ARCHIVED - Planning for a Sustainable Future: Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Canada's Contribution to the 2010 Federal Sustainable Development Strategy (2012–2013 update)

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Author: Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Canada
Date: March 2012
ISSN: 1929-3488
QS-6275-000-EE-A1
Catalogue No.: R1-47/2010E-PDF

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© Her Majesty the Queen in Right of Canada, represented by the Minister of Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development, 2012

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Table of contents

Section 1 - Sustainable Development

Introduction

Welcome to the website component of Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Canada's Sustainable Development Strategy under the 2010 Federal Sustainable Development Strategy (FSDS) for Canada. This website details the department's responsibilities, objectives and plans for contributing to the goals and targets of the FSDS thereby supporting the Government of Canada's approach to sustainable development.

Federal Sustainable Development Strategy

Canada's first Federal Sustainable Development Strategy (FSDS), Planning for a Sustainable Future: A Federal Sustainable Development Strategy for Canada  [Note 1] was adopted October 6, 2010 pursuant to the Federal Sustainable Development Act. The Federal Sustainable Development Act (FSDA) had replaced requirements established in 1995 under the Auditor General Act that required federal departments and agencies to table in Parliament their individual strategies for sustainable development. The former system was criticized by the Commissioner of the Environment and Sustainable Development for lacking a common government-wide vision and sustainable development goals and targets were often pushed to the margins of federal planning and reporting. Effective measurement, monitoring and reporting of progress was also found lacking. As a result, the ability of government to pursue a "plan, do, check and improve" approach to sustainable development was limited.

The first FSDS consolidates the federal approach to sustainable development, streamlines the way various departments and agencies report and places sustainable development at the heart of government decision-making.

The Department of Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development, hereafter referred to as Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Canada (AANDC), is responsible for preparing a Departmental Sustainable Development Strategy that supports and contributes to the FSDS.

The first AANDC Sustainable Development Strategy was adopted in late 1997, with the fourth and most recent being the AANDC Sustainable Development Strategy 2007-2010. This Strategy builds on the successes of previous AANDC strategies and is responsive to the requirements of the FSDA.

Decision-making under the Act

The Federal Sustainable Development Strategy (FSDS) situates the Government of Canada's environmental priorities within the broader context of social and economic priorities by recognizing the linkages to environmental concerns when economic and social decisions are being made. Its strength lies in making the outcomes of decision-making more transparent. The FSDS also establishes a framework for sustainable development planning and reporting with three key elements:

Development and implementation of the FSDS is a collaborative process across the Government of Canada. The Minister of the Environment has overall responsibility for the development of the FSDS.

The Minister of Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Canada and other Ministers presiding over departments and agencies identified in the Act are responsible for preparing and tabling in Parliament Departmental Sustainable Development Strategies that comply with and contribute to the FSDS. The government has chosen to utilize the Report on Plans and Priorities (RPP) as a means of fulfilling this requirement.

In addition, Environment Canada, Treasury Board Secretariat and Public Works and Government Services Canada also play key management roles through the preparation of common guidelines, assessment tools and data collection and dissemination across government.

Priorities for Environmental Sustainability

The FSDS focuses on environmental sustainability as a first step in integrating environmental concerns with economic and social considerations. This approach is guided by international experience and best practices that demonstrate the benefits of a strategic and targeted approach to planning and reporting. This environmental focus addresses four themes that are consistently high priorities of the Canadian public:

  1. Addressing Climate Change and Air Quality;
  2. Maintaining Water Quality and Availability;
  3. Protecting Nature; and
  4. Shrinking the Environmental Footprint - Beginning with Government.

Departmental Overview

Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Canada (AANDC) supports Aboriginal people (First Nations, Inuit and Métis) and Northerners in their efforts to:

AANDC is one of the federal government departments responsible for meeting the Government of Canada's obligations and commitments to First Nations, Inuit and Métis, and for fulfilling the federal government's constitutional responsibilities in the North. AANDC's responsibilities are largely determined by numerous statutes, negotiated agreements and relevant legal decisions. Most of the Department's programs, representing a majority of its spending - are delivered through partnerships with Aboriginal communities and federal-provincial or federal-territorial agreements. AANDC also works with urban Aboriginal people, Métis and Non-Status Indians (many of whom live in rural areas) through the Office of the Federal Interlocutor [Note 2].

