ARCHIVED - Performance Report on the Departmental Sustainable Development Strategy, 2011–2012 — Including 2011–2012 Performance Reporting for the Clean Air Agenda

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Table of contents

Section 1: Overview

Welcome to the Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Canada's (AANDC) Progress Performance Report on AANDC's Departmental Sustainable Development Strategy (DSDS), 2011–2012.

Canada's first Federal Sustainable Development Strategy (FSDS), Planning for a Sustainable Future was tabled in October 6, 2010, pursuant to the Federal Sustainable Development Act (FSDA). The FSDA replaced the requirements established in 1995 under the Auditor General Act. The Federal Sustainable Development Act provides the legal framework for developing and implementing a Federal Sustainable Development Strategy that will make environmental decision-making more transparent and accountable to Parliament.

The first FSDS consolidates the federal approach to sustainable development, streamlining the way various departments and agencies report, and places sustainable development at the heart of government decision-making. Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Canada, along with over 25 other federal departments, is responsible for preparing a DSDS that supports and contributes to the FSDS.

This progress report is laid out in four sections. The first section outlines the Department's vision and sustainable development. The second section provides a progress report on the Department's sustainable development contribution to the overall FSDS. The third section includes progress on DSDS initiatives not captured in the FSDS. Finally, the last section provides a comprehensive performance report on the Clean Air Agenda.

AANDC Vision

Canada's economic and social well-being benefits from strong, self-sufficient Aboriginal and northern people and communities.

Our vision is a future in which First Nations, Inuit, Métis and northern communities are healthy, safe, self-sufficient and prosperous — a Canada where people make their own decisions, manage their own affairs and make strong contributions to the country as a whole.

The Federal Sustainable Development Strategy 2012 Progress Report and the Departmental Sustainable Development Strategy 2011–2012 Progress Report

The information provided in this report is supported by the 2012 FSDS Progress Report. State of the environment indicators presented in Departmental Performance Reports and FSDS Progress Reports demonstrate the Government of Canada's progress towards environmental objectives and sustainable development goals and targets as laid out in the FSDS. These indicators track progress on measures of environmental and socioeconomic issues at broad outcome levels.

This report outlines departmental FSDS implementation strategies and corresponding performance information applicable over the intermediate and immediate time frame. Generally, progress toward a broad outcome is not always directly attributed to any one factor such as a government program or policy, however, the link between the broad outcome and government actions can be demonstrated, documented and made transparent. Moving from the implementation strategy performance measure to the state of environment measure (indicator), the direct attribution to any one factor is reduced; nonetheless, the logical links between government programs and policies broad outcomes remain.

Departmental Decision-Making and Sustainable Development Practices

AANDC's first Sustainable Development Strategy was adopted in late 1997, with the fourth and most recent being the AANDC DSDS in 2007–2010. The DSDS builds on the success and learning opportunities of previous AANDC strategies and it responds to the requirements of the FSDA.

Managing Sustainable Development Internally

AANDC commits to:

Managing Sustainable Development Externally

External to the Department, AANDC continues to be actively engaged in several interdepartmental working groups to advance sustainable development. AANDC is a member of the following interdepartmental working groups:

In addition to the above, the Department is an active member of the Canadian Sustainability Indicators Network.

Strategic Environmental Assessment

Strategic Environmental Assessment (SEA) is a key analytical tool used by the federal government to support environmentally sustainable decision-making. It evaluates the environmental effects of a proposed policy, plan, or program and its alternatives, and informs strategic decision-making through a careful analysis of environmental risks and opportunities. AANDC continues to consider the environmental effects of initiatives subject to the Cabinet Directive on the Environmental Assessment of Policy, Plan and Program Proposals. AANDC is committed to implementing the Directive, and is currently reviewing its governance structure for implementing SEAs. For more information on SEAs visit the Canadian Environmental Assessment Agency.

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Section 2: FSDS Implementation Strategies Performance Summary

This section outlines AANDC's contribution to the FSDS. AANDC is responsible for 10 implementation strategies under the FSDS that reflect existing departmental initiatives related to federal goals and targets.


