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Table of contents

Minister’s Message

In our every deliberation we must consider the impact of our decisions on the next seven generations.

From the Great Law of the Iroquois Confederacy

Minister’s Message

As Minister of Indian Affairs and Northern Development and Federal Interlocutor for Métis and Non–Status Indians, I am pleased to present our Sustainable Development Strategy 2007–2010. This Strategy presents a holistic approach to sustainable communities with strong social, economic and environmental dimensions. It has been developed by Indian and Northern Affairs Canada’s (INAC) National Sustainable Development Strategy Working Group (NSDSWG), composed of departmental and Aboriginal representatives from across the country.

Across the Department, efforts are focussed on promoting sustainable development through strong foundations of governance, investing in people and improving community infrastructure. Strengthened governance, strategic investments in economic development and education, along with improved housing and infrastructure and safe drinking water are part of a streamlined set of priorities that are beginning to bring forth positive results.

Self–reliance for Aboriginal and northern communities, the protection of socio–cultural, economic and ecological capital, and efficiency and effectiveness in achieving results are key considerations that this Strategy promotes for integration into all our policies, programs and decision–making processes, at every level and in every part of our organization.

Canada’s new government is committed to the concept of sustainable development, and I am confident that, as a key tool, this Strategy places us firmly on the right path to continue to improve the lives of First Nations, Inuit, Métis and Northerners, as we form new partnerships and strengthen existing relationships through mutual respect and trust.

Jim Prentice, PC, QC, MP

Minister of Indian Affairs and Northern Development Canada and Federal Interlocutor for Métis and Non–Status Indians

List of Acronyms

CCP Comprehensive Community Planning
CESD Commissioner of the Environment and Sustainable Development
EMS Environmental Management System
ESS Environmental Stewardship Strategy
FVPP Family Violence Prevention Program
GHG Greenhouse gas
IIABL Indian and Inuit Affairs Business Line
IIAP Indian and Inuit Affairs Program
INAC Indian and Northern Affairs Canada
NSDSWG National Sustainable Development Strategy Working Group
SD Sustainable Development
SDD Sustainable Development Division
SDS Sustainable Development Strategy
SEA Strategic Environmental Assessment

Introduction

Sustainable Development Strategies (SDS), prepared by federal departments and agencies under 1995 amendments to the Auditor General Act, are a key element of the Government of Canada’s approach to sustainable development (SD). These strategies provide a tool for departments to systematically consider the implementation of sustainable development into their policies, programs, legislation and operation.

This document is Indian and Northern Affairs Canada’s (INAC) fourth SDS. It builds upon the lessons learned and best practices of past strategies, striving to further promote the integration of sustainable development thinking into the Department’s structure, policy and direction.

This SDS highlights the key SD initiatives that INAC is undertaking over the next three years. It is, however, only one vehicle used by INAC to support sustainable communities. There are many examples of initiatives underway where a community or INAC region is working on sustainability issues simply as part of their way of doing business.

Sustainable Development

Much like the term "globalization," "sustainable development" is now a term commonly used in popular media, yet difficult to define due to its complexities. It was therefore critical for INAC to not only clearly define sustainable development, but to also establish a vision specific to the INAC goals, and guiding principles to follow in pursuit of it. These are outlined below and are the foundation for each of the INAC Sustainable Development Strategies.

A Definition

Sustainable development is increasingly seen as the most viable solution for managing today’s complex environmental, economic and social challenges. However, making decisions that are environmentally, socially and economically sustainable has long been a cornerstone of Aboriginal cultures.

INAC uses the definition of sustainable development that was published by the World Commission on Environment and Development (the Brundtland Commission) in 1987, and adopted by Canada in 1995. Sustainable development is:

Development that meets the needs of the present without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their own needs.

Communities that are "sustainable" can be described as those which enjoy a prosperous economy, a vibrant and just society, and a healthy environment for current and future generations.

Working Towards a Vision

INAC has developed its own vision of sustainable development to guide the development of programs, policies and operational tools that will enable its employees to effectively support sustainable communities. In the context of this Strategy, "communities" is a set of people with some shared elements, whether physical communities or communities of interest.

The departmental SD vision is not the First Nations, Métis, Inuit or Northerner vision of sustainable development. INAC cannot speak on their behalf, but rather uses the vision to describe where the Department sees itself in the future.

INAC’s Sustainable Development Vision
Within two generations, many First Nations and Inuit communities will be healthy and safe models of sustainability. They will have housing, infrastructure and support services comparable to those of similar size and function elsewhere in Canada. Within a protected environment, they will have effective transportation and communications links to the rest of the country and ample affordable, clean sources of energy. A majority of First Nations and Inuit communities will effectively manage their own institutions with strong governance structures. Community members, especially women and youth, will have acceptable opportunities for education, will participate in the economy, and will be able to get involved in local governance.

Métis, Non–Status Indians and urban Aboriginal people will realize their full potential economically, socially and politically in Canadian society.

Land claims and issues such as management and access to natural resources and land tenure have been largely settled through negotiations. Community planning and development will be long–term, locally driven and comprehensive.

The northern territories will be more self– sufficient and prosperous regions where people manage their own affairs and make stronger contributions to the country as a whole.

As First Nations, Inuit, and Northerners gain greater autonomy and build capacity, the types of services they will require from the federal government will change. As communities become healthier, safer, and economically and environmentally stable, a smaller department will likely emerge.

A major focus of the Department will be the implementation of the many Aboriginal self– government agreements.INAC will also be a strong advocate for Aboriginal and northern peoples and will play a more active role as a facilitator to develop partnerships to work more cooperatively on Aboriginal and northern issues, while respecting traditions, governance structures, language, gender and culture.

Striving toward this vision strengthens the federal government’s legal, constitutional, fiduciary and treaty obligations and will require concerted cooperation.

Planning for Success

"If we don’t involve the community, we’re doomed to failure," says We Wai Kai Chief Ralph Dick.

Chief Dick’s words aptly summarize the objective of the Comprehensive Community Planning, or CPP, pilot projects launched in five First Nations — Lytton, Okanagan, Squiala, We Wai Kai (Cape Mudge) and Yekooche — in British Columbia in 2004.

Comprehensive community planning (CCP) addresses key planning areas, all of which are interrelated and interdependent: governance, land and resources, health, infrastructure development, culture, social issues and the economy. (More information on CPP is available in Appendix 2.)

As of March 2006, four out of five of these communities had completed their respective CCPs. INAC partnered with each community individually, and each used a different approach to achieve their CPP.

The vision recognizes that each Aboriginal and northern community is unique. Thus, the long–term vision of sustainability and the right path to that vision will be different for each community.

Guiding Principles

INAC’s eight SD principles have remained constant through its four strategies. Developed through consultations across the Department, as well as with Aboriginal and northern partners, they serve as the fundamental criteria for establishing commitments to achieve the Department’s long–term vision of sustainability.

  1. Full consideration of economic viability, social implications, and cultural and environmental values in decision making and policy and program development;

  2. Open, inclusive and accountable decision making;

  3. Honouring treaty and fiduciary obligations, as well as land claim, self–government and international agreements;

  4. Engagement of interested local communities and organizations when planning and implementing federal programs;

  5. Respect for diverse cultures and traditional values, as well as the land and its diversity as the foundation for healthy communities;

  6. Fair and equitable opportunities for First Nations, Inuit, Métis and northern peoples to share in the benefits, risks and drawbacks of development;

  7. Decisions based on the best available scientific, traditional and local knowledge;

  8. Efficient use of natural resources and minimization of pollution in INAC’s internal operations.

Development of the 2007–2010 Strategy

INAC recognizes that for a strategy to be effective, it cannot be developed in isolation. For this reason, INAC’s SDS has been developed in such a way as to be synchronized with the Government of Canada approach to SD; the findings from the most recent Commissioner of the Environment and Development (CESD) audit; the lessons learned from INAC’s 2004–2006 SDS; the results of consultations and Departmental planning.