A Vision Under the FSDS

AANDC's vision realizes the important role that social, economic and environmental conditions play in supporting sustainable communities:

Canada's economic and social well-being benefits from strong, self-sufficient Aboriginal and northern people and communities.

Our vision is a future in which First Nations, Inuit, Métis and northern communities are healthy, safe, self-sufficient and prosperous - a Canada where people make their own decisions, manage their own affairs and make strong contributions to the country as a whole.

The department strives to integrate environmental, economic and social factors in the making of decisions in order to derive added benefits or to avoid or mitigate negative impacts on Aboriginal and northern communities for both present and future generations.

Sustainable Development Practices

Strategic Environmental Assessments at AANDC

In association with the adoption of the first FSDS in 2010, the Government of Canada revised the Guidelines for Implementing the Cabinet Directive on the Environmental Assessment of Policy, Plan and Program Proposals (the Cabinet Directive). First established in 1990, the Cabinet Directive is a key policy that formally integrates environmental considerations into federal government decision-making through the use of Strategic Environmental Assessment (SEA). Revisions to the Guidelines link SEA to the FSDS in three ways:

  1. Applying the FSDS goals and targets when undertaking SEAs;

  2. Reporting on the results of SEAs in Departmental Performance Reports; and

  3. Describing the link to the achievement of the FSDS goals and targets in SEA public statements.

SEA is a key analytical tool used by the federal government to support environmentally sustainable decision-making. It evaluates the environmental effects of a proposed policy, plan, or program and its alternatives, and informs strategic decision-making through a careful analysis of environmental risks and opportunities. For more information on SEAs visit the Canadian Environmental Assessment Agency  website [Note 3].

Managing Sustainable Development Internally

Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Canada commits to:

Managing Sustainable Development Externally

External to the Department, AANDC is actively engaged in several interdepartmental working groups to advance sustainable development. AANDC is a member of the following interdepartmental working groups:

In addition to the above, the Department is an active member of the Canadian Sustainability Indicators Network.

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Section 2 - Implementation of AANDC's Responsibilities under the Federal Sustainable Development Strategy

This section outlines AANDC's contribution to the Federal Sustainable Development Strategy. AANDC is responsible for 10 implementation strategies under the FSDS that reflect existing departmental initiatives related to federal goals and targets.

FSDS Theme I: Climate Change and Air Quality

AANDC contributes to the Goal 1: Climate Change and Goal 2: Air Pollution under Theme I as follows:

Goal 1: Climate Change - Reduce greenhouse gas emission levels to mitigate the severity and unavoidable impacts of climate change

Target 1.1: Climate Change Mitigation - Relative to 2005 emission levels, reduce Canada's total greenhouse gas emissions (GHG) 17% by 2020.

Implementation Strategy 1.1.31 - Work with Aboriginal and northern communities, organizations and governments on climate change issues, through the development of sustainable energy initiatives and support them in managing vulnerabilities and opportunities created by a changing climate. (AANDC, NRCan)

The Department's two climate change programs contribute to this implementation strategy and support two departmental strategic outcomes. The ecoEnergy for Aboriginal and Northern Communities Program under the Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency sub-activity contributes to the Community Infrastructure Program Activity and supports the Land and Economy strategic outcome. The Climate Change Adaptation Program falls under the Climate Change Adaptation sub activity which contributes to the Northern Governance and People Program Activity and supports the North strategic outcome.

Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency

The ecoENERGY for Aboriginal and Northern Communities Program focuses exclusively on Aboriginal and northern communities to provide funding support for pre-feasibility and feasibility studies of renewable energy projects and design and construction of energy projects integrated with community buildings. Emphasis is placed on Aboriginal and northern off-grid communities that currently use diesel generators to produce electricity and heat. Introduction of proven renewable energy and energy efficiency measures will result in reduced fossil fuel use and lead to GHG reductions. Therefore the program directly contributes to the achievement of Target 1.1 Climate Change Mitigation.

In 2012-13, the program will support pre-feasibility and feasibility studies of 5-10 renewable energy projects (e.g. wind, small hydro, solar, biomass), and design and construction of 5-10 energy projects integrated with community buildings (e.g. solar heating, ground source heat pumps, high efficiency heating systems).

Further details on the ecoENERGY for Aboriginal and Northern Communities program can be found on the AANDC Climate Change website.