Theme I: Addressing Climate Change and Air Quality

Goal 1: Climate Change — Reduce greenhouse gas emission levels to mitigate the severity and unavoidable impacts of climate change.

Target 1.1: Climate Change Mitigation (Federal Lead: Environment Canada)

FSDS Implementation Strategy

1.1.31: Work with Aboriginal and northern communities, organizations and governments on climate change issues, through the development of sustainable energy initiatives and support them in managing vulnerabilities and opportunities created by a changing climate. (AANDC, Natural Resources Canada)

Link to AANDC 2011–2012 Program Activity Architecture

4 The North
4.1 Northern Governance and People
4.1.3 Climate Change Adaptation

Description

AANDC's Climate Adaptation and Resilience Program for Aboriginals and Northerners (Climate Change Adaptation Program) supports the development of community-relevant information and tools for Aboriginal and northern communities, governments, and organizations to assess vulnerabilities to climate change and to develop adaptation plans. This will result in plans, actions, and decisions which enhance the resiliency of communities. The program targets communities where the impacts of climate change are already visible and vulnerability is high. The initial Climate Change Adaptation Program (2008–2011) sunset March 31, 2011. In 2011–2012, the Climate Adaptation and Resilience Program for Aboriginals and Northerners was renewed for an additional five years (2011–2012 to 2015–2016).

Relationship between the Implementation Strategy and the FSDS Goals and Targets

The Climate Adaptation and Resilience Program for Aboriginals and Northerners supports the development of sustainable Aboriginal and northern communities through identification of risks and vulnerabilities related to climate change, as well as the development and implementation of plans and actions to manage those risks. It also supports the development of capacity and policy for the integration of climate change considerations into decision-making, and develops partnerships with Aboriginal and northern governments to maintain their engagement in addressing climate change issues. Therefore, the Climate Adaptation and Resilience Program for Aboriginals and Northerners directly contributes to the goals and targets above.

Expected Results* Performance Indicators Targets 2011–2012 Performance Status

*This program sunsetted on March 31, 2011. There were no performance expectations set for the 2011–2012 Report on Plans and Priorities. The expected results, performance indicators and targets for the program were revised as a result of program renewal.

Aboriginal and northern communities implement adaptation measures and decisions to protect community health and safety Number of communities implementing adaptation plans and measures to protect community health and safety 10 communities/ 5 years The Climate Change Adaptation Program received approval in Fall 2011. Three regional workshops (Yukon, Northwest Territories, Inuit Regions) were held in March 2012 to showcase past projects and engage interest in, and plan for, the new program. A call for letters of Interest for projects to be funded in 2012–2013 was launched in October 2011. Out of 152 letters of Interest received, 100 proponents were invited to submit full project proposals. These activities prepared the program to be fully implemented starting in 2012–2013 and will contribute to the program's expected results.

Related Initiatives/Programs

The Climate Adaptation and Resilience Program for Aboriginals and Northerners, as described above, is a program under the Clean Air Agenda — Adaptation Theme (see Section 4). The work completed by this program supports the goals of both the Clean Air Agenda and the FSDS.


Theme I: Addressing Climate Change and Air Quality

Goal 1: Climate Change — Reduce greenhouse gas emission levels to mitigate the severity and unavoidable impacts of climate change.

Target 1.1: Climate Change Mitigation (Federal Lead: Environment Canada)

Goal 2: Air Pollution — Minimize the threats to air quality so that the air Canadians breathe is clean and supports healthy ecosystems.

Target 2.1: Air Pollutants — Reduce air pollutants in order to maintain or improve air quality across the country and achieve the emission targets which are currently under development in consultation with provinces and stakeholders.

FSDS Implementation Strategy

1.1.31: Work with Aboriginal and northern communities, organizations and governments on climate change issues, through the development of sustainable energy initiatives and support them in managing vulnerabilities and opportunities created by a changing climate. (AANDC, Natural Resources Canada)

2.1.16: ecoACTION programs reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and can directly or indirectly contribute to air pollutant emission reduction. (Natural Resources Canada, Transport Canada, AANDC)

Link to AANDC 2011–2012 Program Activity Architecture

3 The Land and Economy
3.3 Community Infrastructure
3.3.5 Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency

Description

AANDC's ecoENERGY for Aboriginal and Northern Communities Program is a proposal-based program which focuses exclusively on Aboriginal and northern communities with an emphasis on off-grid communities that currently use diesel generators to produce electricity. Introduction of proven renewable energy and energy efficiency measures will lead to GHG reductions and sustainable energy production within these communities. The initial ecoENERGY for Aboriginal and Northern Communities Program (2007–2011) sunset March 31, 2011. In 2011–2012, the program was renewed for an additional five years (2011–2012 to 2015–2016).