Government of Canada Approach

Developing a centralized, federal approach to sustainable development has been recognized as a top priority. In response, the Government of Canada has identified a set of six sustainable development goals: Clean Air, Clean Water, Reduce Greenhouse Gas Emissions, Sustainable Development and Use of Natural Resources, Sustainable Communities, and Governance for Sustainable Development. [Note 1]

These goals integrate and complement the objectives set earlier this year regarding the greening of government operations. It is hoped that by identifying how departmental activities support broader federal goals and objectives with respect to sustainable development that Canadians will gain a clearer picture of how the federal government works, in an ongoing way, to ensure improvements in the Canadian quality of life. At the same time, improved coordination will strengthen accountability, drive government–wide performance, and focus and stimulate activity in some key areas.

The 2007–2010 INAC SDS is solidly linked to federal goals of sustainability, as outlined in the federal guidance Coordinating the Fourth Round of Departmental Sustainable Development Strategies.

Integration of CESD Findings

The Commissioner of the Environment and Sustainable Development (CESD) [Note 2] is part of the Auditor General’s office and is responsible for monitoring the implementation, management and impact of departmental SD strategies. Following the release of the 2005 audit of federal Sustainable Development Strategies, the Commissioner recommended that in order to make fundamental change, SDSs need to play a "challenge function" by encouraging departments to stretch beyond "business as usual."

To do so, the Commissioner advised that commitments should be innovative, collaborative and enhance progress through the use of partnerships. Further, they should be meaningful and measurable with short–term activities set in the context of long–term results. In addition, the CESD counseled that management systems supporting the SDSs that govern planning, implementation, monitoring, and reporting need to demonstrate greater accountability for commitments.

In response to the Commissioner’s recommendations, INAC has made improvements to the development, implementation, and management of its SDS, which are reflected in this SDS 2007–2010. While previous strategies addressed most issues with an "activitybased" approach, this strategy commits to change at a higher level, with fewer commitments and more rigorous performance management standards.

Monitoring and Reporting of the 2004–2006 Strategy

As part of the monitoring and reporting requirements for SDS 2004–2006, the Sustainable Development Division (SDD) of INAC completed its second progress report in January 2006. [Note 3]

The key challenges identified in this 2006 progress report were timeliness and quality of reporting. Specifically, there were too many SD commitments, many of which were difficult to measure in terms of progress and concrete results. While a step forward in terms of monitoring departmental commitments, the tracking and reporting system developed for the SDS 2004–2006 was not user–friendly, nor clearly linked to departmental planning and reporting processes.

Despite these challenges, the progress report also identified some key successes. This was particularly evident in departmental efforts to promote horizontal, collaborative and integrated approaches to address the challenges of working across organization boundaries on complex issues facing Aboriginal and northern communities. Examples of successful collaborative approaches to SD are highlighted within this 2007–2010 SDS (see coloured text boxes throughout).

Bringing People Together

"There was so much separation amongst our people, and now they are coming together — working handin– hand — to develop a community plan," says Chief Ann Francis–Muise of Pictou Landing First Nation, one of the three Atlantic communities in the First Nations Community Planning Project, a pilot CPP (more information in Appendix 2).

The project was started by the Cities & Environment Unit from the Faculty of Architecture and Planning at Dalhousie University and the Joint Community Planning Committee (JCPC), a steering committee made up of government and First Nation representatives. Together, they created the First Nations Community Planning Model.

This project has won numerous awards; most recently, it was recognized as one of the 10 best practices in the world, selected from over 700 submissions in the 2004 Dubai International Award for Best Practices in Improving the Living Environment, sponsored by the United Nations Centre for Human Settlements (Habitat).

Consultations

As part of the renewal process from the 2004–2006 SDS to the 2007–2010 SDS, consultations were carried out with departmental regions and sectors, as well as with representatives from Aboriginal communities and organizations. These consultations aimed to collaboratively identify SD commitments for the upcoming three–year period.

The result is a focus on commitments that will have a long–term, concrete impact at the community level as well as on departmental policy, operations and decision making. Thus, the 2007–2010 strategy also strives to better fit with the Department’s strategic direction and planning and reporting processes.

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The 2007–2010 Strategy

Based on the information acquired in the development process, INAC has established two strategic directions: one that is focused on INAC community programs, and one that is focused on INAC internal operations.

Under each strategic direction area, INAC commits to achieving a number of high–level, long–term objectives. Supporting each objective are shorter–term targets that will be implemented by the different regions and sectors of the Department, a number of which build upon the work accomplished under 2004–2006 SDS. The Department is accountable for each target set for SDS 2007–2010 and will report on them annually through the Departmental Performance Report.

These strategic directions, as well as their integration with the larger federal SD goals, are illustrated in the INAC SD Conceptual Framework. In addition, both of these strategic directions and their related objectives are supported by logic models.

Strategic Directions:

INAC’s commitment for its community programs can be summarized in these words:
Supporting Sustainable Communities

INAC’s commitment for its operations can be summarized in these words:
Building a Culture of Sustainability

"Supporting Sustainable Communities" focuses on INAC’s external programming for First Nations, Inuit, Métis and Northerners, while "Building a Culture of Sustainability" focuses on how INAC can modify its internal operations to further enhance SD.

INAC SD Conceptual Framework

INAC’s conceptual framework (Figure 1.0) for its SDS portrays a holistic, integrated process.

At the centre of the diagram is its strategic direction: Supporting Sustainable Communities. To support this strategic direction, four long–term commitment areas of focus have been established for the 2007–2010 period: Long–term Planning, Socio–Economic Development, Sustainable Infrastructure, and Responsible Environmental Stewardship.

Figure 1.0: INAC SD Conceptual Framework

Figure 1.0: INAC SD Conceptual Framework

INAC’s programs for First Nations, Inuit and northern communities are the core of its commitment to Supporting Sustainable Communities. INAC has established four strategic outcomes under which fall all its programs: The Government, The People, The Land, The Economy. [Note 4] The interconnected nature of these four strategic outcome areas with the SDS direction is illustrated by their placement in the conceptual framework.

Encircling INAC’s commitment "Supporting Sustainable Communities," is its commitment "Building a Culture of Sustainability." Integrating sustainable development and the greening of departmental operations changes how INAC does business; therefore, it impacts all strategic outcomes. This commitment is intimately related to the INAC’s operational outcome of Departmental Management and Administration [Note 5], as illustrated in the framework.

The federal sustainable development goals are on the outer perimeter of the framework, influencing how INAC approaches sustainable development. Likewise, INAC has an opportunity to influence federal policy on sustainable development through interdepartmental collaboration.

Logic Models

The CESD has recommended using logic models to link actions and targets to their longer–term objectives and goals. INAC has employed the Treasury Board Secretariat Guide for Development of Results–based Management and Accountability Frameworks in the development of its logic models for this SDS.

The logic models for this SDS demonstrate that results have been developed for each objective. The objective is a statement which articulates a long–term commitment, or goal state. To reach this objective, one or more targets are set, with both short–term and medium–term outcomes identified.