Climate Change Adaptation

The Climate Change Adaptation Program supports the development of sustainable Aboriginal and northern communities through identification of risks and vulnerabilities related to climate change, as well as development and implementation of plans and actions to manage those risks. It supports development of capacity and policy for the integration of climate change considerations into decision-making, and develops partnerships with Aboriginal and northern governments to maintain their engagement in addressing climate change issues. Therefore the program directly contributes to the achievement of Target 1.1 Climate Change Mitigation.

In 2012-13, it is anticipated that the program will provide funding for 20 projects to be completed in approximately 10 communities. Projects will be funded in four categories: vulnerability assessments, tools, adaptation plans, and knowledge dissemination.  Emphasis will be placed on communities that are considered particularly vulnerable to the impacts of climate change, due to geographic location or a reduced ability to adapt.

Further details on the Climate Change Adaptation program can be found on the AANDC Climate Change website.

Expected Result: Reduced greenhouse gas emissions in northern and Aboriginal communities
Performance Indicator Target Target Date
Projected reductions in GHG emissions resulting from all projects funded by the ecoENERGY for Aboriginal and Northern Communities Program (2011 - 2016) A projected 1.5 Mt reduction of GHG emissions over a 20-year project life-cycle, for projects funded by the program. March 31, 2016.
Expected Result: Aboriginal and northern communities implement adaptation measures and decisions to protect community health and safety
Performance Indicator Target Target Date
Number of communities implementing adaptation plans and measures to protect community health and safety

10 communities

(2011-2016)
March 31, 2016

Goal 2: Air Pollution - Minimize the threats to air quality so that the air Canadians breathe is clean and supports healthy ecosystems

Target 2.1: Air Pollutants - Reduce air pollutants in order to maintain or improve air quality across the country and achieve the emission targets which are currently under development in consultation with provinces and stakeholders.

Implementation Strategy 2.1.16 - ecoACTION programs reduce greenhouse gas emissions and can directly or indirectly contribute to air pollutant emission reduction. (NRCan, TC, AANDC)

This implementation strategy is supported by the ecoEnergy for Aboriginal and Northern Communities Program under the Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency sub-activity which contributes to the Community Infrastructure Program Activity and supports the Land and Economy strategic outcome.

Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency (See description above)

The ecoENERGY for Aboriginal and Northern Communities Program focuses exclusively on Aboriginal and northern communities to provide funding support for pre-feasibility and feasibility studies of renewable energy projects and design and construction of energy projects integrated with community buildings. Emphasis is placed on Aboriginal and northern off-grid communities that currently use diesel generators to produce electricity and heat. Introduction of proven renewable energy and energy efficiency measures will result in reduced fossil fuel use and lead to GHG reductions. Therefore the program directly contributes to the achievement of Target 2.1 Air Pollutants.

In 2012-13, the program will support pre-feasibility and feasibility studies of 5-10 renewable energy projects (e.g. wind, small hydro, solar, biomass), and design and construction of 5-10 energy projects integrated with community buildings (e.g. solar heating, ground source heat pumps, high efficiency heating systems).

Further details on the ecoENERGY for Aboriginal and Northern Communities program can be found on the AANDC Climate Change website.

Expected Result: Reduced greenhouse gas emissions in northern and Aboriginal communities
Performance Indicator Target Target Date
Projected reductions in GHG emissions resulting from all projects funded by the ecoENERGY for Aboriginal and Northern Communities Program (2011 - 2016). A projected 1.5 Mt reduction of GHG emissions over a 20-year project life-cycle, for projects funded by the program. March 31, 2016.

Goal 2: Air Pollution - Minimize the threats to air quality so that the air Canadians breathe is clean and supports healthy ecosystems.

Target 2.3: Chemicals Management - Reduce risks to Canadians and impacts on the environment posed by harmful substances as a result of decreased environmental concentrations and human exposure to such substances.

Implementation Strategy 2.3.7 and 3.12.6 - The Northern Contaminants Program will continue monitoring contaminant levels in wildlife and people in the Canadian North.

This implementation strategy is found under the North Strategic Outcome, the Northern Science and Technology Program Activity and the Northern Contaminants sub-activity.

Northern Contaminants Program

This program engages Northerners and world-class Canadian scientists in research and monitoring of long-range contaminants in the Canadian Arctic. The health and well-being of all Northerners is augmented as northern people consume traditional/country foods based in part on information and advice made possible by this program. The program has international influence as a leader in the Arctic Council - Arctic Monitoring and Assessment Program, and is a key contributor of scientific data to international agreements, such as the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) Stockholm Convention, and helps to position Canada as an international leader in Arctic science.