Relationship between the Implementation Strategy and the FSDS Goals and Targets

The introduction of proven renewable energy and energy efficiency measures will result in reduced fossil fuel use and lead to GHG reductions. Therefore, the ecoENERGY for Aboriginal and Northern Communities Program directly contributes to the achievement of the above goals and targets.

Expected Results* Performance Indicators Targets 2011–2012 Performance Status

*This program sunsetted on March 31, 2011. There were no performance expectations set for the 2011–2012 Report on Plans and Priorities. The expected results, performance indicators and targets for the program were revised as a result of program renewal.

Reduced greenhouse gas emissions in Aboriginal and northern communities Projected reductions in GHG emissions over a 20-year project lifecycle resulting from all projects funded by the ecoENERGY for Aboriginal and Northern Communities Program (2011–2016) Projected 1.5 Mt/ 5 years The ecoENERGY for Aboriginal and Northern Communities Program received approval in the Summer of 2011. The program received a total of 81 project proposals during 2011–2012, of which 36 projects were provided funding support. It is projected that these projects will reduce GHG emissions by an estimated 0.9 Mt of the projected 1.5 Mt over the course of a 20-year project lifecycle.

Related Initiatives/Programs

The ecoENERGY for Aboriginal and Northern Communities Program, described above, is a program under the Clean Air Agenda — Clean Energy Theme (see Section 4). The work completed by this program supports the goals of both the Clean Air Agenda and the FSDS.


Theme I: Addressing Climate Change and Air Quality

Goal 2: Air Pollution — Minimize the threats to air quality so that the air Canadians breathe is clean and supports healthy ecosystems.


Theme II: Maintaining Water Quality and Availability

Goal 3: Water Quality — Protect and enhance the Quality of Water so that it is clean, safe, and secure for all Canadians and supports healthy ecosystems.

Target 2.3 and Target 3.12: Chemicals Management — Reduce risks to Canadians and environmental concentrations and human exposure to such substances.

FSDS Implementation Strategy

2.3.7 and 3.12.6 — The Northern Contaminants Program will continue monitoring contaminant levels in wildlife and people in the Canadian North.

Federal Lead: Environment Canada and Health Canada

Link to AANDC 2011–2012 Program Activity Architecture

4 The North
4.2 Northern Science and Technology
4.2.1 Northern Contaminants

Description

This program engages Northerners and world-class Canadian scientists in research and monitoring of long-range contaminants in the Canadian Arctic. The health and well-being of all Northerners is augmented as northern people consume traditional/country foods based in part on information and advice made possible by this program. The program has international influence as a leader in the Arctic Council — Arctic Monitoring and Assessment Programme, and is a key contributor of scientific data to international agreements, such as the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) Stockholm Convention and helps to position Canada as an international leader in Arctic science.

Relationship between the Implementation Strategy and the FSDS Goals and Targets

The Northern Contaminants Program generated data is used to complete assessments on ecosystem and human health. The results of theses assessments influence policy that results in actions to eliminate contaminants from long range sources. This action will ensure that the safety and security of traditional country food that is important to the health of Northerners and Northern communities. Therefore, this activity directly contributes to the achievement of Targets 2.3.

Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets 2011–2012 Performance Status
Reduced contaminant related risk to ecosystem and human health Percent decrease in concentrations of previously identified contaminants in northern wildlife 5% decrease in concentration from 1990 levels by March 31, 2014 Research results in 2011–2012 show significant reductions in legacy Persistent Organic Pollutants (POP), exceeding the targeted 5% reductions. However, Mercury concentrations in some northern wildlife and in certain regions are still on the rise.
Percent decrease in concentrations of previously identified contaminants among northern populations 5% decrease in concentration from 1990 levels by March 31, 2014 Research results in 2011–2012 show a reduction of legacy POP's in northern populations. No significant trends for Mercury in northern populations, but levels remain of concern to health authorities.