The "Short–term outcome" identified within each logic model is intended for completion during the time frame of the strategy (2007–2010), whereas the "Medium–term outcome" go beyond the strategy. Key activities for each target have been identified. The completion of the activities will lead to the achievement of the targets. Other activities which may not appear in the logic model may also lead to the achievement of a target and may be reported on in the annual INAC SDS Report. In addition, performance measures have been developed, which will allow for an assessment of the completion of the targets and the achievement of short–term outcomes.

logic models for this SDS

Commitments

1. INAC Programs: Supporting Sustainable Communities

INAC’s commitments related to programming reflect its strategic direction to support sustainable Aboriginal and northern communities. Consultations revealed key areas for SD focus: Long–term Planning, Socio–Economic Development, Sustainable Infrastructure, and Responsible Environmental Stewardship.

Long–term Planning
The sustainability of any community relies on its ability to envision its long–term future, chart its own course and then have the capacity to manage and direct resources. In the process of becoming more sustainable, communities must go through the process of determining priorities, identifying needs and determining how to fulfill them. Realizing a vision also relies heavily on the clear articulation of a planning framework, where all affected players know and understand the context in which community and regional development occurs. This may require cooperation among several communities that crosscuts political boundaries and government departments to examine issues at a broader regional level.

Objective 1.1: Improved departmental and federal co–ordination and harmonization of program planning and implementation in support of long–term planning.

Comprehensive Community Planning
Comprehensive community planning (CCP) can provide a framework for the integrated management of land, natural resources and the environment, while incorporating and addressing the social, economic and governance elements of a community. Meeting the diverse cultural, social and economic needs of all residents requires the cooperation of many players and a need to define the respective roles and responsibilities of the federal, provincial, territorial and Aboriginal governments, and third parties. All members of a community, including Elders and youth, can offer unique and valuable perspectives on community needs, values and priorities.

Uncovering a Path Forward

As part of a pilot project, the Atikamewk community of Manawan agreed to test the Analytical Grid for Community–Based Planning and Territorial Management. This tool was developed jointly by the First Nations of Quebec and Labrador Sustainable Development Institute (FNQLSDI) and Indian and Northern Affairs Canada, Quebec Region.

Thirty community members took part in this self–evaluation exercise. The participants represented most of the community organizations and areas of activity, such as finance, public safety, civic engagement, social development, education, health, language and culture, economy, employment, infrastructure, territory, resources, environment, and government. It took four months to complete the pilot project.

Now that the community of Manawan is aware of where it stands in terms of community planning, it is ready to develop and implement community activities to find solutions to the various problems identified in the community portrait.

One of the key targets in SDS 2004–2006 was to provide support for comprehensive community–specific planning initiatives among First Nations in all southern regions. A second target focused on the development of a comprehensive community planning strategy for the Department. SDS 2007–2010 builds on upon this earlier work through the following target.

Target 1.1.1: The CCP Strategy approved and implemented in collaboration with First Nations. Led by Socio–Economic Policy and Regional Operations.

Remote Communities south of 60
Remote communities south of 60 share a number of similar challenges in their ability to provide a quality of life for residents that is sustainable. While many of these challenges are shared by communities north of 60, there are some political, socio–economic and geographic factors that make the achievement of sustainable development particularly challenging for more southern remote communities. The following target, which is a new initiative, should help INAC better understand the factors that contribute to building sustainable communities in remote regions and improve policies and programs to enhance the quality of life of people living in these areas.

Target 1.1.2: Identify the factors that influence the sustainability of remote communities south of 60 and determine how INAC policies and programs could be modified to better address the challenges. Led by the Sustainable Development Division in partnerships with the INAC regional offices of Alberta, Saskatchewan, Manitoba and Ontario as well as interested First Nation and academic organizations.

Objective Improved departmental and federal co–ordination and harmonization of program planning and implementation in support of long–term community and regional planning.
Medium–term outcome The CCP Strategy and management frameworks in place to ensure strategic investments aligned to community priorities.
Improved departmental and federal cooperation and harmonization of program planning and implementation in support of CCP development and implementation.
Improved effectiveness and efficiency of federal programs and services in remote communities south of 60.
Short–term outcome Increase participation of First Nation communities engaged in CCP. Better understanding of socio–economic, geographic and political factors that contribute to the sustainability of remote northern communities north and south of 60.
Target The CCP Strategy approved and implemented in collaboration with First Nations. (March 2010) In partnership with territorial and provincial governments and Aboriginal organizations, identify the factors that influence the sustainability of remote communities both north and south of 60 and determine how federal policies and programs could be modified to better address the challenges. (March 2010)
Activities CCP awareness activites are well supported and contribute effectively to implementing CCP.
Baseline data on the number of communities engaged in CCP activities are established.
Support to communities in capacity building is provided.
Define scope of research and identify potential research partners to conduct the research (2007).
Conduct comparative research and review government provision of services (2008).
Analyse and evaluate results of research. Formulate recommendations for departmental/ federal action to improve policies and programs to better meet the needs of remote communities south of 60. (March 2010)
Outputs Communication and awareness plans and activities.
CCP tool kit.
Baseline data available.
Partnerships, proposal and funding (e.g., SSHRC).
Comparative data on remote communities and government policies.
Research results and recommendations.
Performance measures Number of communities engaged in CCP. Number of recommendations.
Number of recommendations acted upon (post 2010).

Socio–Economic Development
Sustainable communities depend on the social well–being of individuals and families and the capacity of their members to participate in, and benefit from, economic opportunities. Having access to educational and social programming is essential for communities to develop to their full potential and achieve a quality of life comparable to that of other Canadians.

Objective 1.2: Enhanced social and economic capacity in Aboriginal communities through educational and social programming.

Educational Attainment
Aboriginal peoples are the youngest and fastest growing segment of Canada’s population. Over time, they will become an increasingly important segment of the labour force. Improving Aboriginal education is a key factor to achieve self–reliant and sustainable communities. INAC is preparing an education policy framework and a management framework that will serve as the basis for a fiscally sustainable plan aimed at achieving measured progress in Aboriginal high school graduation rates.

Target 1.2.1: Graduate more Aboriginal learners from high school and post–secondary institutions. Led by Socio– Economic Policy and Regional Operations.

Family Violence Prevention
Aboriginal women play a pivotal role within their families and communities. However, within Aboriginal communities women are often the most seriously disadvantaged. Therefore, it is a priority of INAC to address some of the most devastating obstacles that have for far too long hampered the lives of Aboriginal women. INAC’s Social Development Program activity supports the safety and well–being of First Nations individuals and families through the provision of social services to meet basic needs for food, clothing and shelter on reserves. The Family Violence Prevention Program (FVPP) will focus on enhancing safety and security, service delivery standards, data collection and reporting instruments, making the program more comparable to similar ones in the provinces and territories.

Aboriginal Workforce on the Rise

All 28 Quebec First Nations communities have now completed the Training and Certification Program for Drinking Water Systems Operators. The Program is coordinated by the Regroupement Mamit Innuat, on behalf of the Tribal Councils of Quebec in collaboration with the institutions approved by the Ministère de l’Éducation du Québec. Funding was provided by INAC.

Ghislain Picard, Regional Chief of the Assembly of the First Nations of Quebec and Labrador (AFNQL), declared that "a 100% success rate is very impressive. It proves that our members want to succeed and, above all, to help their communities in the challenge of assuring quality drinking water."