The Northern Contaminants Program generated data is used to complete assessments on ecosystem and human health. The results of these assessments influence policy that results in actions to eliminate contaminants from long range sources. This action will ensure that the safety and security of traditional country food that is important to the health of Northerners and Northern communities. Therefore, this activity directly contributes to the achievement of Target 2.3 Chemicals Management.

Expected Result: Reduced contaminant related risk to ecosystem and human health
Performance Indicator Target Target Date
Percent decrease in concentrations of previously identified contaminants in northern wildlife. 5% decrease in concentration from 1990 levels by 2014. March 31, 2014.
Percent decrease in concentrations of previously identified contaminants among northern populations. 5% decrease in concentration from 1990 levels by 2014. March 31, 2014.

FSDS Theme II: Maintaining Water Quality and Availability

AANDC contributes to the Goal 3: Water Quality under Theme II as follows:

Goal 3: Water Quality - Protect and enhance the quality of water so that it is clean, safe and secure for all Canadians and supports healthy ecosystems.

3.10 Target: Drinking Water Quality -Increase the percentage of First Nation communities with acceptable [Note 4] water and wastewater facility risk ratings by 2013.

This target is co-lead Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Canada and Health Canada.

Expected Result: Infrastructure base in First Nation communities that protects the health and safety of community members and enables engagement in the economy
Performance Indicator Target Target Date
Percentage of First Nations wastewater systems that have low risk ratings 50% March 31, 2013
Percentage of First Nations drinking water systems that have low risk ratings 35% March 31, 2013

The following six AANDC implementation strategies support target 3.10 Drinking Water Quality. The implementation strategies are all from the program sub-activity Water and Wastewater Infrastructure under the Community Infrastructure Program Activity of The Land and Economy Strategic Outcome.

Water and Wastewater Infrastructure

The goal is to support First Nations in meeting health and safety standards and providing their residents with similar levels of service to off reserve communities. First Nations identify their priorities and needs and present project proposals to the department. Grants and contribution funding is provided for projects based on a priority assessment and project risk levels. This program supports the provision of funding for the planning, design, construction, acquisition, operation and maintenance of infrastructure facilities, including: community water supply, treatment and distribution systems; and community wastewater collection, treatment and disposal systems. It includes the provision of funding for: coordination, training and capacity building for activities related to water and wastewater facilities; identification of on-reserve water and wastewater infrastructure needs; development of water and wastewater infrastructure capital plans; and the design, and ongoing implementation of water and wastewater facilities maintenance management practices.

Implementation Strategy 3.10.1 - Undertake a National Assessment of First Nation communities to assess the current status and associated risk for all existing communal water and wastewater systems and analyze various options for community serviceability. Indirect link to FSDS target.

Expected Result: Infrastructure base in First Nation communities that protects the health and safety of community members and enables engagement in the economy
Performance Indicator Target Target Date
All field work for the National Assessment of Water and Wastewater Systems in First Nations Communities assessment is complete. Analysis of options

Early fiscal year 2011-2012.

COMPLETED

Implementation Strategy 3.10.4 - Ensure that training is available for all operators and that a regime is in place so that all water systems have oversight of a certified operator. Direct link to FSDS target 3.10.

Implementation Strategy 3.10.5.1 - Enhance the Circuit Rider Training Program. Direct link to FSDS target 3.10.

Implementation Strategy 3.10.5.2 - Increase the number of Circuit Rider trainers and operators. Direct link to FSDS target 3.10.

Expected Result: The operation of water and wastewater facilities meet AANDC protocols and communities have the capacity to manage water and wastewater facilities
Performance Indicator Target Target Date
% of First Nations communities that have primary operators certified to the level of the wastewater systems 47% March 31, 2013
% of First Nations communities that have primary operators certified to the level of the drinking water systems 55% March 31, 2013

Implementation Strategy 3.10.9 - Develop and continuously update technical guidance protocols, such as the Protocol for Safe Drinking Water in First Nations Communities and the Protocol for Wastewater Treatment and Disposal in First Nations Communities. (AANDC and Environment Canada are jointly responsible for this implementation strategy.) Direct link to FSDS target 3.10.

Expected Result: Infrastructure base in First Nation communities that protects the health and safety of community members and enables engagement in the economy
Performance Indicator Target Target Date
Develop or update protocols as required. Protocols developed or updated.

Completed as required.