Theme II: Maintaining Water Quality and Availability

Goal 3: Water Quality — Protect and enhance the quality of water so that it is clean, safe and secure for all Canadians and supports healthy ecosystems.

Target 3.10: Drinking Water Quality — Increase the percentage of First Nation communities with acceptable water and wastewater facility risk ratings by 2013. (Federal Lead: this target is co-lead Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Canada and Health Canada).

The following AANDC implementation strategies support target 3.10 Drinking Water Quality.

FSDS Implementation Strategies

3.10.1 — Undertake a National Assessment of First Nation communities to assess the current status and associated risk for all existing communal water and wastewater systems and analyze various options for community serviceability

3.10.4 — Ensure that training is available for all operators and that a regime is in place so that all water systems have oversight of a certified operator

3.10.5.1 — Enhance the Circuit Rider Training Program

3.10.5.2 — Increase the number of Circuit Rider trainers and operators

3.10.9 — Develop and continuously update technical guidance protocols, such as the Protocol for Safe Drinking Water in First Nation Communities and the Protocol for Wastewater Treatment and Disposal in First Nation Communities. (AANDC and Environment Canada are jointly responsible for this implementation strategy)

3.10.11 — Develop appropriate regulatory framework and legislation for safe drinking water and wastewater treatment in First Nation communities

Link to AANDC 2011–2012 Program Activity Architecture

3 The Land and Economy
3.3 Community Infrastructure
3.3.1 Water and Wastewater Infrastructure

Description

The goal is to support First Nations in meeting health and safety standards and providing their residents with similar levels of service to off-reserve communities. First Nations identify their priorities and needs and present project proposals to the Department. Grants and contribution funding is provided for projects based on a priority assessment and project risk levels. This program supports the provision of funding for the planning, design, construction, acquisition, operation and maintenance of infrastructure facilities, including: community water supply, treatment and distribution systems; and community wastewater collection, treatment and disposal systems. It includes the provision of funding for: coordination, training and capacity building for activities related to water and wastewater facilities; identification of on-reserve water and wastewater infrastructure needs; development of water and wastewater infrastructure capital plans; and the design, and ongoing implementation of water and wastewater facilities maintenance management practices.

Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets 2011–2012 Performance Status

*A number of water and wastewater systems that were inspected in the National Assessment of Water and Wastewater Systems in First Nation Communities — 2009–2011 were not inspected in 2011–2012. Those are systems for which Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Canada does not provide direct funding, including systems owned by Self-Governing and Modern Treaty First Nations, private systems, some small septic systems, systems since retired from use and systems where the water or wastewater service is provided by an off-reserve service provider. The systems described in this indicator are only those for which inspections were carried out in both 2009–2010 and 2011–2012.