Chief Picard also expressed a wish for other such programs in the future as a means to continue to enlarge the Aboriginal workforce.

Target 1.2.2: Enhance the Family Violence Prevention Program. Led by Socio–Economic Policy and Regional Operations.

Objective Enhanced social and economic capacity in Aboriginal communities through educational and social programming.
Medium–term outcome Improved Aboriginal high school graduation rates. Reduction of family violence and increased community safety.
Short–term outcome Improved First Nation and federal government tools for administration, evaluation and reform of education programming. Increased access to shelters and prevention programming.
Increased number of shelters.
Increased number of better qualified shelter workers.
Increased awareness of healthy choices and the impacts of family violence.
Target Graduate more Aboriginal learners from high school and post–secondary institutions. (March 2010) Enhance the Family Violence Prevention Program (FVPP) (March 2012)
Activities Renovate existing federal education programming and relationships amongst all stakeholders. (March 2010)
Introduce evaluation, measurement and reporting systems that focus on performance. (March 2010)
Work with partners to pursue a legislative framework and provide second–level services and programs to on–reserve K–12 schools. (March 2010)
Improve existing services, including enhanced prevention programming in areas such as information and media awareness campaigns. (ongoing–2011)
Increase shelters’ capacity to respond to and prevent family violence by providing operational
funding for salaries and benefits, training and outreach. (ongoing–2012) Build additional shelters. (2007–2011)
Outputs New reformed programs and relationships.
Systems that will allow performance measurement and reporting.
A legislative framework and Regional Education
Organizations for the delivery of second–level services.
Awareness campaigns.
Professionally trained staff.
4–5 new shelters.
Performance measures High school graduation rates.
Post–secondary participation rates.
Number of families enabled to transition back into the community.
Percentage of participants with increased awareness of personal safety situation.

Sustainable Infrastructure
The provision of sustainable infrastructure is fundamental to meeting the basic needs of all communities. INAC recognizes the challenges faced by many First Nation communities to provide suitable housing and clean drinking water and wastewater management facilities for residents.

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The 2007–2010 Strategy (Cont'd)

Objective 1.3: Housing, water and wastewater facilities to First Nations that meet standards applicable to other comparable Canadian communities.

Housing
In terms of housing, efforts must be made to create market options and stimulate the use of public and private equity to increase the number of homes built on reserve. INAC is committed to develop, in collaboration with all key stakeholders, innovative approaches that will effectively respond to the challenges and needs in respect to the provision of housing on reserve. The outcome sought is the provision of affordable, suitable and adequate housing while building capacity to ensure effective management and control of housing by First Nation communities.

Target 1.3.1: Increase the amount of affordable and suitable housing while building capacity to ensure effective management and control by First Nation communities. Led by Socio–Economic Policy and Regional Operations.

Water and Wastewater
While considerable advances have been made to improve water quality on First Nations reserves, much remains to be done and addressing this issue continues to be a top priority for the Government of Canada. Provincial regulations and standards do not apply on First Nations reserves and while there are federal guidelines dealing with water and wastewater effluent, they do not address many of the activities required to ensure that the water quality parameters are achieved. March 21, 2006 saw the release by INAC’s Minister the Honourable Jim Prentice of a new federal "Protocol for Safe Drinking Water in First Nations Communities", for immediate implementation, to address the establishment of standards for Design, Construction, Operation, Maintenance and Monitoring of First Nations Drinking Water Systems. Over the next three years, as part of the First Nation Water Management Strategy, INAC will focus on assisting communities that do not have access to drinking water that meets the Guidelines for Canadian Drinking Water Quality and in treatment of wastewater where sub–standard performance could result in contamination of water sources and spread disease.

Water Project Success

On August 4, 2006, the Mohawks of Akwesasne celebrated the official opening of a state–of–the–art water treatment plant and distribution centre at Cornwall Island, part of the Mohawk Territory of Akwesasne.

On this occasion, Grand Chief Thompson declared, "It is my responsibility to ensure the delivery of clean and safe water to members of this community. It was because of a thorough, collaborative approach, which included Indian and Northern Affairs Canada, that this water treatment plant became a reality – ahead of expectation and on budget."

The estimated cost of the Cornwall Island water treatment plant and distribution system is approximately $13.1 million. The Mohawk Council of Akwesasne contributed $2 million through its own Nation Building funding.

Many other similar success stories of improved or new water infrastructure have been repeated throughout First Nations communities across Canada as part of the First Nation Water Management Strategy (more detail available in Appendix 3).



Objective Housing, water and wastewater facilities to First Nations that meet standards applicable to other comparable Canadian communities.
Medium–term outcome Housing that meets standards applicable to comparable neighbouring communities. First Nations communities that have safe, potable water and environmentally sound wastewater management facilities.
Short–term outcome Increase the capacity of First Nations to develop land use codes, undertake property inspections, and to implement home ownership programs. Enhanced operation and maintenance practices for water and wastewater systems.
Target Increase the amount of affordable and suitable housing while building capacity to ensure effective management and control by First Nation communities. (March 2010) Reduce the number of high–risk and mediumrisk sites identified in the National Assessment of Water and Wastewater Systems in First Nation communities. (March 2008)
Activities Improve the contruction and management of social housing through improved regulatory structures, adherence to building codes, improved allocation of housing to those in need, and professional certification
Facilitate home–ownership options to assist eligible families with their purchase of either existing band–owned housing or new home.
Develop and implement remedial plans for all high–risk systems, ensure that all systems are overseen by certified operators while improving the training of the local operator, and develop a regulatory regime for drinking water in First Nations communities.
Outputs 20 First Nations each year will develop the capacity to create home ownership initiatives. Remedial plans for high–risk systems, oversight operators who ensure operations and management of systems, and a regulatory regime for drinking water in First Nations communities.
Performance measures Number of First Nations with housing by–laws and land codes.
Percentage of First Nations houses that are owned by the occupants.
Reduction in the number of high– and medium–risk systems.
Increase in the number of certified operators.

Target 1.3.2: Reduce the number of high–risk and medium–risk sites identified in the National Assessment of Water and Wastewater Systems in First Nation communities. Led by Socio–Economic Policy and Regional Operations.

Responsible Environmental Stewardship
The livelihood of many First Nation, Inuit, and northern communities comes from the land, water and other natural resources and will be compromised as ecosystems and wildlife are affected by the impacts of climate change and resource development. Making sure that appropriate environmental management systems are in place to mitigate the negative impacts is essential to seek to balance environmental protection with economic development. It is also vital for Aboriginal peoples and Northerners to have the knowledge, capacity and tools to respond to these challenges to promote responsible environmental stewardship.

Objective 1.4: Sound environmental management practices in First Nation, Inuit and northern communities.

Climate Change Adaptation and Mitigation
First Nation, Inuit and northern communities face unique challenges in building their capacity to respond to climate change. Many communities are reporting major changes in animal migration patterns, which are already affecting their dependence on the land, its resources and their traditional livelihoods. Winter roads to remote communities are available for shorter, less predictable periods, thereby increasing the cost of supplying these communities. In the North, melting permafrost puts buildings, pipelines, roads, drinking water and other infrastructure at risk. In addition, First Nation, Inuit and Northerners are consumers of energy, with many remote communities dependent on diesel generators. Without reliable, high–quality power, both the quality of life and economic development of these communities will be compromised.