Implementation Strategy 3.10.11 - Develop appropriate regulatory framework and legislation for safe drinking water and wastewater treatment in First Nation communities. Direct link to FSDS target 3.10.

Expected Result: Infrastructure base in First Nation communities that protects the health and safety of community members and enables engagement in the economy
Performance Indicator Target Target Date
Development and approval of legislation. Approval of legislation.

Legislation approval is dependent on Parliamentary processes.

Target 3.12: Chemicals Management- Reduce risks to Canadians and impacts on the environment posed by harmful substances as a result of decreased environmental concentrations and human exposure to such substances.

Implementation Strategy 2.3.7 and 3.12.6 - The Northern Contaminants Program will continue monitoring contaminant levels in wildlife and people in the Canadian North.

This implementation strategy is found under the North Strategic Outcome, the Northern Science and Technology Program Activity and the Northern Contaminants sub-activity.

Northern Contaminants Program

This program engages Northerners and world-class Canadian scientists in research and monitoring of long-range contaminants in the Canadian Arctic. The health and well-being of all Northerners is augmented as northern people consume traditional/country foods based in part on information and advice made possible by this program. The program has international influence as a leader in the Arctic Council - Arctic Monitoring and Assessment Program (AMAP), and is a key contributor of scientific data to international agreements, such as the UNEP Stockholm Convention, and helps to position Canada as an international leader in Arctic science.

The Northern Contaminants Program generated data is used to complete assessments on ecosystem and human health. The results of these assessments influence policy that results in actions to eliminate contaminants from long range sources. This action will ensure that the safety and security of traditional country food that is important to the health of Northerners and Northern communities. Therefore, this activity directly contributes to the achievement of Target 3.12 Chemicals Management.

FSDS Theme III: Protecting Nature

AANDC contributes to one goal under Theme III as follows:

Goal 7: Biological Resources

Target 7.3: Sustainable Forest Management - Improve the management of Canada's forest ecosystems through the development and dissemination of knowledge.

Implementation Strategy 7.3.1 - First Nations Forestry Program - support initiatives to enhance first nations' capacity to sustainably manage reserve forests and other forests. (AANDC and Natural Resources Canada are jointly responsible for this implementation strategy).

The program is found under the Land and Economy Strategic Outcome, the Aboriginal Economic Development Program Activity, Activation of Community Assets sub-activity.

First Nations Forestry Program

The First Nations Forestry Program is a joint program with Natural Resources Canada. It provides funding and support to improve the capacity of First Nations to develop and sustainably manage their forest resources and to participate in and benefit from forest-based development opportunities. This activity links to the FSDS and directly to the achievement of Target 7.3: Sustainable Forest Management.

This program sunsetted on March 31, 2011 and does not have any performance expectations for the 2012-2013 fiscal year.

While the First Nations Forestry Program (FNFP) was completed in March 2011, the Aboriginal Forestry Initiative - led by Natural Resources Canada (NRCan) - builds on contributions made by FNFP. The Aboriginal Forestry Initiative focuses on Aboriginal economic development projects premised on the Federal Sustainable Development Strategy target to enhance Canada's capacity to sustainably manage reserve forests and other forests.

For more information on this program see the Aboriginal Forestry Initiative .

FSDS Theme IV: Shrinking the Environmental Footprint - Beginning with Government

Greening of Government Operations was a major objective of AANDC's previous Sustainable Development Strategy. The Office of Greening Government Operations was created in April 2005 and recommended that federal departments include activities concerning three areas - buildings, vehicles and green procurement - in their fourth strategy. Building on these recommendations, the FSDS sets out new mandatory targets in the areas of green buildings, greenhouse gas emissions, electronic waste, printing units, paper consumption, green meetings and green procurement. AANDC is committed to greening its internal operations as required by the new targets for greening government operations.

AANDC contributes to the Greening of Government Operations targets through the internal services program activity. The Department contributes to the following target areas of Theme IV, Shrinking the Environmental Footprint — Beginning with Government, of the FSDS:

Details regarding AANDC's specific responsibilities are available in the Greening Government Operations Supplementary Table [Note 5] in AANDC's 2012-2013 Report on Plans and Priorities.