Infrastructure base in First Nation communities that protects the health and safety of community members and enables engagement in the economy Percentage of First Nation communities with acceptable water and wastewater facility risk ratings Increase in the percentage of First Nation communities with acceptable water and wastewater facility risk ratings 2013 Wastewater systems:
  • Percentage of low-risk systems has increased from 31.2% to 45.1%
  • Percentage of medium-risk systems has decreased from 48.4% to 40.5%
  • Percentage of high-risk systems has decreased from 13.3% to 11.2%
Per the 2012 Annual Performance Inspection results (June 2012), compared to data on the same systems from the National Assessment results (published July 2011)*
Percentage of First Nation drinking water systems have low risk ratings The National Assessment will provide the baseline for this indicator. This target was established in 2011 and will be reviewed annually. Water systems:
  • Percentage of low-risk systems has increased from 25.2% to 34.5%
  • Percentage of medium-risk systems has increased from 33.3% to 34.8%
  • Percentage of high risk systems has decreased from 34.8% to 26.7%
Per the 2012 Annual Performance Inspection results (June 2012), compared to data on the same systems from the National Assessment results (published July 2011)*
Infrastructure base in First Nation communities that protects the health and safety of community members and enables engagement in the economy All field work for the National Assessment of Water and Wastewater Systems in First Nation communities assessment is complete Analysis of Options The National Assessment of Water and Wastewater Systems in First Nation communities was completed in 2010, and results were made public in July 2011.
The operation of water and wastewater facilities meets AANDC protocols and communities have the capacity to manage water and wastewater facilities Percentage of First Nation communities that have primary operators certified to the level of waste water systems 47%
Target date: March 31, 2013
New Circuit Rider Trainer Program guidelines were developed to help standardize the program and to support operators in improving the management of O&M on their systems. The Annual Performance Inspection results indicated that 53% of wastewater systems and 60.1% of water treatment systems were managed by operators certified to the level of the system. These results exceed the 2013 targets of 47% for wastewater systems and 55% for drinking water systems.
Percentage of Fist Nation communities that have primary operators certified to the level of the drinking water systems Target: 55%
Target date: March 31, 2013
New Circuit Rider Trainer Program guidelines were developed to help standardize the program and to support operators in improving the management of O&M on their systems. The Annual Performance Inspection results indicated that 53% of wastewater systems and 60.1% of water treatment systems were managed by operators certified to the level of the system. These results exceed the 2013 targets of 47% for wastewater systems and 55% for drinking water systems.
Infrastructure base in First Nation communities protects the health and safety of community members and enables engagement in the economy Develop or update protocols as required Target: Protocols developed or updated.
Target date: Competed as required
AANDC maintains a suite of water and wastewater protocols to help ensure that on-reserve residents enjoy standards of health and safety comparable to neighbouring off-reserve residents. These protocols provide First Nations with guidance to help maintain water quality and to protect the government's substantial investments in First Nation water and wastewater services. This initiative represents ongoing efforts by AANDC to ensure that all technical guidance documents are continuously updated for accuracy and relevance.
Development and approval of legislation Approval of legislation The Safe Drinking Water for First Nations Act was introduced in the Senate as Bill S-8 on February 29, 2012.

Related Initiatives/Programs

The First Nations water and wastewater indicator is a part of the Canadian Environmental Sustainability Indicators(CESI) program, which provides data and information to track Canada's performance on key environmental sustainability issues.


Theme III: Protecting Nature

Goal 7: Biological Resources

Target 7.3: Sustainable Forest Management — Improve the management of Canada's forest ecosystems through the development and dissemination of knowledge.

FSDS Implementation Strategy

7.3.1 — First Nations Forestry Program (FNFP) — Support initiatives to enhance First Nations' capacity to sustainably manage reserve forests and other forests.

The FNFP was a joint program with Natural Resources Canada (NRCan). This program sunsetted on March 31, 2011 and did not have any performance expectations for the 2011–2012 fiscal year. While the FNFP was completed in March 2011, the Aboriginal Forestry Initiative led by NRCan builds on contributions made by FNFP. The Aboriginal Forestry Initiative focuses on Aboriginal economic development projects premised on the FSDS target to enhance Canada's capacity to sustainably manage reserve forests and other forests.


Theme IV: Shrinking the Environmental Footprint — Beginning with Government

AANDC contributes to the Greening of Government Operations targets through the internal services program activity. The Department contributes to the following target areas of Theme IV, Shrinking the Environmental Footprint — Beginning with Government, of the FSDS:

For additional details on AANDC's Greening Government Operations activities, please see the List of Supplementary Information Tables in Section III of the 2011–2012 Departmental Performance Report.

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Section 3: Additional Departmental Sustainable Development Activities/Initiatives not captured in the FSDS

AANDC is committed to managing contaminated sites in both the North and on reserve lands south of latitude 60° N, in a cost-effective and consistent manner, to reduce and eliminate, where possible, risk to human and environmental health and liability associated with contaminated sites.

The Contaminated Sites Management Program

The Contaminated Sites Management Program (CSMP) is currently responsible for managing 2939 active contaminated sites on reserve lands south of latitude 60° N. The CSMP provides funding to First Nations through Grants and Contributions for the identification, site assessment and remediation of contaminated and potentially contaminated sites on reserve lands and lands set aside.