First Nation, Inuit and Northerners must have the knowledge, capacity and tools to respond to the impacts of climate change. This includes developing effective energy and emission reduction strategies, and impact and adaptation strategies. Communities would like to contribute to climate change solutions and often have local resources such as wind hydro and solar power that they can use to generate electricity. The use of these energy sources will reduce the dependence on fossil fuels and reduce Canada’s greenhouse gas emissions.

Target 1.4.1: Support development of energy management initiatives in First Nation, Inuit and northern communities. Led by Northern Affairs Program.

Target 1.4.2: Support development of First Nation, Inuit and northern communities’ capacity to adapt to the impacts of climate change. Led by Northern Affairs Program.

Taking Action on Climate Change

A strong network of partnerships developed during INAC’s SDS 2004–2006 period led to the creation of the Northern Climate Change Coordinating Committee (NC4) to oversee the development and implementation of the Northern Impacts and Adaptation Strategy.

The NC4 includes representation from the three territorial governments, several federal departments, and the following Aboriginal organizations: Council of Yukon First Nations, Dene Nation, Inuit Circumpolar Conference, Inuit Tapirisat Kanatami and Arctic Energy Alliance, Canadian Climate Impacts and Adaptation Research Network northern node and Nunavut Research Institute.

As part of the Northern Impacts and Adaptation Strategy, INAC is developing a framework to assess risks for the Department and First Nation, Inuit and northern communities in the management of climate change impacts. This process was begun during SDS 2004–2006 and will be completed under SDS 2007–2010.



Objective Sound environmental management practices in Aboriginal and northern communities.
Medium–term outcome INAC and communities work toward building sustainable communities through developing and implementing actions and plans to reduce GHG emissions. INAC and communities work toward building sustainable communities through developing and implementing actions and plans to manage risks and benefit from opportunities related to climate change.
Short–term outcome INAC and communities collaborate to identify GHG reduction opportunities. INAC and communities collaborate to assess climate change risks and develop risk management strategies.
Target Support development of energy management initiatives in Aboriginal and northern communities. (March 2010) Support development of Aboriginal and northern communities capacity to adapt to the impacts of climate change. (March 2010)
Activities Support projects at the community level to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and increase efficiency of energy use. (March 2010)
Reduce greenhouse gas emissions in Aboriginal and northern communities.
Develop a departmental policy framework that identifies risks and opportunities. (March 2009)
Identify and document the risks and opportunities for the Department related to climate change. (March 2010)
Support projects at the community level to increase awareness, understanding and planning for managing the risks and opportunities created by climate change. (March 2010)
Outputs GHG Report.
Project Tracking Report.
Series of Workshop Reports. (March 2007)
Departmental Risk Assessment Report. (July 2007)
Departmental Risk Management Framework. (December 2007)
Support of Community Level Work (ongoing).
Performance measures All INAC regions and sectors developed an approach to integration of renewable energy and energy efficiency in their business lines.
Number of Aboriginal and northern communities with renewable energy or energy efficiency projects implemented.
Developed risk management framework relies on engagement from All INAC regions and sectors.
All INAC regions and sectors developed an approach to integration of climate change risk management in their business lines.
Number of Aboriginal and northern communities with completed climate change risk assessment or adaptation strategies.
Number of Aboriginal and northern communities implementing climate change risk management or adaptation strategies.

Clean–up of Contaminated Sites
The purpose of INAC’s Contaminated Sites Program is to "reduce and eliminate, where possible, risk to human and environmental health and liability associated with contaminated sites." INAC works collaboratively with First Nations, Inuit and Northerners, as well as provincial and territorial governments, to create socio–economic opportunities for communities to participate in contaminated site remediation and prevent further damage to their ecosystems.

Target 1.4.3: Reduce the number of contaminated sites south of 60. Led by Lands and Trust Services.

Target 1.4.4: Increase the number of northern contaminated sites in remediation phase or completed. Led by Northern Affairs Program.

Objective Sound environmental management practices in First Nation, Inuit and northern communities.
Medium–term outcome Reduce and eliminate, where possible, risks to human and environmental health and liabilities associated with contaminated sites.
Short–term outcome Reduced number of contaminated sites and reduced departmental liability. Increase number of contaminated sites remediated or in active remediation.
Accurately quantify liabilities.
Target Reduce the number of contaminated sites south of 60. (March 2010) Increase number of northern contaminated sites in remediation phase or completed. (March 2010)
Activities Regions to implement 5–year Contaminated Sites Management Plans.
Regions to submit applications to the Federal Contaminated Sites Action Plan to leverage additional funding.
Contaminated Sites Management Plan approved in accordance with Treasury Board guidance.
Develop and implement remediation/risk management strategies by site.
Long–term monitoring.
Outputs Approval of a 5–year National CS Management Plan.
Approved funding from FCSAP.
Contaminated Site Management Plan.
Remediation plans.
Detailed work plans and quarterly reports.
Performance measures Regionally approved 5–year Contaminated Sites Management Plans.
Regionally submitted FCSAP applications.
A percentage decrease in Class 1 & Class 2 Contaminated Sites liabilities.
Contaminated Sites Management Plan approved by ADM.
Absolute number of sites in remediation phase or completed.

2. INAC Operations: Building a Culture of Sustainability
While the first set of SD commitments address the cornerstones of supporting sustainability at the community level, this second set of commitments focus on the more subtle operational and behavioural changes required from within the INAC.

Building a culture of sustainability within INAC will enable the department to develop and deliver programs that lead to sustainable communities. To effectively integrate sustainability into the way the department does business, decision makers must be equipped with the proper knowledge, tools, structures and processes. By adopting these best practices, INAC can minimize the ecological footprint of its operations.

Improving the Integration of SD within INAC
In order to better understand and anticipate the social, cultural, economic and environmental dynamics of their decisions, employees need guidance, tools and a clear departmental commitment to integrate the principles of sustainable development into planning and reporting processes.

Objective Objective Improved sustainable development integration in INAC.
Medium–term outcome Departmental structures and processes support sustainable development objectives.
Short–term outcome Improved awareness among INAC management and employees. SD considerations are integrated into the key departmental plans, programs and policies.
Target Raise awareness of SD within the Department. (March 2010) Improve the integration of SD considerations within the Department. (March 2010)
Activities Develop and implement a communication plan for raising SD awareness (2007–2010) (SDD & NSDWG).
Conduct a SD awareness survey to establish baseline data and comparison data (2007 & 2009) (SDD).
Establish an Environmental Sustainability Network (ESN) 2008 (CS). Establish the role of NSDWG (2007–2010).
Ensure SDS commitments are included in strategic outcome planning.
Integrate the SDS annual reporting with annual dept reporting.
Develop a strategy to improve the linkage with the SO Tables.
Implement a strengthened SEA management system across INAC that ensures that the principles of sustainable development are factored into early planning of policies, plans and programs.
Outputs Communications plan.
Baseline data and comparison data.
ESN members and ESN events.
NSDWG terms of reference and work plan.
SDS commitments appear is SO plans.
Timely annual SD reports.
Strategy.
Officers trained in SEA, electronic tracking registry for SEA.
Performance measures Level of sustainable development awareness. SD reporting coincides with DPR reporting and SDS4 commitments are included annually in DPR & RPP.
Number of preliminary scans and SEAs completed.
The results of SEAs are reported on in all MCs and TB submissions.

This objective puts forward targets to promote awareness of sustainable development within the INAC and to facilitate the integration of the SDS into the overall departmental planning, reporting and decision–making process. A key activity that will contribute to this objective is the department’s implementation of the Cabinet Directive on Strategic Environmental Assessment. Strategic Environmental Assessment (SEA) is an important tool to achieve sustainable development because it generates information about potential environmental effects that can be used to inform the development of policies, plans and programs.

