The Ipperwash Final Settlement Agreement: A Journey Toward Reconciliation

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Long text description of the graphic of the Ipperwash Final Settlement Agreement: A Journey Toward Reconciliation

This web page, entitled "The Ipperwash Final Settlement Agreement:
A Journey Toward Reconciliation" has three parts. It provides an overview of this settlement as well as general background and information about next steps.

Overview This journey began in 1942 when Canada took the Stoney Point reserve from the First Nation for use as a military base.

Canada and the Chippewas of Kettle and Stony Point First Nation (CKSPFN) have negotiated a final settlement regarding the former Camp Ipperwash lands.

The settlement includes $95 million and safe return of land, marking a new beginning for CKSPFN in its journey toward healing, renewal and reconciliation.

On April 14, 2016
Canada and CKSPFN mark the signing of the final settlement at special ceremony

This date marks the 74th anniversary since the land was taken from the First Nation.

Did You Know?
The Kettles that distinguish KSP are of cultural and spiritual significance to the Anishinaabe. According to FN storytellers, the Kettles are Thunderbird eggs. The Thunderbirds are powerful spirits that bring healing rains to the land and people; the point is their nesting place.

The nearby shore of Lake Huron was rife with flint beds and the flint used for tools, weapons, and to make fire. Archaeologists have found the flint from KSP in locations as far away as the southern United States.

Learn more about CKSPFN culture and heritage.

See also: Looking Back: Path to a Settlement

UXO Looking Back: Path to a Settlement
Long text description of the graphic Looking Ahead: Path toward Community Renewal, Healing and Reconciliation

Looking Ahead: Path toward Community Renewal, Healing and Reconciliation
2016: After years of negotiation, Canada and Chippewas of Kettle and Stony Point First Nation concluded a final settlement re: former Camp Ipperwash. We still have more work to do in the spirit of partnership and renewal.

The settlement has two parts:

CKSPFN developed its own plans to use its settlement funds. This includes investments in:

The land was used by the military for 50 years. Remediation work will ensure that land is safe and environmentally sound when returned.

Step#1: Clear land of dangerous material such as UXO and contaminants

Step#2: Remediate the lands

Along the way…

Step 3: As lands cleared and remediated, they will be returned to CKSPFN's reserve land base

Ippewash Inquiry CKSPFN culture & heritage Looking Ahead: Path toward Community Renewal, Healing and Reconciliation Chippewas of Kettle and Stony Point First Nation a new beginning Looking Ahead Path to Settlement CKSPFN culture & heritage Looking Back
Long text description of the graphic Looking Back: Path to a Settlement

Looking Back: Path to a Settlement

April 14, 2016
Canada and CKSPFN hold ceremony to celebrate the
signing of Ipperwash Final Settlement Agreement

September 18, 2015
Majority of CKSPFN voters agree to settlement
negotiated with Canada

81.6 % CKSPFN voters say "yes" to negotiated settlement,
with 51 % of 1,876 members casting a ballot

2004
Joint work begins to investigate condition of lands
after 50 years military use; negotiators use this info to
decide how to deal with land in the settlement

September 13, 1995
Canada and CKSPFN agree to begin formal negotiations
on return of Camp Ipperwash lands

September 6, 1995
First Nation member Dudley George is shot and killed by a
police officer during a confrontation at nearby park

The Ipperwash Inquiry 2003-2007
A provincial inquiry into the death of CKSPFN member Anthony "Dudley" George in the nearby provincial park led to key recommendations on avoiding such violence in the future. On May 28, 2009, Ontario and CKSPFN signed an agreement to transfer Ipperwash Provincial Park to the First Nation.

1993-1995
Some First Nation members occupy Camp Ipperwash;
military withdraws from the base July 29, 1995

February 26, 1981:
Canada commits to return land to First Nation
when no longer needed for military purposes

September, 1945
CKSPFN has sought the return of the Camp Ipperwash lands
since the end of Second World War

April 17, 1942
Families at Stoney Point are informed they will be relocated
to CKSPFN's other reserve at Kettle Point (causing
overcrowding/disruption in both communities)

April 14, 1942:
Canada takes Stoney Point reserve land from
CKSPFN for use as military training base
(ie. Camp Ipperwash)

Learn more about CKSPFN culture and heritage and the settlement in: Looking Ahead: Path Toward Community Renewal, Healing and Reconciliation

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