This program links to the FSDS and the achievement of Target 2.3 Chemicals Management under Theme I — Addressing Climate Change and Air Quality, and Target 3.12 Chemicals Management under Theme II — Maintaining Water Quality and Availability.

Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets 2011–2012 Performance Status
Management of contaminated sites to protect human health and the safety of the environment Number of contaminated sites remediated Targets: 5 by March 31, 2012 Due to the greater levels of complexity, cost and multi-year remediation requirements of higher risk Class 1 sites, remediation work on 5 sites was not able to be completed. In addition, remediation work on several sites were subject to delays in project tendering, reduced accessibility as a result of poor weather, and equipment failure. Notwithstanding delays, the CSMP reduced the known financial liability to $252.8M at year end, down from $260.3M at the start of the year.

The Northern Contaminated Sites Program

The Northern Contaminated Sites Program (NCSP) ensures that contaminated sites are managed to ensure the protection of human health and safety as well as the environment for all Northerners by assessing and remediating contaminated sites and supporting the employment and training of Northerners, particularly Aboriginals.

This program links to the FSDS and the achievement of Target 2.3 Chemicals Management under Theme I — Addressing Climate Change and Air Quality and Target 3.12 Chemicals Management under Theme II — Maintaining Water Quality and Availability.

Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets 2011–2012 Performance Status
Contaminated sites are managed to ensure the protection of human health and the safety of the environment while bringing economic benefit to the North (Contaminated Sites) Number of suspected contaminated sites assessed 848 (all) by March 31, 2012 The NCSP has endeavoured to ensure that all suspected sites have been assessed by 2012. NCSP has assessed all suspected sites, with the exception of 27 sites, located in the Northwest Territories, which will be completed in the summer of 2012. In 2011–2012, 65 sites in Nunavut were assessed; as a result no suspected sites remain in Nunavut.
Number of sites in Step 8 (implementation) through Step 10 (monitoring) of the Federal Contaminated Sites Action Plan 10-step process 25 by March 31, 2012 In 2011–2012 NCSP had 15 sites in monitoring (step 10) and 9 sites in implementation/remediation (step 8 or 9). In addition, 6 sites were closed, meaning that they were remediated and no monitoring is required. Therefore, NCSP achieved its target.

Protected Areas Strategy

AANDC contributes to the establishment of protected areas in the Northwest Territories (NWT) through the NWT Protected Areas Strategy (PAS). This activity falls under The North strategic outcome, the Northern Land, Resources and Environmental Management program activity, Environmental Management sub-activity and supports the achievement of Target 6.1 Terrestrial Ecosystems and Habitat — Non-Park Protected Habitat.

The work completed under the NWT Protected Areas Strategy supports the achievement of Target 6.1 Terrestrial Ecosystems and Habitat — Non-Park Protected Habitat under Theme III — Protecting Nature.

Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets 2011–2012 Performance Status
Sound environmental protection and management is fostered and promoted through the NWT Protected Areas Strategy and fulfilling claims-related obligations with respect to the implementation of environmental monitoring programs Number of areas brought under protection through the NWT Protected Areas Strategy 5 areas by 2013 (Areas reduced from 6 to 5: One of the candidate area sponsored by Environment Canada is no longer being pursued and was withdrawn from the PAS process).
Target Date: March 31, 2013
In 2011–2012, AANDC continued work and collaboration with Environment Canada to advance the assessment and establishment of five candidate National Wildlife Areas (NWA) under the NWT Protected Areas Strategy.

Specifically, Non Renewable Assessments (NRAs) have been completed on four of the areas; socio-economic reports have now been completed for four of the candidate National Wildlife Areas, and all other assessments (cultural, ecological, renewable resource) have been completed. Decision framework for sub-surface management for NWAs approved by the Northern Conservation Coordination Committee.

AANDC also continued coordination, implementation and establishment of the Northwest Territories Cumulative Impact Monitoring Program (CIMP) and the Nunavut General Monitoring Plan (NGMP) to support responsible economic development in the context of sustainable development and sound adaptive environmental/resource management in the North.