Objective 2.1: Improved sustainable development integration in INAC.

Target 2.1.1: Raise awareness of sustainable development within the Department. Led by the Sustainable Development Division.

Target 2.1.2: Improve the integration of the sustainable development considerations within the Department. Led by the Sustainable Development Division.

Environmental Stewardship Strategy
There have been significant changes to the legislative and regulatory frameworks in which the Indian and Inuit Affairs Business Line (IIABL) operates. Questions related to departmental compliance with federal environmental legislation, potential increases to liabilities and accountabilities associated with an expanding reserve land base, and the increasing sophistication of First Nation development initiatives have required a renewed commitment to environmental stewardship.

The Environmental Stewardship Strategy is an action plan for INAC sectors that ensures environmental concerns and sound environmental management practices become an integral component of IIABL departmental operations. This renewed SDS commitment promotes improvements in environmental quality and protection of First Nations health and safety, which will also mitigate INAC’s liabilities.

Concluding Land Claims

Comprehensive land claims agreements and the constitutionally protected rights they define are key to defining the relationship between the Government of Canada, provincial and territorial governments and Aboriginal parties. They provide institutions and processes that all parties can use to improve social and economic conditions and protect natural resources and the environment.

The Labrador Inuit Land Claims Agreement, signed in Nain, Labrador, January 22, 2005 represents the successful conclusion of 28 years of work by the parties. The Agreement — a modern– day treaty — is the first of its kind in Atlantic Canada.

Objective 2.2: Promote sound environmental management practices into departmental operations.

Target 2.2.1: Implement IIABL’s Environmental Stewardship Strategy (ESS) Environmental Performance Framework through the integration of sound environmental management practices into IIABL departmental operations. Led by Lands and Trust Services.

Objective Promote sound environmental management practices into departmental operations.
Medium–term outcome IIABL departmental operations are environmentally sound and INAC’s liabilities are minimized.
Short–term outcome Sound environmental practices are promoted and integrated within IIABL departmental operations.
Target Implement IIABL’s Environmental Stewardship Strategy (ESS) Environmental Performance Framework through the integration of sound environmental management practices into IIABL departmental operations. (March 2009)
Activities Creation of a tank inventory. (March 31, 2009)
Creation of a waste site inventory. (March 31, 2009)
Development and approval of an IIABL Waste Site Management Policy in accordance with the Indian Act Indian Waste Disposal Regulations. (March 31, 2008)
Outputs National Fuel Tank inventory.
National Waste Site inventory.
Standardized national policy and protocols on waste management.
Performance measures A completed tank inventory database.
A completed waste site inventory database.
An approved IIABL Waste Management Policy.
An approved IIABL Environmental Performance Framework.

Greening of Departmental Operations
The Greening of Government Operations is a government–wide initiative that establishes guidelines about integrating environmental and sustainable development considerations into the operations of federal departments.

Corporate Services is responsible for INAC’s Greening Internal Operations program, which focuses on the reduction of environmental degradation due to departmental internal operations. With approximately 4,700 employees nation–wide, there is great potential to reduce INAC’s environmental impact due to both departmental operations and the personal practices of its employees.

Objective 2.3: Sustainable Development will be firmly integrated into Corporate Systems (Finance, Human Resources, Information Management, Audit and Evaluation, and Administrative Services) nation–wide.

Target 2.3.1: Develop and Implement an Environmental Management System for Corporate Services. Led by Corporate Services.

An Environmental Management System (EMS) for Corporate Services will further integrate sustainable development principles and sound environmental management practices into the internal operations of the Department. The EMS will provide baseline information to support decision making, performance measurement, and the development of mitigation measures to address identified significant environmental aspects of Corporate Services’ operations. Furthermore, the EMS is anticipated to provide valuable strategic direction for the development of future sustainable development strategy targets for Corporate Services.

Partnering to Protect Edehzhie

The Northwest Territories Protected Areas Strategy (NWT PAS) was established in 1999 as an overall framework to help NWT communities protect areas of land and water with special natural and cultural values for the long term. Under the NWT PAS initiative, six communities have been working with INAC and Environment Canada to protect a 2.5 million–hectare piece of land called "Edehzhie," located in the southwest area of the territory.

Edehzhie has significant cultural and spiritual importance to the First Nations and is a significant area of boreal forest and wetlands, providing key habitat for migratory birds and woodland caribou.

INAC plays a facilitation role, working jointly with many partners.

Target 2.3.2: Develop and implement a green procurement policy for INAC. Led by Corporate Services.

Green procurement became mandatory with the release of the Policy on Green Procurement in April 2006, and federal guidance is available to all departments across Canada. In order to effectively integrate green procurement practices into the Department’s internal operations, Corporate Services will develop and implement INAC’s departmental Green Procurement Policy as well as supporting training, awareness, guidance and tools. Additionally, Corporate Services will strive to harmonize the requirements of the Procurement Strategy for Aboriginal Business (PSAB) and the departmental Green Procurement Policy.

Greening of Government Operations and Government–wide Targets
The Office of Greening Government Operations (OGGO) was created in April 2005 within Public Works and Government Services Canada with the mandate to accelerate the greening of the government’s operations by working closely with other federal departments, particularly Treasury Board Secretariat and Environment Canada. OGGO recommends that federal departments include targets and activities concerning three areas — buildings, vehicles, and green procurement — into departmental Sustainable Development Strategies.

The recommendations suggested by OGGO are not entirely applicable or feasible in the context of INAC’s current operations. However, INAC is responding to the recommendations and it is foreseen that the implementation of an EMS in the 2007–2010 period will generate more targets and activities relating to greening of government operations.

Buildings: INAC’s operational facilities are mainly leased from or by Public Works and Government Services Canada (PWGSC). INAC will work closely with PWGSC to implement sustainable development principles into its facility management. In order to set future targets related to buildings, INAC must first collect baseline information to assess current conditions. The collection and analysis of baseline information, as well as the resulting development and implementation of related action plans, will be incorporated as a part of the EMS for Corporate Services.

Vehicles: INAC has achieved many past accomplishments in the realm of environmentally sound vehicle fleet management. For example, stringent procurement requirements are present within the departmental Fleet Management Policy, such as the need to obtain approval from the Assistant Deputy Minister (ADM) of Corporate Services to purchase sport utility type vehicles south of 60. The Department has also reduced its fleet from 800 vehicles in 1987 to its current status of 120 vehicles. However, awareness about the departmental Fleet Management Policy and alternative forms of transportation available to employees (such as car pooling and public transit) needs to be assessed. A policy review, gap analysis, and baseline information collection regarding vehicles will be completed through the implementation of the EMS for Corporate Services. INAC will continue to report annually to the Treasury Board Secretariat about its departmental fleet management.