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Section 3 - Additional Departmental Sustainable Development Activities / Initiatives Not Captured in the FSDS

Contaminated Sites

Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Canada contributes to the cleanup of contaminated sites in Canada through two programs: Contaminated Sites on Reserve and northern Contaminated Sites, which support two departmental strategic outcomes. Contaminated Sites on Reserve is under the Land and Economy Strategic Outcome, the Federal Administration of Reserve Land Program Activity, Environmental Management sub-activity. Northern Contaminated Sites is under the North Strategic Outcome, the Northern Land, Resources and Environmental Management Program Activity, Contaminated Sites sub-activity.

Contaminated Sites on Reserve (Land and Economy Strategic Outcome)

The Contaminated Sites on Reserve activity provides for the assessment and remediation of contaminated sites on reserve land through the implementation of the Contaminated Sites Management Program (CSMP) and the Federal Contaminated Sites Action Plan (FSCAP), in accordance with departmental and federal policies and procedures. It also provides funding to First Nation organizations and individual First Nations for the identification, assessment, management and remediation of contaminated sites, as well as environmental capacity building. This program links to FSDS and the achievement of Target 2.3 Chemicals Management under Theme I - Addressing Climate Change and Air Quality and Target 3.12 Chemicals Management under Theme II - Maintaining Water Quality and Availability.

Contaminated Sites (The North Strategic Outcome)

This sub-activity ensures that contaminated sites are managed to ensure the protection of human health and safety as well as the environment for all Northerners by assessing and remediating contaminated sites and supporting the employment and training of Northerners, particularly Aboriginals. This program links to the FSDS and the achievement of Target 2.3 Chemicals Management under Theme I - Addressing Climate Change and Air Quality and Target 3.12 Chemicals Management under Theme II - Maintaining Water Quality and Availability.

Expected Result: : Improved characterization of contaminated sites on reserve (Contaminated Sites on Reserve)
Performance Indicator Target Target Date
Number of sites assessed in Integrated Environmental Management System (IEMS). 30 March 31, 2013
Expected Result: Reduction of highest ranked human health and ecological risks on reserve according to the priority ranking system (Contaminated Sites on Reserve)
Number of Class 1 and 2 sites in IEMS where risk reduction is occurring (Step 7 and 8). 25 March 31, 2013
Expected Result: Reduction of known federal financial liability in confirmed contaminated sites (Contaminated Sites on Reserve)
Dollar reduction in total contaminated sites liability for known sites in remediation/risk management (R/RM). 9 Million March 31, 2013
Expected Result: Contaminated sites are managed to ensure the protection of human health and the safety of the environment while bringing economic benefit to the North (Contaminated Sites)
Number of suspected contaminated sites assessed. 890 March 31, 2013
Number of sites in Step 8 (implementation) through Step 10 (monitoring) of the Federal Contaminated Sites Action Plan 10-step process. 40 March 31, 2013
Level (%) of Northerners and Aboriginal peoples employed within Contaminated Sites projects. 60 March 31, 2013

Protected Areas Strategy

Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Canada's contributes to the establishment of protected areas in the NWT through the NWT Protected Areas Strategy.  This activity falls under the North Strategic Outcome, the Northern Land, Resources and Environmental Management Program Activity, Environmental Management sub-activity and supports the achievement of Target 6.1 Terrestrial Ecosystems and Habitat - Non-Park Protected Habitat under Theme III - Protecting Nature.

Expected Result: Protected areas are established in NWT
Performance Indicator Target Target Date
Number of areas brought under protection through the NWT Protected Areas Strategy. 6 areas by 2013

March 31, 2013

Sustainable Community Development

In keeping with our mandate and vision [Note 6], Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Canada will continue to better integrate the department's response to environmental concerns with its responses to social and economic issues.

This integrated approach to addressing sustainable development concerns is particularly relevant to the department, and is reinforced by Aboriginal and northern communities which often regard social, economic and environmental challenges as inter-related.

Healthier, safer, economically, politically and environmentally more stable Aboriginal and northern communities is a sustainable development outcome that the department seeks to support through its policies, programs, funding opportunities and relationships.


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Footnotes

  1. Planning for a Sustainable Future: A Federal Sustainable Development Strategy for Canada (return to source paragraph)

  2. For more information on the Office of the Federal Interlocutor for Métis and Non-Status Indians (OFI), please see Office of the Federal Interlocutor(return to source paragraph)

  3. Canadian Environmental Assessment Agency (return to source paragraph)

  4. It is understood that "acceptable" means "low risk". (return to source paragraph)

  5. 2012-2013 RPPs - Supplementary Information (return to source paragraph)

  6. See: About AANDC(return to source paragraph)

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