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Section 4: 2011–2012 Clean Air Agenda Horizontal Performance Report

CAA Theme: Adaptation
CAA Program Name: Climate Adaptation and Resilience Program for Aboriginals and Northerners
Department: Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Canada

2011–2012 Departmental Program Activity Architecture

4 The North
4.1 Northern Governance and People
4.1.3 Climate Change Adaptation

2011–2012 CAA Program Description and Expected Achievements

AANDC's Climate Adaptation and Resilience Program for Aboriginals and Northerners (Climate Change Adaptation Program) supports the development of community-relevant information and tools for Aboriginal and northern communities, governments, and organizations to assess vulnerabilities to climate change and to develop adaptation plans. This will result in plans, actions, and decisions which enhance the resiliency of communities. Up to $200,000 per year for a maximum of three years in funding is available for each project conducting vulnerability assessments, developing tools/methods/best practices, developing adaptation plans or disseminating knowledge. The program targets communities where the impacts of climate change are already visible and vulnerability is high.

The Program's overall expected results are as follows:

Expected Result: Aboriginal and northern communities implement adaptation measures and decisions to protect community health and safety

Indicator: Number of communities implementing adaptation plans and measures to protect community health and safety

Target: 10 communities/5 years

Data Source: Administrative data: program records, files and reports

Frequency of Data Collection: Annually (data collection begins year 2)

Output: Funded projects under four categories: vulnerability assessments; tools; adaptation plans; knowledge dissemination

Indicator: Number of funded projects under each category

Target: 90 projects/5 years

Data Source: Administrative data: program records, files and reports

Frequency of Data Collection: Annually

2011–2012 CAA Program Achievements/Performance Summary

The Climate Change Adaptation Program received approval in Fall 2011. Three regional workshops (Yukon, Northwest Territories, Inuit Regions) were held in March 2012 to showcase past projects and engage interest in, and plan for, the new program. A call for Letters of Intent for projects to be funded in 2012–2013 was launched in October 2011. Out of 152 Letters of Interest received, 100 proponents were invited to submit full project proposals. These activities prepared the program to be fully implemented starting 2012–2013 and contribute to program expected results.

The Climate Change Adaptation Program directly supports the Adaptation Theme's immediate and intermediate outcomes. The program works with Aboriginal governments, communities, and other government departments to increase collaboration on climate change adaptation (immediate outcome). The Program's focus is to provide funding to communities to assess their risks and opportunities arising from a changing climate and identify adaptation measures to address risks and opportunities arising from climate change (immediate outcome). Following the development of adaptation plans and identification of specific actions to reduce the impacts of climate change, some communities will move to implement adaptation measures, which is the Theme's intermediate outcome and the Program's ultimate outcome.

2011–2012 CAA Program Lessons Learned

There is increasing interest in the program from all regions in Canada, which led to a significant uptake in the call for Letters of Interest for 2012–2013. The program will strive to manage a clear and transparent proposal development and review process, selecting projects that will build the knowledge base and promote adaptive action on climate change. The key challenge facing the program is to identify and target vulnerable communities that have not previously participated in the program. Efforts will be made to communicate information about the program and support them in developing their project proposals.

CAA Program Spending Information

Total Approved Funding: $19,717,100
2011–2012 Planned Spending: $1,349,420
2011–2012 Actual Spending: $1,349,420


CAA Theme: Adaptation
CAA Program Name: Integrating Adaptation into Codes and Standards for Northern Infrastructure
Department: Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Canada

2011–2012 Departmental Program Activity Architecture

4 The North
4.1 Northern Governance and People
4.1.3 Climate Change Adaptation

2011–2012 CAA Program Expected Achievements

The Northern Infrastructure Standardization Initiative (NISI) is a joint collaboration between AANDC and the Standards Council of Canada (SCC) to support Aboriginal and northern communities in building and designing safer and more resilient infrastructure. The Initiative is working towards the development of codes, standards and guidelines for northern infrastructure that consider climate change impacts. AANDC supports the facilitation of the Initiative's Northern Advisory Committee (NAC) by engaging and supporting the members of the committee.