Objective Sustainable Development will be firmly integrated into Corporate Systems (Finance, Human Resources, Information Management, Audit and Evaluation, and Administrative Services) nation–wide.
Medium–term outcome Environmentally–responsible and cost–efficient departmental support services, and the systematization of sustainable development in Corporate Services operations. Significantly decrease the negative environmental impact of procurement at INAC.
Short–term outcome Baseline information regarding the environmental impact of Corporate Services’ operations is collected and applied to the next phase of the EMS. Opportunities for integrating green procurement practices into the Department’s operations are identified and promoted throughout the Department.
Target Develop and implement an Environmental Management System (EMS) for INAC Corporate Services. Develop and implement a Green Procurement Policy for INAC.
Activities Implement environmental action plans developed in 2006 by August 2007.
Execute policy review and gap analysis exercises for HQ Corporate Services Sector by September 2008.
Develop and implement environmental management programs for HQ Corporate Services Sector by December 2009.
Implement supporting regional specific policy reviews by December 2009.
Create a working definition of Green Procurement by March 2007.
Conduct an in–house policy review of procurement and implement environmental considerations by December 2008.
Write and implement a departmental Green Procurement policy by March 2008.
Reduce personal printer usage and paper consumption by 10% by December 2009.
Outputs Baseline data regarding the environmental impacts of Corporate Services Sector is collected. A Green Procurement Policy and supporting guidance, tools, training and awareness is created and promoted throughout the Department.
Performance measures Results of environmental management programs for Administrative Services and Corporate Services are quantified. The dollar value and quantity of green procurement is documented.
Historical data and rates of consumption between past years and the current year are measured and documented.

Green Procurement: OGGO’s recommendations regarding green procurement are consistent with the requirements of the federal Policy on Green Procurement, released in April 2006. INAC has set one target regarding green procurement: to develop and implement a departmental Green Procurement Policy. The Green Procurement Policy will move beyond the requirements of the federal policy by integrating supporting activities, such as the delivery of related awareness initiatives, training, and guidance.

Sharing the Sustainability Story

INAC aims to raise awareness of SD initiatives by documenting the conditions that make an initiative sustainable at the community level.

As one of the activities under the SDS 2004–2006, INAC hired the Centre for Indigenous Environmental Resources (CIER) to help document and disseminate information about sustainable initiatives in First Nations. Under the guidance of an Advisory Committee, Aboriginal researchers documented and analysed the processes and conditions that resulted in or hindered the promotion of sustainability in 15 First Nation communities.

The results of the research were presented in two formats: (1) as an article in Nation to Nation, a user–friendly information magazine for First Nation communities across Canada, and (2) as a policy document titled "Sharing the Story," aimed at helping INAC and other organizations better meet the needs of First Nations when developing, implementing programs, policies and processes.


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Monitoring and Reporting

SDS monitoring and reporting are substantially enhanced for this SDS 2007–2010. These enhancements will allow SD activities to be more accurately monitored as well as more fully integrated into broader federal and departmental activities.

Monitoring

The first major enhancement is the development of logic models for the monitoring purposes of SDS 2007–2010. Each objective has its own logic model, based on Treasury Board Secretariat (TBS) and departmental models, demonstrating outputs, short– and mediumterm outcomes, and performance measures.

For greater integration, all SDS targets are now included in a strategic outcome plan or regional plan. In doing so, SDS targets can be reviewed annually when departmental plans are being developed and revised. The logic models developed for each objective will also ensure that senior departmental managers are fully aware of the nature of each commitment, and that implementation can be monitored and measured.

Beyond what is included in the SDS document, individual action plans have been developed for each SDS target. These include a detailed work plan with specific milestones and accountabilities. The work plans are not contained within the SDS, but will be monitored by Sustainable Development Division and accountable sectors and regions.

Reporting

In order to better align with departmental planning and reporting, the SDS 2007–2010 is now developed for the fiscal year, rather than the calendar year. While still covering a three–year period, the SDS timeframe will now begin on April 1, 2007 and end March 31, 2010. This change is based on the CESD recommendation to better integrate SDSs with departmental planning and reporting to facilitate coordination of federal reporting on horizontal SD commitments.

While the sectors and regions are accountable for implementing their targets within the SDS, it is the Sustainable Development Division that is responsible for monitoring and reporting on progress. Reporting will be done on an annual basis and will coincide with the Departmental Performance Report (DPR).

At the end of each fiscal year, the Sustainable Development Division will work with the Strategic Outcome Planning Directorate, Strategic Outcome secretaries and sector and regional SDS coordinators to develop an Annual SDS Progress Report. Working within the time frame of the development of the DPR and Strategic Outcome reporting will allow for a joint reporting process and eliminate duplication of efforts. Both TBS and CESD recommend detailed annual reporting and recognize the deficiencies of reporting solely within the DPR guidelines. The Annual SDS Progress Report will provide greater detail than what can be included in the DPR and will be referenced within the DPR. The Annual SDS Progress Report will be published on INAC’s website each fall.

Conclusion

INAC’s third Sustainable Development Strategy (2004–2006) focused extensively on developing and integrating processes for involving First Nations, Inuit and Northerners in government decisions that affect their lives. Achieving effective partnerships is a fundamental step if community–based impacts are to be long–term, and development to be sustainable.

Building on the success of the engagement processes stemming from the last SDS, this fourth Sustainable Development Strategy makes significant strides towards fully integrating the concept of sustainable development into all aspects of INAC’s external programming and internal operations.

INAC is confident that this intensified focus on integration will lead to more accurate and careful monitoring, and thereby greater results over the long term for First Nations, Inuit and northern communities.

It is INAC’s vision for sustainable development that within two generations, many First Nations and Inuit communities will be healthy and safe models of sustainability, and that the northern territories will be more self–sufficient and prosperous regions where people manage their own affairs and make strong contributions to the country as a whole. This SDS document is but one step towards this vision, and INAC is committed to its realization.

Appendices

Appendix 1. Integration of SD Strategy into Overall INAC Direction and Reporting

INAC’s fourth Sustainable Development Strategy is integrated with the Department’s overall direction and structure. All targets included in the strategy report through one of the strategic outcomes of the program activity architecture, thus they are clearly linked to achieving positive results that address key departmental priorities.

INAC’s Mission, Mandate and Strategic Outcomes
The department’s mission is to support First Nations, Inuit, Métis and Northerners in achieving their social and economic aspirations and in developing healthy, sustainable communities where members enjoy a quality of life comparable to that of other Canadians This mission is realized through the exercise of three distinct mandates: Indian and Inuit Affairs, Northern Development, and Interlocutor for Métis and Non–status Indians, which, combined aim to provide opportunities for First Nations, Inuit, Métis and Northerners to more fully participate in and benefit from Canada’s political, socio–economic development.

To achieve its mission and mandate, the Department has identified five programrelated strategic outcomes, under the following headings:

The Government: Good governance, effective institutions and co–operative relationships for First Nations, Inuit and Northerners.

The People: Strengthened individual and family well–being for First Nations, Inuit and Northerners.

The Land: Sustainable use of lands and resources by First Nations, Inuit and Northerners.

The Economy: First Nations, Inuit and Northerners close the economic gap.

Office of the Federal Interlocutor:
Strengthened relationships with Métis, non– Status Indians and urban Aboriginal people to raise awareness of their needs and improve access to federal services with the aim of improving their socio–economic conditions.

These strategic outcomes shape policies, programs and services offered to First Nations, Inuit and Métis, and in the North, and provide criteria for assessing the Department’s performance and progress.

Departmental Management and Administration
is an operational outcome that underpins INAC’s strategic outcomes and program activities. With this outcome, the Department is strategically, effectively and sustainably managed to support the Department’s mission to make Canada a better place for First Nations, Inuit, Métis and Northerners.

SDS targets will be reported on in the Departmental Performance Report under their corresponding strategic outcomes. Although each individual target is directly linked to one strategic outcome, focus areas and their specific targets will likely have an impact on more than one strategic outcome. The following table demonstrates under which strategic outcome the targets will report and where are also likely to have a direct or indirect impact. The right hand column indicates which federal SD goals the focus areas and targets support.

