Northern Advisory Committee by engaging and supporting the members of the committee.

CAA Theme: Clean Energy

CAA Program Name: ecoENERGY for Aboriginal and Northern Communities

Department: Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Canada

3 The Land and Economy
3.3 Community Infrastructure
3.3.5 Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency

Total CAA Approved Funding (excluding PWGSC accommodations): $19,632,100

2013–2014 Planned Spending: $3,926,420

CAA Program Expected Achievement for 2013–2014

AANDC’s ecoENERGY for Aboriginal and Northern Communities Program directly addresses the Clean Energy Theme’s goal of reduced emissions of greenhouse gases from the energy sector by reducing emissions in Aboriginal and northern communities.

AANDC’s overall expected results are as follows:

Expected Result: Reduced greenhouse gas emissions in Aboriginal and northern communities.
Indicator: Projected reductions in GHG emissions over a 20-year project lifecycle resulting from all projects funded by the ecoENERGY for Aboriginal and Northern Communities Program (2011–2016).
Target: Projected 1.5 Mt/5-years
Data Source: Administrative data: program records, files and reports
Frequency of Data Collection: Annually

Output: Funded energy projects
Indicator: Number of projects funded by the ecoENERGY for Aboriginal and Northern Communities Program
Target: 10–20/year
Data Source: Administrative data: program records, files and reports
Frequency of Data Collection: Annually

This proposal-based program focuses exclusively on Aboriginal and northern communities, with an emphasis on off-grid communities. The introduction of proven renewable energy and energy efficiency measures will lead to GHG reductions.

In 2013–2014, the program will support pre-feasibility and feasibility studies of 5–10 renewable energy projects (e.g. wind, small hydro, solar, biomass), and design and construction of 5–10 energy projects integrated with community buildings (e.g. solar heating, ground source heat pumps, high efficiency heating systems). Further details on the ecoENERGY for Aboriginal and Northern Communities program can be found on the AANDC Climate Change website.

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Section IV: Greening Government Operations

FSDS Theme IV: Shrinking the Environmental Footprint — Beginning with Government

Greening of Government Operations was a major objective of AANDC’s previous Sustainable Development Strategy. The Office of Greening Government Operations was created in April 2005 and recommended that federal departments include activities concerning three areas — buildings, vehicles and green procurement — in their fourth strategy. Building on these recommendations, the FSDS sets out new mandatory targets in the areas of green buildings, greenhouse gas emissions, electronic waste, printing units, paper consumption, green meetings and green procurement. AANDC is committed to greening its internal operations as required by the new targets for greening government operations.

AANDC contributes to the Greening of Government Operations targets through the internal services program activity. The Department contributes to the following target areas of Theme IV, Shrinking the Environmental Footprint — Beginning with Government, of the FSDS:

Details regarding AANDC’s specific responsibilities are available in the Greening Government Operations supplementary table in AANDC’s 2013–2014 Report on Plans and Priorities.

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