AANDC's overall expected results are as follows:

Expected Result: Aboriginal and northern communities implement adaptation measures and decisions to protect community health and safety

Indicator: Number of new and revised codes and standards for infrastructure being adopted in the North; number of new and revised guidelines for infrastructure being adopted in the North

Target: 3 to 5 new and/or revised codes, standards, guidelines/5–10 years

Data Source: Administrative data: program records, files and reports

Frequency of Data Collection: Annually

2011–2012 CAA Program Achievements/Performance Summary

The NISI received funding approval in the fall of 2011. A National Advisory Committee was formed to build capacity and share knowledge among northern practitioners and regulators about the issues regarding infrastructure development in a changing climate. The Committee consists of two Assistant Deputy Minister representatives from each territorial government and Nunavik, ensuring appropriate guidance.

The NISI supports the Adaptation Theme's immediate outcome of identifying adaptation measures to address risks and opportunities arising from climate change and the intermediate outcome of implementing adaptation measures. The revision and development of codes, standards and guidelines will be a tangible adaptation measure that can be adopted and used by jurisdictions throughout the North to strengthen infrastructure. AANDC and SCC are establishing the governance and operational structures to move towards these outcomes in the coming years.

2011–2012 Program Lessons Learned

The NISI has generated interest in the North across jurisdictions. The challenge will be to keep appropriate government organizations and communities engaged while managing competing priorities and ensuring expectations are met.

CAA Program Spending Information

Total Approved Funding: $935,000
2011–2012 Planned Spending: $187,000
2011–2012 Actual Spending: $187,000


CAA Theme: Clean Energy
CAA Program Name: ecoENERGY for Aboriginal and Northern Communities
Department: Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Canada

2011–2012 Departmental Program Activity Architecture

3 The Land and Economy
3.3 Community Infrastructure
3.3.5 Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency

2011–2012 CAA Program Expected Achievements

The ecoENERGY for Aboriginal and Northern Communities Program is a proposal-based program which focuses exclusively on Aboriginal and northern communities with an emphasis on off-grid communities that currently use diesel generators to produce electricity. Introduction of proven renewable energy and energy efficiency measures will lead to GHG reductions.

The program provides contributions to support projects under two funding streams. Up to $250,000 funding is available for pre-feasibility and feasibility studies of renewable energy projects (e.g. wind, small hydro, solar, biomass) that result in greater than 4000 tonnes of GHG reductions over their lifecycle; and up to $100,000 funding is available for design and construction of energy projects integrated with community buildings (e.g. solar heating, ground source heat pumps, high efficiency heating systems).

The Program's overall expected results are as follows:

Expected Result: Reduced greenhouse gas emissions in Aboriginal and northern communities

Indicator: Projected reductions in GHG emissions over a 20-year project lifecycle resulting from all projects funded by the ecoENERGY for Aboriginal and Northern Communities Program (2011–2016)

Target: Projected 1.5 Mt/5 years

Data Source: Administrative data: program records, files and reports

Frequency of Data Collection: Annually

Output: Funded energy projects

Indicator: Number of projects funded by the ecoENERGY for Aboriginal and Northern Communities Program

Target: 10–20 year

Data Source: Administrative data: program records, files and reports

Frequency of Data Collection: Annually

2011–2012 CAA Program Achievements/Performance Summary

The Program's results for 2011–2012 are as follows:

Through the work described above, AANDC's ecoENERGY for Aboriginal and Northern Communities Program directly addresses the Clean Energy Theme's ultimate outcome of reduced emissions of greenhouse gases from the energy sector, by reducing emissions from Aboriginal and northern communities. With financial support in the early phases of development for renewable energy projects, communities have an increased capacity to adopt cleaner energy technologies (immediate outcome). When projects are implemented, as is directly the case with the energy projects integrated with community buildings stream and later in the process with the renewable energy projects stream, clean energy technologies are adopted (intermediate outcome).

2011–2012 Program Lessons Learned

As the program is on track to meet its targets, adjustments are not currently required. The program has prepared a comprehensive risk profile, including a mitigation plan. The key risks to the program are as follows:

CAA Program Spending Information

Total Approved Funding: $19,632,100
2011–2012 Planned Spending: $3,926,420
2011–2012 Actual Spending: $3,926,420

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