SDS4 Strategic Outcomes
  The Go–
vern–
ment
The People The Land The Eco–
nomy
Depart–
mental Mana–
gement & Adminis–
tration
Federal SD Goals
Strategic Direction Looking Outward: Supporting Community Sustainability
Long–term planning 1.2.1, 1.2.2 R Sustainable Communities
Socio–Economic Development 1.3.1, 1.3.2 R Sustainable Communities
Sustainable Infrastructure 1.4.1, 1.4.2 R Clean water & Sustainable Communities
Responsible Environmental Stewardship 1.5.1, 1.5.2, 1.5.3, 1.5.4 R R Reducing green house gas emissions, sustainable use of natural resources
Strategic Direction Looking Inward: Building a culture of SD within INAC
SD Integration 2.1.1, 2.1.2 R Governance for sustainable development
Environmental Stewardship Strategy 2.2.1 R Governance for sustainable development
Greening of Government Operations 2.3.1, 2.3.2 R Governance for sustainable development

R indicates the Strategic Outcome that the objective is reported under.
— indicates secondary Strategic Outcome impacts.

Appendix 2. Comprehensive Community Planning Framework

Comprehensive community planning (CCP) addresses key planning areas, all of which are interrelated and interdependent: governance, land and resources, health, infrastructure development, culture, social issues and the economy. Consideration of all key planning areas through one unified process defines community planning as a holistic and integrated exercise that can lead to sustainable development.

Under the SDS 2004–2006, CCP pilot projects were undertaken in the INAC Atlantic, Quebec and British Columbia Regional Offices to support First Nations in the development and implementation of comprehensive community plans. (More information on these pilot projects is found in the text boxes featured on pages 5, 8, and 13.)

Pilot evaluation workshops were also held in several regions to discuss the lessons learned, and steps forward. In addition, a national workshop was held in Cranbrook B.C., in October 2005, where INAC staff, First Nation representatives and other government departments came together to examine the current situation and to develop recommended options for the departmental CCP strategy.

The lessons learned include the need for CCP to be a community–driven, community–owned process; for INAC and other federal departments to support and facilitate the process through more coordination and integration of program activities and resources; and, for the process to be flexible enough to meet the needs of the First Nation, while responding to regional issues. As well, while the CCP is linked to federal programs, the partners to the CCP process must extend beyond the federal government to include provinces, municipalities and other stakeholders.

Appendix 3: First Nations Water Management Strategy

The First Nations Water Management Strategy (FNWMS) was developed by Indian and Northern Affairs Canada (INAC) and Health Canada, in collaboration with First Nations, and was announced in 2003.

To assist with implementation of the strategy, $600 million in new funding is targeted towards improving the quality of water and wastewater treatment in First Nations communities. In total, INAC and Health Canada are investing $1.6 B over 5 years (2003–2004 to 2007–2008) for water and wastewater services in First Nations’ communities. This includes funding for infrastructure, operation and maintenance of water and wastewater facilities, training of operators, and water quality monitoring.

Briefly, First Nations are responsible for the construction, operation, and maintenance of their water and wastewater systems. INAC provides funding to the First Nations for these activities, subject to the appropriate technical review and funding approval process. Health Canada works with First Nations to ensure that there are programs for monitoring drinking water quality in their communities. These programs help to quickly identify problems and to communicate them to Chief and Council for action. INAC works in close collaboration with Health Canada to promote the safety of drinking water in First Nations’ communities. Environment Canada helps INAC in the development of wastewater and source water protection standards and protocols.

Appendix 4. Inventory of SDS 2007–2010 Commitments, Objectives, Targets

Outward Commitments: Supporting Sustainable Communities

Long–term Planning
Objective 1.1: Improved departmental and federal co–ordination and harmonization of program planning and implementation in support of long–term planning.
# Target Lead Due date Federal goal
1.1.1 The CCP Strategy approved and implemented in collaboration with First Nations. Socio–Economic Policy and Regional Operations March 2010 IV
1.1.2 Identify the factors that influence the sustainability of remote communities south of 60 and determine how INAC policies and programs could be modified to better address the challenges. Sustainable Development Division in partnerships with the INAC regional offices of Alberta, Saskatchewan, Manitoba and Ontario March 2010 IV


Socio–Economic Development
Objective 1.2: Enhanced social and economic capacity in Aboriginal communities through educational and social programming.
# Target Lead Due date Federal goal
1.2.1 Graduate more Aboriginal learners from high school and post–secondary institutions. (March 2010) Socio–Economic Policy and Regional Operations March 2010 IV
1.2.2 Enhance the Family Violence Prevention Program. Socio–Economic Policy and Regional Operations March 2012 IV


Sustainable Infrastructure
Objective 1.3: Housing, water and wastewater facilities to First Nations that meet standards applicable to other comparable Canadian communities.
# Target Lead Due date Federal goal
1.3.1 Increase the amount of affordable and suitable housing while building capacity to ensure effective management and control by First Nation communities. Socio–Economic Policy and Regional Operations March 2010 IV
1.3.2 Reduce the number of high–risk and medium–risk sites identified in the National Assessment of Water and Wastewater Systems in First Nation communities. Socio–Economic Policy and Regional Operations March 2008 I


Responsible Environmental Stewardship
Objective 1.4: Sound environmental management practices in First Nation, Inuit and northern communities.
# Target Lead Due date Federal goal
1.4.1 Support development of energy management initiatives in First Nation, Inuit and northern communities. Northern Affairs Program March 2010 III
1.4.2 Support development of First Nation, Inuit and northern communities’ capacity to adapt to the impacts of climate change. Northern Affairs Program March 2010 III
1.4.3 Reduce the number of contaminated sites south of 60. Lands and Trust Services March 2010 IV
1.4.4 Increase the number of northern contaminated sites in remediation phase or completed. Northern Affairs Program March 2010 IV

Inward Commitments: Building a Culture of Sustainability

Improving the Integration of SD within INAC
Objective 2.1: Improved sustainable development integration in INAC.
# Target Lead Due date Federal goal
2.1.1 Raise awareness of sustainable development within the Department. Sustainable Development Division March 2010 VI
2.1.2 Improve the integration of sustainable development considerations within the Department. Sustainable Development Division March 2010 VI


Environmental Stewardship Strategy
Objective 2.2: Promote sound environmental management practices into departmental operations.
# Target Lead Due date Federal goal
2.2.1 Implement IIABL’s Environmental Stewardship Strategy (ESS) Environmental Performance Framework through the integration of sound environmental management practices into IIABL departmental operations. Lands and Trust Services March 2009 VI


Greening of Departmental Operations
Objective 2.3: Sustainable Development will be firmly integrated into Corporate Systems (Finance, Human Resources, Information Management, Audit and Evaluation, and Administrative Services) nation–wide.
# Target Lead Due date Federal goal
2.3.1 Develop and implement an Environmental Management System for Corporate Services. Corporate Services Dec 2009 VI
2.3.2 Develop and implement a green procurement policy for INAC. Corporate Services Dec 2009 VI


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Footnotes

  1. More information on the federal sustainable development goals and green government operations is available online (return to source paragraph)

  2. CESD (return to source paragraph)

  3. This report is available online. (return to source paragraph)

  4. INAC’s strategic outcomes are detailed in Appendix A of this document. (return to source paragraph)

  5. INAC’s operational outcome is detailed in Appendix A of this document. (return to source paragraph)
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